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tater_salad
Sep 15, 2007




melon cat posted:

Flooding problem. At noon today our local city authority ran an annual "hydrant flushing" maintenance. All residents were advised that "this may cause discoloured water temporarily" and to run "the lowest tap in your home for 10-30 minutes ... to clear anything that that has dislodged."

So we did that. We also flushed our basement toilet while running the laundry room utility basin tap. Then immediately started to experience flooding.



It's sewer water. And it bubbles up and starts flooding every time we run a tap or shower in our house.

Any thoughts as to why this would happen? Is this something a sump pump would prevent? I spoke to the city who's obviously claiming it's not their fault but this definitely happened at the same time as the hydrant flushing was underway.


If they were doing Supply line based stuff (hydrant flush possibly getting old rusty hydrant water back into the supply) it's supply based.

You have a drainage issue. Call a plumber to snake out your main line to the sewer considering that any faucet is causing water backing up through your floor drain.

same with other poster, get your main lines cleared out and hope it's not anything more.

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Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


tater_salad posted:

If they were doing Supply line based stuff (hydrant flush possibly getting old rusty hydrant water back into the supply) it's supply based.

You have a drainage issue. Call a plumber to snake out your main line to the sewer considering that any faucet is causing water backing up through your floor drain.

same with other poster, get your main lines cleared out and hope it's not anything more.

Other poster here; I dealt with a tree root intrusion for years but as those trees died and got cut down, that seemed to lessen. Back in maybe October or November I had a backup; they didn't think it was roots but weren't sure.

Then in February we had a backup during a hard freeze; I figured maybe the two were related, but now I'm not so sure.

I'm submitting this one through a subscription-based claims service, so we'll see how it goes!

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


Zarin posted:

Other poster here; I dealt with a tree root intrusion for years but as those trees died and got cut down, that seemed to lessen. Back in maybe October or November I had a backup; they didn't think it was roots but weren't sure.

Then in February we had a backup during a hard freeze; I figured maybe the two were related, but now I'm not so sure.

I'm submitting this one through a subscription-based claims service, so we'll see how it goes!

Update: They got out here fast and did good work. It was a root ball at the end of my yard, apparently. Going to need to go pick up some foaming root killer and start using that pretty liberally. Otherwise they said the sewer pipe looks to be in really good condition overall, so that's good!

Tipped 'em each what I hope was a pretty reasonable amount for their trouble.

melon cat
Jan 21, 2010



tater_salad posted:

If they were doing Supply line based stuff (hydrant flush possibly getting old rusty hydrant water back into the supply) it's supply based.

You have a drainage issue. Call a plumber to snake out your main line to the sewer considering that any faucet is causing water backing up through your floor drain.

same with other poster, get your main lines cleared out and hope it's not anything more.

Update: City contracted plumber came out and says we have a serious blockage in the main drain at the backflow, about 12 feet out from our backflow valve access hatch in our basement. Big rocks and a tennis ball (wtf?). As if a child crammed the main drain full of rocks and junk at the backflow valve at some point.

...We don't have a kid. But we also just moved into our place a year ago so who knows what the hell happened before we moved in.

I'm wondering if the hydrant flush pushed the rocks (and tennis ball?) further back into our main drain causing the blockage. Either way need to find a plumber with a flush truck to blast it loose nice and clear. Apparently it's tough finding a plumbing company with a flush truck though so I'll have to do a lot of calling around.

melon cat fucked around with this message at 21:45 on Apr 8, 2021

GoonyMcGoonface
Sep 11, 2001

Friends don't left friends do ECB

Dinosaur Gum

PainterofCrap posted:

They do sell PVC trap sets, but you will need a compression/slip joint eventually, at the sink drain tailpiece.

I think the J tube I linked already has a slip joint? Bullnose.

Is the other end just a normal NPT connection? Because then I could just get a regular ol' 90 degree PVC joint with a male end to screw it into.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

melon cat posted:

I'm wondering if the hydrant flush pushed the rocks (and tennis ball?) further back into our main drain causing the blockage.

