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FogHelmut
Dec 18, 2003

Your authority is not recognized in Fort Kickass.


I find that drippers do a good job at dripping, but they're attached to my sprinkler system which doesn't have enough zones, so I gotta do a manual deep watering once or twice a week.

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showbiz_liz
Jun 2, 2008


showbiz_liz posted:

I'm worries I hosed up my tomato seedlings They are all alive but after 3 initial weeks of steady growth they have mostly stalled out for the past 2, and they are all super leggy and none have more than two stubby little true leaves. Upon researching it's either overwatering or my grow light isn't good enough or they need to be fertilized, or all three. I've been distracted by a new job or I would have been better about proactive researching! It's my first time growing tomatoes from seed and I guess they're more sensitive then peppers (all of those look fine).

But now it's warm enough to move them next to the south-facing windows (terribly poorly insulated, so when it's cold I can't keep anything sensitive there). So I will pot them up today and gently fertilize and move them and hope for the best!

I don't need them all to live, I only have garden space to keep maybe 30% of them, but it would be nice to be able to take the rest to a seedling swap next month.

Update, these guys are almost all recovering nicely and I definitely should have potted them up like two weeks before I did. I'll try to do the same to the peppers still in the trays this weekend. It helps that my current roommate is NOT an insane plant person and so I have three nice big windows to put transitional pots in - last year those windows were half full of my old roommate's succulent collection.

Also this weekend I hope I have time to sow my lettuce and mustard, which I also should have done a while ago. This whole "having a job" thing is really cramping my style.

CancerCakes
Jan 10, 2006


Ieft my seedlings in the greenhouse last night and there was a light frost this morning. gently caress

Hopefully some will live but there are definitely some frost bitten ones. Caught out by probably the last frost of the year

Platystemon
Feb 13, 2012



Do you mean you left them outside the greenhouse or is your greenhouse just that exposed to the elements?

CancerCakes
Jan 10, 2006


In the greenhouse, but it is a plastic one with a broken door so it gives limited protection.



The courgettes will bounce back, but Tom's are pretty hosed

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



Could be worse.

I nurtured my little cold weather seedlings just perfectly and planted them in my greens/herbs raised bed garden yesterday only to have them be annihilated by hail yesterday! Looks like about 1/2 will survive.

Solkanar512
Dec 28, 2006



BaseballPCHiker posted:

Could be worse.

I nurtured my little cold weather seedlings just perfectly and planted them in my greens/herbs raised bed garden yesterday only to have them be annihilated by hail yesterday! Looks like about 1/2 will survive.

The last gently caress you of winter, I hate it. Last year I planted tomatoes two days too early and got hit by a surprise 28 degree frost. They recovered from newer shoots but compared to the spare starts I planted they were weeks behind. Mother Nature can be a complete rear end in a top hat.

So quick question about using regular old Round-Up/Glyphosate. I saw a clip of This Old House talk about applying it to a foam brush to hit grass that it growing around other plants, basically painting it selectively rather than spraying. I tried this on Saturday and I'm not seeing and results. How long should I wait to try and reapply?

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




Solkanar512 posted:

The last gently caress you of winter, I hate it. Last year I planted tomatoes two days too early and got hit by a surprise 28 degree frost. They recovered from newer shoots but compared to the spare starts I planted they were weeks behind. Mother Nature can be a complete rear end in a top hat.

So quick question about using regular old Round-Up/Glyphosate. I saw a clip of This Old House talk about applying it to a foam brush to hit grass that it growing around other plants, basically painting it selectively rather than spraying. I tried this on Saturday and I'm not seeing and results. How long should I wait to try and reapply?

Roundup works best on things that are actively and vigorously growing, but even then it usually takes a few days or a week for the plant to start yellowing/wilting. If stuff isn't growing super fast, it's not gonna die super fast. I sprayed a bunch of stuff sunday and it's been perfect sunny 75 degree days since then and I'm not really seeing any yellowing yet. Sometimes on a hot summer day it'll make stuff wilt in hours, but usually it's a few days. Give it 10 days and reapply if needed?

Chad Sexington
May 26, 2005

You say 'in bed with the Russians' like it's a bad thing...

NomNomNom posted:

Is the drip line freeze proof? Or do you have to take it all up and store it for the winter? I'd imagine you can't blow it our with air like a sprinkler system.

Definitely not freeze proof.

