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WattsvilleBlues
Jan 25, 2005

Every demon wants his pound of flesh

Teriyaki Hairpiece posted:

The scariest and best audio recording of a King book is Steven Edwin himself reading the short story/novella 1408.

Listening to the audiobook version of From a Buick 8 is vastly superior to actually reading that book and I don't know why. I'd put that as my number 1 recommendation. Aggressively mediocre book, wonderful as audio.

Elaborate please!

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Untrustable
Mar 16, 2009

Goodness no, now that wouldn't do at all!


I have never listened to an audiobook. I just don't get what I'm supposed to do. When I'm reading my eyes have something to do, my hands are holding the Kindle. With an audiobook do I just stare off into space? I feel like I would fall asleep. I sound much older than my 30 years thinking these things but I don't get it. I should try it, but I'm serious: when I'm listening to an audiobook, what do I do?

Also non-weird audiobook related things: Joe Hill writes good books and good stories. About halfway through with Full Throttle and I've enjoyed every story, especially Late Returns.

scary ghost dog
Aug 5, 2007
Probation
Can't post for 25 days!


Untrustable posted:

I have never listened to an audiobook. I just don't get what I'm supposed to do. When I'm reading my eyes have something to do, my hands are holding the Kindle. With an audiobook do I just stare off into space? I feel like I would fall asleep. I sound much older than my 30 years thinking these things but I don't get it. I should try it, but I'm serious: when I'm listening to an audiobook, what do I do?

Also non-weird audiobook related things: Joe Hill writes good books and good stories. About halfway through with Full Throttle and I've enjoyed every story, especially Late Returns.

im with you here. if i get distracted and zone out while reading i can go back a few pages and miss nothing. but im way more likely to get distracted while listening to an audiobook, and its much more difficult and annoying to figure out how far to rewind it. plus, it takes much longer to listen to a book than to read it

Untrustable
Mar 16, 2009

Goodness no, now that wouldn't do at all!


The Audible commercials show a lone rancher lamenting that he can't sit under a tree and die listening to audiobooks so there must be something to it.

Mister Kingdom
Dec 14, 2005

And the tears that fall
On the city wall
Will fade away
With the rays of morning light

Untrustable posted:

I have never listened to an audiobook. I just don't get what I'm supposed to do. When I'm reading my eyes have something to do, my hands are holding the Kindle. With an audiobook do I just stare off into space? I feel like I would fall asleep. I sound much older than my 30 years thinking these things but I don't get it. I should try it, but I'm serious: when I'm listening to an audiobook, what do I do?

Also non-weird audiobook related things: Joe Hill writes good books and good stories. About halfway through with Full Throttle and I've enjoyed every story, especially Late Returns.

I listen to them on my daily walk, so maybe try that?

Untrustable
Mar 16, 2009

Goodness no, now that wouldn't do at all!


Yeah alright. I'm down for that. I'll also be camping the next two days, and maybe that'll do it. Well, maybe no headphones while camping because the ever looming threat of 30-50 feral hogs.

Crimpolioni
Mar 9, 2014



Untrustable posted:

I have never listened to an audiobook. I just don't get what I'm supposed to do. When I'm reading my eyes have something to do, my hands are holding the Kindle. With an audiobook do I just stare off into space? I feel like I would fall asleep. I sound much older than my 30 years thinking these things but I don't get it. I should try it, but I'm serious: when I'm listening to an audiobook, what do I do?

Also non-weird audiobook related things: Joe Hill writes good books and good stories. About halfway through with Full Throttle and I've enjoyed every story, especially Late Returns.

It's nice when you're walking/commuting/cleaning up around the house, etc.

Teriyaki Hairpiece
Dec 29, 2006

Ask me about my dream Frasier episode where Frasier and Bulldog oil their heads and then rub them together. It's definitely not a fetish of mine, I swear!

WattsvilleBlues posted:

Elaborate please!

