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Solkanar512
Dec 28, 2006



College Slice

Fitzy Fitz posted:

Hopefully your soil provider doesn't have knotweed contamination. Jesus Christ. I don't think there's anything you can do if it does.

So no joke, a while back I worked with AmeriCorps/Washington Conservation Corps and the local surface water management district (so you know we were heavily restricted on what we could use) dealing with invasive species. To deal with knotweed, we would have to inject those fuckers with pure, undiluted glyphosate. Yes, even in riparian habitats.

They hosed up whole watersheds. They would crowd out other species, take over whole river banks then their shallow roots would cause them to dislodge, float down the river and start all over again. In the mean time that exposed silt would seriously gently caress up the salmon and other fish trying to live in the river.

gently caress that plant so hard. Invasive species loving suck. If you have issues with it or other invasive plants, look into your local noxious weed control board or surface water management district for guidance. Hell, go there anyway so you know what to look for - some areas will ticket you if you ignore especially problematic species, though they’d rather help you out or some places will take care of the removal themselves.

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LogisticEarth
Mar 28, 2004

Someone once told me, "Time is a flat circle".


Solkanar512 posted:

go tonyour surface water management district for guidance. Hell, go there anyway so you know what to look for - some areas will ticket you if you ignore especially problematic species, though they’d rather help you out or some places will take care of the removal themselves.

Yeah, I work for a conservation district in PA, we're a good place to start but your local extension office is useful as well.

The method we have used for control of established knotweed is generally to cut it down in June or so, let it come back up and expend some of the energy in its roots, then spray with glyphosate in August. Sometimes folks will do a second cutting and spray in September-ish. This usually gets rid of it in 1-2 years, although more established stands might take longer.

Although if you're just dealing with a small veggie garden, just keep pulling it before it goes to seed and you'll be fine.

EDIT: And for what it's worth, glyphosate is really demonized and I am constantly trying to communicate to folks that it is not radioactive waste. It's a great and safe tool when used responsibly.

Suspect Bucket
Jan 14, 2012

SHRIMPDOR WAS A MAN
I mean, HE WAS A SHRIMP MAN
er, maybe also A DRAGON
or possibly
A MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL TEAM
BUT HE WAS STILL
SHRIMPDOR


LogisticEarth posted:


EDIT: And for what it's worth, glyphosate is really demonized and I am constantly trying to communicate to folks that it is not radioactive waste. It's a great and safe tool when used responsibly.

So's DDT. But unfortunately the application of pesticides is often the task of the undereducated and overworked, given the instructions of "spray it everywhere try not to drink it".

Solkanar512
Dec 28, 2006



College Slice

LogisticEarth posted:

Yeah, I work for a conservation district in PA, we're a good place to start but your local extension office is useful as well.

The method we have used for control of established knotweed is generally to cut it down in June or so, let it come back up and expend some of the energy in its roots, then spray with glyphosate in August. Sometimes folks will do a second cutting and spray in September-ish. This usually gets rid of it in 1-2 years, although more established stands might take longer.

Although if you're just dealing with a small veggie garden, just keep pulling it before it goes to seed and you'll be fine.

EDIT: And for what it's worth, glyphosate is really demonized and I am constantly trying to communicate to folks that it is not radioactive waste. It's a great and safe tool when used responsibly.

Yeah, I’m a big fan of it personally. You just have to be careful.

One thing we did when we had to spray was add food coloring to the liquid mix. That way you can really easily see where you’ve sprayed. That way if you’re over spraying, missing spots or need to come back later you can.

Nosre
Apr 16, 2002




LogisticEarth posted:

Yeah, I work for a conservation district in PA, we're a good place to start but your local extension office is useful as well.

The method we have used for control of established knotweed is generally to cut it down in June or so, let it come back up and expend some of the energy in its roots, then spray with glyphosate in August. Sometimes folks will do a second cutting and spray in September-ish. This usually gets rid of it in 1-2 years, although more established stands might take longer.

Quoting this in case I may need it eventually. There's a ton on my parents' 64 acres in New Hampshire; not much by the house but big patches along the banks of a few streams we have running through the property.

What's the procedure for cutting it down? I've read that even little pieces (that get flung around or otherwise transported by accident) can turn into full plants

LogisticEarth
Mar 28, 2004

Someone once told me, "Time is a flat circle".


