Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
 
  • Post
  • Reply
Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


Gooch181 posted:

Cool, thanks. Would I be allright sticking with the premade one, or better off changing stats around manually? It looks pretty daunting but as long as the premade class is good enough, I'd like to avoid it. I'd just hate to get hours into the game and find out I didn't put enough points in tree knowledge or some poo poo and be stuck.

It really seems like everyone who plays Drakensang firmly believes that you will simply fail to win the game if you do not have a properly balanced party of "some sort of excellent mage, two heavy hitters, and a fancy rogue lad." However, my standard strategy in every game, "have everyone hit things with the biggest weapons available," is working just fine even in this supposedly melee-unfriendly game; I am already past two or three of the legendary mega-fights in the game I just killed the dragon last night without having anyone go down, and did not even use the heat resistant stuff, and have thus far seen no weaknesses to the "tough PC and Rhulana/Forgrimm/Traldar" championship tactic.

Honestly, that mother rat in the brewery is the toughest fight I have seen in the entire game so far, extra-hilarious given that it is basically a newbie quest.

Drakensang is one of the best CRPGs in years, and everyone complaining about how it is just "same old same old" is ignoring the facts that it is absolutely gorgeous, that it has fantastic music and voice acting, and that it actually breaks fantasy gaming cliché territory left and right despite on paper having a semi-standard plot (do you KNOW how long it takes before you encounter a dwarf with a Scottish accent? AGES!).

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


Nonvalueadded User posted:

The only other advice I feel compelled to give is play the game with Wrex and either Garrus or Tali; the other three are useless and/or annoying.

Alternately, I would say that only Wrex, Liara, and Tali are worth having in your party, and that the other three are useless and/or annoying. Wrex is a mixed bag, also, since his character is painfully one-dimensionally evil for the most part, but it is obvious that he is the best stock combat character (other than your own, if you go that route). The best part is that someone will argue with this, pointing out that his evil is just a result of his race's history, but the fact remains that BioWare loves throwing in horribly rude, blatantly evil, and fundamentally unlikable characters to see what kind of rabid adulation they can develop for them on the Internet regardless (Morrigan).

Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


SpazmasterX posted:

-If you cheat on your ME1 love interest, there will be "consequences" in ME3. Do it anyways because your selection is a lot better this time around.

A lot better this time around? What does that even mean? If it is something about what you get in-game for having a love interest, then that is something (I have not gotten this far yet, if so). If you mean the love interests in the first game were insufficient, I must protest and say that Liara is awesome. Meanwhile, in this game, Jack is awesome, but I hardly think Miranda is an improvement over Ashley (Miranda and Ashley are really the same character, as far as I can tell; standoffish rude women [honestly, Jack is more pleasant to talk to than Miranda]).

SpazmasterX posted:

-The new mining feature for gathering resources from planets may look irritating, but it's not. Get the scanner upgrade from Miranda ASAP, only bother scanning planets that register as "Rich", and tap the Scan button as you move so it goes quicker.

I guess something bad did come from me refusing to ever interact with Miranda once she was out of my party, after all. Oh well; I just mined the whole galaxy the hard way, and hey, it was a fine thing to do when I was on the phone or otherwise occupied but still wanted to be playing Mass Effect 2.

(ON THIS ISSUE: It seems that all [or at least like 99%] of the highest concentrations of minerals on planet surfaces are ON the planet scan-line-grid that the game draws; there is no need to scan all over the planet surface, you can stick to the lines)

Also, thanks for basically avoiding spoilers in your response--I feel like I know a little more about the end of the game than I wanted to know, but not really, considering I still have no idea what any of what you said meant. I just know that I am slightly inspired to talk to Miranda now, but still you said "mostly" loyal so I can probably skip her.

Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


SpazmasterX posted:

If you like Liara, you can certainly stay loyal to her by not making any advances on the other gals. Talk to Miranda, there's a lot of character in there.

Regarding Liara in Mass Effect 2, it seems like they decided to turn her into another generic quasi-evil schemer, so the fact that she is relegated to an unimportant side role (assuming nothing changes too dramatically) is fine for me.

But I did give in and talk to Miranda, so that was something. Even if I cannot tell what the upgraded mineral scanner actually does differently than the old one.

Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


graventy posted:

I didn't get the right dialogue in my first playthrough, but apparently Liara is directly responsible for Cerberus recovering your remains instead of the Shadow Broker selling you to the Collectors. I think she plays a pretty significant role, especially since the Shadow Broker stuff will probably come to a head next game.

That is interesting. As far as her role in Mass Effect 2, I stopped working for her after her missions went from "hack something for me!" to "help me murder someone in cold blood!" so I never knew the full story there. Yes, I understand, the Shadow Broker killed someone she liked, but if there is one thing I keep as a constant it is that killing someone because it is the "right thing to do" is always the wrong thing to do. On the plus side, her being like that made romancing Jack guilt-free!

Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


Can I just say this is one of my favorite threads ever on the forums? Other than the fact that people have an uncanny knack for asking "Hey can somebody maybe give me some hints for a game discussed on this page or the last one? I'm not going to read through a hundred pages."

Does anyone have any hints for what to do when wanting to buy Dead Rising 2 for the PC but being unable to get Games For Windows Live! to give a username? Thanks! Mostly kidding.

Caufman posted:

Dragon Age Origins question:

When I play an RPG like this, I like to go through all the dialog options with my party mates as soon as I get them. Am I going to burn through all their dialogs at the start, or will more options be available as the story progresses like in Mass Effect?

