Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us money per month for bills, and since we don't believe in showing ads to our users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
 
  • Post
  • Reply
Rakeris
Jul 20, 2014



One thing I will say with PEX and freezing, is most of the plumbing in my house was redone in pex who knows when and in the recent north texas freeze nothing broke or anything. Granted I did the basic BS like leaving anything that had plumbing running through the outside walls dripping. But it survived with almost 0 insulation sub freezing temps for 5 days.

I was surprised, but also amazed coming from the deep north where freezing temps are normal for months and how here basic poo poo like outdoor spigots have valves above the ground...

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

SourKraut
Nov 20, 2005

POST QUALITY UNDER CONSTRUCTION




One of the nicest things about PEX is that, being flexible, it has anti-water hammer and thermal expansion/contraction characteristics. However, I still think it's best suited for specific climates and circumstances.

Here in AZ, pretty much everyone is moving to PEX in new home construction, and if you have to do any re-pipes, plumbers are typically going to PEX also for the ease of installation. I still wonder long-term however what the impacts of low humidity and high temperatures in the attic will be, and I could see the plasticizers evaporating off over time and causing it to become brittle.

It reminds me in a way of poly-B, and seeing videos of how flexible poly-B tubing was. My house was originally plumbed with it in 1994, and at some point was re-plumbed as copper (I'm guessing due to the lawsuits), but they left the poly-B in the attic when they did it, and it's amazing how rigid it is now compared to what you see in old videos of the stuff.

Granted, it may not have been quite so bad if water had actually been flowing through it, but even then, I'd still be worried about the hot water lines and low humidity/high temps and plasticizer degradation.

That's at least one major benefit of PEX - it doesn't have the susceptibility to disinfection treatments used, like chloramines, that other plastic piping have, and so at least the pipe/tubing material shouldn't break down internally over time.

B-Nasty
May 25, 2005



SourKraut posted:

Here in AZ, pretty much everyone is moving to PEX in new home construction, and if you have to do any re-pipes, plumbers are typically going to PEX also for the ease of installation. I still wonder long-term however what the impacts of low humidity and high temperatures in the attic will be, and I could see the plasticizers evaporating off over time and causing it to become brittle.

It reminds me in a way of poly-B, and seeing videos of how flexible poly-B tubing was. My house was originally plumbed with it in 1994, and at some point was re-plumbed as copper (I'm guessing due to the lawsuits), but they left the poly-B in the attic when they did it, and it's amazing how rigid it is now compared to what you see in old videos of the stuff.


As I understand it, one of the major failure points for PB piping was the fittings. They were typically cheap plastic with a copper crimp ring, which... is the exact system used by many PEX installs.

It has influenced my use of PEX in that I only use brass fittings and stainless clamps (not crimp rings). Oetiker clamps have been used for decades in systems that demand much higher performance like automotive and carbonated beverages. I just don't trust expansion fittings that rely on the 'memory' of PEX to remain solid for decades, especially since the Uponor system typically uses plastic fittings - double no.

wesleywillis
Dec 30, 2016

SUCK A MALE CAMEL'S DICK WITH MIRACLE WHIP!!


Is poly b pipe the same as kitec pipe or different stuff? About a year ago I had to get my condo repiped because it was built with kitec. poo poo cost me 5100 bucks.

B-Nasty
May 25, 2005



wesleywillis posted:

Is poly b pipe the same as kitec pipe or different stuff? About a year ago I had to get my condo repiped because it was built with kitec. poo poo cost me 5100 bucks.

Different stuff. Kitec is actually PEX, with a sandwiched layer of aluminum. IIRC, the issue there was also related to fittings and them leeching zinc and causing some interaction with the aluminum in the pipe.

Pretty much all the major pipe types have had class-action lawsuits at one time or another (PEX, CPVC, copper, PB), so it does come down largely to the quality of the install, quality of your water, and luck of the draw.

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


Clearly, the correct option is simply good ol' black iron pipe

I haven't done much plumbing in the house; most of my experience is with industrial hydraulics. And even then, it wasn't much experience overall.

Edit for content: Is there any system for household water that uses screw-together pipe fittings? I feel like I'd trust the joints on that the most, but I'm not sure if copper is durable enough for that, and I can't think of what other material would actually be good for it.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

Zarin posted:

Clearly, the correct option is simply good ol' black iron pipe

High end quality installs actually ARE going back to black iron for waste piping so you can't hear it in the walls every time someone flushes an upstairs toilet.

