Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
«177 »
  • Post
  • Reply
Lucid Smog
Dec 13, 2004
Easily understood air pollution.

Some bozos flipped the house I bought a couple of years ago. They did a decent job as far as flippers go, but certainly skimped on some things.

For instance, they added a bathroom on the upstairs. They ran CPVC for it (and flipped the hot and cold water lines). The rest of the house is all copper. I see that they used to gold primer+cement all in one, which I couldn't find at Lowe's. So I used purple primer and whatever color the cement comes in when I un-did the hot/cold screw up.

I have heard that some jurisdictions forbid the use of combined primer+cement. I can't figure out if mine does (Baltimore County, MD). I know CPVC is allowed for both hot and cold, but I gather I will have problems with it in the future. Hopefully I'm out of here before then Is there any real different between splitting out the primer stage?

Also, does the same prime and then cement rule apply to drain lines? I'm going to be adding an auger access to some 1.5" drain pipe in my basement soon.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

fishhooked
Nov 14, 2006
[img]https://forumimages.somethingawful.com/images/newbie.gif[/img]



Nap Ghost

Any tips on loosening up old galvanized fittings? I'm having a hell of a time trying to replace part of my hot supply line to the shower.

grover
Jan 23, 2002

PEW PEW PEW







Have you tried PB Blaster or WD40?

Lucid Smog posted:

Also, does the same prime and then cement rule apply to drain lines? I'm going to be adding an auger access to some 1.5" drain pipe in my basement soon.
Yes, it's exactly the same. Purple primer, plus the appropriate cement.

As to the yellow one-step cement... it's for CPVC only, and whether or not it's legal depends on the local code. I don't see anything in IBC that would prohibit it. If local codes specifically require a pre-application of primer, it may be a "letter of the law" thing.

Turd Herder
May 20, 2008

BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK


fishhooked posted:

Any tips on loosening up old galvanized fittings? I'm having a hell of a time trying to replace part of my hot supply line to the shower.

i'd try a harbor freight pipe wrench and a cheater bar. You can also heat up the fitting to make it expand so its easier to loosen the pipe inside of it.

fishhooked
Nov 14, 2006
[img]https://forumimages.somethingawful.com/images/newbie.gif[/img]



Nap Ghost

access space is limited so I cant get a cheater bar in. I'll try heating up the fitting and knocking the poo poo out of it.

How often do you guys get calls to re-plumb a 100-year+ house, and is it a job you look forward to?

Turd Herder
May 20, 2008

BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK


fishhooked posted:

access space is limited so I cant get a cheater bar in. I'll try heating up the fitting and knocking the poo poo out of it.

How often do you guys get calls to re-plumb a 100-year+ house, and is it a job you look forward to?

i've never actually replumbed a house that old. I have done some remodels where you just find odd stuff. Also re plumbing a pole building we found a bunch of dead rats in this wall. It was pretty odd.

kid sinister
Nov 16, 2002


fishhooked posted:

access space is limited so I cant get a cheater bar in. I'll try heating up the fitting and knocking the poo poo out of it.

How often do you guys get calls to re-plumb a 100-year+ house, and is it a job you look forward to?

If that pipe you're trying to loosen is also 100+ years old and rusty, you'll probably break off that rusty steel trying to get it out. That being said, I've found penetrating oil works better than WD40 in most cases. One thing you can try is to apply the oil, let is soak in for 5 minutes, then come back and hit it with a hammer a few times. If it isn't loose yet, reapply oil and repeat.

Turd Herder
May 20, 2008

BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK


kid sinister posted:

If that pipe you're trying to loosen is also 100+ years old and rusty, you'll probably break off that rusty steel trying to get it out. That being said, I've found penetrating oil works better than WD40 in most cases. One thing you can try is to apply the oil, let is soak in for 5 minutes, then come back and hit it with a hammer a few times. If it isn't loose yet, reapply oil and repeat.

No most likely he'll crush the pipe. Unless he grips the pipe with the rear teeth of the pipe wrench (so the opening of the pipe wrench is bigger then the pipe)

benitocereno
Apr 14, 2005



Doctor Rope

Just wanted to post an update- I crawled into my crawlspace for the first time this weekend and found there's more than adequate insulation for running the pipe under my house (in fact, there are several under there already that appear to be working fine).

However, I noticed when I was under there that it was awfully cold... and then I discovered blowing cobwebs. This led me to find that a main duct off of my AC unit was only half attached... I was blowing cold air into my crawlspace by the truck load. Having only been in this house for only a month, we figured that the AC unit was just old. It's still old and inefficient, but it sure does blow a lot more cold air now.