The fresh water system/hydrants is not directly connected to your wastewater system in any way.

melon cat
Jan 21, 2010



Motronic posted:

The fresh water system/hydrants is not directly connected to your wastewater system in any way.
Huh, interesting. So I guess the sewer backup and hydrant flush were coincidental. The timing was pretty much perfect from when the backup started and the hydrant flush occurred. Down to the minute.

melon cat fucked around with this message at 21:55 on Apr 8, 2021

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

I get it, and I'm trying to come up with some way that this is possible. I think you said you ran a bunch of water because it was recommended so the only thing I can come up with is that this was gonna happen anyway the next time your washer was draining and you flushed a toilet at the same time.

melon cat
Jan 21, 2010



Motronic posted:

I get it, and I'm trying to come up with some way that this is possible. I think you said you ran a bunch of water because it was recommended so the only thing I can come up with is that this was gonna happen anyway the next time your washer was draining and you flushed a toilet at the same time.

Yeah I think that's exactly what happened. We're usually very light on water usage so for the first time we had multiple fixtures running at full to drain the lines during the hydrant flush, which meant bigger strain on our drainage system.

Shop vac (Milwaukee cordless) came in clutch during this literal shitshow. To anyone reading this- get a loving shop vac. Goddamn we would have been hosed if I didn't have one.

Edit: I wouldn't say we NEVER run multiple fixtures at once. We do run taps and showers and flush toilets at the same time like any normal household. Just can't recall the last time we did this with the basement fixtures specifically.

melon cat fucked around with this message at 15:08 on Apr 10, 2021

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


melon cat posted:

Yeah I think that's exactly what happened. We're usually very light on water usage so for the first time we had multiple fixtures running at full to drain the lines during the hydrant flush, which meant bigger strain on our drainage system.

Shop vac (Milwaukee cordless) came in clutch during this literal shitshow. To anyone reading this- get a loving shop vac. Goddamn we would have been hosed if I didn't have one.

I hate to say it, but my Shop Vac is probably the gift that has seen the most use at my place. I'm not sure any other gift has come close.

With enough pipes, it's pretty great for cleaning the gutters too.

SourKraut
Nov 20, 2005

POST QUALITY UNDER CONSTRUCTION




Bird in a Blender posted:

I think your only option for material is copper. Plastic pipe doesn't like to be outside because of UV degradation. I think you have the right idea to just run it above ground and slope it downward so you can drain it. Typical slope is 1/4" per foot, so over a 15' run means you need to drop the pipe by 3.75". Keeping a consistent slope is important, you don't want to end up with any low or high points that could trap water.

Another option is just putting some hooks along your patio and just running a hose with a valve on the end. It would be less permanent, and you would just need to bring that hose in every winter. Could just run the hose along the ground too.

I don't know about where the OP lives, but a lot of places (including mine) have NSF-certified carbon steel pipe available at Home Depot/Lowes/etc., and usually in threaded options. That would make it a faster and much cheaper option to copper for what he's looking to use, and would give him the winterization factor too.

Also, while plain white PVC will suffer significant UV degradation, putting a couple of coats of even a cheap paint will significantly improve it, to the point that as long as he paints the exposed portions every 3-5 years as the paint wears down, it'd be fine. Otherwise, the main limiting factor is ambient temperature and its impact on the operating pressure of PVC.

Edit:

Motronic posted:

I get it, and I'm trying to come up with some way that this is possible. I think you said you ran a bunch of water because it was recommended so the only thing I can come up with is that this was gonna happen anyway the next time your washer was draining and you flushed a toilet at the same time.

A lot of municipalities will run a line from a hydrant to the closest MH, popping the MH lid and terminating the hydrant hose right at the MH rim or just slightly within, with the idea being that there's enough of a drop to act as an air gap.

They do this because no-one likes to just discharge hydrants to grade anymore during flushes, and depending on how long they're flushing for, it's nice to say that they "recycle" the flushing water... by putting it into the sewer, where it will go over to a wastewater plant and be treated.

So I could absolutely believe that a hydrant flush could create enough turbulence to push materials back up the sanitary service lines that feed the MH. It's part of why most jurisdictional regulations disallow drop MHs except in very, very specific circumstances.

SourKraut fucked around with this message at 15:33 on Apr 9, 2021

Rakeris
Jul 20, 2014



Huh, kind of wish they would do that were I live, we live near a water tower, and when they need to waste water out of it they just let the hydrants go to grade and it floods the streets for several blocks occasionally.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

SourKraut posted:

A lot of municipalities will run a line from a hydrant to the closest MH, popping the MH lid and terminating the hydrant hose right at the MH rim or just slightly within, with the idea being that there's enough of a drop to act as an air gap.