Yooper
Apr 30, 2012



Grimey Drawer

Zarin posted:

Clearly, the correct option is simply good ol' black iron pipe

I haven't done much plumbing in the house; most of my experience is with industrial hydraulics. And even then, it wasn't much experience overall.

Edit for content: Is there any system for household water that uses screw-together pipe fittings? I feel like I'd trust the joints on that the most, but I'm not sure if copper is durable enough for that, and I can't think of what other material would actually be good for it.

Galvanized steel. But I can show you some awesome pictures of what that can look like after 40 years.

Waste water in my previous house was 4" copper coupled to iron/oakum joints. After 60 years it all looked great. The roof drains at work are all cast iron too with hand hammered oakum into the joints.

SpartanIvy
May 18, 2007


Hair Elf

Motronic posted:

High end quality installs actually ARE going back to black iron for waste piping so you can't hear it in the walls every time someone flushes an upstairs toilet.

The pictures I have seen of new installs have them held together with a pallets worth of ferncos instead of lead and oakum though, which feels like a bad implementation of a good product.

SourKraut
Nov 20, 2005

POST QUALITY UNDER CONSTRUCTION




B-Nasty posted:

As I understand it, one of the major failure points for PB piping was the fittings. They were typically cheap plastic with a copper crimp ring, which... is the exact system used by many PEX installs.

It has influenced my use of PEX in that I only use brass fittings and stainless clamps (not crimp rings). Oetiker clamps have been used for decades in systems that demand much higher performance like automotive and carbonated beverages. I just don't trust expansion fittings that rely on the 'memory' of PEX to remain solid for decades, especially since the Uponor system typically uses plastic fittings - double no.

So PB piping's problems are multi-fold. The "first generation" of PB used plastic fittings with copper crimp rings or plastic compression rings, and it was often the plastic compression rings that would fail due to thermal expansion/contraction and cracking of the rings. However, over several years, depending on the method of disinfection treatment used by the PWS, the plastic fittings would begin to fail as you said and cause abrupt ruptures also. Copper crimp rings were far more likely to be used after the late 1970s/early 1980s, so it's typically why the plastic fittings are the primary source from these installs.

In the 1980s, the PB industry realized they had a problem, and studies were done by 3rd parties showing the failure risks of the fittings, and so they switched to the copper fitting/copper crimp ring method for PB pipe ("second generation"). This eliminated the concern obviously about the plastic fittings, but it simply shifted the failure timeline from 5 - 10 years, to about 20-25 years.

The reason for that is because it turns out that PB piping is susceptible to attack by free radicals from the disinfection process, and so depending on the specific method of disinfection used, the PB installations may only have gotten 10-15 years if something like chloramine was used, whereas you could probably see the 20-25+ years if typical chlorine gas or sodium hypochlorite was used. But even those methods still cause enough free radicals to attack the interior pipe wall over time, and so the installations still have an expiration point regardless of the fittings...

Interestingly enough, PB with metal fittings is still used quite often in parts of Europe, because they have seen success with it in areas that use ozone disinfection instead of chlorine. Ozone doesn't maintain a long-lasting residual like chlorine does, but since the PWS are typically smaller, they can inject ozone and its residual is able to remain long enough to deliver water to customers, but it's not high enough to do any damage to the PB piping.

Anyway, regarding PEX: it has much greater resistance to most chemicals compared to PB, so that is definitely in its favor. But PEX also has plasticizers used in it as all plastic piping does to some extent, and unless you can maintain ideal conditions for its installation, those plasticizers are going to break down over time. When they can install the PEX inside walls and make sure it has insulation and/or some level of climate control, then I think it'll serve well for a long, long time. When they're just running it through attics between the various taps, I worry that it might only have 30-40 years at the most, which is still probably multiple-owners timeframe, but definitely not copper's lifespan.

Copper also has the benefit that it typically doesn't catastrophically fail like plastic piping does, but instead develops pinholes/etc. So you're trading significant house flooding usually for localized water damage and need to remediate mold/etc. Pick your poison I guess?

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


SourKraut posted:

Copper also has the benefit that it typically doesn't catastrophically fail like plastic piping does, but instead develops pinholes/etc. So you're trading significant house flooding usually for localized water damage and need to remediate mold/etc. Pick your poison I guess?