From a Buick 8 is probably good as an audiobook because it's mostly people telling stories to one person.

The Berzerker
Feb 24, 2006

treat me like a dog


Yeah I treat audiobooks the same as podcasts, I listen to them while I clean, or commute (back when commuting existed), go for a walk, or doing something like playing Animal Crossing since you don't exactly need the sound on for games like that. I still am not an audiobook person, but I've listened to a few. Also great on planes and so forth.

Leavemywife
Feb 7, 2012

Taking the term "Koopaling" to a whole new level since 2016.


Grimey Drawer

Teriyaki Hairpiece posted:

From a Buick 8 is probably good as an audiobook because it's mostly people telling stories to one person.

I think that's why a lot of people don't like it as a book. It's not really heavily plotted, not building to a satisfying endgame; it's just people talking, shooting the poo poo about this guy's dad, which would be fantastic to hear about around a campfire or at a holiday meal, but not so much just written down.

Lt Jon Kavanaugh
Feb 8, 2012


Anyone read If It Bleeds? The title story with Holly was a bit bleh but the other stories were fun, was pretty funny reading two of them in particular in our new corona world.

Teriyaki Hairpiece
Dec 29, 2006

Ask me about my dream Frasier episode where Frasier and Bulldog oil their heads and then rub them together. It's definitely not a fetish of mine, I swear!

Leavemywife posted:

I think that's why a lot of people don't like it as a book. It's not really heavily plotted, not building to a satisfying endgame; it's just people talking, shooting the poo poo about this guy's dad, which would be fantastic to hear about around a campfire or at a holiday meal, but not so much just written down.

Well that's why it's nice in audio form while you're driving around or walking or playing some video game you don't have to pay a lot of attention to.

I don't think it's a 1:1 good book = good audiobook or vice versa I think they're two very different both fine ways to consume words. And I haaaate the overly performative audio books with the different voices and sound effects and garbage.

kenny powerzzz
Jan 20, 2010


Lt Jon Kavanaugh posted:

Anyone read If It Bleeds? The title story with Holly was a bit bleh but the other stories were fun, was pretty funny reading two of them in particular in our new corona world.

Working on it now. I absolutely flew through the chapters up until the Holly story. Even that one started out with a nice hook. But it’s been a chore to read much of it since.

Leavemywife
Feb 7, 2012

Taking the term "Koopaling" to a whole new level since 2016.


Grimey Drawer

Teriyaki Hairpiece posted:

Well that's why it's nice in audio form while you're driving around or walking or playing some video game you don't have to pay a lot of attention to.

I don't think it's a 1:1 good book = good audiobook or vice versa I think they're two very different both fine ways to consume words. And I haaaate the overly performative audio books with the different voices and sound effects and garbage.

I think that would be a good candidate for a mini series, really, to experience it. And I kinda like when an audio book goes full ham and cheese on their sound effects and voices. It's fun.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002



Grimey Drawer

I’ve mostly given up on reading actual books unless they’re obscure historical non-fiction about gender roles in the Middle Ages or some poo poo and even those I have trouble making time to read. Usually it’s audiobooks, even for non-fiction.

The last King books I actually read were The Regulators and Desperation so I ended on a really poor note.

Khizan
Jul 30, 2013



Untrustable posted:

I have never listened to an audiobook. I just don't get what I'm supposed to do. When I'm reading my eyes have something to do, my hands are holding the Kindle. With an audiobook do I just stare off into space? I feel like I would fall asleep. I sound much older than my 30 years thinking these things but I don't get it. I should try it, but I'm serious: when I'm listening to an audiobook, what do I do?

I used to be this way until just recently, but I've recently started to really enjoy them. The key for me was listening to books that I've already read. This lets me just enjoy the story without having to pay 100% attention to it, and it also means that I'm comfortable listening to it for 15 minutes here and 20 minutes there over a month or so without worrying about forgetting minor details and without wanting to just binge it all the way through to finish the story.

