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Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




I'm playing Fallout 2 for, well, not the first time, but I haven't played the game in so long that it might as well be. I made a gun-based character, but alas, you start the game with no guns and very little money. What should I be doing at the beginning of the game to get myself some guns and money? The wasteland is very harsh to an unprepared tribal. I specialized in small guns; will that carry me through the game, or do I need to build up energy weapons and big guns as well?

Any other newbie tips would be nice as well; places to go, people to talk to, quests to take, quests to avoid, guns and gear to look for, skills that I'll need, skills that will suck, that kind of thing. It's a huge game and I'm looking forward to sinking my teeth into it again but I'd like to be nudged in the right direction first.

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Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




Foxhound posted:

Anyone that have any tips for Evil Genius?

My only tip is a lame one - find a cheat code and just cheat yourself all the money you need. Scrounging up funds is the most annoying part of that game in my opinion. I had a lot more fun with it when I didn't have to worry about money and I was free to just design my base however I wanted.

I'm playing STALKER - Shadow of Chernobyl for the first time; any tips for that? There seems like there are a lot of things to get used to.

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




ToxicFrog posted:

Reposting from a few pages ago:

Install STALKER Complete, if your machine can handle it. It's a graphical overhaul + unofficial patch, and since the last official version is buggy as gently caress, you will want this in order to not go insane.

It's been a while since I played Shadow of Chernobyl, so I don't have a lot of general gameplay advice for you. Use food instead of bandages for healing where possible (bandages also cure bleeding, so if you aren't bleeding you don't want to waste them), remember where you saw lots of anomalies so you can come back later and check for artifacts, don't catch too many bullets with your face...

I don't think my computer could handle it, actually . Are there any other mods that are must-haves? The head-bobbing is driving me nuts, I found a mod for that already.

I have the steam version, if that complicates anything.

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




I'm looking at the wiki for Farcry 2 and one of the tips is "It's worth it to do the buddy missions. Really. " Two questions:

1) Why?

2) By "buddy missions", is it referring to the bonus objectives your buddy will call you about when you start a story mission, or is it referring to the missions that mercs/potential buddies will give you in Mike's Bar? I think I know what the bonus objectives do (upgrades the safe house, anything else?) but what's the point of the Mike's Bar missions?

Also, if a buddy dies, is there an opportunity to replace him? You get two buddies, one who calls you with objectives, one who saves you when you're dying; if one dies are you SOL, or do you get a chance to make a new buddy?

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




ArchRanger posted:

To add to this a little, if you ever get tired of clearing out the same checkpoints for the hundredth time, start using boats whenever possible. There are enemies along rivers and streams as well, but it's usually possible to outrun them, unlike the terrible rubber-banding Road AI that will catch up to you every time.

Yeah, my method with checkpoints is to just blow past them with a gun jeep and then, when I'm far enough away from it, hop on the turret and kill anyone who followed me, then either repair my jeep or steal one of theirs if I haven't shot the engine too much.

Is there any way to clear out checkpoints permanently so they stop giving you trouble in the future, or will enemies always be there? They're a little annoying tbh

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




An important thing to know for ME1 is that you want to have at least one party member with tech skills, otherwise you can't pick locks or hack computers. If you didn't pick an engineer or infiltrator as your class, make sure you take tali, garrus, or kaidan along with you. Upgrade their decryption and electronics (I think) skills as soon as possible until you get the master rank; that way no doors or computers will be unavailable to you.

It's kind of lame that they force you to do that; ME2 fixes it by having hacking/bypass be an entirely separate minigame, having nothing to do with tech skills.

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




BigTeaBag posted:

Any advice before I start Red Dead Redemption?

Do Bonnie's missions first until you get the lasso. The lasso's a nice thing to have.

Buying a horse deed at a store lets you summon the horse whenever you want, however many times you want. So for example if you get yourself a nice horse (you get one from one of Bonnie's missions), and it dies, and you use the horse deed to get another one, the horse deed doesn't disappear, it stays in your inventory forever. So if you bought the deed you'll have an endless supply of that horse at your disposal (only one at a time, obviously). That's what justifies the $1,500 ($750 later on) price tag.

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




If I recall correctly, hiding in full shadow means that you're 100% invisible so that unless an enemy physically bumps into you, he won't see you no matter how close you are. That's a handy thing to know when you're trying to knock out/avoid guards.