I feel like the correct answer here is to figure out how to plumb a place where all the plumbing is routed behind easily-removable panels for maintenance access. I feel the same about electrical, as well.

Of course, I don't know what the right answer for any of this is! But I do know I find "bury the stuff in the walls and hope it doesn't fail in my lifetime" makes the maintenance guy in me want to scream endlessly haha.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

Zarin posted:

I feel like the correct answer here is to figure out how to plumb a place where all the plumbing is routed behind easily-removable panels for maintenance access. I feel the same about electrical, as well.

Of course, I don't know what the right answer for any of this is! But I do know I find "bury the stuff in the walls and hope it doesn't fail in my lifetime" makes the maintenance guy in me want to scream endlessly haha.

Swedes have very nice chrome pipes and pipe hangers and simply don't bother burying all of that in the walls at least for like, bathrooms.

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


Motronic posted:

Swedes have very nice chrome pipes and pipe hangers and simply don't bother burying all of that in the walls at least for like, bathrooms.

Oh, interesting! I was thinking something like an accent strip along the wall that was easy to take on/off that covered up the lines, but then that doesn't solve the issue of how you reconcile that with stuff run through holes drilled in studs or something.

Yeah, probably just leaving it tasteful and in the open is probably the best idea for everything, to be honest - not only would it be easy to work on, but then any issues should hopefully be spotted more quickly.

Although you could probably try and run everything up at the ceiling/wall joint or something, and just have EXTRA LARGE trim that acts as both a cover for that, and to hide the joint. On the floor, that'd be wasted space where you can't get anything up next to the wall, but at the ceiling . . . hmm . . .

SourKraut
Nov 20, 2005

POST QUALITY UNDER CONSTRUCTION




Zarin posted:

I feel like the correct answer here is to figure out how to plumb a place where all the plumbing is routed behind easily-removable panels for maintenance access. I feel the same about electrical, as well.

Of course, I don't know what the right answer for any of this is! But I do know I find "bury the stuff in the walls and hope it doesn't fail in my lifetime" makes the maintenance guy in me want to scream endlessly haha.

Yeah, we bought our house in 2019, and it was built in 1994 and used Poly-b. The house obviously had a major water damage event at some point given the extent of the remodeling, and seeing how they ran the Poly-B through the attic, it'd be no surprise that it'd cause a lot of damage when it failed, and ultimately they re-piped with copper through the attic.

When we had our home inspection done, the home inspector actually confused Poly-B with PEX... but couldn't tell us whether the Poly-B was still in service. Once I got up in the attic I could knock on it and hear it was empty, but ultimately I spent some time after we moved in, trying to chase all the copper in the attic to make sure it all got replaced. The only wild card is that we have a kitchen island with sink and dishwasher - I'm hoping it was run as copper, but who knows...

But yeah, in the attic I can at least see the majority of the copper lines, which makes it nice to work on them. I have to get back up and insulate them at some point.

I agree with you though, it'd be nice if water lines, electrical, etc., were all more easily accessible. It seems like it shouldn't be that hard to figure out a convenient way to do a pipe/conduit chase in key areas for maintenance.

B-Nasty
May 25, 2005



Zarin posted:

I feel like the correct answer here is to figure out how to plumb a place where all the plumbing is routed behind easily-removable panels for maintenance access. I feel the same about electrical, as well.

This is one advantage to a well-designed PEX manifold/home-run setup. The fittings are almost always the weak-point, so having runs that use almost no fittings from the manifold to the fixture shutoff is a huge win.

KKKLIP ART
Sep 3, 2004



B-Nasty posted:

This is one advantage to a well-designed PEX manifold/home-run setup. The fittings are almost always the weak-point, so having runs that use almost no fittings from the manifold to the fixture shutoff is a huge win.

Yeah that is what I told myself when I spent the extra money to get a manifold system. One line, two fittings (one on each end) so hopefully no issues. I still need to get my service line replaced but they are waiting on weather for that

Yooper
Apr 30, 2012



Grimey Drawer

Motronic posted:

Swedes have very nice chrome pipes and pipe hangers and simply don't bother burying all of that in the walls at least for like, bathrooms.

Got a link? I'd like to see what this looks like. I GIS'd it and half the results were bongs.

