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drkeiscool
Aug 1, 2014


Soiled Meat

It took me at least 70 hours to clear the map of drug lords, not counting gathering collectibles (I stopped doing that about 2/3rds of the way through).

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gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

No Balls No Game


drkeiscool posted:

It took me at least 70 hours to clear the map of drug lords, not counting gathering collectibles (I stopped doing that about 2/3rds of the way through).

Thanks, that makes sense based on my pace so far. I will stop doing some of the side missions, I think. Wildlands is some good Ubisoft-ing but even I have a limit.

PRL412
Sep 11, 2007

... ... MINE

A friend recently got into Warframe, and we realized the page is a little out of date. I may have gone overboard, so feel free to cut this down to the section of general tips:

Wiki update posted:

Warframe is mainly a co-operative MMO. Feel free to use the wikia page to sort through all the jargon, pre-requisites, and assorted confusion: http://warframe.wikia.com/wiki/WARFRAME_Wiki


Currency and Trading
----------------------------------

The 2 main forms of currency in the game are:
-Credits which are earned from missions and quests; and
-Platinum. New warframe accounts are given 50 to start. Additional platinum can be purchased with real money, or it can earned later on by trading items with other players.

Both currencies can be used to buy items in the Market, the console on your ship that lists most of the game's content.

Credits are mostly used to buy the blueprints for weapons and warframes. From there, you'll need resources and specific parts to craft them.

Platinum is used to buy items and equipment for immediate use.

It should be noted that Platinum is the only way to increase your inventory space. Consider spending your starter platinum on weapon slots or warframe slots.

When making a store purchase with Platinum, pieces of equipment will include an inventory slot as well as double mod capacity to start (This means an Orokin Reactor or Orokin Catalyst is pre-installed). These benefits would normally cost around 26 to 30 platinum if you created the item with a blueprint.

You can start trading at Mastery Rank 2 if you have access to the relay on Mars (called Maroo's Bazaar). Otherwise, you can join a clan, and trade in their dojo. Also, take note of the 2-Factor Authentication requirement: https://warframe.fandom.com/wiki/Trading

With that out of the way, there's many ways to get free stuff:
-During most (North American) holidays, the market will offer a free colour palette. These will save you around 75 platinum and help customize the look of your arsenal.
-There's a monthly developer stream and it's always accompanied by time limited missions in Warframe. Completing the "Gift of the Lotus" missions will awared you things like weapons skins and upgrade materials.
-Other various devstreams have platinum giveaways and twitch drops (if you link your warframe and twitch accounts)
-Invasions will sometimes offer upgrade materials, like Forma and Exilus adapters.
-There's also Login rewards, timed events, and many nice people who can help you out if you're confused/lost/tired.

There's 3 other forms of currency: Ducats, Standing, and Nightwave creds. Details below:
-"Ducats" are earned by trading in Prime parts at kiosks in any of the the planetary relays. (See "Void relics, Void Fissures, Prime parts, and Prime Mods" for more info)
-"Standing" is earned by doing missions (and bounties) for various syndicates. Each syndicate has their own form of Standing that can be used to purchase their offerings.
-Warframe has "seasons" under the banner of "Nightwave". Completing these goals can unlock cosmetics, upgrade materials, and inventory slots. You'll also earn Nightwave specific currency that can be spent on even more cosmetics, upgrade materials, as well as rare mods.

Reaching Mastery Rank 3 will activate the Syndicates console in your orbiter. Joining a Faction Syndicate is a good source of tradable items, since mods and weapons can be sold for platinum. Equip a Faction "Sigil" on the Warframe(s) of your choice, and you'll passively gain Standing while completing any missions.

Also, each Faction Syndicate has an ally, which means you can level up at least two at a time. Look up a guide if you want to make the most of these offerings.

If you're enjoying yourself and want to spend money on the game, consider waiting for a login reward that gives you a discount on purchasing Platinum. These discounts range from 20% to 75% off, but they expire within a couple days.



Leveling up your equipment and increasing your Mastery Rank
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

All equipment (Weapons, warframes, companions) will rank up when brought into a mission. Most equipment will max out at Rank 30, and each rank will give you Mastery Points. These points contribute to your overall Mastery Rank.

Mastery Rank is tied to unlocking new content in the game, which means there's an element of "Gotta collect them all". Currently, Mastery Rank 30 is the highest. However almost all content is available by Mastery Rank 16, so you canskip a few things.

Once you gain enough Mastery Points for the next rank, you'll have to complete a test. You can make these tests easier by using different frames, weapons, and tactics. It should be noted that Mastery points continue to acrue even though the test appears to block your progress. It's possible to complete a test and have another ready to go, especially early on in the game.

Each mastery rank will boost your daily standing caps with all syndicates.

Each even-numbered rank attained will increase the amount of available Loadout slots in your Arsenal.

Playing with others increases your mastery gain. It's called "affinity range" and a symbol will appear next to other player names when you're close enough. You'll share a portion of the kills and damage dealt by others, which is a boon early on since other players will tear through most missions.

The "MK-1" series of weapons are there to test out your preferred playstyle. They carry their own mastery points, but they each have direct upgrades (e.g. use MK-1 Paris first, then move onto Paris).

If you're having trouble getting something to Max Rank, or if you simply dislike , consider the following:
-Some weapons don't reveal their strengths until they're heavily upgraded or have a particular mod (or set of mods) equipped.
-Other weapons are indeed terrible. Try to collect the remaining Mastery Points by joining a group for the shared experience, then sell it to clear up inventory space.



Warframes, weapons, and mods
---------------------------------------------------

The higher the equipment rank, the more capacity it has for mods.

Mods can be collected from fallen enemies, and some are purchased through the various syndicate offerings.

Most mods have 3 - 10 pips along the bottom, showing their overall rank. Higher ranks are more powerful but also mean a larger capacity cost.