TIL, I've never seen this anywhere around here. If they're not running to grade they run into the storm sewer, not the sanitary sewer. I don't see how there would be a "recycling" difference.....it's already clean treated water, it doesn't need to be treated again and all munis that I'm familiar with discharge treated water to the same places that the storm sewers discharge. This experience may be "living along a river" things.

Bird in a Blender
Nov 17, 2005

It's amazing what they can do with computers these days.



Look at this guy who doesn't live in a city with combined sewers. Must be nice!

SourKraut posted:

I don't know about where the OP lives, but a lot of places (including mine) have NSF-certified carbon steel pipe available at Home Depot/Lowes/etc., and usually in threaded options. That would make it a faster and much cheaper option to copper for what he's looking to use, and would give him the winterization factor too.

Also, while plain white PVC will suffer significant UV degradation, putting a couple of coats of even a cheap paint will significantly improve it, to the point that as long as he paints the exposed portions every 3-5 years as the paint wears down, it'd be fine. Otherwise, the main limiting factor is ambient temperature and its impact on the operating pressure of PVC.

Yea, you could paint the PVC, I didn't really think about that. I just reflexively think to never use PVC outside. I don't think I've ever seen someone use black carbon steel pipe for plumbing. I would imagine that would start rusting immediately unless you coat it.

SourKraut
Nov 20, 2005

POST QUALITY UNDER CONSTRUCTION




Motronic posted:

TIL, I've never seen this anywhere around here. If they're not running to grade they run into the storm sewer, not the sanitary sewer. I don't see how there would be a "recycling" difference.....it's already clean treated water, it doesn't need to be treated again and all munis that I'm familiar with discharge treated water to the same places that the storm sewers discharge. This experience may be "living along a river" things.

Plenty of places in the US will try to flush to sewer when possible vs. the storm drain, so I'm guessing you don't live in a state where drought comes up enough that state regulations/laws requires municipalities to account for more than a certain % of water loss, because usually a small % of "lost water" can be attributed to hydrant flushing under the justification that it was sent into the sewer system and not "lost".

And often enough, when it's contractors doing pipeline/watermain flushing, they're often usually required to flush to sewer instead of grade because of the shear quantity of water involved. Sometimes they'll be allowed to put a meter on so the volume of water flushed can be recorded, if they want to flush to grade or the street, but most contractors just seem to opt to go to sewer since it's faster/cheaper than the permits and rental of the meter involve.

So yes, that experience is definitely "living along a river", versus living in the western half of the US (outside of the PNW coastal areas).

Bird in a Blender posted:

Yea, you could paint the PVC, I didn't really think about that. I just reflexively think to never use PVC outside. I don't think I've ever seen someone use black carbon steel pipe for plumbing. I would imagine that would start rusting immediately unless you coat it.

The CS pipe I've seen usually have a basic epoxy lining to help with internal corrosion resistance. We also have NSF-61 galvanized pipe available also here, but most seem to avoid it given the bad reputation galvanized earned.

melon cat
Jan 21, 2010



SourKraut posted:


A lot of municipalities will run a line from a hydrant to the closest MH, popping the MH lid and terminating the hydrant hose right at the MH rim or just slightly within, with the idea being that there's enough of a drop to act as an air gap.

They do this because no-one likes to just discharge hydrants to grade anymore during flushes, and depending on how long they're flushing for, it's nice to say that they "recycle" the flushing water... by putting it into the sewer, where it will go over to a wastewater plant and be treated.

So I could absolutely believe that a hydrant flush could create enough turbulence to push materials back up the sanitary service lines that feed the MH. It's part of why most jurisdictional regulations disallow drop MHs except in very, very specific circumstances.

Bird in a Blender posted:

Look at this guy who doesn't live in a city with combined sewers. Must be nice!

My city definitely has combined sewers. The infrastructure here is... notoriously messy. So based on what you (SourKraut) wrote up it is possible that the hydrant flush pushed the obstruction backwards into our main drainage pipe? Because I have a drain and sewage company coming to our house with a flush truck on Monday to blast the obstruction out from our drain. Any specific questions that I should be asking them to determine if this blockage and subsequent flooding had to do with the hydrant flushing? Any measures I can take to cover my rear end if it turns out the city's hydrant flushing WAS responsible for the flooding?