PainterofCrap
Oct 17, 2002

hey bebe




Zarin posted:

Clearly, the correct option is simply good ol' black iron pipe

I haven't done much plumbing in the house; most of my experience is with industrial hydraulics. And even then, it wasn't much experience overall.

Edit for content: Is there any system for household water that uses screw-together pipe fittings? I feel like I'd trust the joints on that the most, but I'm not sure if copper is durable enough for that, and I can't think of what other material would actually be good for it.

You whippersnappers.

tater_salad
Sep 15, 2007




that's a cursed image

Meow Meow Meow
Nov 13, 2010


My outdoor faucet is in a very inconvenient location, I have to walk around my whole house to turn the water off/on. I would like to add a hose bib and extension onto the edge of my deck which is on the other side of the fence in the picture, then leave the pictured faucet open. The total run would be about 15'.

Keeping it above ground is my preference because I have cold winters so that means I'd have to blow out a buried line, vs just taking it down or installing it on a slope so it's easy to drain come winter. But I can easily be convinced to bury it if that's the right thing to do.



What is my best bet here in terms of materials, run and pipe type to use?

GoonyMcGoonface
Sep 11, 2001

Friends don't left friends do ECB

Dinosaur Gum

My sink broke recently (shattered straight through the porcelain when someone dropped a toothbrush holder on it). Because I live with people who are at high risk and have not yet been vaccinated, I decided to try and replace the sink myself. Yes, that was my first mistake.

After much huffing and puffing, I've managed to get the sink mounted, new clips attached to the counter, and the drain installed -- only to find that the drain location is a good four inches back from where it was on the previous sink, and the tailpipe of the drain is basically humping the edge of the pipe to the wall -- no way for me to fit the p trap back in.

The stuff to the wall is all PVC that's been cemented together, so I'm at a bit of a loss as what I should do. I guess theoretically I could cut it somehow and try and fit a new p trap in, but I need guidance from people who actually have a loving clue what they're doing.

Behold, a collage of my ineptitude:

https://imgur.com/a/vHmeRM4

Blindeye
Sep 22, 2006

I can't believe I kissed you!


GoonyMcGoonface posted:

My sink broke recently (shattered straight through the porcelain when someone dropped a toothbrush holder on it). Because I live with people who are at high risk and have not yet been vaccinated, I decided to try and replace the sink myself. Yes, that was my first mistake.

After much huffing and puffing, I've managed to get the sink mounted, new clips attached to the counter, and the drain installed -- only to find that the drain location is a good four inches back from where it was on the previous sink, and the tailpipe of the drain is basically humping the edge of the pipe to the wall -- no way for me to fit the p trap back in.

The stuff to the wall is all PVC that's been cemented together, so I'm at a bit of a loss as what I should do. I guess theoretically I could cut it somehow and try and fit a new p trap in, but I need guidance from people who actually have a loving clue what they're doing.

Behold, a collage of my ineptitude:

https://imgur.com/a/vHmeRM4

Hard to tell from here but dry-fit your P-trap to the sink, seeing how far back you need to cut the old pipe. If you have at least 1" past that cemented PVC coupler, you can measure and cut the pipe 1/8" past where the p-trap piece ends, then cement a new coupler to the sink and drainpipe. If you're less confident, they do make sleeved couplers that might work depending on your space.

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


Speaking of P-Traps, the P-traps in both my upstairs and downstairs bathroom sinks smell . . . musty, for lack of a better word . . . when I run water in them.

Should I just dump a half/gallon of vinegar in there overnight? Or is there a product anyone swears by for killing whatever's in there?

toastedyou55228
Jan 28, 2014


Northern Indiana here. Can I vent a water heater in my basement through an exterior wall? My roof is getting replaced, and the water heater currently vents through a chimney in disrepair. which I am planning to take below the roofline when the roof is replaced.

PainterofCrap
Oct 17, 2002

hey bebe




GoonyMcGoonface posted:

Behold, a collage of my ineptitude:
https://imgur.com/a/vHmeRM4

I would cut it right up against that glued coupler - the back side of it. Then, glue on a female-threaded coupler, because you're out of pipe with the next thing that's glued onto that stub, and you never know what the next guy (which may be you in a few years) will have to deal with next. Then add a threaded male coupler to complete the union. That will, hopefully, give you enough space for a trap.

You could also try adding a lateral 90 or 45 elbow after the union, but you'd have to hack out more shelf, there to make room for the offset.

Measure it out first with various combinations of PVC.