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




Mierenneuker posted:

Generally, you shouldn't just hide bodies in the shadows. Make sure they're in corners and siderooms, places guards could never stumble upon them. Even if you KO/kill everybody you can still trigger an alarm later if you hide the bodies carelessly.

Won't an alert be triggered if a body is sitting out in plain sight, even if no guard ever actually finds it? It took me forever to figure that one out; even if you take down everyone in the room, make sure all the bodies are at least in shadows. A body out in the light is a ticking time bomb for an alarm, it's kind of stupid.

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




You can do counter attacks with the hidden blade for an instant kill. It's riskier though, because you can't block and the window for success seems to be smaller.

That's for AC1; in Assassin's creed 2 it's less risky, because you can block with it.

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




Danger - Octopus! posted:

Just Cause 2

I've completed the intro missions and am being asked to go look into three criminal gangs or something.

Is there any reason to actually do more plot missions, or can I just go and gently caress poo poo up and make things explode? Also, any crucial tips (that aren't in the OP of the JC2 thread since I can't face reading it all...)

The faction missions are quick ways of raising chaos to unlock the next story mission/black market items etc. They're usually quick and fun, I'd suggest trying a few if you get tired of the constant random destruction.

Attack helicopters are the fastest way to destroy bases. A lot of bases have helipads with helicopters waiting for you, look for them first. Just be sure to learn to dodge SAMs.

There are a bunch of airports scattered around the map. Most, possibly all of them have jet planes that you can steal, I recommend scouting them out early on so you can fast travel to them if you need to reach a point on the map that you haven't explored yet.

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




BigTeaBag posted:

Play this game co-op, if at all possible. I could only manage an hour or two at a time in single player, but the game is WAY better with somebody else.

Yeah, I tried playing it single player and got bored as hell. None of my friends owned it on the 360 and I hate co-op games with pubbies so I sent it back.

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




For Alpha Protocol

Jjaarreett posted:


The chain shot skill in pistols is godly and will become your best friend.

This, a million times. Even if you're not playing a stealth character, you're going to want to get your chain shot as high as possible, because it's literally just a "win button" for boss fights. Activate chain shot, aim every shot at their head (you will not miss), and if they survive it, wait for it to recharge (or use brilliance if your tech skill is high enough) and use it again. Most bosses go down in one or two rounds of this. I personally couldn't stand the boss fights in AP so it was nice to have a way to get around them like that.

If you are playing as a stealth character, pistols are even more important. Chain shot is a fantastic way to clear out a room or hit a far away enemy when outside of boss fights. Plus the ability to line up a critical hit without poking your head out of cover is absolutely invaluable. Just make sure to aim for the head - if you miss the head, you'll alert the guard, who will more often than not fire his gun randomly while falling to the ground, thus alerting all the other guards as well. This is very annoying. I find that aiming slightly above the head usually guarantees a headshot.

Putting a few points in Martial Arts is a good idea as a stealth character. Your primary goal should be to shoot and stab people without being spotted, but if poo poo hits the fan (and there are scripted moments where it always will, even if you play perfectly), martial arts will help you out. It's a good backup ability for situations where your weapons aren't going to help, but I wouldn't specialize in it.

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




Burning Mustache posted:

I also wouldn't recommend doing a renegade-only run just because some people find that more entertaining (this really just affects how some dialogues play out and the conclusions to some quests, no major plot-altering stuff). Go with whatever type of Shepard you want to play or just pick whatever dialogue options you feel are most appropriate for a given situation.
There's no harm in making a mixed character that picks both choices equally.
There is one advantage to sticking to a single path (either completely paragon or completely renegade), and that is the fact that some dialogue responses are only available if you have a very high paragon / renegade meter, so using a mix of both may lock you out of a few response options in the game (because you won't have both meters maxed out), but it's nothing that will lock you out of a ton of content or anything.

It doesn't block out a ton of content, no, but using charm and intimidate can be pretty fun (intimidate especially) and the only way to reliably do it is to pick one option and stick with it, switching it up kind of gimps you. If you don't care about using charm and intimidate, then no, I suppose there's no harm in it, but if you do, you really shouldn't try to sit on the fence. There's a very fun benefit to maxing out charm or intimidate towards the end that I can't really talk about without spoiling anything but people who know what I'm talking about know what I'm talking about.