Because on Thursday (day of the flooding and hydrant flushing) the city's contracted plumbing company came in, drew up a Sewer Lateral Management Assessment with a diagram of the blockage. They may or may not send me a bill for their plumber's visit (they didn't do anything since they don't have a flush truck). It all comes down to whether they deem the flooding to be my fault, or theirs. When I spoke with a rep from the city on the phone to schedule their plumber's initial visit she was in full-out damage control claiming the city "definitely is not" responsible for the blockage and flood... despite the fact that their plumber hadn't even arrived on-site and diagnosed the problem yet. Really seemed like they blowing smoke up my rear end.

melon cat fucked around with this message at 03:52 on Apr 10, 2021

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

Here's a first for the plumbing thread: you need to hire a lawyer.

SourKraut
Nov 20, 2005

POST QUALITY UNDER CONSTRUCTION




melon cat posted:

My city definitely has combined sewers. The infrastructure here is... notoriously messy. So based on what you (SourKraut) wrote up it is possible that the hydrant flush pushed the obstruction backwards into our main drainage pipe? Because I have a drain and sewage company coming to our house with a flush truck on Monday to blast the obstruction out from our drain. Any specific questions that I should be asking them to determine if this blockage and subsequent flooding had to do with the hydrant flushing? Any measures I can take to cover my rear end if it turns out the city's hydrant flushing WAS responsible for the flooding?

Because on Thursday (day of the flooding and hydrant flushing) the city's contracted plumbing company came in, drew up a Sewer Lateral Management Assessment with a diagram of the blockage. They may or may not send me a bill for their plumber's visit (they didn't do anything since they don't have a flush truck). It all comes down to whether they deem the flooding to be my fault, or theirs. When I spoke with a rep from the city on the phone to schedule their plumber's initial visit she was in full-out damage control claiming the city "definitely is not" responsible for the blockage and flood... despite the fact that their plumber hadn't even arrived on-site and diagnosed the problem yet. Really seemed like they blowing smoke up my rear end.

Motronic already said it, but I mean, depending on how much stress and frustration you want to deal with, I would definitely consider getting a lawyer involved. At a minimum, save all correspondence you have, save the bills/invoice you receive, and prepare to cause them a headache.

Depending on the expertise of the drain and sewer company you have coming out, I would tell you to spend tomorrow writing down your past observations/timeline, and then on Monday either talk to them (or a plumbing company) about what, if any, issues you had previously seen before the flush/flood date. Then, explain what the City did, what the City told you, and then what you did, and see what they say. If you hadn't had any draining issues before the flush/flood, definitely stress that to them. I legitimately think that if you can explain to them that you had no backup/flooding issues pre-flushing, that they'll simply assume 1+1 = 2 and say it's the City.

Tell them upfront that, if they agree that it could have occurred due to the City's flushing actions, that you want it written down on the invoice you receive from them. And if they won't agree to that, then I would consider finding another firm to at least get a second opinion.

After that, I would reach back out via email to the City and tell them that per the speciality firm you hired, they believe the backup was caused by the flushing activity that occurred, and that you want them to pay for the cost of services rendered and for any estimated repairs due to the flood. If they agree, yay, feel good! If they don't agree, get a lawyer involved, but also don't hesitate to let any local media know.

The reason I say email, and not phone, is because you want it documented that you contacted them, sent them copies of everything, etc., because if you do get that lawyer involved, it will demonstrate that you reached out and provided backup documentation in good faith.

And of course the person you talked to is in damage control, because a) they probably don't know enough to understand what impacts may have actually occurred, and b) they're trained to always deny culpability when the public reaches out. The Sewer Lateral Management Assessment they conducted may not cost you anything in the long-run, but was done so they can try and demonstrate that the issue is with your service lateral and not the City's MH/gravity main/infrastructure. Which it is currently... because they likely flushed debris back up your service line!

Edit: Also, going back to your original post, when you bought the home and had it inspected, did the home inspector run say the shower and some sinks and flush? Usually they'll try to stress the drain to see if there is a blockage (at least, the few I've had done have), and that could help make your case too.


Motronic posted:

Here's a first for the plumbing thread: you need to hire a lawyer.
Yep, though I think he can still collect documentation/etc. and do one last pass at getting the City to agree it was their fault. Honestly, a single resident reporting an issue like this, shouldn't be such a big deal that they wouldn't just take care of it, so it will be interesting to see. If they keep refusing to cover any part of it, it would make me think they know there are issues and they've had other complaints, and agreeing to one person's complaint means opening themselves up to any other known issues.