I like to listen to them while driving or while doing other tasks that keep my hands/eyes busy without really taking much brainpower. Cooking, eating, repetitive tasks like drilling 300 pilot holes in wooden spindles for a deck railing, etc.

bobjr
Oct 16, 2012

Roose is loose.



When I reread Salem's Lot I forgot how slow the build up is and how crazy things get after a certain point.

It's good it does that though.

Ugly In The Morning
Jul 1, 2010

Don't look at me-
I'm ugly in the morning
When the headaches gone
The sun is not.
Forgot to turn the alarm
On - on


Pillbug

Krispy Wafer posted:

I’ve mostly given up on reading actual books unless they’re obscure historical non-fiction about gender roles in the Middle Ages or some poo poo and even those I have trouble making time to read. Usually it’s audiobooks, even for non-fiction.

The last King books I actually read were The Regulators and Desperation so I ended on a really poor note.

Desperation was pretty good but regulators was dire.

I also think he should have had Desperation be the Bachman one and Regulators be the King one. Desperation had a tone much closer to the Bachman books.

Pope Corky the IX
Dec 18, 2006

What are you looking at?

I feel like I'm loving crazy because I love the Regulators and felt Desperation was a similar to so many stories he had done prior.

The Berzerker
Feb 24, 2006

treat me like a dog


It's fine. I prefer The Regulators as well. I feel like this thread has compared the two books about a million times before. To me, Desperation is probably the better book, but Regulators is just such a loving weird one, he took such a big swing with it (to be fair I think he missed, I just think it's so weird that it's admirable). I always loved the way the two covers went together on my dad's bookshelf.

Teriyaki Hairpiece
Dec 29, 2006

Ask me about my dream Frasier episode where Frasier and Bulldog oil their heads and then rub them together. It's definitely not a fetish of mine, I swear!

There's a pretty good Regulators audiobook from the 90's.

BiggerBoat
Sep 26, 2007

For that you get the head...

the tail...

the whole damned thing.

Ugly In The Morning posted:

Desperation was pretty good but regulators was dire.

I also think he should have had Desperation be the Bachman one and Regulators be the King one. Desperation had a tone much closer to the Bachman books.

Desperation started off great ("You have the right to remain silent. I'm going to kill you. If you choose not to remain silent anything you say could be used against you"). Also, I've dealt with small town cops, cops in the middle of nowhere and cops in general so I could immediately relate and when it became obvious we had an unhinged lone wolf cop who framed 2 people, I was expecting a crazy, sadistic serial killer guy or something that kept weak people locked up in his private little jail and hosed with them.

Instead we got Tak, demon possession, mines full of ancient artifacts, buncha bats and I forget whatever the gently caress else but it started to really suck about 1/3 to 1/2 of the way through. God drat it, King. You hooked me in HARD to what could have been a really cool story of an isolated, psychotic police officer that heard devil voices in his head locking up innocent people in Death Valley and using his own rustic jail for his terrible schizophrenic purposes; a cool prison break adventure filled with torture, sadism, murder, police corruption, escape attempts and all that scary poo poo but, no.

Let's do "it was all MAGIC" again.

nate fisher
Mar 3, 2004

We've Got To Go Back


Audible is great if you run or while commuting. That is the only times I ever use it. As Khizan said it works best for books you have already that read. That is why I have almost every good King novel in Audible format because I read it years ago. That way if I get distracted while running, I'm not lost when I return my focus.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002



Grimey Drawer

I honestly can’t remember which book was Desperation and which one was Regulators. It’s all a fuzzy haze where I vaguely remember Tag and a town with Buddy Holly or some poo poo. It’s entirely possible I liked one more than another, but neither had any memory staying power.

Just After Sunset is another one I really didn’t like. I didn’t even get past the first short story where it was essentially, ‘introduce a new character, get some back story, murder character immediately’. Is it worth another effort?

Untrustable
Mar 16, 2009

Goodness no, now that wouldn't do at all!


In The Tall Grass loving sucked. I've enjoyed Joe Hill's stuff far more than his dad's recently and In The Tall Grass is a join venture in fuckin sucking. Yeah I'm watching the movie right now. drat I'm dumb. I'm hoping it'll be like The Terror, where the book fell off hard but the show was good all the way through.

The Berzerker
Feb 24, 2006

treat me like a dog


Yeah it was a pretty dumb movie.

Brocktoon
Jul 18, 2006

Before we engage we should hang back and study their tactics.


Oh good god was It: Chapter Two ducking terrible. Why did every monster look like Large Marge from Pee Wee’s Bug Adventure?

Crindee
Nov 16, 2005

LOOK LIKE EMERIL

That old lady darting around nude in the background did manage to creep me out, then oops nevermind she's a big goofy CGI thing

Naz al-Ghul
Mar 23, 2014

Honorarily Japanese


Brocktoon posted:

Oh good god was It: Chapter Two ducking terrible. Why did every monster look like Large Marge from Pee Wee’s Bug Adventure?

It: Chapter Two didn't have any of the ominous vibe or tension of the first movie. Honestly the CGI wasn't even the worst bit. There were terrible moments of CGI in the original movie (Painting Lady, anyone?) but the problem of this movie is pretty unique compared to the other ones.

It might be a bit of a hot take, but the adult actors were amateur hour compared to the child actors. I didn't like a single thing about the adults. Bill Denbrough as a kid was great in the first movie and whenever we returned to his actor in Chapter Two. While they didn't make him the unquestioned trusted leader of the Loser's Club that he was in the book, he felt like he was taking that leadership role with confidence even through his stutter. Eddie's child actor was picture perfect as a traumatized germophobe lied to by his mother about his health. Beverly was also excellently portrayed as an abused young girl starting to open up around her new friends. Richie Tozier was the king of them all however. Absolutely flawless acting from that kid, you couldn't pick a better kid for that role if you tried. The adults however didn't feel that way. They felt half-assed. Adult!Richie couldn't hold a candle to his childhood counterpart and came across less amusing and even less compelling than he should've been (that might have been because of the terrible choice for his character to make him a standup comedian rather than a talk radio host. Seriously, at least make him a podcaster or something. What a needless change). Bill didn't feel like a leader half the time and Bev was just there. Eddie was perhaps the best of the adults though.

In all honesty, the movie felt like it was trying to be a comedy some of the time. The fight with Henry Bowers I think had a rock track to it? I don't remember too well but it didn't feel suspenseful at all and his escape to attack the adult Loser's Club was incredibly suspenseful. Tom loving Rogan was nowhere to be seen which was perhaps the biggest crime for the suspense of the movie though it makes sense on one hand since he was established as a threat in the beginning of the book and was present throughout. We only have one of two movies to have him do his thing, and that might've been distracting from the main villain of these movies. On the other hand, he was scarier than Pennywise with his slow warpath to Derry knowing what went on inside his head. You were really dreading him meeting up with the Loser's Club though he didn't and died like an idiot at the hands of the Spider. The ending wasn't great either. Derry floating away was a shitshow in the book but bullying Pennywise to death was just lame.

This combined with the fact that the effects weren't great made the conclusion a lackluster experience compared to the amazing first movie.

Teach
Mar 28, 2008



Pillbug

Best bit of the second movie was that everyone was always ragging on Bill Denbrough (including Stephen King in his cameo) for not being able to write endings.

Canuckistan
Jan 14, 2004

I'm the greatest thing since World War III.



Soiled Meat

BiggerBoat posted:

a cool prison break adventure filled with torture, sadism, murder, police corruption, escape attempts and all that scary poo poo but, no.



Kind of sounds like In the Deathroom, the short story in Everything's Eventual.

BaldDwarfOnPCP
Jun 26, 2019



Canuckistan posted:

Kind of sounds like In the Deathroom, the short story in Everything's Eventual.

Speaking of audiobooks (right?) that was actually in Blood and Smoke before Everything’s Eventual and the first audiobook I ever listened to. I still remember King himself reading the waiter in Lunch at the Gotham Cafe.




Eeeeeeeeeeeeeee

Canuckistan
Jan 14, 2004

I'm the greatest thing since World War III.



Soiled Meat

BaldDwarfOnPCP posted:


Eeeeeeeeeeeeeee

I thought that was the Crimson King. Same person?? King metaverse expanded!

Brocktoon
Jul 18, 2006

Before we engage we should hang back and study their tactics.


It: Chapter Two’s biggest flaw is that Mike calling all the losers back to Derry and telling them they have to explore the town and examine their past to relearn what happened is the perfect setup as a framing device for the first movie...except they did it for the second movie, which means 2/3 of already way too long runtime is spent getting the characters up to speed on what the audience already knows.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002



Grimey Drawer

Has anyone seen any behind the scenes stories about IT: Chapter 1 and 2? It feels like the studio was hedging it's bets on the first one by making it a relatively stand alone film. The sequel didn't get green-lit or the new characters cast until after it was a bonafide hit.

I think they did a good job of integrating the two movies, but it will always be clunkier than it should have been had they filmed the cast at the same time.

BiggerBoat
Sep 26, 2007

For that you get the head...

the tail...

the whole damned thing.

Count me in as liking both movies.

I went into IT:C2 with low expectations based on the reviews, which my have been part of it, but I found it a pleasant surprise and didn't get the hate. I'd put that book in the "unfilmable" category for the most part and overall I'd say they did a pretty great job with IT.

Also don't get the one poster who said the grown up actors poo poo the bed with Chapter 2 compared to the kid actors. The acting was the least of that movie's problems. I'd reserve that criticism for the TV series where the kids completely out shined the better known adult actors. Which was weird since there WAS a lot of talent there. We know John Ritter, Harry Anderson and Annette O'Toole are capable of good poo poo but, man, they sucked - especially compared to IT C2.

I thought the adults were fine and really liked both movies. The TV series, aside from a few kid actors and Tim Curry was loving terrible.

Naz al-Ghul
Mar 23, 2014

Honorarily Japanese


Brocktoon posted:

It: Chapter Two’s biggest flaw is that Mike calling all the losers back to Derry and telling them they have to explore the town and examine their past to relearn what happened is the perfect setup as a framing device for the first movie...except they did it for the second movie, which means 2/3 of already way too long runtime is spent getting the characters up to speed on what the audience already knows.

I was thinking that It would probably work better as an Amazon miniseries rather than a full-fledged movie. Salem's Lot (my absolute favorite book by Stephen King) would be a phenomenal movie if they bothered to make the movie good.

Dr. Faustus
Feb 18, 2001



Grimey Drawer

Naz al-Ghul posted:

Salem's Lot (my absolute favorite book by Stephen King) would be a phenomenal movie if they bothered to make the movie good.
It's difficult to pick a favorite SK novel but I think Salem's Lot might be mine.

They did a miniseries of it that was pretty true to the book. I'd recommend it but it's probably not for everyone. It is a mini-series after all.

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0355987/

bobjr
Oct 16, 2012

Roose is loose.



Salem's lot could be a good movie, but they would have to set it in it's original time period I think. I haven't put too much thought into it, but I think that's probably better than modernizing it.

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ghostwritingduck
Aug 26, 2004

"I hope you like waking up at 6 a.m. and having your favorite things destroyed. P.S. Forgive me because I'm cuter than that $50 wire I just ate."


bobjr posted:

Salem's lot could be a good movie, but they would have to set it in it's original time period I think. I haven't put too much thought into it, but I think that's probably better than modernizing it.

Reading The Institute was weird, because it both felt like classic Stephen King AND had multiple Trump digs.

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