"Endo" is dropped from enemies and can be used to upgrade your mods.

Unwanted or duplicate mods can be melted down into Endo, fueling the upgrades of other mods.

Speaking of duplicates, you only really need 2-3 copies of a single mod. If you have more copies of the mod than the number of pips on the bottom, then turn the extra into endo.

At the beginning of the game, you'll find mods that appear cracked and say "Damaged" in the description. These are weakened versions of normal mods, so they're basically made for Endo.

Some mods aren't worth using unless they're maxed out. For example, the "Suppress" mod has a chance to make your pistol silent, but it'll only be 100% effective when its fully upgraded.

"Aura" mods (for warframes) and "Stance" mods (for melee weapons) will increase mod capacity, so you should always fully upgrade them.

Not every mod needs to be upgraded to be effective. This most often means they add a new functionality to your equipment that can't be found elsewhere.

Orokin catalysts can be used to double the mod capacity on weapons.

Orokin reactors can be used to double the mod capacity on Warframes/Companions.

In the upper right corner of each mod is a number indicating capacity cost, and a symbol indicating "polarity". Sometimes equipment will come with a polarity by default. If you place a mod with a matching polarity in that spot, the capacity cost will be halved and turn green. Conversely, a mod with any other polarity will see the capacity cost increase by approximately 25% and turn red.

Once equipment hits rank 30, "Forma" can be used to "polarize" a mod slot. This will reset the overall level of that piece of equipment, meaning it has to be ranked up again. Forma is key once you start collecting the rare mods that need 16 capacity.

The first mods you want to rank up are increased shield and health (Redirection, Vitality) for Warframes, and increased damage (Serration, Hornet Strike, Pressure Point) for weapons.

Over time, modding becomes less about making your stats go up and more about combo counters and warframe functionality.

You'll soon find status mods for Heat, Cold, Electricity and Toxic. Each can be combined to create more elements, just remember the mod screen applies them from left to right in row one, then left to right in row two. Some weapons have elements by default, which will affect the first elemental combination.

As a general rule, you should avoid applying forma to the upper-left corner on weapons. Many weapons come with statuses by default, so you'll want to keep this spot open for all possible combinations.

The Grineer, Corpus, and Infected each have their own elemental defenses, so mod for their weaknesses appropriately at higher difficulties.

Warframes can be modded in many, many ways. Some frames benefit from stats under 100%. To do this, you'll need to collect "Corrupted" mods.

Each planet has at least one boss, and each will drop parts to a single frame. Some bosses also drop weapon parts. Each time you kill them, they'll randomly drop one of these parts.

You'll still have to buy the blueprints from the market though.

If you join a clan, their dojos will have "Research" rooms where you can spend credits to get weapon blueprints. They also have access to a few warframes (BP and Parts).


General tips
-------------------

You might have to customize your controls or sensitivity to suit your playstyle. Regardless of your platform, make sure that you can comfortably slide and jump endlessly. Rolling

helps with directional speed and resets everytime you land or jump.

Your main goal starting out is to unlock the mission nodes in the navigation screen. Each planet has its own resources, so you might not be able to craft a blueprint until you get a bit further.

There's no limit on the amount of mods, resources, gear, blueprints, or miscellaneous parts you can collect. They don't take up inventory space like frames, weapons, and companions.

Earth, Venus, and Deimos each have an open world area. It's easy to become bogged down with the amount of content they have on offer, but you can always return with better equipment to see it all through. A realistic goal to start with is to get a hold of some pieces of gear, namely: a mining laser, a fishing spear, and a tranquilizer gun. Each can be used to earn more resources directly from the open worlds, even while free roaming.

If you're playing solo, it's good idea to look for Energy at the start of the mission before the enemy spots you. By opening a few lockers, you can boost your energy and focus on maintaining it rather than building it up. Later on you'll have other ways of generating energy and won't have to scour the map anymore.

Mission levels are finite, but enemies are infinite. You only have fight the ones that interfere with the mission objective.

If you need to farm resources, create or join a group of people looking for the same resource. Coordinate your loadouts and find the right mission to collect resources faster. Joining a Clan is great for this purpose alone.

Certain mission types are endless. For example, "Defence" will directly ask if you want to cash out and leave, or continue to fight and risk losing it all to earn even more. On the other hand, "Survival" is simply an endurance run that will mark the exit after a certain amount of time, so you can choose when to call it quits.

Invasions require you to play a mission 3 times in order to earn the reward listed. If there's a choice of two rewards, you can only earn one.

Quests are a small series of narrative based missions that unlock things like specific frames and equipment. You can ignore quests between missions and resume at any time. Many quests ask you to craft items from blueprints before continuing, forcing a 12 to 24 hour wait. There's a chain of story quests once you make it far enough into the star chart that will unlock a new gameplay element.

Bounties are found in the open world areas. They're small chains of 3 to 5 missions that all need to be completed in one fell swoop. If you fail or quit, then you'll have to start over again. They often drop frame parts in addition to the many local resources.

The game can be repetitive, so you may want to turn off the instructional dialogue once you have a handle on all the mission types.


Stealth (is optional)
-------------------------------

All melee weapons are silent, even when slamming the ground from the air or when shooting gunblades. Melee can "quietly" break open crates for resources.

You can sneak up behind unalerted enemies, and the game will give you a prompt for a stealth attack. If the stealth attack kills the enemy, it'll count as a stealth kill.

The stealth attack prompt won't appear on flying enemies or enemies that are alerted. You'll know they're suspicious if their weapon is raised.

Killing an unalerted enemy with a single shot will count as a stealth kill.

Some primary and secondary weapons will be silent by default, so check their stats for the "noise level". Even then, many guns can be silenced with mods.