SourKraut fucked around with this message at 05:59 on Apr 11, 2021

AmbassadorofSodomy
Dec 30, 2016

SUCK A MALE CAMEL'S DICK WITH MIRACLE WHIP!!


Talk to your neighbors too OP, see if they've had issues since the city flushed. You're in Toronto right? What part if I may ask.

dads friend steve
Dec 24, 2004





So my wife and I just moved into a new place and we have a minor annoyance with our bathtub that I'm hoping to fix inexpensively.

The tub has an extremely rough anti-slip texture on the bottom that makes taking a bath very uncomfortable. I wish it were a decal so I could just scrape it off, but it appears to be part of the glaze/surface finish itself.

There's plenty of guides online about how to add anti-slip but not so much on how to remove. I'm pretty sure it's an acrylic tub, so I was thinking of getting some 120 grit sandpaper and just sanding it down. My questions are:

1. Is this a terrible idea?
2. If I do do that, I assume I'll need to apply some kind of coating afterwards?
3. Should I stop being a cheap dummy and just get some estimates for reglazing?

dads friend steve fucked around with this message at 21:06 on Apr 11, 2021

pmchem
Jan 21, 2010




have you considered just laying down a smooth mat on top of that surface

dads friend steve
Dec 24, 2004





pmchem posted:

have you considered just laying down a smooth mat on top of that surface

For sure, and that's probably going to be the backup plan.

All our previous places have been big apartment complexes where you can't really do anything about fixtures/appliances you don't like. So I don't have a ton of experience tackling "real" projects like this, and I'm very open to being told this is way more effort than it's worth. I just like the idea of fixing the tub itself since it feels like a more permanent solution than laying down a bath mat which inevitably gets moldy and needs to be replaced every so often.

PainterofCrap
Oct 17, 2002

hey bebe




No matter what you do, any coating that you try to lay down on a tub will fail.

Painting fails.
Relining fails.

Everything fails.

Either lay a mat, replace the tub (drastic), or learn to enjoy sanded bunnage.

AmbassadorofSodomy
Dec 30, 2016

SUCK A MALE CAMEL'S DICK WITH MIRACLE WHIP!!


PainterofCrap posted:

No matter what you do, any coating that you try to lay down on a tub will fail.

Painting fails.
Relining fails.

Everything fails.

Either lay a mat, replace the tub (drastic), or learn to enjoy sanded bunnage.

It'll keep your foot and rear end callouses at bay

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


I have a strange issue with my upstairs toilet - it basically just flushes slow. Even with clear water, it'll sometimes hesitate like it's trying to decide if it wants to back up or not. Sometimes yeah, sometimes nah.

Every other drain in the house, including the downstairs toilet, are fine.

We had a plumber out last week because of a sewer issue, and they ran a hand auger in the upstairs toilet, which seemed to help a bit. They said they felt "something hard" in there, but couldn't explain beyond that. I'm not sure if that means a calcium buildup or what. They didn't pull the stool or anything, because running the hand auger seemed to help well enough.

Any idea what could be causing this? I wouldn't think there's an object in there, because they didn't have any issue getting the auger to go the full extension. If it's just a mineral buildup, is there anything I can use in a toilet that will help? Every chemical that seems like it might be worth something says "don't use this in toilets" so I'm at a bit of a loss.

I'd rather not have to go through the hassle of a toilet replacement this close to selling the house, but I don't know what else to do.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

Zarin posted:

selling the house, but I don't know what else to do.

Um... nothing? You're selling, it's the new owner's problem.

If you want to check, you could always just pull the toilet out and check the drain pipe directly. You'll need a new wax ring and to deal with the flange bolts, but if everything is in good shape, it's a 20-minute, sub-$20 job.

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


sharkytm posted:

Um... nothing? You're selling, it's the new owner's problem.

If you want to check, you could always just pull the toilet out and check the drain pipe directly. You'll need a new wax ring and to deal with the flange bolts, but if everything is in good shape, it's a 20-minute, sub-$20 job.

I'm just afraid if someone on a showing tests the toilet and it chooses THAT empty flush to overflow . . .

I have so much else to do that I haven't pulled the stool yet to look, but I suppose maybe if I'm gonna do it anyway I can wait until the painter is ready to paint the bathroom.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

Zarin posted:

I'm just afraid if someone on a showing tests the toilet and it chooses THAT empty flush to overflow . . .

I have so much else to do that I haven't pulled the stool yet to look, but I suppose maybe if I'm gonna do it anyway I can wait until the painter is ready to paint the bathroom.

I'm going to plug my favorite plumbing substance: https://www.homedepot.com/p/Oatey-Liquilock-6-oz-Toilet-Water-Solidifier-Gel-31419/202882917

One in the tank one in the bowl and you won't spill anything.

devicenull
May 30, 2007



Grimey Drawer

Zarin posted:

I'm just afraid if someone on a showing tests the toilet and it chooses THAT empty flush to overflow . . .

I have so much else to do that I haven't pulled the stool yet to look, but I suppose maybe if I'm gonna do it anyway I can wait until the painter is ready to paint the bathroom.

If you're going to pull the toilet to check, you might as well replace it. It's maybe ~10 mins of extra effort and $100 to put in a new one. If that prevents your closing from being delayed, sounds completely worth it to me.

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


Motronic posted:

I'm going to plug my favorite plumbing substance: https://www.homedepot.com/p/Oatey-Liquilock-6-oz-Toilet-Water-Solidifier-Gel-31419/202882917

One in the tank one in the bowl and you won't spill anything.

Interesting! Never seen that before.



devicenull posted:

If you're going to pull the toilet to check, you might as well replace it. It's maybe ~10 mins of extra effort and $100 to put in a new one. If that prevents your closing from being delayed, sounds completely worth it to me.

You're probably right. I'll give it some empty test flushes after the house is emptied and if I'm even a little iffy on it I'll just pull it and chuck it.

Nitrox
Jul 5, 2002

Slur, your fighting style is extremely problematic!

The real estate market is so bonkers right now that you can fill it with concrete and nobody will bat an eye. And still offer you more money than the asking price

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

Nitrox posted:

The real estate market is so bonkers right now that you can fill it with concrete and nobody will bat an eye. And still offer you more money than the asking price

This is probably the most correct answer.

Zarin
Nov 11, 2008

I SEE YOU


Motronic posted:

This is probably the most correct answer.

I want to believe that, but I don't trust my sleepy little town Peoria, IL to be that good.

Especially because I am not in the most desirable neighborhood. It's not a great neighborhood, not terrible. All the surrounding villages are considered "the good schools" now, so that doesn't help. I'll call it a win if I can get exactly what I paid for the house 12 years ago (April 2009, which I thought was the bottom of the market but maybe it wasn't) back out of it. Maybe I'll be surprised and luck into a bit more, but I'm not ready to count on that just yet.


Edit for plumbing thread: I did go flush it, and it never hesitated like it was going to come back up; it just took forever to complete the flush. Maybe it's fine now. I'll keep an eye on it. I'm doing so much else with the house, I'm not sure I feel like loving with a toilet I've managed to ignore for a year+ at this point.

Zarin fucked around with this message at 03:53 on Apr 14, 2021

Rakeris
Jul 20, 2014



Funny I moved out of the ole stinky P right before the whole covid poo poo hit the fan. I never bought a house as when looking three/four years ago the average time houses sat on the market was...uh not good. Cat moving HQs out didn't help for sure.

Only time I've missed it was when we had a bit of a freeze down here in TX, never though I would have to wrap all my outdoor faucets and poo poo in a blanket and a tarp and leave water running so poo poo didn't freeze, just down south things I guess. On the plus side don't have to dig very far to fix things.

I have an old toilet that does the same, just flushes not good, no other way to put it, one of these days I'll replace it but I think it's just the toilet being crap from decades ago.

PainterofCrap
Oct 17, 2002

hey bebe




Nitrox posted:

The real estate market is so bonkers right now that you can fill it with concrete and nobody will bat an eye. And still offer you more money than the asking price

My sister is in the process of selling her house and she keeps dinging me about doing all kinds of stuff like remodelling the bathrooms & kitchen to make it more saleable, as well as wanting to paint the whole thing (3.5 story brick built 1895). Keep explaining that she is in a desireable suburban town outside of Philadelphia, there are only two other houses for sale in the entire town, and that she could easily sell it for twice what she paid for it without even vacuuming.

Nitrox
Jul 5, 2002

Slur, your fighting style is extremely problematic!