If all else fails, you may have to open the wall, or replace the sink. I assume we're looking at the inside of a hacked-up vanity?

PainterofCrap fucked around with this message at 03:33 on Apr 7, 2021

GoonyMcGoonface
Sep 11, 2001

Friends don't left friends do ECB

Dinosaur Gum

PainterofCrap posted:

I would cut it right up against that glued coupler - the back side of it. Then, glue on a female-threaded coupler, because you're out of pipe with the next thing that's glued onto that stub, and you never know what the next guy (which may be you in a few years) will have to deal with next. Then add a threaded male coupler to complete the union. That will, hopefully, give you enough space for a trap.

You could also try adding a lateral 90 or 45 elbow after the union, but you'd have to hack out more shelf, there to make room for the offset.

Measure it out first with various combinations of PVC.

If all else fails, you may have to open the wall, or replace the sink. I assume we're looking at the inside of a hacked-up vanity?

I think that makes sense. I'll go to the local hardware store and procure a variety of PVC to try and make it fit. The distance to the front of the connector is a bit small based on what Blindeye said, but on the back I might be able to fit it in.

Honestly, if it's something that needs the wall to get opened up, I'm just going to get an actual plumber to come in. At that point, I'd be worried about somehow getting out of code and/or massively loving up the entire house's plumbing.

Nitrox
Jul 5, 2002

Slur, your fighting style is extremely problematic!

GoonyMcGoonface posted:

I think that makes sense. I'll go to the local hardware store and procure a variety of PVC to try and make it fit. The distance to the front of the connector is a bit small based on what Blindeye said, but on the back I might be able to fit it in.

Honestly, if it's something that needs the wall to get opened up, I'm just going to get an actual plumber to come in. At that point, I'd be worried about somehow getting out of code and/or massively loving up the entire house's plumbing.

You need this but preferably in 1¼", which I don't see on their website.
https://www.lowes.com/pd/Keeney-1-1-2-in-dia-PVC-P-Trap-Fitting/1042735

But don't fret, all you need is reducer bushing to connect your 1¼ drain to 1½ trap, like this
https://www.lowes.com/pd/Keeney-1-1-4-in-Plastic-Slip-Joint-Washer-Fits-Faucet-Brands-Models/1070089

Remove your sink first so you can cut existing pvc nice and straight from the top. Measure twice, cut once. Primer, then adhesive, don't skip the primer step. Install faucet into the sink, follow instructions. Set the sink onto the cabinet. Connect trap unions, hand tighten only. Cut the excess or use extension pieces if needed. Connect supply lines (preferably install new ones), and you're done.
https://www.lowes.com/pd/Keeney-1-1-4-in-Plastic-Slip-Joint-Extension-Tube/1071623

You can also go to local plumbing supply instead of a big box store, show them your photos and I will give you everything you need in a cardboard box

Good luck

tater_salad
Sep 15, 2007




toastedyou55228 posted:

Northern Indiana here. Can I vent a water heater in my basement through an exterior wall? My roof is getting replaced, and the water heater currently vents through a chimney in disrepair. which I am planning to take below the roofline when the roof is replaced.

You may need to get a power vent one (this adds money) generally you shouldn't be running 90 elbows for your non power draft water heater. The power vent keeps the exhaust cool so you're not worrying about heat at ground level.

I ended up getting a power vent water tank because my water heater was most likely not to code with about a 15' run with minimal slope to a chimney. Also was told by more than 1 HVAC/Plumbing company it would proably be a good idea to sleeve my chimney to continue to use anything there as my furnace was going away and wouldn't aid in the chimney's updraft. The cost of sleeving chimney was going to be more than the added cost of power vent and I also gained some headroom in basement utility area.

tater_salad fucked around with this message at 13:11 on Apr 7, 2021

H110Hawk
Dec 28, 2006


Zarin posted:

Speaking of P-Traps, the P-traps in both my upstairs and downstairs bathroom sinks smell . . . musty, for lack of a better word . . . when I run water in them.

Should I just dump a half/gallon of vinegar in there overnight? Or is there a product anyone swears by for killing whatever's in there?

You're going to be better off just taking them off straight into a bucket, taking them outside, and cleaning them there. If they smell like sewer gas and not just funk then you probably have a clogged vent stack? (Guessing.)