Stealth kills will provide a 100% mastery bonus on the next kill, and it can stack up to five times. This will always reset after 30 seconds, or when you kill an alerted enemy.

Note that the stealthy approach doesn't really work unless you have a frame with the power of invisiblity. Once you're invisible, avoid bumping into enemies, making noise, or leaving a corpse in front of them. If an alarm is triggered, you can slink away and overide it through a console.

Certain missions will have a constant alarm, but you can use invisibility to avoid direct damage.

On the open world maps, alarms are somewhat location based. Enemy camps should have an override console, but you can also flee while avoiding arial pursuers.

As you might suspect, stealth is hilariously broken after you get some decent mods.


Void relics, Void Fissures, Prime parts, and Prime Mods
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

At some point you'll end up with "Void Relics". These can only be opened in "Void Fissure" missions. There's four types of relics that correspond with four types of fissures. The fissures vary only in difficulty, with "Axi" being the toughest.

Once you're in a Void Fissure, it's a normal mission plus the inclusion of enemies that become corrupted and sometimes drop "Reactant" upon death. You have to collect 10 reactant before completing the mission in order to unlock the void relic. Your reward will be one of the half dozen items listed in the relic's description, most likely a Prime part.

When playing in a group, make sure everyone has 10 reactant before ending the mission. Everyone with 10 reactant get to choose one of the prizes from all the opened relics. If you fail to collect 10, then you don't get any prizes.

Void Fissure missions also reward you with "Void Traces". These traces can be used to "refine" void relics, and get a better chance at the uncommon and rare drops. Void traces are collected regardless of whether you equipped a relic or collected enough reactant. Also, bonus traces are earned if other players choose your relic's reward.

All Prime equipment grants its own mastery points on top of the regular version.

Prime frames are direct upgrades to their normal versions, so you can comfortably sell the original frame after unlocking its Prime.

Prime weapons have diverse benefits over their normal counterparts. For example, they might focus more on status effects and less on critical chance. You'll have to weigh the pros and cons of each before streamlining your inventory.

Prime parts are used for many things:
-Certain parts are requested by faction syndicates to access more rewards.
-Prime parts are one of the main ways to trade for Platinum. Collecting whole sets -such as the BP and all parts of a frame- can net you hundreds of platinum.
-Once you're overflowing with prime parts, you can trade them at certain kiosks on the relays for a currency called "Ducats". Every two weeks, you'll get a message from "Baro Ki'teer" who'll only accept Ducats for his wares. This is the main way to earn Prime mods, so look out for "Primed Continuity" and "Primed Flow".

girl dick energy
Sep 30, 2009

You think you have the wherewithal to figure out my puzzle vagina?


That seems like a really good info post, but definitely too much for a BIP. I'd say post the whole thing somewhere so we can link to it (the Warframe thread, maybe?), but cut down to the absolute essentials for the page itself. Remember, this is before someone boots up the game, it needs to be advice they can process and internalize while having only the most general of context.

StoryTime
Feb 26, 2010

Now listen to me children and I'll tell you of the legend of the Ninja

I started playing Warframe a couple of months ago, so I pared the post down to what I would have liked to know to begin with. Almost all of the post, unfortunately, is very relevant information you'll need to understand to engage with the game. It's a long established free to play game with years and years of accrued systems, many of which make less sense than they probably should. The Void Relic part could maybe be cut, but it's one of those things the game pushes in your face fairly early on without a lot of explanation, and it's important to understand for co-op.

quote:

Warframe is mainly a co-operative MMO. Solo play is possible, but playing co-op and joining a guild lets you progress much faster. The wikia page is useful to sort through all the jargon, pre-requisites, and assorted confusion: http://warframe.wikia.com/wiki/WARFRAME_Wiki


Currency and Trading
----------------------------------

The 2 main forms of currency in the game are:
-Credits which are earned from missions and quests; and
-Platinum. New warframe accounts are given 50 to start. Additional platinum can be purchased with real money, or it can earned later on by trading items with other players.

Both currencies can be used to buy items in the Market, the console on your ship that lists most of the game's content.

Credits are mostly used to buy the blueprints for weapons and warframes. From there, you'll need resources and specific parts to craft them. Crafting with blueprints is the primary way of acquiring new warframes, weapons and gear.

Platinum is used to buy items and equipment for immediate use.

It should be noted that Platinum is the only way to increase your inventory space. Consider spending your starter platinum on weapon slots or warframe slots.

You can start trading with other players at Mastery Rank 2 if you have access to the relay on Mars (called Maroo's Bazaar). Otherwise, you can join a clan, and trade in their dojo. Also, take note of the 2-Factor Authentication requirement: https://warframe.fandom.com/wiki/Trading

There's 3 other forms of currency: Ducats, Standing, and Nightwave creds. Details below:
-"Ducats" Earned by trading in Prime parts at kiosks in any of the the planetary relays. (See "Void relics, Void Fissures, Prime parts, and Prime Mods" for more info)
-"Standing" Earned by doing missions (and bounties) for various syndicates. Each syndicate has their own form of Standing that can be used to purchase their offerings.
-"Nightwave creds" Warframe has "seasons" under the banner of "Nightwave". Completing these daily or weekly goals can unlock cosmetics, upgrade materials, and inventory slots. You'll also earn Nightwave specific currency that can be spent on even more cosmetics, upgrade materials, as well as rare mods.

Leveling up your equipment and increasing your Mastery Rank
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

All equipment (Weapons, warframes, companions) will rank up when brought into a mission. Most equipment will max out at Rank 30, and each rank will give you Mastery Points. These points contribute to your overall Mastery Rank.

Mastery Rank is tied to unlocking new content in the game, which means there's an element of "Gotta collect them all". Currently, Mastery Rank 30 is the highest. However almost all content is available by Mastery Rank 16, so you canskip a few things.