Suspect Bucket posted:

So's DDT. But unfortunately the application of pesticides is often the task of the undereducated and overworked, given the instructions of "spray it everywhere try not to drink it".

I mean, as far as herbicides go glyphosate is pretty safe and most alternatives are much more nasty. It's not DDT, which had a be bio-cumulative effect and damaged apex predators. Glyphosate breaks down, binds to soil particles and doesn't enter the food chain. Sure you can over-apply it but you can over apply pretty much anything. Even organic practices can be hugely damaging to soil and water quality if improperly used (e.g. mouldboard plowing)

Nosre posted:

Quoting this in case I may need it eventually. There's a ton on my parents' 64 acres in New Hampshire; not much by the house but big patches along the banks of a few streams we have running through the property.

What's the procedure for cutting it down? I've read that even little pieces (that get flung around or otherwise transported by accident) can turn into full plants

We just brush hog it or hand cut depending how big a stand. You can get some transfer but most of it is through seeds and such. Just have to monitor the site. And, of course, keep mowing or get some good native vegetation in there to compete with the knotweed. What to plant is going to depend on the site and region.

Solkanar512
Dec 28, 2006



College Slice

If you’re talking riverbanks then find some native willows to plant there after you cut it down. They’re dead easy to propagate as well - we’d fill like 4” pvc tubes (maybe 2-3’ long) with soil, stick a willow branch in there (something between the thickness of your first finger to your thumb) then have all those tubes sit upright in a tub of shallow water. In a few weeks you get tons of roots and with an auger you can quickly get those planted.

Nosre
Apr 16, 2002




^ You mean for me in NH, or LogisticEarth in PA?

It's a project I'd love to take on eventually, especially if I take over the property some day. The one saving grace is it doesn't seem to be quite as spread-happy as I read it is in more mild climates - like I said, we've got a bit by the house but it hasn't expanded at all in 20 years. I grew up playing with it and didn't even realize until a few years ago that it was such a horror elsewhere

LogisticEarth
Mar 28, 2004

Someone once told me, "Time is a flat circle".


Willows would be fine in either PA or NH. Actually one of the nurseries we order from is from up in Vermont. Red Osier Dogwood, pussy willows, ninebark, would all work. Getting a conservation seed mix (check out Ernst Conservation Seeds) is another option.

We usually don't bother "starting" the willow cuttings in water beforehand. I just use the live-stake method, where you just plant the cutting straight in the ground. If you use rooting hormone and the site is moist enough, we have had pretty great success rates.

Really though getting into details is tricky without knowing more about the site. Your best bet is probably contacting your local conservation district or extension office and seeing if someone would be willing to come out or give some localized guidance.

Shifty Pony
Dec 28, 2004

Up ta somethin'




College Slice

Solkanar512 posted:

Yeah, I’m a big fan of it personally. You just have to be careful.

One thing we did when we had to spray was add food coloring to the liquid mix. That way you can really easily see where you’ve sprayed. That way if you’re over spraying, missing spots or need to come back later you can.

"Spray Indicator" or "spray colorant" are the industry terms for colors you add to herbicide and pesticide. You can get a jug for $20 that will last nearly forever.

It's also good to use because it can keep you from walking in sprayed areas. I've seen a neat line of dead grass footprints across a yard from where someone walked through an area they had hit with roundup and then walked back to the door.

Suspect Bucket
Jan 14, 2012

SHRIMPDOR WAS A MAN
I mean, HE WAS A SHRIMP MAN
er, maybe also A DRAGON
or possibly
A MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL TEAM
BUT HE WAS STILL
SHRIMPDOR


LogisticEarth posted:

I mean, as far as herbicides go glyphosate is pretty safe and most alternatives are much more nasty. It's not DDT, which had a be bio-cumulative effect and damaged apex predators. Glyphosate breaks down, binds to soil particles and doesn't enter the food chain. Sure you can over-apply it but you can over apply pretty much anything. Even organic practices can be hugely damaging to soil and water quality if improperly used (e.g. mouldboard plowing)


True true. I'm also operating a bit from a brief background in pesticides and rodenticide, I'm only just learning more about herbicide.

