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Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




I think to get an appreciable amount of strawberries you need alot of space and I don't think I've ever had enough space to devote to letting strawbrerries run rampant. All the commercial operations here seem to grow them through black plastic too.

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CancerCakes
Jan 10, 2006


DrBouvenstein posted:

I know I should have asked this last fall, but...

I have a small raised bed with just strawberries in it. Since it was planted late and I had some very ferocious chipmunks, got a whopping 2 berries out of it, but did get several runners that I managed to place in decent positions before they rooted so they didn't crowd each other, so hoping to get at least enough for, like, 1 tart this summer.

But should I have cut back the brown and dead leaves, runners, etc... last fall? And is it too late to do it now? In northern VT, where only just barely a few things are peaking up out of the ground (mostly early bulbs like crocuses, though I saw the tiniest of new green leaf on one of said strawberry plants.)

From what I have read, the brown leaves protect the plant during winter, so don't worry about being lazy just cut that poo poo off in a few weeks when the new leaves start coming through. Also you have to bear in mind that after a few years the plant doesn't produce any more fruit so you need to cultivate runners at least every two years for replacement. I am probably going to switch to alpine strawbs anyway as they are less hassle

CancerCakes
Jan 10, 2006




I saw these awesome espalier and cords and thought they were worth putting in the thread.

Tunicate
May 15, 2012





I planted a chinese strawberry tree last year, will be interesting to see if i get any fruit

Platystemon
Feb 13, 2012



Tunicate posted:

I planted a chinese strawberry tree last year, will be interesting to see if i get any fruit

I think you mean Cudrania tricuspidata, but I just want to say that the name ďstrawberry treeĒ is out of control.

Iíve heard of Arbutus unedo and Muntingia calabura described by that name, but as a Chinese strawberry tree, if itís not C. tricuspidata, my next guess would be Myrica rubra.

silicone thrills
Jan 9, 2008

Enjoy Nature While It Lasts


CancerCakes posted:



I saw these awesome espalier and cords and thought they were worth putting in the thread.

I want to do this sort of thing so bad and then remove my actual fence. I dont care if it takes like 15 - 30 years. Ill be here probably.

Jhet
Jun 3, 2013


I went and got to tending to my last raised bed today. It was overgrown with weeds and the previous tenant left a bunch of onions in it on one end, while dumping out some weed and moss filled planters in the other end.

It was wonderful until the wood started to come apart because they used 2Ē indoor screws to put it together. Not only did the screws rust, but they pulled straight out and I got to put it back together. So, anyone building a raised bed be sure to use long enough outdoor screws.

I did get to plant my carrots and some mustard greens at least. And two more weeks and my longbeans will go into the garden too.

Tunicate
May 15, 2012





Platystemon posted:

I think you mean Cudrania tricuspidata, but I just want to say that the name ďstrawberry treeĒ is out of control.


It's Cudrania tricuspidata but man don't bite my head off that's what the people called it

Platystemon
Feb 13, 2012



Oh. The tone of that came across all wrong.

I was just musing that that name has perhaps the greatest variety of unrelated species under it.

Anyway, the species you have is dioecious, so if you want fruit, do take care that you have both a male and female. It is possible to graft both male and female branches onto the same trunk, and perhaps the one you bought had already had that done.

Tunicate
May 15, 2012





Platystemon posted:

Oh. The tone of that came across all wrong.

I was just musing that that name has perhaps the greatest variety of unrelated species under it.

Anyway, the species you have is dioecious, so if you want fruit, do take care that you have both a male and female. It is possible to graft both male and female branches onto the same trunk, and perhaps the one you bought had already had that done.

they said it was monoecious cultivar, so we'll see

Fitzy Fitz
May 14, 2005






Platystemon posted:

I think you mean Cudrania tricuspidata, but I just want to say that the name “strawberry tree” is out of control.

I’ve heard of Arbutus unedo and Muntingia calabura described by that name, but as a Chinese strawberry tree, if it’s not C. tricuspidata, my next guess would be Myrica rubra.