This is an old post. But if nobody else gives this THING YOU SHOULD KNOW, I am going to hit it, because I wish I had known it going into the game:

Whatever the name of the priestess lady is, if you (like I did) give her too many gifts and get her approval up too high before some arbitrary part of the game, then you completely miss her romance quest. Which was funny, because since I found Morrigan so unforgivably repugnant of a character and thus I ditched her as soon as I could, my character was thus unable to be interested in love. He did have a world to save, though!

Captain Scandinaiva posted:

The better voice actor.

Also, please, everyone who has not already picked a side in the war, do not believe the way these assholes set things up. There is no definitively better voice actor of the two. If you were specifically talking about her voice being better for a renegade, then I apologize for calling you an rear end in a top hat--because she sounds a lot ruder than does the male voice actor, who therefore naturally works better for my always-paragon-no-I-am-not-tempted-to-randomly-murder-people-like-you-sociopaths-are character.

systran posted:

REGARDING: King's Bounty: Armored Princess
The game is extremely loving hard when you start playing and somewhere like 8-10 hours in it will become so easy that you might stop playing (I stopped playing).

The new King's Bounty games have quite possibly the most awesome revival distinction of all time: being an expert at the original King's Bounty (yes, from 1990) actually gives you an advantage in these remakes/revivals, since the fundamental gameplay is rather similar. Archdemons even still have the old demon ability to cut a troop's numbers in half! Wooo!

The best hint for this game, like the others (including the original), is that if you get good at "maneuvering around enemy units on the overworld map" you can collect huge amounts of gold, character-enhancing shrines and fountains, and even maps to other islands (where you repeat the process). In my game, for example, after about a dozen hours of doing this, I had unlocked all but the last game map, and had about a 10-level equivalent head start on where I was supposed to be, which made the whole game very easy. But I realize not everyone likes to play this way.

If you actually want to, you know, do things the normal way, pay attention to the units your class is good with--there are humanoid/military-unit bonuses on two of the three classes, and they are usually in ready availability. There are a billion spells. If there is an obvious "cheese your way through the game" route, it is through building up dragon dive or fire phantoms with your dragon, and then just trying to have enough rage (and mana for awaken dragon) to do it twice in the opening round. Combine that with some damage-everything-on-the-field units and you will probably be killing half the enemies before they even go.

Thwack! posted:

Just starting Wizardry 6. Anything I should know before starting this?

It was made at one of the wonderful awkward times for PC gaming, where IBM was winning the computer-of-choice war but most people still had poor graphics and sound capabilities. Oh, well, you probably already know that.

Wizardry 6 is a very difficult game, which is good to know going in so you do not think you are doing everything wrong. Other than the fact that you can import your characters to Wizardry 7 and Wizardry 8 and might feel cheated from a lack of variety overall, I imagine the best party would be a very uncreative mix of like three fighters, a ninja, and two bishops. But I am sure someone will tell me that bishops suck because they never get maximum-level spells (though I am not sure if that is true). There are a lot of little things you will probably miss throughout the game, including some things that would probably make it unbeatable, if you do not know about them--so I would find a FAQ somewhere and just look for "IMPORTANT!" or "GAME-BREAKING BUG" or similar headings.

Beyond that, you should know how much fun Wizardry 7 will be after you finish Wizardry 6.

I wish I had a game to ask about. But every game I am going to start playing soon has not actually come out yet. Unless someone really wants to tell me something about Siege of Avalon, which I just picked up for $1 at Gen-Con this year. Or if there is something about Civilization V that makes it somehow vastly different from the first 4.5 games, 3.5 of which I have played through all the way.

Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


Dr Snofeld posted:

If you don't care about multiplayer or achievements just make an offline GfWL account when you get the game.

Well, I signed up for Games for Windows Live! when I found out I would need to do it--or, I should say, went through the motions. It will not let me use Quarex as my name, and every time I e-mail tech support about inquiring as to what the problem is I get a form letter response that is not, in fact, addressing my question. Yes, there is an XBox Live account named Quarex, but A. I think that was me too even though I cannot figure out how to sync the two and B. Why should that matter for an entirely different system?

Edit: Yes, snarky response man, I know--"USE SOMETHING THAT IS NOT QUAREX DERRPAAAAA" but sorry, I am not nearly interested enough in Dead Rising 2 to so debasedly compromise my e-integrity.

Dr Snofeld posted:

To be fair, Mark Meer is considerably less bland in ME2 than he is in ME1.

Well, I suppose I did not hear about this argument before I had played through the second one. I do not remember having a problem with him in the first game, but then, there is so much just-plain-bad main-character-voice-acting out there in the CRPG world that I probably would not have noticed.

Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


pseudorandom name posted:

It isn't an entirely different system, it is the same system. You don't sync them, you log in with the same email and password.

You are wiser than any thousand Microsoft employees and FAQs I tried to consult to figure this out. Thank you! Now, to figure out what e-mail address I used.

Edit: While your solution made me feel better, it still did not solve my fundamental problem: I have no idea what e-mail address I signed up with, considering I have had dozens in the past few years, and I cannot figure out how to enter the ID as the "forgot password" data, rather than the e-mail address as the "forgot password" data. Is there a way to do this? Or, more specifically, I guess I am looking for a "forgot e-mail address" link, but that certainly does not seem to exist.