Playing with others increases your mastery gain. You'll have to be within "affinity range", a symbol will appear next to other player names when you're close enough. You'll share a portion of the kills and damage dealt by others, which is a boon early on since experienced players will tear through most missions.


Warframes, weapons, and mods
---------------------------------------------------

The higher the rank equipment has, the more capacity it has for mods.

Most mods have 3 - 10 pips along the bottom, showing their overall rank. Higher ranks are more powerful but also mean a larger capacity cost.

"Endo" is dropped from enemies and can be used to upgrade your mods.

Unwanted or duplicate mods can be melted down into Endo, fueling the upgrades of other mods.

Upgrading "Aura" mods (for warframes) and "Stance" mods (for melee weapons) will increase mod capacity instead of requiring it, so you should always fully upgrade them.

If you join a clan, their dojos will have "Research" rooms where you can spend credits to get weapon blueprints. They also have access to a few warframes. You'll need the blueprint for the warframe itself, and the blueprints for the parts it requires.

To access a Clan Dojo, you'll need to construct a Clan Key from a blueprint you receive when you join.


Void relics, Void Fissures, Prime parts, and Prime Mods
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

At some point you'll end up with "Void Relics". These are essentially random lootboxes that can only be opened in "Void Fissure" missions. Void Relics are the source of Prime equipment and warframe blueprints. Prime equipment and frames are the best gear available in the game.

Once you're in a Void Fissure, it's a normal mission plus the inclusion of enemies that become corrupted and sometimes drop "Reactant" upon death. You have to collect 10 reactant before completing the mission in order to unlock the void relic. Your reward will be one of the half dozen items listed in the relic's description, most likely a Prime part.

When playing in a group, make sure everyone has 10 reactant before ending the mission. Everyone with 10 reactant get to choose one of the prizes from all the opened relics. If you fail to collect 10, then you don't get any prizes.

Void Fissure missions also reward you with "Void Traces". These traces can be used to "refine" void relics, and get a better chance at the uncommon and rare drops. Void traces are collected regardless of whether you equipped a relic or collected enough reactant. Also, bonus traces are earned if other players choose your relic's reward.

Ciaphas
Nov 20, 2005

> BEWARE, COWARD




Anyone have anything for For The King?


In trade, I have something for SnowRunner

- The tutorial sends you to Alaska near the end. Go right back to Michigan; the mud there is less treacherous than the Alaskan snow and ice
- Hang on to the Chevrolet pickup the game starts you off with; it can be customized to be a fairly capable Scout early on, which are great for finding watchtowers or checking out new road
- The Tayga 6436 is an excellent all-around heavy truck that you can find and unlock as soon as you get your first garage. This is highly recommended
- https://www.maprunner.info/ is a one-stop wiki/map for all your exploration needs - including the aforementioned Tayga
- There are some goofy control and UI design decisions, but the game is usually good about displaying available controls in menus. Look carefully in e.g. the map and garage menus
- To transfer vehicles between regions, they need to be in the garage, then you Retain them (space on keyboard, X on xbox)

girl dick energy
Sep 30, 2009

You think you have the wherewithal to figure out my puzzle vagina?


Formatted it in a wiki-friendly way and put it up.

CuddleCryptid
Jan 11, 2013

Things could be going better


Resident Evil 8: Village

- Do not sell meat for cash! It is not renewable! You will open up a much better path for it later in the story, but you are not told this when you first start being able to collect it.

- The first area after the village cannot be accessed again after you leave it.

- The game follows the RE4 tradition of having treasures that can be combined to make far more valuable ones. You can tell if this is true by the item description, if they are named as "combinable". Some of the second halves of those items are spaced far apart, so don't sell off the pieces unless you are truly desperate.

- The map will have each room go from red to blue when all items are taken from it. Said items can be anywhere. Under chairs, inside drawers, even glinting gems in the ceiling. If you want to clean the place out make sure you look up.

- Some horror games demand you stop and fight enemies. This is not one of them. If you can just book it right past enemies then do so. Yes you can get items and cash from their bodies, but a bullet you don't have to spend is often better than one you have to buy.

CuddleCryptid fucked around with this message at 13:09 on May 10, 2021

BisbyWorl
Jan 12, 2019

Knowledge is pain plus observation.




CuddleCryptid posted:

Resident Evil 8: Village

- Do not sell meat for cash! It is not renewable! You will open up a much better path for it later in the story, but you are not told this when you first start being able to collect it.

- The first area after the village cannot be accessed again after you leave it.

- The game follows the RE4 tradition of having treasures that can be combined to make far more valuable ones. You can tell if this is true by the item description, if they are named as "combinable". Some of the second halves of those items are spaced far apart, so don't sell off the pieces unless you are truly desperate.

- The map will have each room go from red to blue when all items are taken from it. Said items can be anywhere. Under chairs, inside drawers, even glinting gems in the ceiling. If you want to clean the place out make sure you look up.

- Some horror games demand you stop and fight enemies. This is not one of them. If you can just book it right past enemies then do so. Yes you can get items and cash from their bodies, but a bullet you don't have to spend is often better than one you have to buy.

- Just like RE4, upgrading weapon capacity fully refills your weapon. Burning all the ammo you have loaded will give you a ton of free ammo on more expensive weapons.

- Some weapons have upgrade parts that increase capacity. These also fully refill your weapon, so holding off on equipping them will let you use them as an instant reload in a fight.

Pierzak
Oct 30, 2010


CuddleCryptid posted:

- Do not sell meat for cash! It is not renewable!
What the gently caress?

CuddleCryptid
Jan 11, 2013

Things could be going better


Pierzak posted:

What the gently caress?

You can kill fish and chickens and such, but they are limited resources (as in "marked on the map behind keyed doors" limited) and are part of the permanent upgrade system. But the game does a naughty thing of telling you to give the meat to the shopkeeper before telling you the upgrade path even exists, so a lot of people (myself included) sold valuable materials for pennies without knowing it was needed for something else.