There's also the strawberry bush, Euonymus americanus

showbiz_liz
Jun 2, 2008


Wow I've never planted beans before and I'm amazed at how my long beans just sproinged right up. I started my peppers and tomatoes over a month ago, and the beans I started five days ago are already twice as big. I hope I haven't jumped the gun, it won't be warm enough to put them out for almost another month.

Ok Comboomer
Oct 20, 2007



showbiz_liz posted:

Wow I've never planted beans before and I'm amazed at how my long beans just sproinged right up. I started my peppers and tomatoes over a month ago, and the beans I started five days ago are already twice as big. I hope I haven't jumped the gun, it won't be warm enough to put them out for almost another month.

they didnít call it Jack and the Pepper Bush did they?

SubG
Aug 19, 2004

It's a hard world for little things.


showbiz_liz posted:

Wow I've never planted beans before and I'm amazed at how my long beans just sproinged right up. I started my peppers and tomatoes over a month ago, and the beans I started five days ago are already twice as big. I hope I haven't jumped the gun, it won't be warm enough to put them out for almost another month.
Yeah, beans are like cheat mode for gardening.

Don't be surprised if they appear to stall for awhile when they're like 6" to 8". Long beans in particular do this thing where they shoot up like crazy after germination, then pause for a bit while they put down roots before getting back to growing.

Fitzy Fitz
May 14, 2005






Long beans are my #1 veg now. So easy to start & grow, they produce prolifically, and they're great in stir fry.

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




Good Friday is the traditional Ďplant your summer gardení date around here and really actually a little late but thereís a freeze warning tonight so Iím gonna pretend Iím really smart and not just lazy.

Iím not really very excited about tomatoes right now and Iím thinking about skipping them entirely and planting like 5 different varieties of okra and a million eggplants and laughing at the stinkbugs and hornworms.

Platystemon
Feb 13, 2012



I mean, thatís ďthe vernal equinox, plus an arbitrary delay of up to a monthĒ, so it could be later.

Platystemon fucked around with this message at 02:54 on Apr 3, 2021

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



If anyone in the twin cities area wants to try to grow their own hops I have a bunch of rhizomes I just cut off of mine as I trimmed it back. No guarantees theyíll grow but send me a pm and Iíll be happy to share.

Lead out in cuffs
Sep 18, 2012

"That's right. We've evolved."

"I can see that. Cool mutations."



Meaty Ore posted:

When you say "double digging", am I correct in assuming that to mean tilling the existing soil, adding my amendments, then till again to mix them in?



Not exactly, no.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double_digging

Fozzy The Bear
Sep 27, 2009


This explains double digging really well.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NUp8XOsA2q4

I have access to large amounts of organic compost for almost free ($10 per cubic yard), so I like to use the "no-dig" method.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OIojWdJz0RE

Fozzy The Bear fucked around with this message at 18:08 on Apr 3, 2021

FogHelmut
Dec 18, 2003

Your authority is not recognized in Fort Kickass.


This is what I ended up building. Transplanted the jalapeno from last year which dropped all it's leaves to shock, but it's coming back. I think there's some baby peas my wife got from a facebook group. I just want to fill it out with tomatoes, basil, and peppers.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

Wow that looks really nice. Great job.

Jhet
Jun 3, 2013


FogHelmut posted:

This is what I ended up building. Transplanted the jalapeno from last year which dropped all it's leaves to shock, but it's coming back. I think there's some baby peas my wife got from a facebook group. I just want to fill it out with tomatoes, basil, and peppers.



I see you have those peat pot things in the ground. They donít decompose like you think they would and those things probably wonít do a good job growing unless you pulled off the bottoms at the very least.

That looks like a great big garden bed though and Iím jealous of the sun it looks like youíll get.

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



Jhet posted:

I see you have those peat pot things in the ground. They donít decompose like you think they would and those things probably wonít do a good job growing unless you pulled off the bottoms at the very least.

That looks like a great big garden bed though and Iím jealous of the sun it looks like youíll get.

I have some that are 3+ years old that look unfazed from the bottom of my compost pile. Would not buy again!

Meaty Ore
Dec 17, 2011

My God, it's full of cat pictures!