I worked for a year in pest control, and the company I worked for sat you down for a month and gave you a very thorough classroom education in pest control. I enjoyed the classroom and working portions, there was unfortunately a huge disconnect in the office and feild management. ANYHOO. I got a good working education in pesticide use, but also a couple backwards old timer practices and ideas, so please correct me if I spout abjectly incorrect poo poo based off misremembered or Big Tony Said information.

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns






I don’t know exactly how 2,4-D works, but it always seems to make plants grow in contorted, twisted pain before they finally die. I think fucks with their growth regulators and basically makes them grow themselves to death really fast or something?

It’s always scared me a little more than glyphosate for that reason and it smells bad.

poeticoddity
Jan 14, 2007
"How nice - to feel nothing and still get full credit for being alive." - Kurt Vonnegut Jr. - Slaughterhouse Five

Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

I don’t know exactly how 2,4-D works, but it always seems to make plants grow in contorted, twisted pain before they finally die. I think fucks with their growth regulators and basically makes them grow themselves to death really fast or something?

It’s always scared me a little more than glyphosate for that reason and it smells bad.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/2,4...#Mode_of_action

TL;DR: Auxin receptor agonist.

cakesmith handyman
Jul 22, 2007

Pip-Pip old chap! Last one in is a rotten egg what what.



Platystemon posted:

I think that’s apple powdery mildew, which is different than the mildew other plants get.



Thank you, I was searching mildew but missed this somehow. Turns out I already have a chemical recommended locally so I'll spray tomorrow.

Also set up another schedule of vine weevil nematodes, they did a great job the other year and I've only found grubs in a single pot this year so I'm going to keep ahead of it this time.

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns






I remember reading about bug-eating nematodes somewhere recently and it was really neat, but are there and (root-knot)nematode-eating nematodes?

Platystemon
Feb 13, 2012



There are other nematode species that do prey on them, but fungi, bacteria, and mites are thought of as more promising agents.

There’s also the potential to crowd out the root‐knot‐causing nematodes with benign species of nematodes that don’t prey on the bad nematodes but also don’t parasitise plants.

quote:

Although predacious nematodes constitute a large portion of the biomass in some soils, their role as biocontrol agents of plant-parasitic nematodes is not well understood. Many genera of the nematodes in the Mononchida, Dory­ laimida, and Diplogasteroidea are largely considered predacious; whereas the obligate predation is described in the genus Seinura in Aphelenchoidea. Although a certain amount of specificity may be found in some genera, predacious nematodes in general obtain their food from preying on nema­ todes, fungi, algae, and other soil microfauna. Members of Mononchida have probably received the most attention as possible candidates for control of plant-parasitic nematodes (10, 14, 26, 112). However, because of the lack of specificity in their search for prey, their number can become gradually diminished, as their prey may include members of their own population. Although these nematodes exert certain natural control of plant-parasitic nematodes in agricultural soils, their potential for biocontrol remains un­ certain and warrants further study.

That’s from 1987, mind.

STAC Goat
Mar 12, 2008

Watching you sleep.

Butt first, let's
check the feeds.



I have a composting question that seems in the same general wheelhouse.

I started composting last summer. Nothing special. A big rubbermaid with some holes and a balance of "browns" and "greens" I turned over and kept moist. It seemed to be working great. Everything was breaking down and I had some heat and that pleasant smell. Then I kind of screwed up/got lazy and didn't lay it down in my garden before the winter. Over the winter it froze over and just... stopped composting. It gradually became less of a compost bin and more of a bucket of garbage. Unsurprisingly it drew crazy amounts of bugs and those long fly things that show up around these parts. I was worried I had just ruined it all.

Weather warms up a few weeks ago. I grossingly mix around the thawed out garbage and compost and do my best to break it down on my own. Now, its looking pretty composty again. Most of the visible garbage is gone. Most of the bugs are gone. I don't really have that compost heat and smell but it doesn't smell like garbage either.

So would there be any harm in me mixing it with my garden soil? Would I be doing anything worthwhile? Would I just be burying garbage in my garden? Should I be wary of those flies and bugs? Its just garbage so its not like it would cost me anything but time and effort to dump it and start over. But you know.