Still figuring it out, but I'll probably be reorganizing my initial setup and adding some switches. Gotta put the true drip-feeders at the front of the line and make the ones that get the broader spray in the back because they require different run times.

Solkanar512
Dec 28, 2006



Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

Roundup works best on things that are actively and vigorously growing, but even then it usually takes a few days or a week for the plant to start yellowing/wilting. If stuff isn't growing super fast, it's not gonna die super fast. I sprayed a bunch of stuff sunday and it's been perfect sunny 75 degree days since then and I'm not really seeing any yellowing yet. Sometimes on a hot summer day it'll make stuff wilt in hours, but usually it's a few days. Give it 10 days and reapply if needed?

Perfect, thanks for that!

Wallet
Jun 19, 2006



Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

Roundup works best on things that are actively and vigorously growing, but even then it usually takes a few days or a week for the plant to start yellowing/wilting. If stuff isn't growing super fast, it's not gonna die super fast. I sprayed a bunch of stuff sunday and it's been perfect sunny 75 degree days since then and I'm not really seeing any yellowing yet. Sometimes on a hot summer day it'll make stuff wilt in hours, but usually it's a few days. Give it 10 days and reapply if needed?

How safe is this to do near plants that you don't want to kill? I have a garden on one side of the fence that has lawn on the other side of it and despite sealing the bottom up with stone some grass still manages to sneak through.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

Solkanar512 posted:

So quick question about using regular old Round-Up/Glyphosate. I saw a clip of This Old House talk about applying it to a foam brush to hit grass that it growing around other plants, basically painting it selectively rather than spraying. I tried this on Saturday and I'm not seeing and results. How long should I wait to try and reapply?

Glyphosate's method of action is to interfere with water uptake. If the plant has been well watered (recent rains) before application and/or isn't growing quickly it can take weeks.

Jhet
Jun 3, 2013


Wallet posted:

How safe is this to do near plants that you don't want to kill? I have a garden on one side of the fence that has lawn on the other side of it and despite sealing the bottom up with stone some grass still manages to sneak through.

If you worry about spraying other things, wear a mask and spray the stuff closely or use a paintbrush on a day that itís not raining. Or stick a cardboard box as a barrier to stop any over spraying. Itís not going to get up and walk over once itís on what you want it on. You just need to be deliberate about where you put it and the plants you like should be just fine.

I had to do this with ivy for about four years, and the only thing that was affected was the ivy. It was incredibly established though, so it was a regular event.

lwoodio
Apr 4, 2008



I have been wanting to make a small garden, but due to my back yard being mostly mature maple trees, this is the only spot that gets full sun.



How bad of an idea is it to try to grow tomatoes here in a bed like this right up against the house? The wall is 22ft long.

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



lwoodio posted:

I have been wanting to make a small garden, but due to my back yard being mostly mature maple trees, this is the only spot that gets full sun.

How bad of an idea is it to try to grow tomatoes here in a bed like this right up against the house? The wall is 22ft long.


I would push it out a bit just so you can walk behind the raised bed to get to crops, if you have the room.

The bigger issue/fear that I've read about is potential termites in mulch right next to your house.

CommonShore
Jun 6, 2014

A true renaissance man




I just "planted" my wine cap mushrooms. Thus begin my adventures in mycoculture.

I mixed the spawn into a pail of fine wood chips and sawdust from my planer (think hamster bedding) put some into my newest compost heap, a scoop onto each tree that has wood chip mulch, made a few beds around the yard (particularly where there's tall grass and matted leaves), and then the remainder went into my big pile of wood chips that will become the paths in the greenhouse (which is projected to arrive on April 19).

Jan
Feb 26, 2008

The disruptive powers of excessive national fecundity may have played a greater part in bursting the bonds of convention than either the power of ideas or the errors of autocracy.

I've been having a bitch of a time getting er jing tiao pepper seeds to sprout (both using my own and the ones generously shared by Jhet), but it finally looks like I will have two plants this season.

The first one, I discovered by accident while I was digging out my dud seeds from my first two direct planting attempts. It seems like one seed from the first set had sifted deeper into the nursery pots and was struggling to reach the surface... Thankfully I noticed the little stem curving out without damaging it from my digging around, and left it closer to the surface.

Then I planted Jhet's seeds and I was about to give up on them too when I noticed a second stem starting to poke through, two weeks later.