Fozzy The Bear posted:

This explains double digging really well.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NUp8XOsA2q4

I have access to large amounts of organic compost for almost free ($10 per cubic yard), so I like to use the "no-dig" method.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OIojWdJz0RE

Thanks for these; I had never heard of it before.

FogHelmut
Dec 18, 2003

Your authority is not recognized in Fort Kickass.


Motronic posted:

Wow that looks really nice. Great job.

Thanks, it's part of an 8 months of working every weekend to overhaul my back yard. I'll make a big post in one of these threads at some point.


Jhet posted:

I see you have those peat pot things in the ground. They don’t decompose like you think they would and those things probably won’t do a good job growing unless you pulled off the bottoms at the very least.

That looks like a great big garden bed though and I’m jealous of the sun it looks like you’ll get.

Good tip, we will check them out.

SpannerX
Apr 26, 2010

I had a beer with Stephen Harper once and now I like him.



Fun Shoe

This just showed up in my Youtube feed, I'm going to have to go through his channel because this is an awesome video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CrATltv-Tic

Paradoxish
Dec 19, 2003

Will you stop going crazy in there?

FogHelmut posted:

This is what I ended up building. Transplanted the jalapeno from last year which dropped all it's leaves to shock, but it's coming back. I think there's some baby peas my wife got from a facebook group. I just want to fill it out with tomatoes, basil, and peppers.



That looks great, but agreeing that you shouldn't stick the peat pots in the ground and may want to consider not using them at all. Not only do they not decompose well, but they can create real moisture issues. I used to use a ton of the peat pots and jiffy peat pellets and I've given up on both and gone back to regular plastic flats/inserts.

Chad Sexington
May 26, 2005

You say 'in bed with the Russians' like it's a bad thing...

I used a few of the jiffy pots for indoor starters this year and the mold growth was crazy pants.

Got started on my drip irrigation system today. Pretty impressed with all the stuff you get in a $30 kit on Amazon.



Also quickly discovered the need for a backflow preventer on my hose bib.

Chad Sexington fucked around with this message at 01:11 on Apr 5, 2021

Platystemon
Feb 13, 2012



I was annoyed at one of my haskap bushes for ceasing its bloom before its partner was finished, but then I noticed that the one that was still blooming was the unique self‐fertile cultivar ĎSoloí.

Lead out in cuffs
Sep 18, 2012

"That's right. We've evolved."

"I can see that. Cool mutations."



Meaty Ore posted:

Thanks for these; I had never heard of it before.

No worries! It's a good technique for first preparing a bed. It is a lot of digging though!

Paradoxish
Dec 19, 2003

Will you stop going crazy in there?

Chad Sexington posted:

I used a few of the jiffy pots for indoor starters this year and the mold growth was crazy pants.

Got started on my drip irrigation system today. Pretty impressed with all the stuff you get in a $30 kit on Amazon.

Are there any good resources for setting a drip irrigation system up in terms of spacing, number of emitters, etc? I bought a kit and a bunch of extras last year, but I never got around to installing it or even figuring out if I had enough stuff to work with the size of my garden. I was thinking about attempting it in the next week or two, but planning the whole thing out honestly seems more intimidating than installing it.

Chad Sexington
May 26, 2005

You say 'in bed with the Russians' like it's a bad thing...

Paradoxish posted:

Are there any good resources for setting a drip irrigation system up in terms of spacing, number of emitters, etc? I bought a kit and a bunch of extras last year, but I never got around to installing it or even figuring out if I had enough stuff to work with the size of my garden. I was thinking about attempting it in the next week or two, but planning the whole thing out honestly seems more intimidating than installing it.

You just have to play around with it. My kit didn't have great instructions for which emitters did what. Was using the sprayers for root veg and will use the proper drippers at the base of each tomato/pepper/tomatillo/etc.

Platystemon
Feb 13, 2012



One of the really nice things about drip irrigation is that itís so easy to modify. Donít let the perfect be the enemy of the good. Get out there and get something going.

The big lines, five‐eighths or three‐quarter‐inch in diameter, are way faster to work with than the quater‐inch stuff.

You can also get dripline with emitters built into it at regular intervals. Itís great if you have a lot of beds to water or a big treeís root zone. Itís kind of like soaker hose, but way more reliable and extensible.

Spacing needs vary widely depending on freely water moves horizontally in your soil and how far your plants spread their roots. The aforementioned pre‐formed dripline commonly has emitter spacing of six to eighteen inches. Thatís a good starting place. Itís better to have too much overlap than too little. As long as youíre not hitting flow limits (which is in the hundreds of gallons per hour for the big lines), all it costs you is a little more in emitters.

If your peppers are getting overwatered while your beans are thirsty, punch in more or higher‐flow emitters for the beans and cut back on watering duration and/or frequency.

It does help to have a controller with multiple valves to give you control over independent zones with different water needs. Blueberries might desperately want water every day, but nothing else does.

e: Micro sprinklers are an option, but if you use those in addition to actual drippers, youíll probably want them on their own zones. The desired duration is unlikely to overlap.

Platystemon fucked around with this message at 02:04 on Apr 5, 2021

mischief
Jun 3, 2003


Platystemon posted:

Donít let the perfect be the enemy of the good. Get out there and get something going.

New thread title. That's outstanding advice for gardening in general.

Paradoxish
Dec 19, 2003

Will you stop going crazy in there?



Awesome. Thanks, dudes.

I guess I'll start just messing with it this week and see where it goes. Need to somehow find time for that and for installing a real fence in the next 2-3 weeks.

Platystemon
Feb 13, 2012



The first drip zone I set up, it was for blueberries because those things like so much water and I very quickly tired of watering them daily. I used the little lines with the slip‐on junctions and it took me the better part of an afternoon.

The second zone I set up came about before I left on a trip. I was going to let the plants just deal with a little dryness and water them as soon as I got back. Then, like forty‐five minutes before I had scheduled to leave, I was all packed and ready to go, when I made a spur of the moment decision. I rolled out the mainline, staked it in place, and punched emitters in for all my plants.

I gave it a burst flush out any dirt, capped the end of the mainline, tested it, and all was well. I set the controller to go off a few days into the trip, then got in the car and left on time.

It wasnít perfect, but it took less time than a single watering session and I should have done it sooner.

Platystemon fucked around with this message at 02:37 on Apr 5, 2021

Hexigrammus
May 22, 2006

Cheech Wizard stories are clean, wholesome, reflective truths that go great with the marijuana munchies and a blow job.


Yeah, as Playstemon suggests, just play with it, stuff's pretty forgiving, basically Lego for gardening nerds. When we first set up our system I did a lot of calculations and sketches but a salescritter gave me the wrong flow rate for a critical component and that didn't work too well. Being on a well with cycling pressure didn't help either.

Assuming you're using 1/2" feeder line with emitters, drip line, or 1/8" microtubing branched off it, what I'd suggest is putting in a circuit to plants with similar water needs / similar soil, punching in emitters and see how it performs. After a while you get a pretty good feel for when circuit is reaching its capacity limit and when it's time to add a circuit. Carry a small trowel and don't be afraid to dig around a bit to see what the soil moisture is doing until you get the location and duration of water right. Buy an extra package of goof plugs so you can yank emitters out and move them easily.

As the humus has built up in our garden beds we've had to put the berry bushes in the same area on their own circuit, otherwise the annual beds get waterlogged. The berries are still in (very) sandy humus. So far the asparagus is happy to be watered on the same schedule as the annuals but it might need its own circuit eventually too.

NomNomNom
Jul 20, 2008
Please Work Out

Is the drip line freeze proof? Or do you have to take it all up and store it for the winter? I'd imagine you can't blow it our with air like a sprinkler system.

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Jhet
Jun 3, 2013


Itís the beginning of April and my peppers and tomatoes are getting hours outside in the sun already. Itís a wonderful thing.

I also have peas in and now a full bed of cool weather greens that had better sprout soon or theyíre going to get to be warm weather greens. (I sort of kid, but Iím having fun with the idea of having three seasons of plantings. Next autumn Iíll have a cold frame built and will get a full 4 seasons of nutrition. Itís so much fun.

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