Jhet
Jun 3, 2013


Compost goes dormant in the winter when it gets cold and freezes. It wakes back up when it gets warm enough to melt again. If you leave it until it finishes, or move it to another bucket, you can put more stuff in to make more compost.

You can also run it through a wire fence to pull out the big stuff that didn’t finish yet before putting it into the garden. You can also just bury it in your garden and it will finish decomposing (this is a valid way to do composting anyway). Basically, feel free to use the good looking stuff in your garden regardless, you can choose about the uncomposed stuff.

Fitzy Fitz
May 14, 2005




Bugs are just part of the composting process too. They're helping to break things down.

Jhet
Jun 3, 2013


Fitzy Fitz posted:

Bugs are just part of the composting process too. They're helping to break things down.

I let my neighbor dig up night crawlers to go fishing from mine last year. He could have taken a dozen a week and it wouldn’t have hardly made a dent in their population.

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns






The local paper’s former garden writer who nobody seems to like says that because we get so much rain here, the best way to compost is just throw kitchen scraps on top of your beds and let the worms do the work. The logic is that a compost pile is going to mean really great, well fertilized dirt right under your compost where all the nitrogen has washed out. He’s not entirely wrong and it does work, but it doesn’t make you many friends among your neighbors when all your beds look like trash piles.

STAC Goat
Mar 12, 2008

Watching you sleep.

Butt first, let's
check the feeds.



I never did get worms in my compost last summer. I might dig up some holes and go looking this summer or something. It rained today so I could probably go out now with a flashlight or something. Its been a long time since I went digging for worms.

Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

The local paper’s former garden writer who nobody seems to like says that because we get so much rain here, the best way to compost is just throw kitchen scraps on top of your beds and let the worms do the work. The logic is that a compost pile is going to mean really great, well fertilized dirt right under your compost where all the nitrogen has washed out. He’s not entirely wrong and it does work, but it doesn’t make you many friends among your neighbors when all your beds look like trash piles.

The first time I composted years ago it was just like a pile under a tree where I threw lawn clippings and some kitchen scraps and charcoal ash and got wet when i watered and flipped with a shovel everyone once and awhile and was surprised how easily it actually worked. Just a nasty smell and a ton of bugs so I stopped.

I decided to do it last summer out of more of a "create less garbage/be more environmentally conscious" reason and went to a covered container just so I wouldn't have a smelly mess drawing bugs and animals.

STAC Goat fucked around with this message at 03:19 on May 23, 2020

Fitzy Fitz
May 14, 2005




My aunt does covered compost ditches next to her planting rows. So you're incorporating the scraps into the garden immediately, but it also doesn't sit there and get gross on the surface.

My concern with something like that though is that good scraps attract bigger pests than I usually see. We get raccoons in our compost pile, for example.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

Jhet posted:

Compost goes dormant in the winter when it gets cold and freezes. It wakes back up when it gets warm enough to melt again. If you leave it until it finishes, or move it to another bucket, you can put more stuff in to make more compost.

Yes to everything but the first sentence.

You have a bin or pile large enough and it will go all winter. People literally heat steer barns with piles of poo poo under the shed roof that are compositing all winter long. Doesn't need to be nearly on that scale to keep working. I've had 3-5 yard piles of leaves that kept 100F+ all winter when you dug into the center. No "proper mix of greens and browns"......literally just piles shredded of leaves.

Composting is not hard. It requires almost no effort unless you are trying to do it on too small of a scale. (which seems to be very in vogue these days)

taqueso
Mar 8, 2004









Fun Shoe

Google Jean Pain method, he literally wrote the book on composting forest scraps for heat and fuel.

STAC Goat
Mar 12, 2008

Watching you sleep.

Butt first, let's
check the feeds.



Motronic posted:

Composting is not hard. It requires almost no effort unless you are trying to do it on too small of a scale. (which seems to be very in vogue these days)
Like I said, it was mainly a choice to just cut down on my garbage along with a more serious focus on recycling. And it really worked. Way less garbage. And if I got compost for my garden out of it, bonus.

So yeah, I'm doing it on a small scale. But that's all I really got room or garbage for. And as you said its not a lot of work so even if I was just dumping it all it still would probably be worth the cut down in garbage and cleaner house it resulted in. And the cool feeling of seeing garbage go in and dirt come out. But I did it so I figured I should mix it into my garden dirt when I finally get that poo poo in order this weekend.

