Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
«121 »
  • Post
  • Reply
Franchescanado
Feb 23, 2013


If it wasn't for disappointment,
I wouldn't have any appointment.





Grimey Drawer

I'm looking to add some pastels to my tools.

What's a good starter for oil pastels and soft pastels? I'm open to a kit, or I can buy a individual colors from a good brand.

I'm looking for good quality but I'm not buying top shelf stuff that'll break the bank.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Star Man
Jun 1, 2008

A constellation of faces.


Xun posted:

Thanks guys! Bob Ross is really awesome but since I struggle a lot with painting digitally I figured I should learn/relearn how to paint in real life, and sadly watercolors are way cheaper and more portable than oils/acrylics Shibasaki seems so nice, looking forward to following along

Watercolors bear a lot of similarities to oil and acrylic paints, but they also bear a lot of similarities to drawing with wet media. I took to watercolor because it feels a lot like drawing with a brush and ink. I also feel like I didn't know how to paint until I took a couple of watercolor classes for my studio art minor.

Franchescanado
Feb 23, 2013


If it wasn't for disappointment,
I wouldn't have any appointment.





Grimey Drawer

Star Man posted:

Watercolors bear a lot of similarities to oil and acrylic paints, but they also bear a lot of similarities to drawing with wet media. I took to watercolor because it feels a lot like drawing with a brush and ink. I also feel like I didn't know how to paint until I took a couple of watercolor classes for my studio art minor.

Just wanna add a quick thing to previous posts:

Don't skimp on watercolor paper!

You can get away with cheap brushes. You can get away with student-grade paints. But nothing can salvage a piece painted on bad paper.

And good paper is super affordable.

You'll find a brand you prefer, you'll find whether or not you'll like textured or smooth, you'll find if you prefer hot or cold press...That all comes with experimentation.

You'll see weight grades on notebooks and paper pads that look like this:



I won't use any paper of 100 lb or less with watercolor or gouache. It buckles, it's less absorbent, you won't be able to move the paint. The heavier the better. 140lb is my go-to.

lofi
Apr 2, 2018






Franchescanado posted:

good paper is super affordable.

Trabant
Nov 26, 2011

All systems nominal.


Grimey Drawer

lofi posted:

Print it out, draw your new layer on tracing paper on top. Tech is cute, but it just doesn't prioritise the same things as the human eye.

You're right, I guess I was looking to shortcut the more annoying part of that work, esp. if it would help with colour separation (vs. what I've been doing with monochromatic prints).

Franchescanado
Feb 23, 2013


If it wasn't for disappointment,
I wouldn't have any appointment.





Grimey Drawer


What do you use that's so expensive?

I can get 12-24 paintings out of a $17 Arches Watercolor pad, a $11 Strathmore notebook will last me three months. I've never had issues with $8 pads from Canson if I wanna do larger pieces. Canson makes a spiral notebook with 140 lb watercolor paper that also makes a good travel book. And watercolor pads go on sale all the time at art supplies stores.

My local art supplies sells high quality watercolor paper in huge sizes for around $8 if I want to do something gigantic, or cut them down into a dozen smaller sheets.

lofi
Apr 2, 2018






That's not nothing. I'm super broke, and watercolour hurts. The £1 = $1 conversion on prices doesn't help.

NC Wyeth Death Cult
Dec 30, 2005

He lost his life in Chadds Ford, he was dancing with a train.

You can normally buy single large sheets you can cut up and use for whatever. It winds up being substantially cheaper.

JIZZ DENOUEMENT
Oct 3, 2012

STRIKE!


Is there a "ask a goon for an avatar" thread?

Or an easy place to hire goon artists for a small task like avatars?

TURGID TOMFOOLERY
Nov 1, 2019



Franchescanado posted:

What do you use that's so expensive?

I can get 12-24 paintings out of a $17 Arches Watercolor pad, a $11 Strathmore notebook will last me three months. I've never had issues with $8 pads from Canson if I wanna do larger pieces. Canson makes a spiral notebook with 140 lb watercolor paper that also makes a good travel book. And watercolor pads go on sale all the time at art supplies stores.

My local art supplies sells high quality watercolor paper in huge sizes for around $8 if I want to do something gigantic, or cut them down into a dozen smaller sheets.

These are great. Thank you for the links!

lofi
Apr 2, 2018






JIZZ DENOUEMENT posted:

Is there a "ask a goon for an avatar" thread?

Or an easy place to hire goon artists for a small task like avatars?

https://forums.somethingawful.com/s...r=16&perpage=40

Zenithe
Feb 25, 2013

Ask not to whom the Anidavatar belongs; it belongs to thee.

e. nvm, found my answer.

Lincoln
May 12, 2007

Ladies.

Illustrator CC question:

My dye-sub vendor gave me a document with swatches of his most common colors...Kelly Green, Royal Blue, etc. They're tuned for his specific setup, and each is named..."Emerald PW," for example. When I copy-paste the Emerald PW swatch into a new document, it doesn't bring the swatch name with it...I have to drag it into the Swatches toolbox, then rename it from "R=0 G=85 B=40 1" to "Emerald PW".

I have other pre-built color catalogs in Illustrator, and when I copy-paste those swatches into a new document, the swatch name travels with it, and the swatch is automatically added to the Swatches toolbox when I paste it into the new doc.

How can I get this new swatch catalog file to behave the same way?

edit: Mac OS Mojave

Lincoln fucked around with this message at 13:21 on Nov 13, 2019

gmc9987
Jul 25, 2007


This is just a stab in the dark, but by any chance are the swatches in the problem library left as normal colors, while the other libraries are spot colors?

dorkasaurus_rex
Jun 10, 2005

gawrsh do you think any women will be there



Is there anything that's like, a big .ZIP file or torrent of commonly used video tropes, or heck, even the old 20s cartoon type stuff/big internet video archive sites... Some kind of compact huge download of Jojo greenscreens and usable footage for free.

does that exist. rawr xD

Franchescanado
Feb 23, 2013


If it wasn't for disappointment,
I wouldn't have any appointment.





Grimey Drawer

What are these little glass/plastic tools I see Japanese artists using with their brushes? I can't find the name of them or where to get one.

https://twitter.com/djdabblin/statu...3702289409?s=20

It's like a guide with a ruler, as seen in the first few seconds of this video, and again 30 seconds in

Vitamin Me
Mar 30, 2007



Is there a thread about ironing beads somewhere? If not I'll start one

Synthbuttrange
May 6, 2007
Probation
Can't post for 6 days!


Franchescanado posted:

What are these little glass/plastic tools I see Japanese artists using with their brushes? I can't find the name of them or where to get one.

https://twitter.com/djdabblin/statu...3702289409?s=20

It's like a guide with a ruler, as seen in the first few seconds of this video, and again 30 seconds in

Usually just called an artists bridge or hand rest. never seen one with the sticky outy thingy tho.

mutata
Mar 1, 2003

You walk in with the Turnips, you leave with the Bells.



Vitamin Me posted:

Is there a thread about ironing beads somewhere? If not I'll start one

Perler beads? The closest we have I think is the pixel art thread, but that's only half of the puzzle with beading. I bet the pixel art thread could handle being the bead thread too, though.

The Modern Sky
Aug 7, 2009


We don't exist in real life, but we're working hard in your delusions!


I'm stumped right now, trying to look for a term to help me do some research.

I have a drawing right now in black and white. It's actually white on black. I want to make a variation on the design if I ever want to print black on white. I dont want to do this as a negative, i want the tones to remain consistent (as much as possible)

I'm stuck because i think there should be a word for what i'm trying to do, isolating a drawing so that it can work with whatever background it'll end up in.



That's the design. I guess I'm looking for a way to knockout the black background in as clean a way as possible without effecting the black on the drawing itself? Should this have been something I'd have done from the very beginning? I worked pretty flat to get this where I wanted it to be on Adobe Fresco. I'm wanting to not have to trace with the lasso tool at 2 in the morning if I can help it.

Synthbuttrange
May 6, 2007
Probation
Can't post for 6 days!


You should be able to get a rough start with a color selection tool set to low tolerance and contingous selection turned on.

ed: research shows Fresco is an ipad tool with no magic wand so lmao yes you'll have to do it by hand or send it to photoshop or any other tool with color selection.

more generally if you want something that's isolated from the background, you should work on it in its own layer so you can just export it without the background

Synthbuttrange fucked around with this message at 06:57 on Jan 10, 2020

ijyt
Apr 10, 2012



When learning art fundamentals, is there an order that should be taken, or is it not that important? For example how important is perspective when studying anatomy/figure drawing.

I canít afford to go to art classes so Iím having to self learn and not having any direction has made me stop and start a lot and waste time where I could have been drawing.

HenryJLittlefinger
Jan 31, 2010

stomp clap


Crosspost from the getting paid for your art sticky thread, but I figured here would be a good spot to ask as well.

I'm commissioning my niece to convert an ink drawing I did to a vector file (is this the right term?) so I can have some shirts or stickers printed. I'm not going to sell the stuff, got no plans to license the design, profit from it in any way, or any of that. I just like the drawing and some other people do too, enough to want a sticker or shirt maybe. Anyhow, I'm sending her a scan of the drawing, and she says she should be able to do it in Illustrator pretty easily. She's a junior in an art program at a big university, very good at what she does, extremely hard working, all that. So I want to pay her the appropriate rate, but I'm not entirely sure she'll give me the fair market price since we're family.

So if some rando from the internet emailed you a drawing, said "convert to an image file that could be used with screen printing or vinyl stickers, go hog wild cleaning up whatever you think needs it," what would you charge?

VelociBacon
Dec 8, 2009



How complicated is the image? It'd probably cost you $40 but I'd send her $100, she's in art school so it'll be fun for her to hold that amount of money, she'll never again get the chance.

HenryJLittlefinger
Jan 31, 2010

stomp clap


VelociBacon posted:

How complicated is the image? It'd probably cost you $40 but I'd send her $100, she's in art school so it'll be fun for her to hold that amount of money, she'll never again get the chance.

It's not especially complex. It's taken me probably 3-4 hours total from first draft to current draft, most of which was tracing from the first draft.

kedo
Nov 27, 2007



Most freelance illustrators I've worked with professionally will charge somewhere between $40-200+ per hour depending on their skill level, experience, and how comfortable they are asking for money (which is something commercial artists are notoriously bad at).

HenryJLittlefinger
Jan 31, 2010

stomp clap


Yeah, I hear that a lot. I was really proud of my niece a couple years ago when, during her freshman year, she made a post on her art Instagram page telling people to stop asking her for free drawings and tattoo designs and stuff if they weren't willing to pay. I think she picked up early on that she's got to be a bulldog about getting what she deserves for her work.

Trapick
Apr 17, 2006



Fallen Rib

There's also the standard "ask for their rate, then double it" thing that works pretty well for family/friends who undercharge.

lofi
Apr 2, 2018






ijyt posted:

When learning art fundamentals, is there an order that should be taken, or is it not that important? For example how important is perspective when studying anatomy/figure drawing.

I canít afford to go to art classes so Iím having to self learn and not having any direction has made me stop and start a lot and waste time where I could have been drawing.

Perspective helps you to understand shapes as 3D, which helps you construct figures. You can usually scrape by with a minimal knowledge, but for extreme angles and foreshortening it really makes things easier.

I'd recommend drawabox.com for practical perspective and thinking in 3D, it's a really solid foundation in drawing pretty much anything. Plus it's free, that helps a lot.

Argue
Sep 29, 2005

I represent the Philippines

I wouldn't say there was a prescribed order for learning art, but I think a common mistake is to get bogged down in trying to learn how to do specific details when you should be first concentrating on broader ideas. For example, as a kid, I thought it would be a good idea to memorize all the muscles in a book I found on artistic anatomy. In the long run, I had (and am still having) to relearn all of it anyway because I didn't have a good foundation in gesture and structure. A figure with good gesture and structure will still read well, while one with all the muscles and no such understanding will just end up looking all blobby.

Incidentally, don't underestimate the value of seemingly simple exercises like learning to draw boxes or making two value studies. You may think the same thing I did--"oh yeah I'm good at that, I used to draw things like that all the time in my sketchbooks so I can probably skip these exercises"--but it's very different when you're asked to learn them in service of a bigger goal such as portraits or figure drawing.

So off the top of my head, here's some things that I obsessed over before I rightfully should have:

1. Knowing the muscles -- as I mentioned, learn gesture and structure first
2. Choosing the right colors -- yeah it's important eventually, but learn values (how to properly use light and dark) first
3. How do I draw a building/mountain/etc -- learn perspective first
4. What brushes to use, how to get this particular texture or effect, etc -- composition is more important; brushes and textures just add punch
5. Being able to draw from imagination -- instead, don't be ashamed to draw from reference!

And so on. This is a lot easier said than done, and I still make those mistakes myself. Also, in practice, you'll probably end up learning a little of everything gradually instead of learning one aspect at a time (eg: ideally you would make dozens of grayscale paintings before you even think about using any color, but goddammit that's no fun), but hopefully you'll have a better idea of how to direct your focus to when trying to learn from your experiences.

Regarding perspective, I would consider it pretty essential from the start, but you probably don't need to know the fancier perspective tricks until later. It may seem obvious now, but when I read a Loomis book and saw how perspective applies to figure drawing even when not doing extreme angles, my mind was blown. It was like... oh yeah, that's why the things I draw look so mushy and warped, why didn't I think of that.

BetterLekNextTime
Jul 22, 2008

It's all a matter of perspective...


Grimey Drawer

InDesign Question. I'm printing odd-sized greeting cards at home. What I'd like to do is take a large sheet of cardstock and print several identical cards on it. I know you can link text frames to continue a block of text across, but is there a way to link frames so they mirror the same text? And same question with photos, can I drop and arrange a photo in one frame and it will appear the same in the other frames? Or is the only way to do this to get one set of frames how I like them, group them, and then copy/paste additional copies into the page?

kiimo
Jul 24, 2003



I don't usually venture into this subforum and there is such a wealth of information I figured I'd be insultingly lazy and just post a question, apologies I'm not a total rear end in a top hat!

If I wanted to find some very basic artwork for album covers from goon artists on the cheap would there be a good location for that in this forum? The album artwork is just for a music library so it doesn't have to be unbelievable works of art but it would have to be unique and not shown elsewhere on the internet.

For example, this music library (a MUCH bigger and wealthier library than our fledgling one) has album artwork and we're going for this vibe:

https://search.audiomachine.com/albums

Do you think you fine and creative goons might steer me in the right direction? I have no idea what people pay for this stuff but our library is launching soon and I need like five album covers now and conceivably hundreds more in the future as we grow.

Thoughts?

VelociBacon
Dec 8, 2009



Generally I think an SA MART thread is the way to go for that until you find an artist you like.

kiimo
Jul 24, 2003



I guess I could do that but I'd need to know how much to pay per image and then pay up front for something being created from scratch and have no reference to the level of what I receive and no matter what it looks like I need to pay for it. Just kind of risky but I guess it's not out of the realm of possibility. Thanks for the guidance!

dupersaurus
Aug 1, 2012

Futurism was an art movement where dudes were all 'CARS ARE COOL AND THE PAST IS FOR CHUMPS. LET'S DRAW SOME CARS.'

kiimo posted:

I guess I could do that but I'd need to know how much to pay per image and then pay up front for something being created from scratch and have no reference to the level of what I receive and no matter what it looks like I need to pay for it. Just kind of risky but I guess it's not out of the realm of possibility. Thanks for the guidance!

What's important for the artist is how many you need and what your budget is. From there they can laugh you out of the room or work out what you can get for that budget, and then plan the process of how many proofs you'll get and how many revisions you can ask for. From there you'll pay some percentage up front, get your proofs and approve, pay the rest and get the finals. It's up to you to look at the artist's portfolio and judge if they can deliver what you want.

kiimo
Jul 24, 2003



That seems logical. Okay thanks guys

Tunicate
May 15, 2012





If you want an unlimited number of things that look like album covers you can make them on artbreeder.com

The TOS requires you to license everything you make as CC0, but with a paid account you can make all your album covers private so nobody can grab the cc0 files from the website.

Replace the AI Runes with English and this is perfectly acceptable


https://i.imgur.com/GCvpqaB.jpg

Tunicate fucked around with this message at 22:34 on Feb 13, 2020

gmc9987
Jul 25, 2007


kiimo posted:

I guess I could do that but I'd need to know how much to pay per image and then pay up front for something being created from scratch and have no reference to the level of what I receive and no matter what it looks like I need to pay for it. Just kind of risky but I guess it's not out of the realm of possibility. Thanks for the guidance!

You got some pretty good advice already and it seems like you're on the right track but you have some false assumptions here:

  • You already know what you have in your budget, so you know how much you have per image already. You have to talk with the artist to find out what sort of work you can get for that amount of money - it might not be up to their highest level of polish but most recent artists will absolutely be able to tell you what you can get for a certain price, and it's up to you to know beforehand what you can afford to spend and how many images you need.
  • you do have reference to what level of final artwork you'll receive, it's the artist's portfolio. You're not going to know what the final work looks like before paying for it, but you can definitely get an idea of the level and general feel of what you're getting.
  • Yes, you need to pay for the artwork unless it's drastically, comically not what you told the artist to make or not up the level you negotiated. You're paying the artist for the time they spent making a thing, if it ended up not quite what you wanted that's also on you for not being clear enough. Most artists work on a system with X number of revisions at each stage, so you can request changes before approving an moving to the next step without increasing the price. Most artists will also allow you to purchase extra rounds of revisions at a fixed price, in case they still haven't given you what you want. My general experience is that disagreements in whether the final artwork is good enough or not more often result from the client giving me instructions like, "I can't tell you what it should look like but I'll know it when I see it" or "Just make it POP more, you know?" than from me misinterpreting the directions they gave me.
  • It's about as risky as buying a pre-packaged item at a store - you have to do your research to make sure that the item can do what you want, that the price is right, and that it won't brick on you. In the same wy you should look at the artist's portfolio, previous clients, and general professional ability.

This probably sounds a lot saltier than I intend it to - I just want to dispel the myth that buying artwork is some kind of mystery box where you put in as much money as requested and just hope you get something you like.

melon cat
Jan 21, 2010



What is this weave/art style called? Becoming popular in textiles lately. It looks southwestern USA inspired, I think?

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Fayez Butts
Aug 24, 2006



Native American, to be absurdly broad

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply
«121 »