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




Smirking_Serpent posted:

I think on your map, buildings of interest will be dark grey. A glyph is always on a building of interest.

They are, yeah. However, not every building of interest contains a glyph. To make matters more annoying, approaching a building of interest for anything other than the first time won't always trigger the little indication that there's a glyph nearby. Somewhere in the database there's a list of all the places of interest in the city you're in, and ones with glyphs will have little eyeball symbols next to them, so sometimes you'll just have to kind of study the picture and try and figure out if you've got the right building based on what it looks like. You're better off making a mental note every time you come across a building for the first time (or just consulting an FAQ).

There's one in Venice that's kind of tricky to find, because the building is actually part of (or at least very close to) a larger building of interest. I ended up finding it by looking it up on google maps, I poo poo you not, the developers made a fairly geographically accurate Venice.

Speaking of Venice, you'll find that one of the viewpoints appears to be unreachable the first time you try to climb it. That's because it is, you need to unlock a special move during a story mission to reach it, so don't worry about it until then.

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




I don't really remember that one specifically, but I don't think any of the buildings in Florence require the special move, you ought to be able to find all the glyphs as soon as you have access to the building.

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




I just started Rune Factory 2 and I'm not completely sure what I'm supposed to be doing. Farming of course, but what am I meant to do to advance the game exactly? There's quests on the bulletin board, and I guess I'm supposed to get married and have a kid or something.

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




Morpheus posted:

Quests are dandy and all, but in the first part of the game, you really just want to get a wife and get a kid asap, since the game doesn't actually begin until you do this (the 'main character' of the game is actually the kid you have).

Ah, good to know, thanks. Which potential wife is the easiest to bang? I feel a little dirty asking that because they all look about 12 years old but if I had to guess I'd say it's the one in the witch hat that hangs out at the docks?

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




PrinnySquadron posted:

Any advice for The Guild 2: Pirates of the European Seas?

If you're like me, you'll find that micromanaging your business is fun for about an hour before you get sick of it and wish that you could just let the AI make your money for you while you concentrate on other things like running for office. Unfortunately giving the AI control over your business will never ever ever make you money because it's terrible.

The only business that lets you make passive income without having to constantly manage your carts and buy and sell stuff at the market is the farm - none of the goods (except the animal ones) require any raw materials, so all you have to do is tell your employees to grow beets and wheat and set up the AI so that it will automatically send the carts to sell your stuff - this, at least it can handle. It gets stumped when you try to sell animal products though because it will sell all your cows and sheep before your employees can work on them, so stick to produce.

There's also a (very underwhelming) expansion called renaissance which adds another business like this, the orchard. It's the same thing really, except you sell fruit and honey.

For courtship, the game will tell you that characters will respond better to various approaches depending on what class they are (rogue, patron, craftsman, etc) but it doesn't seem to make any difference; all you need to do is use every option once, and then start over when you've used them all, it works on everyone.

For political office, bribe people. It's the most effective way to gain favor. Also, purchasing titles at the town hall/council palace will give you a big xp boost, so do that when you're trying to level up.

RagnarokAngel posted:

Forgot this, optimum way is one shot to the face, roundhouse kick and then slash them to death on the ground. You can slash them in the face to make them stagger instead of shooting but this leaves you more open to attack and frankly you dont need to save ammo THAT bad.



I prefer to shoot them in the knee and then kick them. This makes them fall in such a way that their head is pointing towards you and is thus easier to shoot or stab. Also if I recall correctly, the enemies in the second area will react...differently to this approach (you suplex them and their heads explode)

Other helpful RE4 hints: flash grenades will kill those wormy plaga monsters that sometimes pop out of ganados' heads instantly, so hang on to one or two for emergencies. And despite the fact that the monsters pop out of their heads, killing enemies with headshots has no impact on the chance of one of them showing up, so don't be shy about blowing heads off.

Ainsley McTree fucked around with this message at 05:46 on Sep 3, 2010

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




The one thing I found the TMP useful for (in the sense that no other weapon would be equally useful) was for killing those flying bug things. But I wouldn't say it's worth carrying around all the time just for them.

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




C-Euro posted:

Any shot on a flying insect is a one-hit kill

Even so, a rapid-fire weapon is pretty useful for that. And I don't think that's always true, I'm sure I remember parts where flying insects took more than one shot to kill, but it's been years since I've played the game, maybe I'm wrong.