I'm pretty surprised at how tricky these were compared to other peppers and nightshades from seed stores, but I suppose those stores have tricks to improve germination rates. I've never had much luck just shoving old tomatoes into my pots hoping for volunteers the following season.

Pinus Porcus
May 14, 2019

Ranger McFriendly


lwoodio posted:

I have been wanting to make a small garden, but due to my back yard being mostly mature maple trees, this is the only spot that gets full sun.



How bad of an idea is it to try to grow tomatoes here in a bed like this right up against the house? The wall is 22ft long.



It looks like you have a masonry or stone siding and that there are no vents in your foundation, so it may not be as big of a deal, but where I live it's recommended not to have plants/plant beds up against your house. This is because it's super damp and placing plants and raised beds too close can result in rotting your siding (or encouraging termites and carpenter ants), encouraging moss growth (so again, siding damage), and may result in blocking some of the crawl space vents, so deteriorating the air flow under your house.

Again, maybe not an issue in your case, but stuff to be aware of.

silicone thrills
Jan 9, 2008

Enjoy Nature While It Lasts




All of the native plants I bought - red currant, salmon berry, thimbleberry, woodland strawberries, miners lettuce, pacific crab apple, gooseberry, evergreen huckleberry - everything survived the winter and after less than 2 years one of my currants is flowering. I'm SO excited.

Put some sugar snaps in the ground and my butter lettuce is growing huge. I think this is going to be a fantastic summer for me. I dont think i've ever been this excited about my garden in my life.

altho im sure we will end up having some sort of massive heat wave dry spell that murders my plants but im optimistic.

Since i got like 95% of the ivy cleared from my yard over the last 3 years im finally going to start working on terracing the hills a little too.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



Re: saving tomato seeds you have to ferment them before you can dry and save them.

I did it with some store bought kumoto tomatoes last year and stuck some in a pot with some coir not expecting much a few weeks ago and they are sprouting up fine and look like they will be healthy baby plants.

Hexigrammus
May 22, 2006

Cheech Wizard stories are clean, wholesome, reflective truths that go great with the marijuana munchies and a blow job.


NomNomNom posted:

Is the drip line freeze proof? Or do you have to take it all up and store it for the winter? I'd imagine you can't blow it our with air like a sprinkler system.

Every run terminates at a valve so I can open the valve, hook a compressor up to the supply manifold, and blow the line out. Not 100% effective (especially with a little pancake compressor) but the drip line is under mulch and seems to be able to take well below freezing temperatures without damage from whatever water is left in the tubes. I installed the supply manifold where all the valves and filters are such that it will drain via gravity alone if need be.

So far the only repairs needed in the spring have been from me using a sickle to clear the asparagus stalks. My technique sucks - I keep chopping into the soil instead of grazing the surface. At least I only have one line that needs patching this spring - a definite improvement over previous years.



silicone thrills posted:



All of the native plants I bought - red currant, salmon berry, thimbleberry, woodland strawberries, miners lettuce, pacific crab apple, gooseberry, evergreen huckleberry - everything survived the winter and after less than 2 years one of my currants is flowering. I'm SO excited.

Put some sugar snaps in the ground and my butter lettuce is growing huge. I think this is going to be a fantastic summer for me. I dont think i've ever been this excited about my garden in my life.

altho im sure we will end up having some sort of massive heat wave dry spell that murders my plants but im optimistic.

Since i got like 95% of the ivy cleared from my yard over the last 3 years im finally going to start working on terracing the hills a little too.


That's cool. I'm starting develop an appreciation for native plants. I'm converting one of the outer beds to perennial vegetables. I actually bought some miner's lettuce seeds - they're supposed to be a larger than normal variety. There's been no sign of anything from the seeds yet but instead of tossing the miners lettuce I've been weeding out of the other beds I've been transplanting them to the permabed. My weeds are now organized, and my wife is giving me funny looks.

We have a red currant at the end of the bed that a friend gave us. Had a problem with worms in the fruit the first year but putting insect netting over the bush when the bugs are flying seems to have kept them out last year. I need to check my notes and see when that time is.

sexy tiger boobs
Aug 23, 2002

Up shit creek with a turd for a paddle.



Thumposaurus posted:

Re: saving tomato seeds you have to ferment them before you can dry and save them.

I did it with some store bought kumoto tomatoes last year and stuck some in a pot with some coir not expecting much a few weeks ago and they are sprouting up fine and look like they will be healthy baby plants.

