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devmd01
Mar 7, 2006

Elektronik
Supersonik


So this has been a fun afternoon. I wanna punch the motherfucker that not only installed a shallow ceiling box (not their fault with the stud but still) but also used really long slotted screws for the mounting bracket.



The ugly generic poo poo I replaced:

devmd01 fucked around with this message at 23:16 on May 23, 2020

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wallaka
Jun 8, 2010

Least it wasn't a fucking red shell


Sanity check: I was looking at my main service panel to see if there were any open spaces, and counted 320 amps worth of breakers. Theyre all 220 though. This is fine, right?

B-Nasty
May 25, 2005



wallaka posted:

Sanity check: I was looking at my main service panel to see if there were any open spaces, and counted 320 amps worth of breakers. Theyre all 220 though. This is fine, right?

They probably aren't all 240v (double pole), because only certain appliances use that in a house. Maybe they are tandems?

In any case, you can't just add up the breaker handles to estimate the load. There's a specific load calc an electrician (or you, maybe) can perform to determine what your main service should be: https://zenfixit.com/free-electrica...rsn=1ca8e453_16

As a very rough rule of thumb: if you have a 200A service, you're almost certainly good to go. If you have natural gas and use it for heating/cooking/water heaters, you can usually get by with 100A, though more is always better.

Look at the main breaker. What does it say? List you major electric appliances (stove? dryer? water heater? electric car? AC? elec baseboard heat?) and house sq/ft and a good guess can be made.

Ferrule
Feb 23, 2007

Yo!

I hate post lights and I hate troubleshooting post lights.

wallaka
Jun 8, 2010

Least it wasn't a fucking red shell


B-Nasty posted:

They probably aren't all 240v (double pole), because only certain appliances use that in a house. Maybe they are tandems?

In any case, you can't just add up the breaker handles to estimate the load. There's a specific load calc an electrician (or you, maybe) can perform to determine what your main service should be: https://zenfixit.com/free-electrica...rsn=1ca8e453_16

As a very rough rule of thumb: if you have a 200A service, you're almost certainly good to go. If you have natural gas and use it for heating/cooking/water heaters, you can usually get by with 100A, though more is always better.

Look at the main breaker. What does it say? List you major electric appliances (stove? dryer? water heater? electric car? AC? elec baseboard heat?) and house sq/ft and a good guess can be made.

A/C, dryer, stove, water heater, and a breaker going to the secondary breaker panel inside the house. They should all be 240v as far as I can tell. Its a 2200 square foot split level house.

Bad Munki
Nov 4, 2008

We're all mad here.



Are there any rules I should be aware of as I plan my front porch extension as regards meter clearances and access? Heres what Im looking at right now:



I want to take the porch here and extend it along this part of the house. That means the deck would be right over the meter, though. Still plenty accessible, nothing will be blocking access from the ground there, but I wasnt sure if I need to account for clearance above the meter as well.

Of course Ill talk to the county inspector and well have to get cleared permits and all, but Im just trying to do some planning ahead of all that.

If thats strictly not allowed, would code generally allow for just extending the service entrance up to be above the deck? Im imagining a fairly low impact alteration of putting a (somewhat smaller?) box where the meter is and extending the service wires from there up about 6 in conduit to a new meter location above the deck. But Im not sure if thats allowed, either.

Blindeye
Sep 22, 2006

I can't believe I kissed you!


I think you would have to move the meter above the deck and ensure 30 inches of clearance around the box?

Bad Munki
Nov 4, 2008

We're all mad here.



Blindeye posted:

I think you would have to move the meter above the deck and ensure 30 inches of clearance around the box?

On all sides? Weird, it certainly doesn't have 30" to that chimney bump out there.

e: Oh, I think this is it:

1) 3 clearance in front of the meter (out from the wall)
2) 30 wide working space in front of meter (so 30 total, not 30 on each side, could be as little as 15 on both sides or presumably something weird like 30 on one side and 0 on the other?)
3) 6 headroom clearance or the meter height itself, whichever is higher.

That all sound about right? That last one is probably what will get me.

e again: Shoot, I think I mis-read it, it's actually 6'6", I'm sunk. Looks like I'll have to move the meter if I want to go through with this, oof. Sounds like service wires CAN be spliced, though, so I'm assuming we can just use splice where the meter was and run some conduit to a new box. Sounding more expensive by the moment, though.

Bad Munki fucked around with this message at 20:05 on May 26, 2020

wolrah
May 8, 2006
what?


At least as you've described it I think you're right, that headroom part is going to be your sticking point. The way I'd interpret those requirements would be to imagine you have a box, 6' x 3' x 2.5' with one of the 2.5' faces against the wall where the meter is. Nothing can be blocking that box.

Could you maybe step up that section of the deck to provide the required headroom? Make it maybe a built in table or something?

The first "brilliant idea" that came to my mind was to have the deck surface be able to hinge up and out of the way in that area, but even if that would be technically legit (I'm guessing probably not) any plan involving being "technically compliant" with code is probably a bad idea.

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Bad Munki
Nov 4, 2008

We're all mad here.



I think I have two options, but they are both just alternate locations for the meter. Either above the deck, or further around the side of the house there, still below deck, but the grade's on a pretty good slope so it gets sufficiently low enough before long. Like, a horizontal run of conduit from a box where the meter is now, running off to the right around that bump out. I easily have 6'6" over there. I dunno, I'll mark a line for where I want the band joist for the deck, and I'll wander around looking for sufficient clearance. but worst-case scenario, I just run it straight up above the deck.

Well, worst-case scenario, I can't do anything about it and the whole project is stillborn.

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