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




Even so, I could swear I remember fighting some of them where the ones in the air took more than one shot to kill. Like there's a part where you fight a bunch of them in a big cave, those ones die in one hit (while flying) but there's another part where you're in a sewer or something, and those ones take multiple hits no matter what they're doing, and for them, the TMP was useful (and also for the swarms of them flying around in the big cave).

It's been years though, I'm probably remembering it wrong. Either way the TMP is still generally pretty useless so it doesn't matter anyway.

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




I have some issues with some of this advice:

Barudak posted:

Get a strategy guide so you can look up what actions start the exploration side-quests. The game won't tell you until you do it and for some its fairly random and obtuse. You'll want to start immediately as you can often complete a level while traveling to missions.

To save you the trouble of looking it up, here's how you start them (spoilered in case you feel like figuring it out yourself):

Hunter: kill and skin a coyote (little howling dogs that travel in packs)
Sharpshooter: kill a flying bird
Survivalist: pick a wild feverfew flower (lavender plants that are absolutely everywhere in the area you start out in)
Treasure Hunter: At some point early in the game you'll come across a chinese guy being attacked by bandits. If you save him, he'll give you a treasure map, if he dies, you pick it up off his body

quote:

The camp you get lets you instantly fast-travel, so expect to see a lot of use out of that.

This is true, and it even lets you fast-travel across regions (as soon as the plot gives you access to them anyway), but this game's landscape is absolutely beautiful and I strongly recommend that you not fast travel too much or you'll miss out on it. Besides, one of the cool things about this game is that you'll have random encounters as you travel (bandits and broken down stage coaches and people sitting by campfires telling stories) and if you fast travel, you'll miss them.


quote:

You'll automatically receive new guns as part of the story, so buying guns is sort of pointless.

Yes and no - you probably can get by in this game just fine without ever buying a gun, but some of them are only available in stores. You won't get your first free semi-automatic pistol until the last act of the game so if you want one, you'll have to buy one. Also there's a bolt-action rifle in Mexico which in my opinion is the best weapon in the game which is only available by purchase.

Don't buy the winchester repeater though, you get it for free in an early mission.

quote:

Being good/bad doesn't really matter the reward is negligible and the story in no way reflects how good or bad you are.

I guess it's a matter of opinion, I think the rewards are kind of cool. Being a good guy nets you a duster and then later, a nun will randomly find you and give you an item which makes bullets miss more often (I have no idea how much more often, though, maybe it is negligible). Being a bad guy gets you a horse with a skull painted on its face or something - I've never bothered to play as a bad guy so I can't vouch for it but I hear it's worse than the three-star horses you can find in the game without being a bad guy.

Additionally, having high honor will get you a 50% discount in all shops other than the ones in Theives' Landing (where having low honor will give you the discount). This can be very nice when you're trying to buy a three-star horse deed (which I recommend doing because those horses are great) since it'll save you $750.


quote:

A lot of people have no idea how the dueling mechanic works, so you may want to read a strategy guide.

In a nutshell, all you need to know is the following:

1) Draw when the screen says "DRAW", either by pulling the left trigger or pushing the right stick down and pulling it up - drawing too soon makes the target smaller, and waiting longer will make it bigger, which helps, but you'll be perfectly safe drawing when the game tells you

2) The idea is that you have to line up six shots (or however many bullets are in your pistol) on the target. The crosshair will shrink and expand - a small white crosshair is good, a wide red one is bad. Pull the trigger when it's small and white. Line up as many shots on the target's chest as you can and you'll be fine. Shooting the gun will disarm him, but a lot of the plot duels don't allow you to do that, so aiming for the chest is the safest shot.


And a bit of advice of my own about treasure hunting: I and a bunch of other people had a hard time finding the first treasure because the map can be kind of ambiguous until you figure out how to read it. Basically it's a series of pictures labeled with roman numerals. Each roman numeral is a picture of the same spot but from a different perspective. For the first treasure, it's easy to mistakenly think that the map is just showing you one big picture, because the area kind of looks like that when you approach it, but it's not! All the treasures after the first two are pretty easy to find as long as you read the map right, but the first two can be a little confusing, so don't give up.

Ainsley McTree fucked around with this message at 20:39 on Sep 8, 2010

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




Barudak posted:

Thanks Ainsley McTree; I got lazy and didn't want to type all that out about the dueling.