On the plus side, after mentioning that I would not be buying Dead Rising 2 in my last e-mail to tech support, I magically got a response from a real person!

Dr. Quarex fucked around with this message at 05:23 on Oct 16, 2010

Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


pseudorandom name posted:

Or you might be able to talk a Microsoft support person into telling you which Windows Live account is associated with the Xbox LIVE account.

I will work with this. Thanks for the encouragement! Carpe diem!


al-azad posted:

Choose female Shepard not because the voice but because there's pretty much no decent female leads in any RPG ever.

That actually sounds like something I should be posting in this thread, so I am sad now that that never dawned on me. I even complained somewhere in the Dragon Age thread about how I want just once for game designers to include a powerful female fighting character--though for the record, Drakensang: The Dark Eye did have an amazon who was about as tough as anyone else in the game.

Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


Captain Novolin posted:

Caravan is OK for money early on if you're really hurting for it, but the big bucks are in the casinos later on. Once you get kicked out from one or two for winning too much you're pretty much set for life.

So, let me ask you a question--are you playing the PC version? I have read the rules about a dozen times, have watched the computer playing, and have trial-and-errored what seems like every possible combination of moves, and have never successfully played so much as a single card after laying down my starter for each caravan. Other than the fact that it lets you put face cards on anything. No, I do not want you to point me to a FAQ, I just want someone to tell me whether the PC version is somehow bugged to not work. If not, I will keep trying to figure it out.

Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


CaptainPsyko posted:

Beyond that, it basically boils down to whether you want about a dozen random pop culture jokes scattered around, all of which have zero gameplay impact. (i.e. you'd meet the same NPC's, except instead of being mugged by the Golden Girls, you'll get mugged by three thugs with the same weapons but without the dumb joke.) There really aren't that many Wild Wasteland encounters though, so it's not like it redefines the game into a gimmick play through if you take it.

I took it, and have found it downright distressing just how infrequently it has come up, even as explore-happy as I am in these games (I have hit level 30 and gotten the highest-ranking "find these locations" perk and still feel like I have seen five or six, tops). Fortunately, given that there is nothing actually that interesting to take as an alternative to Wild Wasteland, it does not seem like much of a big deal.

Though as far as a "before you start playing" tip, if you are the playing-a-non-combat-character-at-the-beginning-to-avoid-missing-things type, the "20% slower fire/20% more accurate" perk seemed to save my life a number of times in the early goings by auto-correcting my aim ... before I recruited someone who just instantly killed everything before I could get to it, anyway.

Edit: Oh, and, the biggest reason it killed MY IMMERSION was because I literally had to look up every single reference to understand what it was, with the exception of the Princess Bride one. And these are never from obscure sources, either--they are just done in obscure ways, if you are not big fans of the things being referenced. Which to me is a big change from Fallout 2, but I could be remembering wrong.

Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


Captain Novolin posted:

I got Temple of Elemental Evil off of GoG, and I got the Co8 mod, what else should I know? I really don't know much about DnD other than you roll dice a lot and there are monsters.

I guess it is important to know that Temple of Elemental Evil is probably the second-most-hated D&D CRPG ever, right after the ~2002 edition of Pool of Radiance. That is still not to say it is all bad; it has fantastic combat and the character creation is fun (as you would expect, given it is a near-direct port of the table-top system), but the game itself feels hollow like a world you created and forgot to populate. But I imagine the Co8 mod, whatever it is, surely fixes some of the problems there.

Basically, the most important thing to know is that if you have no idea what you are doing, listen to the things the game tells you (at least, I think it had good auto-hints), and also make simple characters. There have been other good hints posted here in the last several pages, I think--maybe they are on the Wiki page?

Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


Barudak posted:

Don't be afraid to play on easy or cheat, the combat is pretty much awful throughout and to be avoided.

While I appreciate the general sentiment of "the game story and dialogue is so good that it is worth any impediment to appreciate," I have never understood the hate for Planescape: Torment's combat. Not only is it basically the same as the combat in all other Infinity engine games, which is to say pretty good, it is at times my favorite of all of them due to the infinite power the Nameless One can wield through things like a 25 STR. Or, so I hear, amazing magic spells (I do not think I ever cast a single spell in the game that was not having Falls-From-Grace cast healing, nor became a mage).

Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


RagnarokAngel posted:

Works for lockpicks too! (You get 3 mistakes before pins start breaking)

The most game-balance-breaking change the designers made to New Vegas was giving you four mistakes before pins break (or if you are super-crazy and only barely start turning it just to get a gauge on how close you might be, even more!). It completely ruined my immersion. My immersion that I believed I was still playing Fallout 3.

Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


...of SCIENCE! posted:

I agree with this, it really is just pointless filler and to top it off it's actually impossible to have enough money to buy all the upgrades without doing New Game+.

I had like three times the amount of resources in total that I could even ultimately spend in Mass Effect 2 by the time I finally started upgrading everything. I was so mad that there was nothing to do with all the extra resources I had spent all that time collecting (I do believe I mined every single planet in the entire game until it was depleted [not as hard as you think if you actually got good at the mini-game; each one would only take a few minutes, and was an acceptable break from homework]).

Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


Nate RFB posted:

I fully intend to cheat now that I know it is possible. I would have done the same with Fallout 1/2 but couldn't figure it out. I have very little patience for the slow, clunky gameplay of old WRPGs.

Does that mean Windows RPG or Western RPG? And is the gameplay really any slower or clunkier than any game made before all RPGs were action games in disguise? I really am not trying to start an argument, I promise. I will accept your answer!