The problem with this is that if they're not heirloom your mater babies won't be the same as their parents. I'd wager that those fancy packaged tomatoes are some kind of cross.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



Yeah it was more of a way of testing the method for future seed saving endeavors.
If they don't produce any fruits or something different I'm OK with it. We'll see what happens.

Ok Comboomer
Oct 20, 2007



I posted about this Japanese green maple in the bonsai thread, but itís kinda dead at the moment and this thread occasionally hosts garden tree chat.





Iím really happy with the shape and branch pattern on the tree, but its trunk is way too tall/thin/straight.

Iíd like to shorten/thicken it and make the tree look more proportional as a future bonsai.

That leads me to two possible next steps:

1) leave the tree as-is, prune branches as necessary, try to naturally thicken the trunk and main branches over time.

Treeís about 3í right now, maybe a smidge shorter. I wouldnít want it any taller. That trunk is still gonna be too tall and too straight for my liking, but maybe it gets air layered down in the future.

- - - - - -

2) air layer the main trunk roughly halfway up while itís still young and green. I would perform the air layering this weekend and aim to separate the top and bottom in Aug/Sept.

If I do this:

Does the cambium layer need to be removed in order to successfully perform an air layering? The trunk is quite visibly green. Could I just put a slit pot+soil around it now without any cutting or hormone powder and get it to start throwing out good roots?

And what can I do to preserve the original roots and trunk if I want to try to get two living trees out of this?

From what Iíve read, I should be aiming to do the layering ASAP so that I can shoot for an Aug-Sept. separation. Iím assuming I wonít get any fresh branches coming out of the original lower trunk before winter. Just hold onto the stump and hope for the best come spring 2022?

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




I have a friend who is a great gardener and has only occasionally been able to get Japanese maples to air layer. Sheís done it quite a bit and had maybe a 50% success rate. I think Iíd try it on one of the branches and not the main trunk. Then youíve got a small branch-tree you can do whatever with and you havenít hosed up your nice (and likely expensive) big tree. Even if you did get the main trunk to air layer, youíd be trying to support the entire crown of the tree on just those few little roots.

I think if you let those branches grow out a bit and then weigh/tie them down to get more of a weeping/mounding shape it wonít look so bare. Idk what variety, but some are more suited to particular growth habits than others.

Ok Comboomer
Oct 20, 2007



Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

I have a friend who is a great gardener and has only occasionally been able to get Japanese maples to air layer. Sheís done it quite a bit and had maybe a 50% success rate. I think Iíd try it on one of the branches and not the main trunk. Then youíve got a small branch-tree you can do whatever with and you havenít hosed up your nice (and likely expensive) big tree.

I spent $30 on it, but I see your point.

I thought about using it as an air-layer mother and eventually trunk chopping it down to a better size (why I was looking at the maples in the first place) but I donít know which main branches would look better as their own tree moreso than they do in their current shape.

Gawd- At this rate Iím gonna end up buying 1-2 more at Home Despot before they sell out, either for air layering/trunk chopping purposes, or to try trunk fusing this sucker.

Actually, a better call would be to bulk buy a bunch of bare-root seedlings and try trunk fusing with those. Maybe get coralbark Acer palmatum and try making pinstripes :P

I could always graft branches, etc in the future as well.

Solkanar512
Dec 28, 2006



Ok Comboomer posted:

I spent $30 on it, but I see your point.

I thought about using it as an air-layer mother and eventually trunk chopping it down to a better size (why I was looking at the maples in the first place) but I donít know which main branches would look better as their own tree moreso than they do in their current shape.

Gawd- At this rate Iím gonna end up buying 1-2 more at Home Despot before they sell out, either for air layering/trunk chopping purposes, or to try trunk fusing this sucker.

Actually, a better call would be to bulk buy a bunch of bare-root seedlings and try trunk fusing with those. Maybe get coralbark Acer palmatum and try making pinstripes :P

I could always graft branches, etc in the future as well.

Yeah, don't buy your japanese maples from home depot.

Ok Comboomer
Oct 20, 2007



Solkanar512 posted:

Yeah, don't buy your japanese maples from home depot.

In general? Or do you mean if I get trees for grafts?

Plenty of trees come out of commercial nursery stock, and sometimes that includes places like Home Depot

I didnít set out to buy a maple when I went to Home Depot. But I saw a tree that I liked and everything looked really healthy on it and I thought the price was really good so I grabbed it

Ok Comboomer fucked around with this message at 17:15 on Apr 10, 2021

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


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Grimey Drawer

Ok Comboomer posted:

In general? Or do you mean if I get trees for grafts?

Yes, in general. Of course their stuff comes from the same local commercial nurseries as everyone else. But it's hit and miss if they're being cared for properly once they get tom LowesDepot. Chances are high that they aren't.

Wallet
Jun 19, 2006



Motronic posted:

Yes, in general. Of course their stuff comes from the same local commercial nurseries as everyone else. But it's hit and miss if they're being cared for properly once they get tom LowesDepot. Chances are high that they aren't.

Yeah, don't buy stuff that has been sitting at Home Depot, but stuff that has literally showed up same day is generally going to be fine (and usually cheap).

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

Wallet posted:

Yeah, don't buy stuff that has been sitting at Home Depot, but stuff that has literally showed up same day is generally going to be fine (and usually cheap).

Yup, exactly this. Unless they stabbed the root ball with the fork truck you're good if it's just showed up. Anything that's been there for any length of time is a crapshoot.

Ok Comboomer
Oct 20, 2007



Motronic posted:

Yes, in general. Of course their stuff comes from the same local commercial nurseries as everyone else. But it's hit and miss if they're being cared for properly once they get tom LowesDepot. Chances are high that they aren't.

well yeah, duh. My tree got there that week and wasnít sitting there for more than 3-4 days, max. It remains in what looks like excellent health.

I get what youíre saying but also you seem to have me confused with somebody who doesnít know how to pick healthy plants or plants that look ok. A lot of my favorite euphorbias and succulents that get featured in the Horticulture Thread got originally picked up at a HD or Loweís in the last like 3 yearsógranted a lot of them are from real nurseries and serious plant stores too, but I donít discriminate if it looks like I can get something I want for relatively little cash.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

I'm sorry to have not thoroughly investigating your post history before responding.

HIJK
Nov 25, 2012

People were stupid, sometimes. They thought the Library was a dangerous place because of all the magical books, which was true enough, but what made it really one of the most dangerous places there could ever be was the simple fact that it was a library.


How do you know when something has just been delivered, do you ask an employee?

Ok Comboomer
Oct 20, 2007



HIJK posted:

How do you know when something has just been delivered, do you ask an employee?

if it wasnít there the week before?

Fitzy Fitz
May 14, 2005






HIJK posted:

How do you know when something has just been delivered, do you ask an employee?

Employees at big box garden centers rarely know anything. They put somewhat knowledgeable people in appliances and hardware sometimes, but garden center mostly gets a random selection of high school kids. When I worked a summer at lowe's on "loading" duty I'd go hang out in the garden center when I had time because I could actually help people there.

Paradoxish
Dec 19, 2003

Will you stop going crazy in there?

My Home Depot has their tomatoes and peppers out even though we're still a few days from our last average frost date and our nighttime temperatures aren't reliably above 40F and keep flirting with low 30s.

Fitzy Fitz
May 14, 2005






My understanding is that inventory is shipped in by central/corporate and that stores have little say or control over it. Like, oh, we got a shipment of this stuff today and it says to put it over here.

Jhet
Jun 3, 2013


Paradoxish posted:

My Home Depot has their tomatoes and peppers out even though we're still a few days from our last average frost date and our nighttime temperatures aren't reliably above 40F and keep flirting with low 30s.

Thatís how they manage to sell two of the same thing to the same person. One now and one in 4 weeks when you might want to plant it.

Granted, Iíve been hardening off mine and the forecast is for high 60s by the end of the week (theyíre pushing 2í in 6Ē pots and need to get moved). So depending on your regular frost dates and planting calendars it may not really be that early. I wouldnít be surprised to see them this week by me. Unless youíre in Minnesota or another zone 4 in which case theyíre insane.

I still wouldnít buy them from LowesDepot unless I didnít have another option. But Iím also crazy about starting seeds (and will have to give plants away again this year).

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GreenBuckanneer
Sep 15, 2007




I have no idea about the soil acidity in my apartment's area, which is hella shaded too, so pretty much we're going to be growing a lot of things in either raised beds, or next to the road (urban), or pots

In zone 5b

it's about....a 5 minute walk? to the nearest river, but not near a beach area, and the soil hasn't really been taken care of in a long time. It tends to be rocky and have hard stuff to dig through after about 6 inches down.

Back in the day, my landlord threw down a box in like the one potentially sunny area (like 6 hours of sun, surrounded by an untrimmed apple tree that should have had the top chopped off so it'd keep the apple growth at easily pickable heights, and some sort of tall peach? tree that's never given any fruit ever, and a large maple in the back, and a fir farther back), but then filled it with rooty dirt so even if it could grow something, which they did....kind of... what ended up happening is the cherry tomato plant eventually got that white stuff on the leaves, it petered out (had enough for two salads, which was ok I guess) and some sweet peas also getting the same thing (probably that thing that affects tomatoes), and got tall, but never produced any fruit. The thyme, lavender, random strawberry plant? and rosemary kind of just existed but didn't really get harvested because there wasn't really anything to harvest. The only thing that seemed to work was some chives, chocolate mint, peppermint, parsley, and cherry tomatoes.

Given the fact that moss can grow here and hostas grow easily here, I'm gonna go on a limb and say the dirt is acidic. The landlady (we basically share a house) loves her daylillies (which grow back year after year without issues) and she loves her yard to be shaded. Obviously, that doesn't help if you want to grow poo poo, because, I've learned this past few months, most anything worth growing tends to want full 6+ hours of sun. There are a few areas where these are easier than others that get lots of sun, though, those areas are easily reachable by the folk who walk to work, who could steal berries or intentionally trample over the area (obviously we can put up some of that like, 1 foot plastic "fencing" you use to segregate areas but who knows. She also enjoys birds, which of course are going to be a pain to deal with since I want to plant some blueberries/raspberries, which seems I'll either need to plant out front in the area next to the road, and also cover them somehow (probably 300 sq ft area), but it'll need to share an area with existing bushes like Lilacs and rhododendrons.

I suppose as an aside, if those don't grow we also have plans to just plant as many flowers as possible. We've raked up some of the harder packed dirt the lillies and hostas have been growing in, then either threw down some ProMix on top, or in other areas, threw down some "Happy Frogģ Soil Conditioner" and have been growing inside in mini greenhouses some starters of anything we can possibly grow. Some have been great, some, not. Depends on what's what. There's a 2x30 foot slice of dirt between the houses that we replanted some lillies in that seem to like it, and is an area that gets lots of sun. However, seems whoever set up the paved driveway just decided to throw the gravel in there, and again, it's between two massive maples (not sure of the height, but you know, typical large maple that towers over a two story house) so we both have to dig up the dirt around the maple (the only way that the landlady will agree to take the maple down, is if it falls on the house), deal with heavy thick maple roots once we start to dig down enough, and gravelly dirt. I am kind of of the mind of setting up a 12" raised bed along this area to grow in and call the existing ground there a wash, though, i'd have to figure out how to make a thing that resists the winter frost heaving the box and having to keep emptying it out and fixing it year after year. This area we're thinking of just putting random flowers and sunflowers potentially. They'll have some stability to grow along the chainlink fence. We also cut down some bittersweet that was growing, that looks like it was growing out potentially from the root of the big maple.

Anyways, this is a lot of words to say we're trying a whole bunch of poo poo, and I can't wait to put this poo poo outside and free up my kitchen back from these grow lights and mini green houses (and potentially next year to shove all this poo poo in the basement instead, or the landlady's unused garage, ideally)

edit: also bought a Meyer Lemon plant and I really want that to flower but again, zone 5b so it's just in a pot right now inside. Nights are still too cold. I got one of those tiny plastic/metal greenhouse things (2x2x4) and set it up in the yard to protect against the cold weather for some of these pansies I just bought in the meantime.
edit2: I have been dutifully making sure to not overwater it by sticking my finger down to the second knuckle and only watering when it doesn't seem damp at the tip, and have a pot designed to not let the roots sit in the water, but it's still getting some yellow blochy spots on it, so I think, based on some googling, it's a magnesium deficiency, so I guess I'll add some epsom salt? seems simple enough
edit3: we've relocated the box above to the fence where some light comes in, along with some day lillies (these things apparently just do not give a gently caress lol) and are repurposing a different area that can grow some stuff there instead.

GreenBuckanneer fucked around with this message at 04:37 on Apr 11, 2021

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