Thing to keep in mind, the goal is simply to out-fill the damage your opponent puts into the duel bar. If you fully fill the bar, you just start shooting. The chest is a good zone if you're having trouble, but keep in mind one/two face shots is an instant fill on the bar. Aiming at the Arms and Legs is typically worthless and will get you killed since you won't fill enough of the bar.

Groin shots are also surprisingly worthless

Still kind of satisfying though, especially for a certain duel towards the end

Speaking of the end, AVOID ALL PLOT SPOILERS! Read nothing about the game, you'll get more out of it.

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




Vinlaen posted:

Can somebody give me some advice for Dragon Age?

I'm a wuss so I'll probably play on easy and I'm planning to be either a mage or an archer (?) and use Morrigan (at the very least).

What are some good starting/other spells or archer skills?

Any other advice?

EDIT: Also, any tips for Kings Bounty: Armored Princess?

Archer and mage were the only characters I couldn't be bothered to finish a game with. I found archer boring because it was just sitting in the back, plinking and using abilities (gameplay wise, melee characters are basically the same I guess but at least they're more fun to watch) and with the mage I found myself overwhelmed by the selection of spells and I was never sure how to use them to their best potential, but that's probably just a matter of personal style.

I suppose it's a cop-out to just link to an FAQ, but I used this one when building characters (after my first one, which I made myself) and it all worked out pretty well. My melee rogue had a dying tendency, however (was still pretty interesting to play though).

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




RagnarokAngel posted:

For Mage focus on the ice and healing skill tree. Ice can paralyze enemies for long periods and healing is always good.

I forget which tree it's in, but one spell you're going to want all of your mages to have, no matter what plans you have for them, is crushing prison (at least I think that's the name). It paralyzes the enemy AND does damage over time. If you want to go crazy, you can also give your mages that ice spell that freezes enemies (winter's grasp? something like that) and that forcefield spell that's a prerequisite to crushing prison so I guess you have to get that one, though it does make enemies invisible for the duration. Program your mages to freeze the tough enemies and battles will be quite a bit easier.

Also, one bit of advice I just remembered - if you have a lot of potions and you find your teammates keep dying, give each of them a command, at the very top of the list, to drink a potion if their health drops below 25% or whatever. As long as you have enough potions you probably won't even need a healer in your party, everyone will just heal themselves. Though having a healer as well is obviously a good idea.

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




Vinlaen posted:

Bummer.

So basically you suggest kicking Leliana for Alistair?

...or I suppose I can make my own character a warrior, then get Morrigan, Wynn, and Leliana?

Either of those would work, yeah. My favorite party was myself as a tank, Wynne, Leliana, and the dog, because he required minimal equipment and ability management plus he can pee on things, and it worked for me just fine. Replacing the dog with another mage would probably be even more powerful if you know what you're doing though.

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




Anal Surgery posted:

I just rented Alpha Protocol from Gamefly.

Quick question: Can I just play any way I want and gently caress around or can I accidentally gimp myself or make the game way difficult? I going for like a Handgun, Martial Arts, Stealth James Bond style guy, and I'm still in Saudi Arabia. Do I need to worry about managing my guy or just wing it?

You could probably gently caress yourself by spreading yourself too thin (for the most part there's no reason to specialize in more than one weapon skill, with the exception that pistols are always awesome), but as long as you focus on and max out a few key abilities you'll be fine. Your build will work just fine.

Pistols are great, especially for stealth, for two reasons:

1) Fairly early you'll unlock an ability that lets you line up critical shots while hiding behind cover. This lets you silently headshot enemies while staying out of sight.

2) Chain shot! It's great for rooms full of enemies as well as bosses. Even if you're playing as a shotgun or assault rifle or whatever build, it's still worth getting chain shot for bosses, it's almost literally a "win" button (which is useful because IMO the boss fights in this game kind of suck).

You'll want to get to level 5 of stealth as soon as you can, it lets you see where all the enemies in the room are at all times. It's invaluable for a stealth character, and just plain nice to have for everyone else.

After Saudi Arabia, you'll have a chance to completely respec your character, so don't worry too much about loving yourself just yet.

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




It probably is worth keeping a rogue in your party for lockpicking and trap disarming purposes though. Leliana's better for this than the other one, since you get her earlier on and can pick more of her abilities. She does have a low health problem but if you build her as an archer it doesn't matter.