Barudak posted:

Ignis requires the item that pours out infinite water, don't remember where its gotten. Fall-From Grace is at the brothel and requires a lot of wisdom/charisma to get into the party. She is the only healer, so I can't imagine playing without her.

I did use her, but only because there is a fifth spot in the party and I was even less interested in Vhailor (who I always just killed instead) and Ignus (oh boy, an evil man on fire!). I healed with clots like 99.9% of the time in that game. I have no idea why you would rely on a non-basically-infinite source of healing for your fighting. Maybe this is why people find the game's combat irritating? I may have never rested in the entire game, so I never had to go through memorizing spells, which I could see as a particularly annoying repetitive task in 2nd edition gameplay.

Foxhound posted:

Anyone got anything on Two Worlds 2? (the title makes me think of the SA member everytime I read it )

Any other general tips?

Wait until it comes out in America so we obsessive USAGoons can play it and offer assistance

Did you play the first game? If not, and the combat is anything like the first game, then you are indeed probably getting it fine, and it is just really hard. I remember how I had to basically do the "cast a bunch of pathetic spells at a charging wolf, hit it once, get hit and nearly die in return, run away and get my mana back, repeat a dozen times until it dies" thing for hours when the game began until my character became half-decent in a fight.

Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


A Sometimes Food posted:

Any tips for Divine Divinity (specifically to do with levelling and stat distribution)

Due to the open-ended nature of the allowances for improving your statistics (and skills), the method I used in Divine Divinity (and, for that matter, Beyond Divinity and Divinity 2) is to just never spend any stat points until you find an item that has higher stat requirements than you currently possess (in Divine/Beyond; stat requirements are gone in Divinity 2) ... or any skill points unless you see a skill you can obviously see a use for (lockpick, for example) or that just supports the way you want to play.

Wow, somehow hitting control-space by mistake just posted this ahead of me wanting to write it. I guess the post is done!

Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


Thwack! posted:

Just starting out Divinity 2: Dragon Knight Saga. Any good character builds and other things useful during my playthrough?

For starters, Divinity 2 plays more like the first two games in the series than you might expect for such a drastic change in perspective and game mechanics (though this does you no good if you have not played them). If you are any good at basic CRPG/MMORPG kiting (attacking from afar, avoiding retaliatory attacks if any, repeat), then you can basically put your points wherever you want. I am level 29 at this point, and have still not spent any of my stat points (though at this point out of stubbornness and refusal to believe there is never going to be a stat requirement for anything as there was in the first two games). Because none of the skills particularly strike me as all that much fun to have (except the dragon skills, but naturally they are far more limited), other than raising lockpick to 4, I spent no skill points until level ~25 either, when I raised ranger strength (just to make kiting go a little quicker).

Mindread and Wisdom are both tempting to the right kind of player, but I cannot help but think that mechanically speaking you do yourself an overall disservice by investing in them (particularly in mindread, as that is an occasional reduction of experience cost versus wisdom's continual increase in experience gain, looking like a worse deal).

So, though I have no specific build advice, but if you can make it through huge parts of the game with no build at all, then you are good to go with whatever sounds like fun to you.

Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


Sonic H posted:

And if anyone has any advice on ME 1/2 I'd appreciate it. I'm just getting started and I love BioWare games. Of course, I shall read the entire thread too as I'm sure something must have been posted..

Ignore the guy who says female is the better voice acting. As far as I can tell, most of the people who say the female Shepard is the better choice are playing renegades, because apparently she sounds more intense and no-nonsense. For those of us who never throw defenseless guards off buildings, male Shepard's voice is a much better fit for someone who actually cares about others. Insert goon face quote.

Do not spend too much time mastering Mass Effect 1's fun weapon/armor customization system, since they took it out of the second game. Same goes for the Mako driving-around-beautiful-alien-landscapes-scavenging-and-encountering-interesting-things mini-game, the most fun non-essential thing in the first game, which is replaced in the second game by "looking at a wireframe globe and pushing a button sometimes."

If you read the entire thread or look at the Wiki, I am sure you will find pretty much anything else people can tell you. But it bears repeating that you should do NPC side-quests in both games as soon as possible, more or less. And after seeing what happens with Mass Effect 1's romance storylines in Mass Effect 2, I personally would argue you should just skip them entirely.

Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


Gray Stormy posted:

Tips for Condemned? Ive only played to the part in the beginning where you get knocked out at a fuse box.

The atmosphere is really effective

Badurak's advice is just about all you need, though it is also worth noting that, even though it would surely seem they do something, collecting the hidden birds and televisions and whatever else the game has you collect literally does nothing other than say "great job on collecting these!" Think of it as a precursor to the achievement world order of more recent games.

At almost every moment of the game after the initial building, someone is always sneaking up behind you if you see someone moving in front of you. And usually the person behind you is closer, so I found that just turning around the moment I saw someone in front of me was a reasonably effective tactic.

I think the plot makes more sense than Barudak does, particularly since some of the big reveals towards the end are actually genuinely compelling.

But, that leads into my other tip: Particularly given how fascinating the game gets as you go along, stop playing it right now if you have a PC; you will want to cry after you finish it, since they are never going to release the sequel for PC. Some people insist the second game is lame, but since people on the Internet can hate just about anything, I am unsure.

Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


Coulis posted:

It's probably a long shot but does anyone have tips on how to handle Drankensang: The river of time ?