PainterofCrap posted:

My sister is in the process of selling her house and she keeps dinging me about doing all kinds of stuff like remodelling the bathrooms & kitchen to make it more saleable, as well as wanting to paint the whole thing (3.5 story brick built 1895). Keep explaining that she is in a desireable suburban town outside of Philadelphia, there are only two other houses for sale in the entire town, and that she could easily sell it for twice what she paid for it without even vacuuming.
That's very logical of you, but people like to think with their emotions, which is hard to argue against. You are 100% correct. Every house is sellable, it's just the amount that varies. Dropping 40k on a kitchen does not necessarily make it 40k more valuable.

Also, You need to explain to your sister that most realtors would rather have her sell the house cheaper so they can collect their money quicker. It's a weird problem to have, but something to look out for.

Nitrox fucked around with this message at 13:19 on Apr 14, 2021

SouthShoreSamurai
Apr 28, 2009

It is a tale,
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing.




Fun Shoe

I need to move my laundry box. I was thinking that since I've already got the wall open and I have to put in a new box anyway, I would put in a little extra insurance and get one of these https://ndaonline.net/watts-A2C-WB-M1-intelliflow-with-wall-box/

Anyone have any experience with them? Good idea or no?

SourKraut
Nov 20, 2005

POST QUALITY UNDER CONSTRUCTION




SouthShoreSamurai posted:

I need to move my laundry box. I was thinking that since I've already got the wall open and I have to put in a new box anyway, I would put in a little extra insurance and get one of these https://ndaonline.net/watts-A2C-WB-M1-intelliflow-with-wall-box/

Anyone have any experience with them? Good idea or no?

Why not put a automatic water shutoff meter/valve on your common supply coming in? That wall box is neat, but it obviously doesn't protect the other areas that would likely see failure, such as dishwasher, refrigerator water/ice maker, valve flex lines, toilet flex lines, etc.

SouthShoreSamurai
Apr 28, 2009

It is a tale,
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing.




Fun Shoe

SourKraut posted:

Why not put a automatic water shutoff meter/valve on your common supply coming in? That wall box is neat, but it obviously doesn't protect the other areas that would likely see failure, such as dishwasher, refrigerator water/ice maker, valve flex lines, toilet flex lines, etc.

Mainly because I didn't know such a thing existed. What do you recommend?

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SourKraut
Nov 20, 2005

POST QUALITY UNDER CONSTRUCTION




SouthShoreSamurai posted:

Mainly because I didn't know such a thing existed. What do you recommend?

There's a few different ones - I personally purchased (but still need to install) the Flo by Moen: https://www.moen.com/flo, but there are several different brands you can go. Most have you simply install an actuator on a manual shutoff (usually a quarter-turn ball, which if you don't have, you'll need to get installed...), and then put sensors around the house to monitor for leaks, at which point it would shutoff the valve. I'm not a huge fan of that though, because my experience with leaks has been that it's been the in-the-wall, slow drip leaks that have caused damage and problems.

I like the Flo device because it has a meter and shutoff built in, so no sensors required. You can program the app for home vs away, overnight, etc.; it tries to "learn" your use, though I'm not sure how great that works. The main drawbacks are that it's a plastic bodied device, so while they say it can be installed outdoors, I'm skeptical; it's also app-based for monitoring/control, but it's free at least, and finally, no battery backup since it goes off 120v, so in addition to needing a 120v outlet nearby, it will "fail open" in the event you have a power outage (which, to me, wasn't a big concern, because that's a double-failure scenario that's unlikely in my view). My supply comes in from outside, guess up to the attic through the garage wall space, etc., so my plan has been to simply open up the wall where the pipe is and cut this in.

Depending on how much you want to spend, you can also go for the Best of the Best of these, and get a Flo Logic: https://www.flologic.com/product/flologic-system-3-5-with-1-1-2-40mm-valve/ In addition to the app, it has a control panel and battery backup, so you're always protected and it can also be controlled by the panel so the app isn't 100% required like the Flo by Moen. I almost bought this (and still have been tempted), but paying full MSRP is a tough pill to swallow...

Edit: I forgot about Water Hero, which is an "in-between" option that still uses an app or website, but is self-controlled and doesn't use AI. https://waterheroinc.com/p100leakdetectionautoshutoff/

SourKraut fucked around with this message at 18:49 on Apr 14, 2021

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