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




Mystic_Squid posted:

Anything for Fable 2 that's not in the wiki?

If you're playing a ranged character, get the spell that lets you summon ghosts. For fights, summon the ghosts on the enemy and shoot them while they're busy fighting the ghosts, it makes things a lot easier.

At some level of ranged fighting, you unlock the ability to target specific body parts. You'll be basically unstoppable when this happens, enemies go down pretty quickly when you shoot them in the head, so look forward to that.

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




Barudak posted:

There is one missable stranger mission called "Do I know you?" This stranger mission must be completed before the end of the game for plot reasons, and he appears multiple times throughout the game. You will complete his questline once you meet him near Marshton's ranch. All other stranger missions can be done at any time, pre or post game.

This is true, but my understanding is that you can still 100% the game without doing his stranger missions, you won't miss any trophies or achievements or whatever if you miss him. His quests are definitely interesting and worth doing, but it won't keep you from 100% if you miss him.

quote:

Don't worry about buying new guns as the guns you receive via the questline are more than adequate to handle the challenges the game throws at you. If you want to spend your money, go ahead and there are some neat guns, just know that none of them are mandatory or game-breaking.


I would make an exception for the bolt-action rifle you can buy in Mexico. I don't think you ever find it for free and I think it's the best weapon in the game - it's got a long range, lots of power (it makes small animals explode, so don't use it for hunting), high accuracy, a decent enough rate of fire, and all the bullets reload in one motion. You can get by just fine on repeaters, sure, but I prefer the rifle.

The springfield rifle you can get early on in thieves' landing (or for free on the journey to Mexico) kind of blows though. It only has 4 bullets, has a low rate of fire, and it's worthless to use behind cover because for some stupid reason John stays out in the open to cock it between shots rather than ducking back into cover like with every other gun. Don't bother with that one.


quote:

Technically, you can do the main quests in any order, but it's a lot easier to do Redcliffe and the Mages Circle first, in whichever order. You should definitely wait to do Orzammar until you've done at least one of the other main quests.

I'd recommend the Mage Circle first, because you get access to permanent stat increases which obviously help you out a lot through the rest of the game.

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




RagnarokAngel posted:

Specialize in a weapon skill. That's the only "essential" one because firefights cannot be ignored. Pistols break the game so I reccomend going that route.


muscles like this? posted:

Make sure to put some points into at least one weapon skill.

Even if you choose to specialize in a different weapon, consider putting points into pistols anyway to the point where you have at least two levels of chain shot, because it lets you basically insta-kill bosses. Even if you use a different weapon for every other enemy in the game, the pistol's nice to have for boss fights because they can kinda blow.

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




One of the more annoying aspects of Morrowind is that running drains your stamina, which you also need for fighting, so it's worth it to try and enchant an item which gives you a perpetual stamina boost (I think it's 3 per second? I haven't played it in ages).

You also might want to be on the lookout for the boots of blinding speed (consult an FAQ to find them, I don't remember where they are). You'll also want to enchant an item which counters the blinding effect. Running in this game can be quite slow if you're not a speed-based character, so having some help in that aspect can make the game a bit more fun.

If you're a normal human being and find that cliff racers are unfun and terrible after the first couple times they prevent you from resting or waiting, I think there's a mod that gets rid of them, so be aware of that option.

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




Skilleddk posted:

Assassin's Creed 2

If you want to win a fight quickly, one thing you can do is pop a smoke bomb and just murder everyone with the hidden blade. You can usually get an easy 3-4 kills before they stop coughing.

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




Cbouncerrun posted:

I'm kind of cheating since I just completed Chapter 3, but any tips for Dead Space?

I've noticed already that carrying more than one Air can or Stasis recharge seems to be pointless.

You can get through the entire game using nothing but the plasma cutter (there's even an achievement for it) so be sure to upgrade it, it stays useful throughout the entire game. I like the pulse rifle too, but I suppose that's a matter of personal preference.

The Force Gun is useful for those groups of little skittery bugs that jump on you and make you mash the A button to shake them off. Those little bastards are probably my least favorite enemy in the game so you might find it worthwhile to carry one of those guns around, though it's probably not worth it just for them since they're not terribly common.

Speaking of the little skittery bastards, the fat aliens will release a swarm of them if you shoot them in the belly. The safest way to kill them is to slow them down with the stasis thing and use the plasma cutter or some other precise gun to blow off their limbs.