CuddleCryptid fucked around with this message at 19:04 on May 10, 2021

Scalding Coffee
Jun 26, 2006

You're already dead


CuddleCryptid posted:

Resident Evil 8: Village

- Do not sell meat for cash! It is not renewable! You will open up a much better path for it later in the story, but you are not told this when you first start being able to collect it.

- The first area after the village cannot be accessed again after you leave it.

- The game follows the RE4 tradition of having treasures that can be combined to make far more valuable ones. You can tell if this is true by the item description, if they are named as "combinable". Some of the second halves of those items are spaced far apart, so don't sell off the pieces unless you are truly desperate.

- The map will have each room go from red to blue when all items are taken from it. Said items can be anywhere. Under chairs, inside drawers, even glinting gems in the ceiling. If you want to clean the place out make sure you look up.

- Some horror games demand you stop and fight enemies. This is not one of them. If you can just book it right past enemies then do so. Yes you can get items and cash from their bodies, but a bullet you don't have to spend is often better than one you have to buy.
I am guessing that just like RE4, there are tiers of weapons and you can get by with the starter ones and saving your money to splurge on the top gear?

Tylana
May 5, 2011



Pillbug

RE8 Watching a streamer it did seem like selling an upgraded weapon got you a price comparable to the money spent upgrading it. Also the attached mods stay on it (and are weapon specific like usual in RE) if you buy it back.

Sandwich Anarchist
Sep 12, 2008









Scalding Coffee posted:

I am guessing that just like RE4, there are tiers of weapons and you can get by with the starter ones and saving your money to splurge on the top gear?

Yeah there are like 3 each of shotguns and pistols, but each tier isn't necessarily better than the last one. The second shotgun for instance has a very wide spread, but the third is a tighter cone and does better single target damage, etc

Zaodai
May 23, 2009

Death before dishonor?
Your terms are accepted.




Could someone with wiki access update the first tip on the Roboquest page? One of the recent updates changed the exp orbs color from purple to blue, but as there are currently only one type of orb that drop now it's probably safe to just drop the color descriptor entirely. Maybe make it "the small orbs", since they are consistently tiny.

PRL412
Sep 11, 2007

... ... MINE

StoryTime posted:

I started playing Warframe a couple of months ago, so I pared the post down to what I would have liked to know to begin with. Almost all of the post, unfortunately, is very relevant information you'll need to understand to engage with the game. It's a long established free to play game with years and years of accrued systems, many of which make less sense than they probably should. The Void Relic part could maybe be cut, but it's one of those things the game pushes in your face fairly early on without a lot of explanation, and it's important to understand for co-op.


Thank you both!

ahobday
Apr 19, 2007



Zaodai posted:

Could someone with wiki access update the first tip on the Roboquest page? One of the recent updates changed the exp orbs color from purple to blue, but as there are currently only one type of orb that drop now it's probably safe to just drop the color descriptor entirely. Maybe make it "the small orbs", since they are consistently tiny.

I've done this.

MockingQuantum
Jan 20, 2012




Anything for Ikenfell or Monster Sanctuary?

Chernobyl Peace Prize
May 7, 2007

Or later, later's fine.
But now would be good.



MockingQuantum posted:

Monster Sanctuary?
1. The game does a decent job of describing the combo mechanic, but the best way to think of it is that your turn, and party, should ultimately support something like:
Monster 1: Buff (or use a multi-hit ability if you've already buffed)
Monster 2: Buff or use an ability with the most hits
Monster 3: Big single-hit ability (either aoe to clear the enemy team or single-target if you want to just ruin a single target).

This means Teamwork (the buff where you get an additional hit per attack) is really good, and any "do an additional hit for x% <stat>" is really good on your 1st or 2nd monsters.
Early on this won't come up too much, but it's useful to think about when you're looking at a monster's talent trees and wondering where they could fit into a party.

2. Also: Buffs are really good and useful in this game, but dedicated Buffing Monsters are a thing you'll start to see more of later in the game, so don't sweat it too much early; I used the very first bird you encounter with the "throw Teamwork and the attack/spell damage buffs" ability for probably the first half of the game.

3. You will be able to replay any boss fight later on in the game, which is good to know because (1) you shouldn't sweat not getting a 4- or 5-star result the first time you fight them, and (2) those results are the only way to get an egg and thus that monster, for some monsters/bosses in the game. Not that they're necessarily gamebreakingly strong, either.

4. All the starters are good in their own ways (and there's a pretty robust wiki breaking down every single monster in the game, if you want to see what unique-ish stuff some get, like "can equip an additional item in <slot type>"), but easy mode is definitely picking the frog then making him a buffing/taunting/poisoning healtank later.

My Lovely Horse
Aug 21, 2010




Been playing Nier Replicant, been reading the wiki pages on it and the original.

Would it be a fair assessment to have a tip along the lines of "there's no downside to simply picking the weapon with the highest attack value out of each category, weight in particular has a negligible impact"? I haven't gone in-depth on the mechanics but it sure seems like it.

Also this whole tip:

quote:

If you are going after sidequests, be aware that there are two points of no return. The first part of the game has a specific theme which becomes apparent fairly early on. Once the game tells you you have finished this theme, almost all current quests will become locked out shortly after (the fishing questline is, I think, the only exception). If you're doing sidequests, get them done before you go to the next plot location. The second point of no return is similar to the first, and the game actually tells you that it's a point of no return when you get there.
could be replaced with

quote:

If you're going for 100% sidequests, make sure you have 50% completed before you pick up the Vapor Moss.
Maybe with a second sentence of either "There's also a point of no return near the end but the game will point it out" or just "any sidequests after that point aren't really missable".