So, thanks to the advice this thread, I got to fix that and save myself a ton of money there as well . Just wanted to thank you again!

fishhooked
Nov 14, 2006
[img]https://forumimages.somethingawful.com/images/newbie.gif[/img]



Nap Ghost

Well I was able to get the galv. pipe loose and replace the hot waterline for the upstairs shower up to the hot riser. Sadly with all that bashing around on the pipe I must have knocked some additional rust loose because the pressure to the shower is still non existent and now the pressure to the faucet is low for the hot and cold.

I'm thinking I should stop pussyfooting it and replace the riser for both hot and cold and run new supply lines for all the fixtures up-stairs (shower, faucet and toilet). I'll probably just run the new risers parallel with the existing pipes. It will be a vertical run of about 12-15', does this mean I'll need to cut into the first floor wall and anchor the pipes midway, or can I anchor at the start and end of the vertical run?

I'll probably use copper for the riser and stick with pex for the supply lines. Those sharkbite connections are expensive, but drat they are easy to work with. I'll probably replace the shower fixture workings as well, just in case rust has gotten in the cartridge.

Turd Herder
May 20, 2008

BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK


Ya half inch copper doesn't have to be support as often. I believe its 5ft for ridgid copper. You should be fine. and remember to ream your copper pipe to reduce the chance of added wear.

kid sinister
Nov 16, 2002


You're probably right in that by hitting around on the pipes, you worked loose all kinds of flecks of rust. However, replacing your lines won't fix an existing blockage at the fixtures.

Check all your faucets first. Plug their drains so you don't lose any parts, unscrew all of the diffusers off their spouts and see if your pressure is any better. Clean out any rust or hard water deposits that have built up in them and put them back together.

LegoMan
Mar 17, 2002

ting ting ting


College Slice

I guess this is the right thread. Would a bad wax seal on a toilet cause a slow leak (constant emptying/filling of rear tank)? I recently replaced the wax seal as we have a leak from the toilet in the garage (long story) and about 2 months later I got a slow tank leak that got slowly worst. I just replaced the tank bolts / flapper valve today and it seems to have slowed it quite a bit but I just heard the tank fill again and the only thing I can think of that could be fishy is the wax seal (it was my first replacement and the seal had been sitting in the garage for months).

kid sinister
Nov 16, 2002


No, it wouldn't. That could be a couple things:

1. check for leaks under the tank, including your new bolts and where the fill valve comes through the bottom of the tank.
2. the fill valve may need adjusting. Is the floater on the fill valve set higher than the overflow tube?
3. if adjusting it doesn't work, then the valve inside the fill valve may be getting weak. You'll have to replace the fill valve.

FidgetyRat
Feb 1, 2005

Contemplating the suckiness of people since 1982


I'm pretty plumbing dumb.

Is PVC the new standard vs. copper pipes these days? I see alot of homes going in with mostly PVC in the walls. Do they hold up better then the metal counterparts? I figure the PVC adds a bit a flexibility which would also prevent pipe rattle..

Turd Herder
May 20, 2008

BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK


FidgetyRat posted:

I'm pretty plumbing dumb.

Is PVC the new standard vs. copper pipes these days? I see alot of homes going in with mostly PVC in the walls. Do they hold up better then the metal counterparts? I figure the PVC adds a bit a flexibility which would also prevent pipe rattle..

Its all about speed and price really. Pvc is cheaper then doing cast iron, galv or copper drain lines. On the West coast ABS is the standard. ABS/PVC are great because roots will not grow into them when there in the ground.

One benefit to Cast Iron is sound reduction.

Personally i like ABS alot more then Pvc. Since Pvc gets brittle in my experience.

Turd Herder
May 20, 2008

BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK


LegoMan posted:

I guess this is the right thread. Would a bad wax seal on a toilet cause a slow leak (constant emptying/filling of rear tank)? I recently replaced the wax seal as we have a leak from the toilet in the garage (long story) and about 2 months later I got a slow tank leak that got slowly worst. I just replaced the tank bolts / flapper valve today and it seems to have slowed it quite a bit but I just heard the tank fill again and the only thing I can think of that could be fishy is the wax seal (it was my first replacement and the seal had been sitting in the garage for months).

Remember a toilet shouldn't ever rock. That includes the tank. If the tank rocks or wiggles that could be where your leak is. If the bowl rocks it could not be bolted down all the way. The floor could be level also. Or the flange (the drain where the wax ring goes on the floor) could not be screwed down proper.

The water level in the tank should be about one inch below the over flow. Its simple to adjust the float to make the water level the right height.

LegoMan
Mar 17, 2002

ting ting ting


College Slice

Everything else seems tight so I guess I'll have to try another float valve. It definitely leaks slower now than before but it still leaks which bothers me as a guy who does troubleshooting (albeit not in plumbing) for a living. Changing one thing should either fix the problem or be no change. WHich means I did something wrong in my fix. The toilet doesn't rock, nor does the tank everything seems sturdy.

Dobermaniac
Jun 10, 2004


Yay for leaky stuff! I found a leak under my kitchen sink. Could I just take the fitting off and put some teflon tape where the thread is? Is there any thing else I need to look at while taking the pipe off? Thanks


Click here for the full 800x600 image.



Click here for the full 600x800 image.

Turd Herder
May 20, 2008

BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK


Dobermaniac posted:

Yay for leaky stuff! I found a leak under my kitchen sink. Could I just take the fitting off and put some teflon tape where the thread is? Is there any thing else I need to look at while taking the pipe off? Thanks



Teflon tape won't seal it. I'd go to the hardware store and either get a new plastic gasket that fits over the pipe and in the nut . Or replace the whole piece. I imagine either the gasket wore out or wasnt installed correctly. I'd take it apart and inspect the pipe and the nut. Make sure nothing is cross threaded.

FidgetyRat
Feb 1, 2005

Contemplating the suckiness of people since 1982


Rd Rash 1000cc posted:

Personally i like ABS alot more then Pvc. Since Pvc gets brittle in my experience.

How can you tell the difference between ABS and PVC? The stuff that seems to be going in my walls is black..

kid sinister
Nov 16, 2002


FidgetyRat posted:

How can you tell the difference between ABS and PVC? The stuff that seems to be going in my walls is black..


ABS is black, PVC is white.

FCKGW
May 21, 2006

aaaaaaaaaa
AAAAAAAAAAA
HHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!




I live in a 50-year old house and the water pressure is absolute garbage. Water out of the shower head shoots out about 6 inches max.

Do I need a repiping? What kind of things can I do to fix it myself if possible?

Turd Herder
May 20, 2008

BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK


There is so many things that can be taken into consideration. Is the buliding main not sized properly( its probably a half inch pipe going into the house). What type of piping is installed (galvy most likely). Everyone could have low pressure around the neighborhood.

To repipe the whole house could be a pain in the rear end. You will be opening up alot of walls. Unless you have a crawlspace.

FCKGW
May 21, 2006

aaaaaaaaaa
AAAAAAAAAAA
HHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!




Rd Rash 1000cc posted:

There is so many things that can be taken into consideration. Is the buliding main not sized properly( its probably a half inch pipe going into the house). What type of piping is installed (galvy most likely). Everyone could have low pressure around the neighborhood.

To repipe the whole house could be a pain in the rear end. You will be opening up alot of walls. Unless you have a crawlspace.

I know there's alot of variables in the house for sure, considering it's age.
We have an small attic space and a crawlspace under the house.

Reason I'm asking is that we're trying to prep the house for selling by next year, and lovely water pressure is definitely a turn-off. We'll be doing a lot of work around the house so tearing down walls isn't TOO much of a problem.

Should I just get someone out to take a look at the place? My wife's late father did all the plumbing around the house before and while we was good with his hands, many of the repairs done were meant to be temporary fixes until a proper fix could be done which ended up becoming permanent fixes.

Turd Herder
May 20, 2008

BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK


BorderPatrol posted:

I know there's alot of variables in the house for sure, considering it's age.
We have an small attic space and a crawlspace under the house.

Reason I'm asking is that we're trying to prep the house for selling by next year, and lovely water pressure is definitely a turn-off. We'll be doing a lot of work around the house so tearing down walls isn't TOO much of a problem.

Should I just get someone out to take a look at the place? My wife's late father did all the plumbing around the house before and while we was good with his hands, many of the repairs done were meant to be temporary fixes until a proper fix could be done which ended up becoming permanent fixes.

I'd get a pressure gauge to screw onto your hose bib to see how much PSI you have actually.

http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs...=THDStoreFinder They have ones that acutally addapt right to a hose bib so you can check it right there with out any adapter pieces.