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


H110Hawk posted:

You're going to be better off just taking them off straight into a bucket, taking them outside, and cleaning them there. If they smell like sewer gas and not just funk then you probably have a clogged vent stack? (Guessing.)

Not sewer gas; more like a musty/mildew smell.

Bird in a Blender
Nov 17, 2005

It's amazing what they can do with computers these days.



Meow Meow Meow posted:

My outdoor faucet is in a very inconvenient location, I have to walk around my whole house to turn the water off/on. I would like to add a hose bib and extension onto the edge of my deck which is on the other side of the fence in the picture, then leave the pictured faucet open. The total run would be about 15'.

Keeping it above ground is my preference because I have cold winters so that means I'd have to blow out a buried line, vs just taking it down or installing it on a slope so it's easy to drain come winter. But I can easily be convinced to bury it if that's the right thing to do.



What is my best bet here in terms of materials, run and pipe type to use?

I think your only option for material is copper. Plastic pipe doesn't like to be outside because of UV degradation. I think you have the right idea to just run it above ground and slope it downward so you can drain it. Typical slope is 1/4" per foot, so over a 15' run means you need to drop the pipe by 3.75". Keeping a consistent slope is important, you don't want to end up with any low or high points that could trap water.

Another option is just putting some hooks along your patio and just running a hose with a valve on the end. It would be less permanent, and you would just need to bring that hose in every winter. Could just run the hose along the ground too.

tater_salad
Sep 15, 2007




Bird in a Blender posted:

I think your only option for material is copper. Plastic pipe doesn't like to be outside because of UV degradation. I think you have the right idea to just run it above ground and slope it downward so you can drain it. Typical slope is 1/4" per foot, so over a 15' run means you need to drop the pipe by 3.75". Keeping a consistent slope is important, you don't want to end up with any low or high points that could trap water.

Another option is just putting some hooks along your patio and just running a hose with a valve on the end. It would be less permanent, and you would just need to bring that hose in every winter. Could just run the hose along the ground too.

The cheap n easy way. Short hose run to the backyard through fence to a hose reel by fence with an inline shutoff. Disconnect in the winter to stop freezing

The right/best way remove that bad location hose bib or add another one to the backyard through your basement wall above the concrete (hopefully you have some space above it)

PainterofCrap
Oct 17, 2002

hey bebe




tater_salad posted:

The cheap n easy way. Short hose run to the backyard through fence to a hose reel by fence with an inline shutoff. Disconnect in the winter to stop freezing

The right/best way remove that bad location hose bib or add another one to the backyard through your basement wall above the concrete (hopefully you have some space above it)

This.

I ran 80' of PEX out to my wife's garden plots from my garage, tied into a sillcock on the back garage wall. It's mostly behind a woodpile and under grass, so UV degradation is minimal except the last 8' or so. I put a connection there so it's easier to replace that last 8' when it gets sun-blasted. I also installed an airline fitting (with its own ball valve) so I can attach my compressor to blow out all of my garage lines, including that yard line, for the winter.

It depends on how permanent you want it to be. You could mount 1" PVC on the wall and run PEX through it for UV protection all the way through the fence and around the corner, or run a hose & tie it into a sillcock on the rear wall.

Meow Meow Meow
Nov 13, 2010


Thanks all, I'll go with the hose and a shutoff and bring it in every winter and replace it as needed.

My basement is finished so I don't feel like tearing up stuff to relocate the whole thing, but if we ever do remodelling down the road I'll do that at the same time.

Jerk McJerkface
Jan 16, 2004

LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX LINUX



Soiled Meat

I have a simple enough problem, but my googling isn't helping.

I'd like to get something like this:



Not the entire pole, but I just need the through spigot. I want to bring a leader garden hose from the back side and through a 2x4 and then have connector on the front to attach another hose.

I figure I can just go to BIG BOX HOME STORE and dig through the plumbing and make something, but if there's a product, like a through-mount hose bibb or something, but I just can't find anything.

GoonyMcGoonface
Sep 11, 2001

Friends don't left friends do ECB

Dinosaur Gum

PainterofCrap posted:

I would cut it right up against that glued coupler - the back side of it. Then, glue on a female-threaded coupler, because you're out of pipe with the next thing that's glued onto that stub, and you never know what the next guy (which may be you in a few years) will have to deal with next. Then add a threaded male coupler to complete the union. That will, hopefully, give you enough space for a trap.