I hope it was the Vapor Moss in the original too.

ultrafilter
Aug 23, 2007






My Lovely Horse posted:

I hope it was the Vapor Moss in the original too.

It was.

Captain Walker
Apr 7, 2009

Mother knows best
Listen to your mother
It's a scary world out there


My Lovely Horse posted:

I hope it was the Vapor Moss in the original too.

I distinctly recall from The Dark Id's LP that on the PS3 there was an extra wrinkle: Part 1 had 51% of the game's side quest for no apparent reason other than the developers just absolutely hating completionists

pentyne
Nov 7, 2012

I just couldn't look at your old avatar anymore
Fucking nauseating!


I've come to find a few things that would be very useful for Shenmue 2 and 3, other then "don't play them"

Shenmue II

- When you start the game, spend all your money as soon as you can buying lighters and toys from the first vendors you see.
- You'll need $500 at one point to progress the plot in Hong Kong, and at least $500 for the same reason in Kowloon.
- Earning money in Kowloon is significantly harder then in Hong Kong, so have a comfortable amount saved before leaving the city.
- To quickly earn money find a high/low gambler with a large max bet, then simply save/reload to win every time
- The collectables in the game serve no purpose other then to be sold at pawn shops
- Fangmei has a relatively long, detailed sidequest that is very hard to get. You have to talk to her, or walk by and have her talk to you multiple times, with Ryo giving the 'correct' answers to increase her affection for Ryo, then finding her in certain spots throughout the city at certain times to progress the quest.
- There is much less side content then Shenmue 1, and most of it is very out of the way or gated by certain requirements. Finding it without a walk-through would be prohibitively time consuming.
- You only need to succeed in airing out the books on time once to access the library. Then you'll get rewarded a few times with a martial arts technique. Once that is done it is faster to simply drop the books as often as you can to finish the minigame in a much shorter time
- If you explore, there are some unmarked alleys that serve as shortcuts to other city areas
- There's a certain series of QTEs between areas where failure at any point in the chain sets you all the way back to the beginning of the area rather then the beginning of the QTE. It's during the hunt for Yuanda Zhu where you have to cross long wood planks over missing floors.

Shenmue III

- Earning money is the key to literally everything in the game, chopping wood, selling herbs, or fishing are the only 'honest' ways to earn money
- Herbs do not respawn, and you'll need herbs for some sidequests and pawn shop rewards. Don't sell any cinnamon or white peony in Bailu for cash.
- To quickly earn money, wait until you can access Sunset Hill. The fortune teller will give you your lucky color, and you can go to the gambler in Sunset Hill and play Flower Wind Dragon Moon, play max bet, and pick you color. Save/reload until you win about 20k tokens, then use the prize exchange/pawn shop pipeline for quick cash
- Martial arts moves are going to be found for sale from shops(expensive), or from turning in item sets at the pawn shop. Most pawn shop item sets come from herbs, gatchas, lucky hit prizes, or side quest rewards. Most of these items are not obtainable anywhere else.
- The gatcha capture rates for some rares are extremely low, potentially 1/100 or less
- Check food cost versus HP gained. It will often be cheaper to buy 50 carrots then 10 dumplings if they heal the same amount.
- The main plot will basically stop and gate you from progress until you level up your Kung Fu sufficiently (either from an endurance check or combat getting too difficult), so "keeping up" with training during the game will save time in the long run.

moosecow333
Mar 15, 2007

Super-Duper Supermen!


The websites post for Battle Brothers is pointing me in a good direction, but is there anything else I should know?

Are the DLCs worth it?

My Lovely Horse
Aug 21, 2010




Thinking about another one for Nier, along the lines of if you want 100% sidequests start gardening early or it'll be a right pain in the rear end, if you want 100% trophies start it even earlier. But while it feels helpful it would also require the wiki to explain what gardening means and basically have a whole walkthrough for that one sidequest, which is too in-depth.

"If you want 100% sidequests, the quest Life in the Sands requires time-consuming gardening. While it's not available until late in the game, you can and should get started on the gardening as soon as you can."

Longer version with the strategy:

"If you want 100% sidequests, the quest Life in the Sands requires time-consuming gardening to get 10 pink moonflower seeds. As soon as you can, plant gold and blue moonflower seeds alternatingly in each row of your garden. Harvest them only once they've wilted. This should give you some indigo seeds. Repeat the process with red and indigo seeds and you should hopefully get enough pink seeds."

I don't know, I actually think it's too detailed and out of scope, but I'm putting it out there cause it takes so long to do this at the end of the game. I mean, yeah, you can cheese it with the system clock and timezones but that feels definitely out of scope.

e: compromise:
"If you want 100% sidequests, the late-game quest Life in the Sands requires time-consuming gardening to get 10 pink moonflower seeds. You can start gardening much earlier than the quest becomes available, and doing it as soon as you can will save you some waiting time down the line."

My Lovely Horse fucked around with this message at 10:19 on May 18, 2021

Count Uvula
Dec 20, 2011


moosecow333 posted:

The websites post for Battle Brothers is pointing me in a good direction, but is there anything else I should know?

Are the DLCs worth it?

All of the DLCs are worth it if you like the game.
Beasts & Exploration adds a couple things you have to be really careful about loving with (Schrats and Hexens, and to a lesser degree Alps) but is overall good.
Warriors of the North is pretty great overall but unless you're a masochist it does mean you'll eventually stop spending time in the north because the barbarians have absolutely gnarly end-game fights without an accompanying increase in reward for winning against them. Still worth it for everything else in the DLC.
Blazing Deserts adds a ton of content that's pretty decently balanced with the main game's difficulty. The retinue system is extremely useful and lets you specialize your company in a way you can't without the DLC.