I never played this series of game and so I created a warrior. I gained a level but I have no idea where to put my levelling points.

I guess this means the game finally came out in English, unless you are some sort of Ger-Man.

As someone who has never played this game but loved the first one in the series and bought the table-top books out of obsessive fanhood, I think you should focus on raising whatever combat skills seem most useful if you are going to play a warrior. As in, if the game is throwing one-handed swords at you, just keep raising your one-handed swords skill. There is no harm in keeping the points around, either; the more you have, the easier it is to drastically fix a shortcoming once you notice it (like if you keep getting tripped in combat, you can suddenly raise your sturdiness or whatever the trait was that helps resist that; willpower?).

In the first game, most people agreed you could not get by without magic, so try to recruit a useful magician wherever you can find one (assuming the game still has party dynamics). Still, I personally, said "I hate you, conventional wisdom" and stuck to my character-personality-favoring party of three fighters and a rogue, and still made it through with only a few big problems, so your mileage may vary.

Also please tell me if the game is awesome. Not that you have played the first one to compare.

Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


Lascivious Sloth posted:

What type of character is the best voice/plot/whatever for Mass Effect 2 (I haven't started it yet.)

I am not nearly as angry about this as I used to be, as I have had some very reasonable discussions with people; it seems that if you want to play a renegade, you will be far better off with a female Shepard, as she apparently sounds far more intense. That is not to say that you cannot also like her for paragon, but I have to say the male's voice sounds better to me for the "galactic do-gooder."

RagnarokAngel already pointed out that class does not impact the plot at all, but the type of background you select has at least one interesting impact. I never looked up what the other ones do, but the "sole survivor" background has a pretty awesome scene related to it in the game.

Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


ARX FATALIS: I love that this game came up, as it is one of the few games for which there is something you actually MUST know before playing the game, if you do not want the game to go catastrophically wrong. It was already discussed (the Akbaa Stones' vital importance and the lack of clues to this fact beyond their name), but I wanted to give a shout-out to Arx Fatalis for both being one of the best RPGs of the 2000s and being one of the only games since like 1992 to be so mean in the "vitally important item you can just drop willy-nilly" department.

DOMAIN NAME FOR THIS THREAD: HowDoIGame.com is available (though I doubt you want a semi-joke name for your domain).

Perhaps GameSoothsayer.com! (GamePsychic.com is taken)

Wow, GameSuggestions.com is available. You should probably get that. Nope, too late, someone else did since I thought it.

BeforeIPlay.com is available! Oh, too late; porn.

Hey, BeforeYourPlaythrough.com is available.

I feel surely you will love at least one of these. Perhaps all.

Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


Centipeed posted:

I did enjoy like "BeforeIPlay.com", so I went ahead and registered it.

You can now go to http://www.beforeiplay.com to see the Wiki.

That is awesome. I am glad to have been of some use to these forums for possibly the first time ever.

Also, for the Drakensang: River of Time guy, I finally have the game now that it came out in America, and I can officially say that my assumption-advice seems sound. The mechanics have changed very little, if at all (the advanced character creation system is the only real change it seems).

It is worth mentioning that you can become fabulously wealthy in either one of these games in a very short time by having a character who starts with the ability to pick pockets, though they obviously end up with shortcomings in other areas. Just going through the newbie area and stealing from everyone (in The Dark Eye) netted twice as much total money as playing through the scenario normally (plus, you then get that money, too). River of Time is likely much the same.

Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


Gwyrgyn Blood posted:

What's the difficulty like on the game? I'm going to pick it up at some point in the near future, wondering if I should stick with normal or crank it up.

Given my personal quest to use strict non-magic parties in every game, and this being a game where magic is more effective overall, I am probably a bad judge, but until the area where huge packs of wolves and boars suddenly mow you down if you wander there (likely just to stop you from going there too soon), everything feels pretty well balanced. If you were good at the first game you could certainly play on hard at the beginning at least (and you can change it anytime, so why not?).

Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


Limorkil posted:

1. Compared to BG, you really have to not be paying any attention at all to miss a companion. Big guy in a cage, do we release him or not? Hmmm.

Yes, this is a minor point in your post, but something that seems particularly interesting about Dragon Age: Origins. The only reason I released Sten was because I found it so fascinating that the game had an unabashed (if somewhat apologetic) murderer as a potentially sympathetic figure. If I had been feeling slightly less "oh, what an intriguing artistic decision!" and more "why would I let the murderer out of the cage?" that day, I would have never known he was a party member. It even seems they made it like this so that people more likely to enjoy the style of play that meshes with Sten's personality are also more likely to let him out of the cage, though this may be an insane path of thinking.

Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


Volitaire posted:

So I got Drakensang: The River of Time and besides the usual tips, I was wondering if its even worth playing? The beginning seems painfully generic with some pretty bad voice acting. I've heard the combat is what makes it, but I'm skeptical.

What the hell happens to people when they play this game? No offense to you personally--the arbitrary hate for it is wide-spread enough that obviously these things must be true. But seriously. What?

The beginning is generic in the sense that it is a tutorial, but I am not sure why it is generic beyond that. If you think this is bad voice acting, you should play a game with actually bad voice acting (Beyond Divinity comes to mind immediately). It is true that a lot of the unimportant NPCs are clearly Canadian, and that is too bad, but other than Cano, all of the main characters are decently acted. The dialogue is also often very well-written.

It is interesting that you heard the combat makes it; though the combat is quite fun (and not the usual combat-every-five-seconds combat of most games, either), it seems not quite as good as the visuals, music, and general feel of the game world (particularly how it actually breaks a lot of stereotypes, despite people inexplicably calling it a generic game all the time). Combat animations are amazing at times, particularly when a series of attacks is parried by the same enemy (weapons actually make visible contact when an attack is blocked!).

This is also honestly one of the most beautiful games I have ever seen. Seriously. It is like the only game in which bloom actually works with the artistic style, creating a gorgeous, like, "occasionally-sinister-children's-storybook" effect. It is not in any way photorealistic, so if that is the direction you want games to take, you are probably not going to get any more impressed in that regard.

If you are looking for a game like Dragon Age: Origins, then no, you will probably not like this. But the Drakensang games capture a great oldschool-gaming-in-beautiful-new-style mood. Plus, if you do end up enjoying it, you can play the first game in the new series, which is chronologically a sequel, and end up being sad at how things go!!!

Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


Volitaire posted:

That being said, how the hell do I remove something from the toolbar?

The comparison to DA:O is pretty unavoidable with a game like this, but I think is some ways it has an edge. I'll continue despite the VA, any general gameplay tips I should know?
You can make a lot of money in a relatively short time by pickpocketing everything that moves. It is not a "lot of money" in the grand-sweep-of-the-game sense, but in the you-can-buy-every-basic-sundry-you-need-now sense, which is still quite useful. Magic is pretty powerful in general, it seems, and playing as a mage should give you maximum ability to find this out while having the rest of the party act as your combat blockers. Another general hint, crafting can be very useful (traps, for example, can quickly tip the balance of a fight in your favor, and are relatively inexpensive to make), and plants grow back in this game unlike in the last Drakensang title, so you could probably make infinite money making potions if you were into that kind of slow moneymaking.

I have no idea how to remove things from the toolbar. But I just replace them with other things if I want to change them. You have uncovered a great mystery.

Limorkil posted:

I wonder the same thing. I am playing the first Drakensang at the moment and it is way better than most people seem to think. The combat is pretty interesting because of the tactics required. There is a ton of dialogue, the NPCs and companions are engaging, the creature models are great, the level-up/skills system is one of the best I've seen, and the writing is full of dark humor (for example, the zombie boy with his zombie mule). Unless it really goes downhill later it is looking like a better RPG than many of its more successful contemporaries.

The only difference I can see that may make people like these games less is that they are slow to get going. It takes a while to acquire more interesting abilities. You do not get a lot of magical items and other "interesting" loot (hell, I am still wearing the armor I started with). You never feel like you are that much more powerful than what you are fighting. The whole thing is just different, but by no means bad.

Dexterity 11, roll=14, fail, use 3 skill points (14-11=3), 6-3=3 points left
Since you have 3 points left, Treat Wounds succeeds and you heal 1 additional wound (2 total).
You actually helped me understand the game system better--the mechanics of the "skill points changing the fails to passes" thing eluded me until this moment.

Also, excellent point about the games being slow to get going, and not because they are boring, but because they are as much about improving your tactical combat as about getting a slightly more magical sword.

River of Time does seem better than The Dark Eye, generally speaking, but it is almost entirely due to a more streamlined story focus--never have I felt like I was aimlessly wandering through a forest trying to figure out what to do next like a couple of times in the first game. The clever and anti-stereotypical writing for both games keeps them entertaining even in the most otherwise throw-away scenes. Both games are well worth buying, particularly since you could probably get them for $30 total, if not less.

Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


Dr Snofeld posted:

car boot sale
£2
daft
give it a go

Not having ever played an Ultima game, and the game being made to run on computers in 1992, you may have a hard time getting into it (though I think you are right that Exult, which I think is the name, is the agreed-upon way to play it). Another note on the subject--combat is basically so fast-paced that you have no idea what is going on--no, that is not a factor of playing it on a modern computer or anything. Never has combat played a smaller role in any role-playing game. Not to say that there are not many combats, but they all end about as soon as they begin, with the exceptions of a few big fights against super-tough things.

It is a big game. You might actually get lost. You should have the map of the game world handy, as you can go anywhere (once you finish enough of the quest to leave the opening town of Trinsic, that is), and it is not necessarily easy to know where you are.

I am not sure if you should know about the blatant-cheat-room before playing or only learn about that if you are having such a hard time that you are about to give up.

Come to think of it, games that just blindly include a map because that is "what role-playing games do" missed the point that maps that serve an actual function are a lot more valuable than maps that just add to ambiance.

This game is also from the "you actually have to talk to everyone and pay attention to what they say or write it down" era of games; there is no auto-journal feature or anything, and while you can usually talk to the same person again and get the same information, there is a chance that you will suddenly end up with no clue what to do if you have not been paying attention.

Surely there are other things that fellow oldschool Ultima-fanatics can add. I will also add finally that I genuinely believe Ultima VI is the best game in the series, and honestly feel like its art style is superior (even though the graphics are more advanced in VII). I also think VI has the best turn-based combat of any game ever (yes, even moreso than Fallout--eat it!).

Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


I had a post all typed up, but instead will say to listen to Foxhound at all costs. Edit: which is to say, look at his post, now that it is on the last page:

Foxhound posted:

It's fun, but it's buggy as all hell. Check this site out, they have done some pretty major changes to the game with fanpatches and such. I just got it myself so I can't comment on much else though.

http://www.co8.org/forum/

Temple of Elemental Evil was probably the first PC role-playing game I ever just quit playing out of profound disinterest about half-way through (I even forced myself to beat Lionheart just so I could say I did). The fan patches are often said to restore/breathe in all new life to the game, providing the impetus necessary to convince you that there is any reason to keep going once you are jumped by another random assortment of random enemies after spending hours trying in vain to find anyone anywhere in the game to give-* you a compelling plot hook.

Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


Renoistic posted:

I'm going to start playing Armored Princess (the Crossworlds version) but I'm not sure which difficulty I should be playing. I'm pretty bad at strategy games but I still don't want to be able to steamroll every enemy with no need for tactics. How hard is normal?
If you play in the style of the master cheesers (I am quite fond of it, no disrespect intended) and run around enemies on the overworld map as often as possible to become powerful without really fighting anything, you can get yourself a good enough start to overwhelm the early monsters and get a feel for the game without being permanently overpowered.

Or, if you want to take a different approach, work with the baby dragon as much as possible, using the "awaken" spell religiously to get in as many actions per combat as possible. By the time I was near the end of the game, the dragon was doing about 50% of the work for my entire side with its "dragon dive" ability as well as one other one involving fire.

Was that the worst advice ever? Possibly. Those games are great, though. If you just hire as many random monsters as you can and march them straight at the enemy, you will still win a lot of the time, so normal difficulty should be all right no matter how you roll.

Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


Sworder posted:

Arcomage is awesome.
Arcomage really is awesome. And the spooky fog-barrow-lands really are spooky.

Might & Magic VII might look like a heaping pile of crap to your 2011-Eyes, so you should probably know that it is likely the best Might & Magic after Might & Magic V (I realize you may have never played any of the other ones before--and how in the world did you end up suddenly playing Might & Magic VII in 2011 out of the blue in the first place?). The nigh-infinitely-large-caverns-full-of-time-consuming-to-kill-enemies-who-drop-no-treasure-and-are-not-worth-much-experience that plagued Might & Magic VI are basically gone, too! Other than Wizardy VIII, you are probably experiencing the last great pure oldschool plow-through-kill-everything-get-treasure CRPG. So, that is something to know before you play.

Really, Might & Magic VIII is almost as good (plus it has this totally sweet skull-with-one-eye-and-halo icon in the corner if you cast Wizard Eye and Day of the Gods; it makes a great avatar or tattoo), and IX is far more tolerable than it was generally seen at the time, but you are probably better off playing III/IV/V if you want to experience great games that still look good enough to be fun. This is all far more advice than you are likely to need, but if you do get totally into the series, you will clearly be happy to have it.

Wait, am I supposed to post something directly helpful? Right!

You will probably think some hirelings are far less useful than others--and you are right. One that repairs your magic items forever is indeed worth a billion times more than someone who gives you +1 reputation. I seem to recall going with the Chimney Sweep (big increases to luck give you much better magic items from enemies) and trying to early-on cheese the game by getting the Water Master from somewhere, since being able to cast water walk before the game expects you to have it can help you exploit the order of towns. I think.

I do not remember if it was VI or VII where you could exploit turn-based combat. If it was VII, then after one of your characters goes, you can go into the inventory of whoever's turn it is next, select the inventory of the character who just took a turn, hit "escape," and find yourself with the previous character selected again for another combat action. It was probably VI, since that game had like a billion different ways to exploit it, but there you go.

Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


ToxicFrog posted:

Blood. The original DOS game, GOG.com version.

I've already grabbed the One Unit Whole Mods launcher and played the first level. What should I know before going further?

I've already learned "fire extinguishers will loving kill you".
I really do not think there IS anything you need to know. There are plenty of secrets thrown around throughout the game, but they are pretty much for fun.

The closest thing to something you should know is that the game is way more fun than its sequel, even though the sequel feels a lot more playable by today's standards via actually being in three dimensions.

Also that the voodoo doll is awesome.

Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


Can I just say, for posterity's sake, that I am super-excited for the day when someone asks seriously in this thread "what should I know before I play Duke Nukem Forever?"

Gerblyn posted:

Anyone have any tips for Kings Bounty: Armored Princess? I've played the first one, but I got stuck about half way through. I started facing lots of enemy dragons, and I was suffering so many losses with each fight that the game got too tedious to continue...
I suppose using the Baby Dragon to solve all your problems might not be much advice (and wait a minute, you are in the middle! This is for BEFORE YOU PLAY!#$!#$!), and maybe the Baby Dragon got jacked up in Crossworlds, I would not know as I never played Armored Princess as a stand-alone. But seriously, that thing would take out anywhere between 1/3 to 100% of the enemies I encountered depending on relative level (dragon dive/awaken/dragon dive) before the fight even got going most of the time.

Oh, someone else already answered this. But if you never built up your dragon by incessantly using dragon dive every single fight at the beginning of the game, it may be hard to do so now--but you can still try to get mana/rage-boosting items/potions/et cetera and go crazy using it now to try to make up for lost time.

Centipeed posted:

The domain name was not my idea! Quarex suggested it in this post.
(in a good way)

Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


Centipeed posted:

I'm English, so that emoticon only works if you feel patriotic after exporting your domain name ideas to the Brits.
HAhahahah. Well, that is awesome, since I was just trying to say generally that I was touched by the whole exchange. Not that I demanded vengeance for my country.