I just started last summer and am coming from my first winter so I had questions.

Jhet
Jun 3, 2013


Motronic posted:

Yes to everything but the first sentence.

You have a bin or pile large enough and it will go all winter. People literally heat steer barns with piles of poo poo under the shed roof that are compositing all winter long. Doesn't need to be nearly on that scale to keep working. I've had 3-5 yard piles of leaves that kept 100F+ all winter when you dug into the center. No "proper mix of greens and browns"......literally just piles shredded of leaves.

Composting is not hard. It requires almost no effort unless you are trying to do it on too small of a scale. (which seems to be very in vogue these days)

You're absolutely right. Mine wouldn't freeze entirely either. Just the top. Inside was warm-hot all year. I always neglect scale in compost discussions for some reason. For some reason I always think people are using only those small barrel things on a pole that you're supposed to spin to turn. Those things are too small for me, so I don't know why I think people actually end up doing it that small.

I don't go in for the proper mix of greens/browns either. I will say that too much of the fresh stuff gets pretty rank, but it'll still turn into compost just fine.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



Look at these drat potatoes!

These were all grown from grocery store potatoes that we let sprout. Up until a few days ago they were in 5 gal grow bags. They've shot up at least 6 inches since I transplanted them.

I've also went on a spree and pulled 3 of those paper garden waste sacks worth of ivy and other poo poo from behind the chain link fence. There must have been some poison ivy or something mixed in with it I've got some kinda rash up and down my arms. Trying like crazy not to scratch at it.

Platystemon
Feb 13, 2012



STAC Goat posted:

So would there be any harm in me mixing it with my garden soil? Would I be doing anything worthwhile? Would I just be burying garbage in my garden? Should I be wary of those flies and bugs? Its just garbage so its not like it would cost me anything but time and effort to dump it and start over. But you know.

Rotting garbage is what compost is. All the tips about making compost are just ways to make the process faster and more convenient. I wouldn’t want to feed cockroaches and flies, but in general the bugs that eat rotting stuff aren’t interested in healthy plants.

Don’t throw fresh compost into a planting hole and put a tree on top of it, because then you’ll get anærobic bacteria breaking it down near tender roots and that’s not good, but other than deep burial, almost anything goes.

Endie
Feb 7, 2007

Jings

The mere mention of weedkillers is enough for me to roll out my favourite chemistry joke, which as many as one-in-eight of you may not yet have heard:

A biochemist walks into a garden centre, and wanders up to the counter with a perplexed look on her face. "Excuse me," she says. "Have you got any of that isopropylamine salt of N-(phospohonomethylglycine)?"

The shop assistant looks something between blank and alarmed. "You know," says the biochemist. "The one that works by inhibiting the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase enzyme to prevent broadleaf moisture take-up. You spray it on them."

The assistant looks quizzical, then asks "Do you mean Roundup, ma'am?"

"That's it!" says the biochemist. "I never can remember that drat name!"

Paradoxish
Dec 19, 2003

Will you stop going crazy in there?

Anyone have any experience with getting a late start on tomatoes or cucumbers? Stunted a bunch of my seedlings like an idiot by hardening them too fast/too soon. I decided to just replace them with some healthy nursery starters a few weeks ago because I assumed they were all going to die, but like 75% of them have actually recovered and are looking super healthy. Problem is that they're like a solid month behind where they should be now that they're growing. The tomatoes are maybe 4" high and just starting to get a bit bushy.

I don't think I'm going to waste space in my beds with them, but I've got a whole fuckton of 5-gallon buckets and some space will eventually free up where I'm growing my radishes. Does it seem like it'll be worthwhile to keep trying to grow them in pots/buckets and possibly transplant them mid- or late-season? I've never had plants this small this late, so I don't know what to expect. They're mostly 65-70 day varieties and this is in CT, so theoretically I don't think I'm going to overrun the growing season or anything.

Professor Shark
May 22, 2012



Bleak Gremlin

Hey thread, sorry I ducked out but I was busy finding soil and making those beds! I ended up just going the bagged route, as it would have been the same-ish price but with less likelihood of contamination. We've been dealing with JKW here for a few years and I have been injecting the stems. So far it's working, but slowly, and sometimes a new sprout will come up where I thought I had killed it years before.

Jhet
Jun 3, 2013


Paradoxish posted:

Anyone have any experience with getting a late start on tomatoes or cucumbers? Stunted a bunch of my seedlings like an idiot by hardening them too fast/too soon. I decided to just replace them with some healthy nursery starters a few weeks ago because I assumed they were all going to die, but like 75% of them have actually recovered and are looking super healthy. Problem is that they're like a solid month behind where they should be now that they're growing. The tomatoes are maybe 4" high and just starting to get a bit bushy.

I don't think I'm going to waste space in my beds with them, but I've got a whole fuckton of 5-gallon buckets and some space will eventually free up where I'm growing my radishes. Does it seem like it'll be worthwhile to keep trying to grow them in pots/buckets and possibly transplant them mid- or late-season? I've never had plants this small this late, so I don't know what to expect. They're mostly 65-70 day varieties and this is in CT, so theoretically I don't think I'm going to overrun the growing season or anything.

You can transplant if you want later, but they’ll take a few days to adapt still. You should still be okay for a harvest, but it just will be a couple weeks later. 65-70 days is normal for where I grew up in Wisconsin, and tomatoes don’t go in until this weekend there. I wouldn’t want to try moving them after the end of June, but during the next few weeks should be fine. If they’re outside they’re just going to grow when it hits 70 anyway.

Alternately, you can grow them in the 5 gallon buckets without issue. That should be plenty of space for most tomatoes types, just keep up with watering because they get thirsty and fruit sets better when the water is consistent. I’m guessing you could even move the small plants once the radishes in the middle are pulled, and it’ll get started growing big right away with good weather.

Eeyo
Aug 29, 2004



I'm trying to grow some rat's tail radishes on my balcony, hopefully they'll get enough sun to make something. I had some pretty old seeds (packed for 2016), but I planted four and all four of them popped right up. The biggest problem so far has been that they produced a very long stem in the beginning, and then started falling over when they got a crown of true leaves. They seem to have thickened up and stabilized though. I planted them a month ago and they're already starting to bolt, which was a bit faster than I expected!

I'm also trying some runner beans, but I'm less sure I'll get anything productive out of them. They've already vined to about 5' at least, but the sun's about half the day on my balcony.

Last year I had a community garden on my work's campus so unfortunately I got locked out of growing in the ground this year.

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns






What’s nibblin on my eggplants? The damage is kind of smooth edged-no bite marks or anything. Some kind of fungus or bacteria or something that creeps out at night?

silicone thrills
Jan 9, 2008





Honestly that looks like the chunks the squirrels take out of my seed potatos. There aren't bite marks because they just shove those those giant 2 front teeth in, rip out a chunk, then throw the loving thing on the ground because they wasteful little monster jerks.

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns






silicone thrills posted:

Honestly that looks like the chunks the squirrels take out of my seed potatos. There aren't bite marks because they just shove those those giant 2 front teeth in, rip out a chunk, then throw the loving thing on the ground because they wasteful little monster jerks.

That was my first thought too but they are mostly on the underside of the fruit where it would be sort of awkward for a squirrel to get at.

silicone thrills
Jan 9, 2008





Slightly off topic weedkiller chat:

I've got a huge ivy problem in the ravine behind my house. I'm working slowly through it pulling everything out as much by the root as possible which going well. The thing im wondering about though - I've got some HUGE vines on trees. Like 3" thick. I've sawed through quite a few of the huge vines, left a big gap but i'm wondering if directly dripping some roundup on top of the root stump will help keep from ever coming back.

Any thoughts? Anyone with experience on this?

Here's a picture of what i'm dealing with btw



SubG
Aug 19, 2004

It's a hard world for little things.


Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

That was my first thought too but they are mostly on the underside of the fruit where it would be sort of awkward for a squirrel to get at.
Last year Two years ago I got the same thing on my Japanese eggplants, and they were caged to keep out critters. When I asked about it in this post, with pics for comparison the suggestion was caterpillars.

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Platystemon
Feb 13, 2012



You have to apply the roundup within approximately thirty seconds of stumping the plant, but if you do that, it gets pulled into the roots and prevents resprouting.

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