FWIW I'd also update the wiki to something like:

quote:

When negotiating a contract, the number of skulls at the top of the window shows the difficulty of the contract. Pay rises based on how difficult it is, but it can be smart to stick to 1-skull contracts if you're having difficulty progressing.
Caravan escort contracts are a death-trap if they're going anywhere but a neighboring city. You can get several fights in one journey or multiple groups of enemies attacking you at once, if you're unlucky.
When you're hiring people, backgrounds determine their base stats, not how much they increase per level.
The amount a stat can increase per level is based on talents, the little stars next to a stat. They're completely random and separate from a character's background.
When you hire a character you're also paying for the equipment they have. Expensive backgrounds have better base stats but be careful not to spend a lot of money on equipment you wouldn't otherwise buy, when recruiting.
It's often better to have fewer, better armed soldiers than a large number of poorly armed ones.
Armor always takes precedent over weapons. Enemies strike fast and they strike hard, and being lightly armored is a death sentence when facing anyone but the weakest enemies. You can get some decent armor for relatively cheap.
One handed spears give bonus to hit chance so start the guys with low accuracy out on spear/shield.
It's possible to bring extra replacement shields with you for when your pawns' shields break, which they often do. This does reduce their maximum stamina a little unless you have a specific perk, however.
Goblins and orcs can be extremely dangerous. You can take on orc young without strong equipment, but other orcs and goblins are a nightmare without high level mercs using good equipment.
Specialized mercenaries are best, so decide their role early based on their stats and talents and build around that.
You want a character with sky-high resolve and decent stamina to be your bannerman. The merc holding the banner spreads a percentage of their resolve to your other bros, and can use the Rally the Troops perk to raise the morale of everybody around them.
Shieldwall and Spearwall are great skills but keep in mind they cost a lot of stamina, it's better to save your stamina than use stamina on abilities inefficiently.

ultrafilter
Aug 23, 2007






My Lovely Horse posted:

Thinking about another one for Nier, along the lines of if you want 100% sidequests start gardening early or it'll be a right pain in the rear end, if you want 100% trophies start it even earlier. But while it feels helpful it would also require the wiki to explain what gardening means and basically have a whole walkthrough for that one sidequest, which is too in-depth.

"If you want 100% sidequests, the quest Life in the Sands requires time-consuming gardening. While it's not available until late in the game, you can and should get started on the gardening as soon as you can."

Longer version with the strategy:

"If you want 100% sidequests, the quest Life in the Sands requires time-consuming gardening to get 10 pink moonflower seeds. As soon as you can, plant gold and blue moonflower seeds alternatingly in each row of your garden. Harvest them only once they've wilted. This should give you some indigo seeds. Repeat the process with red and indigo seeds and you should hopefully get enough pink seeds."

I don't know, I actually think it's too detailed and out of scope, but I'm putting it out there cause it takes so long to do this at the end of the game. I mean, yeah, you can cheese it with the system clock and timezones but that feels definitely out of scope.

e: compromise:
"If you want 100% sidequests, the late-game quest Life in the Sands requires time-consuming gardening to get 10 pink moonflower seeds. You can start gardening much earlier than the quest becomes available, and doing it as soon as you can will save you some waiting time down the line."

You could just replace that with "Don't do Life in the Sands."

flatluigi
Apr 22, 2008

here come the planes


nah, contextless "don't do this" is the least helpful sort of tip on the wiki. saying 'here's what you would have to do to do this, and judge yourself if you want to' is much better in every way

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




I think it could be as simple as "look up a guide", there's plenty of spoiler free guides out there that explain how to do it in proper detail, and at no point in-game does anyone tell you, so you'll have to look it up unless you want to experiment on your own (you don't want to do this)

e: or yeah, even just mentioning that the task will take IRL weeks (or clock manipulation) would probably let people know whether they care enough to try it or not

Tylana
May 5, 2011



Pillbug

A better tip might be "If you want to 100% side quests without a huge time sink, you'll probably just need to look them up."

EDIT : With a "Especially flowers. Flowers take days and days of real time or clock manipulation."

EDIT EDIT : Also would probably just shove this image in the beforeIplay honestly. https://lparchive.org/NIER/Update%2009/9-niersidequestchart.png

Tylana fucked around with this message at 13:25 on May 18, 2021

flatluigi
Apr 22, 2008

here come the planes


yeah i'd be fine with 'gardening is an intentionally long-term side mechanic that takes real life days to progress on, so decide whether you want to do that or not as early as possible to save time later on. if you do want to complete that part of the game, use a guide <like this one>'

My Lovely Horse
Aug 21, 2010




"The late-game sidequest Life in the Sands involves gardening, which is based on real time and will take several real-life days to complete (or require you to manipulate the system clock). You can start the required gardening much earlier than the quest becomes available, and getting started as soon as you can will save you some waiting time down the line. There's no noteworthy reward for doing the quest, so feel free to skip it, but if you want 100% on sidequests, use a guide <like this one> for the details."

limp_cheese
Sep 9, 2007

japanese hardcore sex videos fotos los simpson porn16 yrs old porn I NEVER ACTUALLY FACEFUCKED A DEER I JUST brandy ledford nude pics SAID I DID, IT WAS A CLEVER JOKE


Anything for Empire of Sin?

Dr_Amazing
Apr 15, 2006

It's a long story

Anything for Pathfinder: Kingmaker? I'm familiar with table top Pathfinder, but I'm about to start the video game.

Tylana
May 5, 2011



Pillbug

Other than the stuff already up there, the main thing I've heard from people playing it during lockdown is the questlines can be janky and buggy and softlock you out of completing various things (and maybe one of the mainline quests?) so it might be worth googling some of that if you aren't too precious about spoilers. And at the very least, keep a good backlog of saves to cycle through.

pentyne
Nov 7, 2012

I just couldn't look at your old avatar anymore
Fucking nauseating!


Dr_Amazing posted:

Anything for Pathfinder: Kingmaker? I'm familiar with table top Pathfinder, but I'm about to start the video game.

Well, the big one is there's a lot of stuff they made many changes to pnp rules to make it work in the game, or just because they could. Don't assume anything should work just because it does in the tabletop version. The UI is pretty good at explaining what does and doesn't work.

The wiki advice is kind of wrong about the companions. They are all perfectly fine, just not optimized for extreme hard mode. On normal following a min-max build they will absolutely demolish the game enemies in general.

There's a common glitch where everything randomly slows down like tactical slow-mode, hitting V then pausing/unpausing usually restores everything to normal.

Install the Bag of Tricks mods. Popular features
- Increase character move speed by 2x
- Remove needing rations
- Party all moves at the same speed
- remove weight limits
- Early on, cheat wands of restoration to deal with the constant stat damage
- Rogues get unlimited attempts to pick locks

Character building
- There are trap choices. The game can be easily min-maxed with proper combinations of 4-5 different classes. If you are unfamiliar with 3.5 ed D&D check the Ineffect Build guides for characters for templates. Pure classes that seem obvious like paladin, sorcerer, cleric, are completely viable on their own as well.
- You always need a character with the highest perception possible, including feats, for the game in general
- Spells target fortitude, reflex, and willpower. Every creature will have at least one of them as their "weak" stat so you want a mix of spells that go against all three
- Crowd Control is king for 90% of the game. Direct damage spells are somewhat less useful unless using feats that improve them (metamagic etc)
- For spontaneous casters, you can find spell recommendations per level, and you can probably figure it out yourself by midgame what will and won't be useful
- Blindfight is an extremely OP feat due to the nature of the game.
- Teamwork feats are also extremely OP
- Sneak attack damage is OP due to its implementation

The game
- Keep multiple save files. Some things may occur that have major consequences hours later that you may think are absolute bullshit game design choices.
- Place towns far away from the capital. You unlock fast travel between towns/cities at a point in the game
- Kingdom mode is bad in general. Set it to effortless but not automatic for the easiest time and RP the choices. Make sure to be leveling up advisors as a priority, or cheat yourself BP otherwise you can end up in an unstoppable failure spiral.
- The Hellknights kingdom quest is a steaming pile of poo poo you cannot avoid. It is a KS backer quest, so just put up with it and resolve as soon as you can
- Advisors unlock new positions by leveling up high enough. Divine unlocks Arcane for example
- Rush Arcane to level 3/4, where you will unlock teleport gates as a building feature. Simply building one in each location is enough to fast travel to and from there
- The timing is pretty stressful for the first few chapters but isn't that bad after.
- You will lose a party member via a cutscene when you finish a certain chapter. The next chapter starts with "make a choice who to help" as if you must pick one to save and one to lose, but if you pick Amari and rush the main quest to save her friend, you have plenty of time to then go regain the other party member
- When you found a town, travel there right away and look for a named NPC. That will be one of your artisans.

Other then that, post in the KM thread. I kept posting and asking questions as I played and usually got good advice for any problems. I played a pure sorcerer that felt like it turned the game into easy mode once I got enough CC spells, plus you have tons of high exp reward persuasion checks.

Tylana posted:

Other than the stuff already up there, the main thing I've heard from people playing it during lockdown is the questlines can be janky and buggy and softlock you out of completing various things (and maybe one of the mainline quests?) so it might be worth googling some of that if you aren't too precious about spoilers. And at the very least, keep a good backlog of saves to cycle through.

This has almost all been fixed by now for Kingmaker. There's one specific quest that was thought to be bugged the entire time but wasn't it just required a completely insane perception check. It's the "find the tomb" mission you get, where you have to find a random storybook event, then complete a kingdom project to lower the perception check 2x and then hope you can find it.

pentyne fucked around with this message at 20:43 on May 21, 2021

Scalding Coffee
Jun 26, 2006

You're already dead


Anything NEW for Phantom Brave (Steam)? I understand the page was for the older console versions.

My Lovely Horse
Aug 21, 2010




Another thing for Nier I'd definitely want to know in advance: The Junk Heap area is a major source for weapon upgrade components, but don't go out of your way to farm them. The game makes you go through there a lot of times as it is, and upgrading isn't really necessary.

Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


Also worth noting for Pathfinder: Kingmaker that the expansion character class (Kineticist) is so good that it almost becomes pay-to-win (as funny as it is to say that about a single-player game). If I was ever having trouble with a big boss battle, I would just say "screw this" and actually use my main character's Kineticist abilities to instantly destroy the entire fight by simultaneously keeping every enemy knocked down and being constantly pelted by boulders until they died. This is important to know in the sense that you might not want to trivialize combat (or might!) by mid-game

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Fruits of the sea
Dec 1, 2010


Dr. Quarex posted:

Also worth noting for Pathfinder: Kingmaker that the expansion character class (Kineticist) is so good that it almost becomes pay-to-win (as funny as it is to say that about a single-player game). If I was ever having trouble with a big boss battle, I would just say "screw this" and actually use my main character's Kineticist abilities to instantly destroy the entire fight by simultaneously keeping every enemy knocked down and being constantly pelted by boulders until they died. This is important to know in the sense that you might not want to trivialize combat (or might!) by mid-game

This sounds awesome and should probably be close to the top because stuff like this:

pentyne posted:

- There are trap choices.
- Kingdom mode is bad in general. Set it to effortless but not automatic for the easiest time and RP the choices. Make sure to be leveling up advisors as a priority, or cheat yourself BP otherwise you can end up in an unstoppable failure spiral.
- The Hellknights kingdom quest is a steaming pile of poo poo you cannot avoid. It is a KS backer quest, so just put up with it and resolve as soon as you can

would make me do a double-take and consider playing something else.

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