I'd honestly get a licencd professional in there if you're not to handy. I can type of a guide to show you how to replumb a house but its alot of work and wouldnt be cheap.

Can you find the main combing into the house to see how big the pipe is coming into the house.


edit: ideal pressure is around 65. Min pressure that's approved by the UPC is 15 psi. If its above 100 psi you should get a Pressure reducing Valve.

Turd Herder fucked around with this message at 18:45 on Jun 4, 2009

Turd Herder
May 20, 2008

BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK


Does anyone have a problem with a shortness of hot water? If so i can give write up a guide with pics on how to change a dip tube on a water heater.

kid sinister
Nov 16, 2002


BorderPatrol posted:

I live in a 50-year old house and the water pressure is absolute garbage. Water out of the shower head shoots out about 6 inches max.

Do I need a repiping? What kind of things can I do to fix it myself if possible?

Hard water buildup can sometimes cause this, reducing showers and faucets to a trickle. Do you have hard water?

FCKGW
May 21, 2006

aaaaaaaaaa
AAAAAAAAAAA
HHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!




kid sinister posted:

Hard water buildup can sometimes cause this, reducing showers and faucets to a trickle. Do you have hard water?

Absolutely, the water is terrible.
We also have very little hot water flow, especially in the shower. We have to turn the hot water faucet to 100%, and then open up the cold water to about 10-15% to acheive a medium water temperature.

I'm crawling all around the house this weekend, documenting all repairs needed to be done in the next few months. Would crawling under the house help to determine anything, like leaks or old pipings or anything? I've already been in the attic and there's nothing to note up there.

Oh, not necessarily a plumbing question, but the bathroom fog exhaust fan in the bathroom has been broken and covered up for years now, and we've got all kinds of mold in the bathroom. I plan on fixing it soon, how and where would I vent the fan? I suppose it can't just vent into the attic.

kid sinister
Nov 16, 2002


BorderPatrol posted:

Absolutely, the water is terrible.
We also have very little hot water flow, especially in the shower. We have to turn the hot water faucet to 100%, and then open up the cold water to about 10-15% to acheive a medium water temperature.

I'm crawling all around the house this weekend, documenting all repairs needed to be done in the next few months. Would crawling under the house help to determine anything, like leaks or old pipings or anything? I've already been in the attic and there's nothing to note up there.

Oh, not necessarily a plumbing question, but the bathroom fog exhaust fan in the bathroom has been broken and covered up for years now, and we've got all kinds of mold in the bathroom. I plan on fixing it soon, how and where would I vent the fan? I suppose it can't just vent into the attic.

The first thing to do would be to clean the sediment and hard water buildup out the shower heads and aerators, then see if your water pressure improves at that fixture. If not, then move on to the more drastic steps.

You're right, don't vent it to the attic. You'll just end up with mold up there instead. Vent it outside, either through the roof or out a wall. Cover up the vent opening outside with the appropriate cover to keep the weather and birdies. If there was a vent there in the past, then there should be some sort of abandoned venting already in place. Maybe you could salvage that?

FCKGW
May 21, 2006

aaaaaaaaaa
AAAAAAAAAAA
HHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!




kid sinister posted:

The first thing to do would be to clean the sediment and hard water buildup out the shower heads and aerators, then see if your water pressure improves at that fixture. If not, then move on to the more drastic steps.

You're right, don't vent it to the attic. You'll just end up with mold up there instead. Vent it outside, either through the roof or out a wall. Cover up the vent opening outside with the appropriate cover to keep the weather and birdies. If there was a vent there in the past, then there should be some sort of abandoned venting already in place. Maybe you could salvage that?

The show head is fairly new, but I'll hit it with some CLR (does that stuff work?) and see if the situation improves. Would that affect the hot water situation though? We did just replace the water heater in the last 6 months or so when our old one went belly up.

There is no old venting in place. The roof was replaced a number of years ago due to a major leak (the roof collapsed into our room actually) and was replaced fairly quickly, at the expense of unnecessary things like vents and exhausts. I have no qualms about installing one though (just installed 2 turbine exhaust fans for the attic today) so installation would be no problem for me. Would I need to use a powered fan to vent, or can it just be a passive vent leasing up to the roof? The existing one is powered but has no power running to it.

Bush Ant
Jan 4, 2009

by Fistgrrl


ahh excellent a plumbing thread.
So at our rental place the tennants called to complain about a leaking tap, this tap is about 30 years old and has been reseated before and new washers etc but starts leaking a month or two after. Whatever its a lovely old tap so were going to replace it, however I had a quick look under the sink and saw this.





The copper is pretty badly corroded so its going to be replaced, now I have a few options, either try and replace the copper when i put ina new tap or use those bendy hoses with the stainless mesh over them. Im probably going to get a plumber to put in a screw fitting where the elbows are so I can put the new tap in myself if I go with the bendy pipe.

However, I could most likely do it myself, as I have installed a new outdoor tap at my current house, using 2% nickel silver brazing rod and my mapp torch.

The reason im a little heasitant is that if I hosed up the outdoor tap it wouldnt have been much of a problem, But if I do this and something fucks up in say 6 months time and floods the rental property then insurance probably wont cover the damage to the tennants belongings. So should I remove the elbows and put on a screw fitting myself or get a plumber to do it? I mean its 2 fittings so its a bit of a waste of money to call a plumber out.

Also it might be soft solder on the fittings currently, and due to the age of the house it might be lead so im not sure in that situation, or how to join a fitting to a pipe that has had one on it before

Error 404 NpH
Nov 26, 2000



I dont see anything wrong with the pipes in the 2nd picture?!

Turn off the water, open the lowest tap so it drains. Cut the pipe, install some compression angle stops
http://www.plumbingsupply.com/angle.html
and use the stainless steel braided hose to connect from the angle stop to the faucet.

Turd Herder
May 20, 2008

BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK


BorderPatrol posted:

The show head is fairly new, but I'll hit it with some CLR (does that stuff work?) and see if the situation improves.

Any cheap store bought white vinegar will do the same. Clr will do the same but store as vinegar but will only cost more.

Turd Herder
May 20, 2008

BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK


Bush Ant posted:

plumbing question

Well it looks like you could easily fix it but i agree with your liability issue. If there is any doubt that your joints wont joints wont hold. I'd get a licensed plumber in there who is bonded and insured.

binkmeister
Jun 1, 2007

by Y Kant Ozma Post


I have a leak in my lawn sprinkler system in one of the pipes causing the ground around it to be mushy and unsightly (durr durr water). My problem isn't fixing the leak but rather isolating the leak without digging up the entire yard and going into heat stroke.

I googled the problem and one of the sites I found, eHow (link), tells me that professionals have special equipment to trace the leak. I do not know what this equipment is, so I will let you know that I am using shovels, a wheelbarrow, and sweat to dig trenches.

I do not have a blueprint of the sprinkler system nor any idea how it was installed, but I do know that construction in my area (Houston) is done by cheap labor that typically does things the easiest way possible and as such they may have laid down the pipes in some crazy, convoluted pathway.

What I have tried so far is going to the two closest sprinkler heads next to the leak and digging a small hole on it to see where the pipes are going out and drew two lines with strings to estimate the direction of both pipes and where they intersect. I then dug a trench around the area of the wet spot in the yard close to where the strings I put down in hopes of finding a pipe, but have not been successful in doing so.

Do you have any tips for me as how to isolate the leak?

Turd Herder
May 20, 2008

BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK


binkmeister posted:



Do you have any tips for me as how to isolate the leak?

The only other thing i coudl suggest is digging up the head and then every couple feet dig a hole to the pipe and check it out. Keep doing it untill you find the wettest spot.

Are you sure its your sprinkler system and now the main going into your house?

Carbon Copy
Jul 4, 2007
In the image of the Lord.

My toilet is running fairly constantly, making lots of noise and wasting water and I want it to stop. I have replaced the flapper, and changed the ball cock to a fancy, water saving "anti-siphon toilet tank fill valve". How should I trouble shoot this effectively so that I can eliminate the problem.

Bush Ant
Jan 4, 2009

by Fistgrrl


wow that was a stinkyhole of a job, I did it myself and just cut the pipe and put a compression fitting on it, then steel braided rubber hose to the new taps. But I had to rip the whole loving sink out and then hack saw apart the old taps becuase one was corroded to all gently caress.

time to simply change a set of taps?
3 and a half hours

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Turd Herder
May 20, 2008

BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK


Carbon Copy posted:

My toilet is running fairly constantly, making lots of noise and wasting water and I want it to stop. I have replaced the flapper, and changed the ball cock to a fancy, water saving "anti-siphon toilet tank fill valve". How should I trouble shoot this effectively so that I can eliminate the problem.

Did you adjust the ball cock to adjust the water lever?

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply
«177 »