I feel like a crazy person. For some reason, Home Depot only seems to have sink wall tubes in polypropylene, not in PVC, which needs some kind of fusion melt-mold thing (?!). What's the name of the bend that I need to go from straight wall pipe to j tube thing?

MS paint up in this bitch:



Blue is this thing, red is this fucker, purple is the j thing, and the closest I found to green is this but it's PP instead of PVC so that won't work.

There's some weird mushroom thing on the end of the "wall tube", so I assume I can't just stick any old rando 90 degree pipe fitting in there and have it work.

PainterofCrap
Oct 17, 2002

hey bebe




GoonyMcGoonface posted:

I feel like a crazy person. For some reason, Home Depot only seems to have sink wall tubes in polypropylene, not in PVC, which needs some kind of fusion melt-mold thing (?!). What's the name of the bend that I need to go from straight wall pipe to j tube thing?

MS paint up in this bitch:



Blue is this thing, red is this fucker, purple is the j thing, and the closest I found to green is this but it's PP instead of PVC so that won't work.

Blue is fine. For the red part, you need this: a male threaded / compression fitting https://www.amazon.com/LASCO-2-PVC-Compression-Coupling/dp/B00SAJ1IH2

THEN you can slip the polypropylene in there & continue with the trap.

They do sell PVC trap sets, but you will need a compression/slip joint eventually, at the sink drain tailpiece.

GoonyMcGoonface posted:

There's some weird mushroom thing on the end of the "wall tube", so I assume I can't just stick any old rando 90 degree pipe fitting in there and have it work.

You're gonna have to post a photo of that.

Jerk McJerkface posted:

I have a simple enough problem, but my googling isn't helping.

I'd like to get something like this:



Not the entire pole, but I just need the through spigot. I want to bring a leader garden hose from the back side and through a 2x4 and then have connector on the front to attach another hose.

I figure I can just go to BIG BOX HOME STORE and dig through the plumbing and make something, but if there's a product, like a through-mount hose bibb or something, but I just can't find anything.

Built exactly this thing for my wife. She had a brass snail-shaped spigot she wanted to use. I bought a 3/4" brass nipple long enough to fit through a 2x2 post. I may have had to buy adapters to tie the nipple to the spigot and then again to add a male hose thread to the backside. Works well, though.

PainterofCrap fucked around with this message at 02:08 on Apr 8, 2021

Meow Meow Meow
Nov 13, 2010


PainterofCrap posted:



Built exactly this thing for my wife. She had a brass snail-shaped spigot she wanted to use. I bought a 3/4" brass nipple long enough to fit through a 2x2 post. I may have had to buy adapters to tie the nipple to the spigot and then again to add a male hose thread to the backside. Works well, though.

Perfect, this will help me in my hose solution which i asked about the other day.

melon cat
Jan 21, 2010



Flooding problem. At noon today our local city authority ran an annual "hydrant flushing" maintenance. All residents were advised that "this may cause discoloured water temporarily" and to run "the lowest tap in your home for 10-30 minutes ... to clear anything that that has dislodged."

So we did that. We also flushed our basement toilet while running the laundry room utility basin tap. Then immediately started to experience flooding.



It's sewer water. And it bubbles up and starts flooding every time we run a tap or shower in our house.

Any thoughts as to why this would happen? Is this something a sump pump would prevent? I spoke to the city who's obviously claiming it's not their fault but this definitely happened at the same time as the hydrant flushing was underway.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


melon cat posted:

Flooding problem. At noon today our local city authority ran an annual "hydrant flushing" maintenance. All residents were advised that "this may cause discoloured water temporarily" and to run "the lowest tap in your home for 10-30 minutes ... to clear anything that that has dislodged."

So we did that. We also flushed our basement toilet while running the laundry room utility basin tap. Then immediately started to experience flooding.



It's sewer water. And it bubbles up and starts flooding every time we run a tap or shower in our house.

Any thoughts as to why this would happen? Is this something a sump pump would prevent? I spoke to the city who's obviously claiming it's not their fault but this definitely happened at the same time as the hydrant flushing was underway.

Well, I didn't have a hydrant flush in the area, but I'm in the same boat - the sewer pipe out of the house randomly backed up this morning and all the water from the laundry that was supposed to go out of the house backed up through the floor drain instead.

I've had this problem before, and I usually had an idea why it happened when it did. This time I'm at a complete loss though.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply