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Krazyface
Jul 15, 2011

A: to get those sweet first-place bonus points



Hair Elf

BlindSite posted:

Anything I should know before jumping into prey? Regarding skill trees etc: I don't like stealth I like to murder so I want to do that as effectively as possible.

I'm a little late, but:
-The game will tell you there are negative consequences for getting alien upgrades. These negatives are absolutely tiny, and the benefits of alien upgrades are huge. Ignore the game's advice, buy whatever upgrades sound cool to you.
-If you break a piece of glass, it will still be cracked whenever you return to that area. Don't shoot any of the glass walkways in the lobby, it will make them frustrating to navigate in the future.
-Recycling grenades can destroy pretty much any type of prop.
-You can kill anyone, whenever, without getting a game over.
-It's also possible to finish the game without killing a single human being.

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Krazyface
Jul 15, 2011

A: to get those sweet first-place bonus points



Hair Elf

I'm assuming you're playing the original scenario, not RotS or FotS.

The battle tutorial is really hard. The army it gives you is kind of a grab-bag of units, it's not very good.

The game's economy is very tight. In the late game, every other faction will declare war on you, and your trade income will vanish overnight. To survive this, while maintaining enough armies to hold them all back, you need to carefully set up your economy, and use lots of cheap units. Pay attention to how much income each of your provinces generates, and stack up all the income you can get (market chain buildings, high-level farms, unique province buildings, the tavern chain buildings) in a few of them. One of the types of agent you can train is the Metsuke, a secret policeman and tax collector; they provide an increase to tax if you station them in a town. You can only make five of them, so park them in your five wealthiest towns.

On the expenses side of the economy, you're in luck: Shogun 2 has possibly the best basic units of any TW game. A stationary Yari Ashigaru in spear wall formation can beat nearly anything that attacks from the front. Also, all the stat buffs in the game are flat numbers, rather than %s, so they give a disproportionate benefit to units with low stats. You can beat nearly anything with an army of peasants, with maybe a couple samurai for special jobs, and some horses for cleaning up routers.

If you rely on one general too much, his loyalty will decline sharply and he'll try to rebel and start his own faction. Make sure your daimyo is the head of an army, and try to make it so he's always the highest-leveled general, or close to it.

There is not enough time to research all the techs in the game; you need to pick and choose which lines are important to you. Anything that gives public order is great. You should also try to unlock advanced markets (your main source of $$$), and farms (markets and castles have food upkeep). On the military side, keep in mind that you'll mostly be using peasants with spears and bows, and that techs that benefit those units are better than unlocking expensive toys.

Catapults and cannons are pretty mediocre. Midway through the campaign you'll unlock matchlocks; these are NOT an upgrade to bows. Bows reload faster, and can shoot in an arc over uneven ground (or friendly troops). In a lot of situations, bows will deal more damage than guns. The advantages of guns are that they're scary, and they ignore armour. That stuff's nice, but be warned they require more micro than bow units. Also they're incredibly good at siege defenses, performing far above their stats.

You can convert to Christianity, if you want. It gives you easy access to guns and cannons, and lets you stir up Christian revolts in foreign lands, which you can then invade without angering the original owner. However, it also requires you to convert all your lands to Christianity, which slows down your expansion. Also, the non-Christian daimyos (virtually all of them) will hate you. I wouldn't recommend it for a first game.

When you cross a certain threshold (owning about 30% of the map, or taking Kyoto), you will enter Realm Divide: the shogun will declare you to be a usurper, and everyone will declare war on you within a turn or two. Even allies AND VASSALS will do this, so you basically shouldn't make vassals, ever. Once you take Kyoto, though, you can make new vassals safely.

Finally, there's naval battles. They suck, I hate them. I'd suggest you just make large fleets and hope the autoresolve likes you.

Krazyface
Jul 15, 2011

A: to get those sweet first-place bonus points



Hair Elf

Hank Morgan posted:

Anything for Shogun 2 total war? Especially advice for the early campaign stages. I've being playing as the Shimatzu since that was the clan I used in the first game. I keep find myself running into a brick wall after I conquer my first 2-3 provinces where I suddenly see my rivals out produce and out tech me and end up putting my clan into a death spiral.

We had Shogun II-chat a couple pages back.

If you're getting overwhelmed by the enemy, you might not have enough armies. Try making your armies out of ashigaru, with maybe a few samurai and cavalry for flanking. A unit of yari ashigari, standing still in spear wall formation, will beat anything that attacks them from the front (except arrows+bullets, but you have archers and cavalry to fix that problem).

If you want to make money, concentrate markets and pubs into a few towns (ideally the ones that already make a lot of money, due to long sustained economic growth, or containing a unique building). Recruit some metsuke agents, and park them in those towns; once they level up a little you can spec them into raising tax income. Also, the Shimazu start near all the trade nodes at the edge of the map; park trade ships on them, and they'll generate easy money forever.

I'm not sure what you mean by out-tech, it's hard to do that in S2. Are you fighting the Otomo? Because they start with guns, it's their thing. I wouldn't worry about it, guns are decent, but not enough to make normal units obsolete. Anyway, it's impossible to do the entire tech tree; you need to pick a few key lines and focus on them.

Krazyface
Jul 15, 2011

A: to get those sweet first-place bonus points



Hair Elf

Gun Jam posted:

Any advice for Pyre?

Early on, the game will tell you that you can lose matches, and still proceed the story and get an ending. This is 100% true. You can redo matches if you want, of course. It's up to you.

Be prepared to read a lot. Like, a TON.

Also, the characters get unique items, and if you upgrade them enough some of them are incredibly broken. I think one character gets an infinite sprint.

Krazyface
Jul 15, 2011

A: to get those sweet first-place bonus points



Hair Elf

Return of the Obra Dinn:

Pay attention. The game rewards you for noticing tiny details. Every detail is carefully chosen. Consider playing with headphones.

Some of the characters have multiple valid answers for cause of death, you don't always need to be perfectly accurate.

Whenever you get three characters completed, the game will tell you and lock them in. Sometimes, this mechanic gives you extra information (i.e. whenever you close another three cases, you can be certain that all your other characters are either incomplete or partially wrong). One chapter can only be solved in the post-game-- you'll know which one early.

You can leave the boat early without ending the game; although you get an ending (and a little extra info), you can still go back to the boat and keep playing.

Often, you need to make educated guesses. Occasionally, brute-forcing a puzzle works-- though only once you've narrowed it down to two or three people.

This is a spoiler, but it's a vague one, and I was glad when it was pointed out to me: the hammocks have numbers on them

Krazyface
Jul 15, 2011

A: to get those sweet first-place bonus points



Hair Elf

anilEhilated posted:

Anything for Total War: Warhammer 2? I've played the first one, so I'm mostly interested in changes and tips for the new races.

You can now aim Wind-type spells directionally by holding left-click.

Instead of having certain parts of the map locked to certain factions, there's now a system where some land is easy to live on, some is mediocre, and some sucks, varying according to faction. You can still settle on the bad land, but those towns get big debuffs.

Regional capitals now have eight building slots (from six), and famous cities get ten.

The Vortex campaign requires you to gather a special resource (which you mostly receive passively for holding certain special provinces) and performing rituals (which spawn deathstacks all over your land). You can go wide, but there's a lot of benefit to having a medium-sized empire, so that you can defend it a little more easily. Build walls everywhere, of course. If one of the AIs beats you to the end, you have a chance to beat them in the final battle. If you do this-- and it's quite easy-- they become permanently unable to win. In other words, it's hard to truly lose the Vortex race, but the AI getting there first is kind of a moral defeat. Anyway, the vortex campaign isn't awful, but it's repetitive, and there's a reason why the DLC factions-- the Tomb Kings, Vampire Coast, and Nakai and Wulfric-- can play on the Vortex map without engaging with the vortex mechanics.

Mortal Empires has extremely long turn times, even on a high-end PC. Putting the game on an SSD will make a big difference to battle load times (an essential one IMO), but not to turn times. Also, the changes to how habitability works makes the dwarves even more of a terror, and makes playing as the Wood Elves kind of bad.

For the new factions:
Skaven have trash infantry backed up by some of the best artillery in the game, plus some decent monsters and skirmishers. They also have a restrictive food mechanic and a tricky system of under-cities that lets them make mini-settlements under towns belonging to others. Also, some of their best units are behind DLC. For this reason, I'd recommend against playing as them first.

High Elves are the official straightforward noob faction, with easy income, solid melee units, and tons of ranged and monsters. If you play as Tyrion, understand that you've got about 20 turns until the whole island turns into a giant civil war, and that about half your battles across the whole campaign will be against other Helves.

Dark Elves have lots of flimsy, high damage infantry, backed up by maybe the best basic ranged units in the game. Decent selection of monsters and cav. On the campaign map, they get a lot easier if you jump headfirst into the slave economy. Specialise all your dudes to increase the number of slaves captured, and try to concentrate them all into one or two mega-provinces with maxed-out bonuses to slave income.

The Lizardmen have tough, brave, high-damage infantry that can dumpster what most other factions field. They also have heaps of monsters, way more varieties than you even need. Rather weak in the ranged department. Uncomplicated on the campaign map.

Regarding DLC: owning Ham 1 unlocks the big combined Mortal Empires map. All DLC from the first game carries over to the second, although it can be a bit fiddly to unlock it. Several factions have gotten free reworks:
-Dwarves can now craft special items. Also, that Slayer lord got a new start position.
-The Empire now has a loyalty mechanic where it actually works like a disjointed, decentralised country (instead of a bunch of culturally-similar states). You win over the loyalty of the other Elector Counts. They also redid the tech tree. Finally, Gelt got a new start position.
-The Brets had their vow system reworked into something more interesting. I haven't actually played them yet.
-The Vampire Counts got this system where they can revive ancient renowned lords. Also, Kemmler got a new startpos.

Greenskins and WElves are probably getting reworks next year.

Krazyface
Jul 15, 2011

A: to get those sweet first-place bonus points



Hair Elf

Liquid Banjo posted:

Finally getting around to playing FTL: Faster Than Light. Seems simple enough but I'm reading that I should start on Easy Mode off the bat?

The final boss is an absolute fucker, and you shouldn't feel bad when you lose to it.

Also, the methods to unlock new ships are kind of convoluted; you should just look them up (after you've done a run or two).

Krazyface
Jul 15, 2011

A: to get those sweet first-place bonus points



Hair Elf

Ainsley McTree posted:

I just beat Control, and found this tip from the wiki to be inaccurate:

"You'll get enough ability points to completely fill up the whole skill tree."

I was reasonably diligent about sidequests (the mirror and the mold sidequests were the only ones I picked up and didn't finish), but quickly decided to ignore board countermeasures and timed Bureau Alerts, and still had a few trees unfinished by the end of the game; I'd say I only had 3/4 or so of it filled out. So that tip must assume you're doing all the optional content, or something (I'm not even sure if alerts & countermeasures actually give you skill points, but it's the only thing I can think of).

Not a huge deal, the points I didn't spend were on abilities that I didn't use much, but players should be aware that they might want to focus their points a little more carefully.

Those things don't give you skill pointsó but finding secret areas does.

Krazyface
Jul 15, 2011

A: to get those sweet first-place bonus points



Hair Elf

PMush Perfect posted:

The tips for Civ 5 are a little threadbare. Help?

In addition to what StoryTime said:

In previous Civ games, the best play was to keep expanding forever, though you had to pace yourself. In V, they tried to balance it such that "tall" empires of a few highly-developed cities were more competitive. They ended up really overdoing this: the most efficient way to play the game is to settle 3-6 cities and then stop, and just maximise those cities. Also, many of the buildings give you output based on population, so build farms absolutely everywhere. Food is king, because it gives you more of everything else (except happiness, so make sure that's always positive). You can kind of deviate from this vs the AI, but I remember having a bad time with V until I happened to try out a tall game, and then everything clicked.

The two expansions are essential. The civ packs are fine, if you want to play as those civs. The scenarios are a mixed bag; some are good as hell (like that one about colonising the New World/resisting colonisation); others were broken by patches and never fixed (like the Genghis Khan one).

A great civ for new players is Poland. Their benefit is really strong, and useful for all victory conditions and skill levels.

Prince is the fairest difficulty; below that level the player gets free stuff; above that level the AIs get free stuff. I would recommend learning the game on Warlord (or whatever the difficulty right below Prince is).

I don't remember if the tutorial is any good, but the Civilopedia is very thorough and detailed. The Advisors are kind of useless.

Krazyface
Jul 15, 2011

A: to get those sweet first-place bonus points



Hair Elf

anilEhilated posted:

Anyway, I'd like to ask about Hades - it is on the wiki but the section is really sparse and I assumed they'd have changed quite a bit on account of the Early Access status; do the tips still apply and is there anything else one should know?

Tip #2 is semi-outdated, as the item it refers to is now known as Nectar, while a different item has been named Ambrosia. Other than that, the game is fairly easy to get into. It's a roguelike; nothing is missable, and you're supposed to learn it yourself piece by piece. I would say that new players should try to get boons from Athena and Aphrodite, as their stuff tends to be good for any build, while other gods are more situational. Be very stingy with your Titan Blood, as it's the most precious resource in the game. All the weapons are fine, but I found the shield was the first one that properly clicked for me. If you get the chance to give yourself extra dashes, take it: movement is life. Sources of healing are few and far between, so just don't get hit ever. I prefer the controller, but a lot of people say M+KB is fine.

Krazyface
Jul 15, 2011

A: to get those sweet first-place bonus points



Hair Elf

Hwurmp posted:

What should I know before I read this thread for the first time?

DON'T CHANGE THE POSTS PER PAGE SETTING. Pretty much everyone leaves it on the default 40, and if you change it you'll miss out on community dynamics.

Krazyface
Jul 15, 2011

A: to get those sweet first-place bonus points



Hair Elf

Have you played other TW games before?
-Build walls/garrisons loving everywhere. The AI can see through the fog of war, and it will march across a whole continent to burn down your unwalled towns.
-All the DLC for game 1 carries over to game 2. Game 1 itself functions as DLC for game 2, unlocking the super-campaign with all the factions in it.
-Don't play Wood Elves, Beastmen, or Warriors of Chaos; their campaigns are all pretty trash in their current implementation. The devs are slowly updating all the factions (last week they fixed the greenskins, who were previously unplayable), but for now those three are all bad. Wood Elves and Beastmen have fun unit rosters, at least, and all three of them are viable in MP, but the campaigns are not fun to play.
-There are no essential mods. However, there are a lot of tweaks to take the edge off annoying features (for instance, one that disables assassination, or one that imposes a cost limit on all armies so that neither you nor the AI can field death-stacks). Play the game vanilla, at least at first.
-The Skaven feel kind of bad to play without one of their DLC unit packs (either the Prophet & the Warlock, or the Shadow & the Blade). Outside of that, all DLCs are optional. They fall into two categories: a race pack (that makes new factions playable), and a lord pack (that introduces a pair of new characters, with unique starting postions, and adds some new units to two of the faction rosters). The DLC works similar to something like CK2: your game contains all the DLC stuff, but until you buy it, only the AI can use it. So, the Vampire Coast factions are in the game no matter what; buying their DLC just makes them playable. In other words, there's no point in buying a race pack until you want to play as one of those factions.
-Some of the "Starting difficulty" descriptions are... optimistic. The easiest, most straightforward starts are probably Tyrion and Malekith.
-There's no in-game way to trade land. So if, for example, some orks burn down one of your towns, and then one of your allies immediately resettles the ruins, there's no way to peacefully reclaim that land. You need to either attack the ally, or hope some mutual enemy will do it for you; it sucks. I believe there are mods that let you trade land. The AI doesn't value it properly in trade deals (which is why the devs removed it from the series ages ago), so it's kind of a cheat mod; you just need to restrain yourself.

Krazyface
Jul 15, 2011

A: to get those sweet first-place bonus points



Hair Elf

Some additions to Outer Wilds:
-You don't unlock the ability to save the game until about half an hour in. Try not to die in that time!
-You should do every tutorial in the starting village, it'll save you a lot of frustration down the line.
-If you're stuck, consider pursuing one of your other leads. Some things are not meant to be solved the first time you see them.
-It's sometimes possible to reach a hard-to-get area if you're extremely good at piloting the ship/jetpack. However, you never need to do this; there's always an easy way, you just haven't learned about it yet.
-The computer in the back of your ship has two ways of displaying data: map mode and rumour mode. Make sure to look at rumour mode from time to time, it's really good!
-In the settings, you can make it so that time doesn't pass while your character is reading, using the computer, or talking to someone. I would suggest you don't enable it for conversations; occasionally the other characters will have animations mixed in with their dialogue, and this setting messes that up.

Krazyface
Jul 15, 2011

A: to get those sweet first-place bonus points



Hair Elf

Danger - Octopus! posted:

Got a question about Assassin's Creed: Odyssey

With the recruitment mechanic for people on my ship, is it like MGSV: Phantom Pain where I should just knock out and recruit everyone I can, or should you only recruit people with particularly special abilities? I couldn't really tell if I was meant to just recruit occasional people who could be lieutenants or if I was meant to recruit general crew as well?

Recruiting someone adds them to your lieutenant pool, which can be used to buff your ship's fight-stats. No interaction with the regular crew. You should only grab people you notice to have cool, high-level traits. Or ignore it, naval combat isn't super hard.

Krazyface
Jul 15, 2011

A: to get those sweet first-place bonus points



Hair Elf

There's a scripted economic crash in late '08, try to plan around that

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Krazyface
Jul 15, 2011

A: to get those sweet first-place bonus points



Hair Elf

I've got a contribution for Batman: Arkham Knight:
-As you approach the final mission, several characters will tell you you're about to hit the point of no return. This is not actually true; you can still free-roam and do side-missions in the post-game.

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