New suits are always nice (for the inventory if nothing else) so try to have enough money for them.

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




SpazmasterX posted:

There's are cheats that restore your stasis energy and oxygen without penalizing you in any way. Go nuts. And, Put the first letter of every chapter in order.

That spoiler actually is a mildly biggish spoiler so don't mouse over it if you care about the plot of dead space for some reason.

Also, when fighting the skittery bugs and those screamy tentacle bastards who spawn little vine monsters (I don't know their name but you'll know what I mean when you meet one if you haven't yet), look around you for explosive canisters, because you can get an easy kill by using your telekinesis module to throw an explosive canister at them. The first few encounters have one pretty close by, I'm not sure about the others.

I hate the screamy tentacle bastards.

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




Sudoku posted:

I got Rune Factory 2 and I'm curious what I should keep in mind that isn't so obvious to someone diving in completely unawares.

You might want to consider checking an FAQ to figure out what you have to do to get some of the tools. Most (all?) of them are acquired through townsperson quests and the game makes no attempt to tell you which quests will give you tools and which won't.

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




blackguy32 posted:

Play the first because the second adds alot of poo poo which makes playing the first kind of crappy. But other than that, just play. Dont let sperglords define how you should play it because the games are full of them who believe that things have to be done a certain way.

I actually think the game is MORE fun when you have a team of people who aren't very good. The game's more tense and exciting when people are actually at risk of dying and you have to rescue and heal them and worry about your ammo. My least favorite games are the ones where my teammates are like these 12-year old commando squads who've memorized every inch of every level and we (well, they) get through without taking a scratch. Plus few things suck more in life than getting yelled at by a 12-year old to pick up the mollies in the small office NO THE SMALL OFFICE WTF IS WRONG WITH YOU YOU enjoyable human being

Other things to know - never fire the last bullet in your gun, because it makes the reload animation take longer. This is super-true for the shotguns. If you reload a shotgun in the middle of a clip you reload it faster and you can interrupt it immediately by taking a shot (a handy thing if you get attacked, which you inevitably will). If you fire the last bullet, however, you can't fire immediately, you have to do a little animation before you can shoot. So get in the habit of never firing that last shot, even if you're surrounded by enemies.

In a related tip, you can do a melee swing while reloading and it won't interrupt your reloading. So while you're putting more shells in your gun you can also be swinging it around to keep the zombies off your face for the duration.

I should say - these tips work for L4D 1, I have no idea if they do for the second game, I've never really played it for any length of time (but I did buy it yesterday for $6.79 so I certainly plan to)

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




What should I know about Master of Orion 2 that's not in the wiki? I'm playing it for the very first time. I dicked around with it for about an hour last night up until I founded a colony on a planet with no food, which taught me that food is important at least. I also accidentally found Orion and got my poo poo kicked in by the guardian.

What should I be looking for in new colonies and what should I be doing to get them up and running? How many colonies is a good number and how soon should I be trying to get them?

The tech tree is overwhelming, what should I be focusing on there? Ship design is also pretty overwhelming, what do I need to be thinking about on that screen?

Any other tips are welcome as well, it seems like a pretty big game.

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Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




Thanks for the MoO2 tips, I think I'm getting the hang of it ever so slightly. What's a good beginner race to start as? I'm guessing not the Silicoids because they're repulsive, and I tried the Klackons but their research penalty is pretty poo poo - with the other races I seemed to get multiple techs per project, they only got one. I'm still not completely sure how the tech tree or research system works but I'm confident that that's a Bad Thing. I'm leaning away from custom races because you can't make them on easy and plus I had a gander at the selections just for fun and immediately quit out of confusion.

What should I be doing on my homeworld? I'm guessing I want to be producing enough food to break even with shortages everywhere else, but is it better to put the rest of my people on science or production after that? Or some kind of compromise?

I get that I want to be specializing my colonies (the way the game works, it seems like you have no choice) but when picking my first colonies, should I be thinking more about production or food first? Production would be handy for building more colony ships and spreading around sooner but you're obviously going to want a lot of food before you do that. I guess I'll dick around some more and figure it out for myself but maybe there's some obvious answer I'm not aware of yet. I'm not the greatest 4x player but I always play them anyway.

Ainsley McTree fucked around with this message at 03:06 on Oct 13, 2010

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