Perhaps we can still find a different good metaphor for the whole thing, where America feels proud of its tiny contribution to an immense project.

Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


xrunner posted:

I picked up Drakensang: River of Time on a complete whim, interested in an BG/NWN-esque RPG. I never played the first one, if that makes any difference. I have to say I'm totally lost. The documentation is non-existent and character creation has me baffled, as do the skills, what they do, and which ones are worthwhile. Any pointers are appreciated.

Is the only way to change my character's race to switch the preset? How important is the preset? Is it like a Bioware game where the class defines your playstyle or more like an Elder Scrolls game where you just pick one and do what you want with it. Should I pick a weapon type and stick with it or is it okay to spread my skills around?
The Drakensang games are some of the most underrated releases of recent years--if you are a certain type of gamer. The kind who grew up playing role-playing games where things did not actually seem that straightforward, for example.

That said, a lot of the skills are straightforward--and hovering over the others should (I think, or right-clicking) give you another idea of how they are used.

I do not understand what you mean "is the only way to change my character's race to switch the preset," incidentally. The character creation screen starts by showing the three classes that (whatever race) can be; you can change the race you are looking at with arrows somewhere on the screen. Then, as you seemingly know, you can go into expert mode or whatever it is called to change a character preset to be what you want it to be.

Unfortunately, the complexity of the game is such that you will probably not be able to do a good job with a powergaming-styled character, if that is what you are looking for, but the other characters you can recruit in the game will probably make up for any weaknesses your main character has anyway.

Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


xrunner posted:

Thanks Quarex: I sunk a few hours into it last night and so far I think it's a charming game that seems to have a good bit of depth.

As for my question about skills I was really more curious about distributing the skill points. Am I crippling my character by putting points into utility and social skills? When should I put them into buying attributes instead of skills? There seem to be a lot of points to spread around and they come in quickly, but I'm not sure if I should prioritize one area, like a weapon proficiency or lockpicking, over another to build it quickly or if I should go for a smoother, more evenly distributed growth. Also, I find myself with a lot of what I assume are either crafting materials or vendor trash, anything I should be holding on to? It's unfortunate that the version I got off of steam doesn't seem to have come with a manual.
It is pretty charming and deep. It is like a beautiful ridiculous fairytale. It is kind of like the Princess Bride meets the Brothers Grimm. Though I realize the former was a kind of satire of the latter.

I suppose you could kind of gimp yourself, but particularly in the River of Time, they do such a good job giving you specialized companions that you should focus on whatever you really want your character to be good at and ignore the things you think you might need anyway. Really, if you have a maximized weapon skill of any sort, you will be in good shape, and even without one I did a pretty good job (Refusing to spend my skill points unless/until I could not hit enemies anymore).

A lot of things could come in handy at one point or another. In the first game, they were fond of having even the most seemingly obvious garbage come in handy, but they seem to have backed off that a lot in the second game, so if it seems like actual trash then you can toss it ... but, well, rusty nails are also a crafting ingredient, so until you start seeing the crafting mechanics (I always started with a blacksmith dwarf so I had some idea of what kinds of things were used in crafting), you might want to just put everything in your chest on the ship/barracks/whatever it is.

Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


Limorkil posted:

Drakensang
No enemy can take more than 5 "wounds". This is very important against bosses, who tend to have high health. They go down ridiculously easily if your team has skills and weapons that cause wounds.
Though just when you think you finally have the game's number, both main games tend to introduce a handful of enemies immune to wounding lest you actually be able to actually plow your way through every encounter (the hilariously-overpowered-as-parody giant rats in each game and a demon in the second game come to mind).

Basically, no single strategy is supreme in Drakensang, which I think is pretty awesome personally.

Well, no single strategy other than "save and load during combat, attack the enemies without being attacked back in the first round of combat, repeat forever." But that is pretty dull.

Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


Regarding Fallout: New Vegas: A quick Google search confirms that the "items randomly disappearing" bug I have heard about may still exist for the PS3 version, so basically do not ever think that leaving something somewhere guarantees it will still be there when you return. And I realize things are not supposed to stay put in the game unless in a safe place--but on the PC version, I left literally everything I ever wanted to stash in a random mailbox in Goodsprings, and all of it was still there the entire game, so I think it is a PS3 thing.

Sir Unimaginative posted:

But seriously? GET THEM ALL

That smiley face is like the Something Awful Forums equivalent of the "Calvin pissing" bumper sticker.

I will feel stupid when I find out Xy Hapu actually created that face himself as an update to the story.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Dr. Quarex
Apr 18, 2003

I'M A BIG DORK WHO POSTS TOO MUCH ABOUT CONVENTIONS LOOK AT THIS

TOVA TOVA TOVA


Monicro posted:

Not if you play it the way I do:

1. When building your deck, pick all of the tens, nines and sevens (they add up to 26. See where I'm going with this?), and then just pick whatever to get 30 cards.

2. On the first turn, discard everything that isn't a ten, nine or seven.

3. Collect free money.

It's true that you don't get as much anymore, but having 1000+ caps before you even get to the Mojave Outpost is a huge help.
I tried to play Caravan a half-dozen different times, each time reading and re-reading the rules to make absolutely sure I understood it, and I could never once select a single card to play without discarding. And discarding. And discarding. Until I had no cards left in my deck and had still not found a single card I could play. I never made a single successful move, because I could not understand how to do so.

Who the hell is responsible for the tutorial in the game? Was it someone who actually did not know how to play either?

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply