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Tad SG
Apr 16, 2003

Here are provided seats of meditative joy, where shall rise again the destined reign of Troy.


Rd Rash 1000cc posted:

Does anyone have a problem with a shortness of hot water? If so i can give write up a guide with pics on how to change a dip tube on a water heater.

I'd be interested in this.

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Turd Herder
May 20, 2008

BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK


Tad SG posted:

I'd be interested in this.

I actually may replace the dip tube on a goons water heater in a new house. The parts are like $5 and it only takes about an hour. If i do it on his house i'll take pics with a how to guide.

PulsarD
Aug 7, 2003
Premium

Biscuit Hider

So fr this week, Rd Rash has replaced all of the drain crap under my sink, as well as fixing the 16 foot copper supply line in the fridge cubby.

Its been awesome having him go through all of this for us. We jut bought the house and its still empty. We will actualy be hooking up a gas dryer and new washer next week and looks like we will be doing the dip pipe mentioned above.

I hear rumors we might even work some wome PEX crap or something so thatll be interesting.

Turd Herder
May 20, 2008

BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK


PulsarD posted:

So fr this week, Rd Rash has replaced all of the drain crap under my sink, as well as fixing the 16 foot copper supply line in the fridge cubby.

Its been awesome having him go through all of this for us. We jut bought the house and its still empty. We will actualy be hooking up a gas dryer and new washer next week and looks like we will be doing the dip pipe mentioned above.

I hear rumors we might even work some wome PEX crap or something so thatll be interesting.

Yes I'll be doing the dip tube at his house. And the we'll be using Wirsbo(uponor) piping in his house later.

Turd Herder
May 20, 2008

BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK


Here is me doing some plumbing at a forum members house.

Here is his kitchen sink before hand. It was all corrugated pipe under the kitchen sink.



Anyone guess whats wrong with the dishwasher going into the disposal in this picture?

It needs to go to an air gap first

Note: There wasn't a picture of the finished job.


Here is a picture of the refrigeration water line. Its run in 1/4 OD copper. Down stairs there is a 1/4 saddle valve that is in poor shape and wouldn't close all the way.


As you can see there is a 5 ft copper line for the refer water line.




Note:
I had to open the saddle valve with pliers. When doing so the packing nut started to leak. I had to tighten the packing nut and is holding.


Here is a picture of the valve.



Here is me putting the 1/4 stem valve on the 1/4 OD copper pipe.




Home depot didn't have a 1/4 2 hole strap to use to support the pipe so we used zip ties into the wall. It works for now, once he re does the basement I'll put an ice maker box in the wall and run the branch line correctly.

grover
Jan 23, 2002

PEW PEW PEW







Rd Rash 1000cc posted:



Anyone guess whats wrong with the dishwasher going into the disposal in this picture?

It needs to go to an air gap first
...which is conveniently provided by the inlet being above the garbage dispsal grinder. This is normal and legal, there's nothing wrong with it.

Turd Herder
May 20, 2008

BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK


grover posted:

...which is conveniently provided by the inlet being above the garbage dispsal grinder. This is normal and legal, there's nothing wrong with it.

No it's not. Show me the code where it says its legal. Its connected and since its so far down near the trap if the sewer backs up it will most likely back up into the dish washer.

grover
Jan 23, 2002

PEW PEW PEW







Rd Rash 1000cc posted:

No it's not. Show me the code where it says its legal. Its connected and since its so far down near the trap if the sewer backs up it will most likely back up into the dish washer.
What are you talking about? The air gap has nothing to do with sewers backing up. In fact, unless you're in a flood zone, there's no provision whatsoever against sewage back-ups in a home; P-traps don't do anything for that, either. Air gaps are required for washing machines and certain other appliances to vent properly and prevent the P-trap from siphoning out. That's it. Disposal or tailpiece, both provide this air gap.

Oh, the code that says this is legal is IRC P2717.3, btw. Says so quite explicitly. The hose should be supported so that some part of is is fastened to the bottom of the counter is the only thing not quite right; otherwise, the line can fill up with crap from the sink and clog.

grover fucked around with this message at 02:09 on Jun 12, 2009

Turd Herder
May 20, 2008

BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK


grover posted:

What are you talking about? The air gap has nothing to do with sewers backing up. In fact, unless you're in a flood zone, there's no provision whatsoever for that in a home; P-traps don't do anything for that, either. Air gaps are required for dishwashers and washing machines to vent properly and prevent the P-trap from siphoning out. That's it. Disposal or tailpiece, both provide this air gap.

Oh, the code that says it's legal is IRC P2717, btw.

I follow the UPC. The Air gap will help prevent if the sewer backs up from going into the dish washer because one its a the rim of the sink (highest part of the ficture). Just because you're not in a flood level doesn't mean a sewer cant back up. If someone flushes something stupid and it clogs a drain line, it could back up into the lowest fixture. Now usually that's the shower would be the lowest but if the kitchen sink is for some reason it will back up there. It will go into your DW and gently caress it up.

grover
Jan 23, 2002

PEW PEW PEW







Rd Rash 1000cc posted:

I follow the UPC. The Air gap will help prevent if the sewer backs up from going into the dish washer because one its a the rim of the sink (highest part of the ficture). Just because you're not in a flood level doesn't mean a sewer cant back up. If someone flushes something stupid and it clogs a drain line, it could back up into the lowest fixture. Now usually that's the shower would be the lowest but if the kitchen sink is for some reason it will back up there. It will go into your DW and gently caress it up.
An air-gap or anti-backflow device is required in the supply line of a dishwasher, is that what you're talking about? That's entirely different from the requirements for a drain line, though. And DWV systems are certainly not designed for elegant failures when clogged- if they were, then there would be anti-backflow fittings all throughout the DWV to force the overflow out the roof or somewhere. They ONLY use them for buildings in flood plains, though. For us normal houses, if there's a clog, the poo poo comes out the lowest hole, regardless. Usually a shower or a floor drain.

Please quote UPC, I'm interested in what it says; I have a feeling you're reading it wrong and then IPC/IRC and UPC are saying the same thing in slightly different ways.

(Ignore the highlighting, that was from another project I did a couple years ago.)

My copy of IPC 09 is at work; I only have IRC 06 handy right now.

grover fucked around with this message at 02:25 on Jun 12, 2009

Turd Herder
May 20, 2008

BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK


I don't have a scanner and my digital camera is with a friend. This is a pic from a iphone. Here is the code section from the 2003 UPC (the UPC edition idaho uses) They haven't excepted the 2006 code book yet.

Only registered members can see post attachments!

grover
Jan 23, 2002

PEW PEW PEW







OK, I apologize, UPC does require it. IPC and IRC, however, do not. I've never seen an air gap on the drain line of a dishwasher, but I've always lived in IBC states- all they do is loop it up under the counter.

Who uses UPC as opposed to IBC? I thought US was 100% IBC now.

Humbaba
Aug 4, 2006


I took out the single sink in my master bath and had a granite countertop with double sinks installed. I've put in the drain pipes, but the water is draining very slowly.

Here you can see the the left side where I come out of the sink into the P trap. The right sink is functionally identical.


Click here for the full 600x800 image.


Here's the T and a third P trap that gets me into the wall. The main reason I had the trap was to handle the height difference.


Click here for the full 600x800 image.


Would it drain faster if I pulled that middle trap out and just ran my T into the pipe on the wall? If the elevation difference isn't going to work with the height of the existing pipes, should I necessarily lower them or could I get some sort of flexible line to connect between the T and the pipe in the wall?

Humbaba fucked around with this message at 16:31 on Jun 12, 2009

Turd Herder
May 20, 2008

BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK


grover posted:

OK, I apologize, UPC does require it. IPC and IRC, however, do not. I've never seen an air gap on the drain line of a dishwasher, but I've always lived in IBC states- all they do is loop it up under the counter.

Who uses UPC as opposed to IBC? I thought US was 100% IBC now.


I know idaho and washington both use the UPC. Washington uses the 2006 book, while idaho still uses the 2003 book. I am not sure what other states use the Uniform Plumbing code.

Turd Herder
May 20, 2008

BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK


Humbaba posted:



Would it drain faster if I pulled that middle trap out and just ran my T into the pipe on the wall? If the elevation difference isn't going to work with the height of the existing pipes, should I necessarily lower them or could I get some sort of flexible line to connect between the T and the pipe in the wall?



You don't need a 3rd trap. And really i would have used a different drainage fitting instead of that T.


I'd take out the 3rd trap and it should drain fine. Even though it may get some back flow towards the other sink through that T.

Humbaba
Aug 4, 2006


I pulled that middle P trap and the drains are now much faster. Thanks!

Super Delegate
Jan 19, 2005

ƃɐlɟ ǝɥʇ

I have a shower that is leaking into my basement. The water is dripping from a hole (for an electrical wire!) in the basement. I tried creating a better seal for the shower drain, and while it was being fixed I realized that the bathtub in the same bathroom was also leaking into the same spot. It looks like the leak is coming from the drainage pipe.

Any advice?



The Hole
The Pipe

Turd Herder
May 20, 2008

BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK


Super Delegate posted:

I have a shower that is leaking into my basement. The water is dripping from a hole (for an electrical wire!) in the basement. I tried creating a better seal for the shower drain, and while it was being fixed I realized that the bathtub in the same bathroom was also leaking into the same spot. It looks like the leak is coming from the drainage pipe.

Any advice?



The Hole
The Pipe

In your case you may want to call a professional to have look at the problem. The p trap doesn't look like he'd really be an issue. And if you can't find exactly where the leaks coming from you should bring in the professional.

FCKGW
May 21, 2006

aaaaaaaaaa
AAAAAAAAAAA
HHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!



The more I think about it, the more I realize that the cold water pressure is just fine, and all my problems seems to be with the hot water pressure.

The hot water takes about 3-4 minutes to rise above room temperature and there's barely a trickle at full blast. Cleaning out the shower heads and faucets have had little to no change.

Where should I look first?

Turd Herder
May 20, 2008

BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK


BorderPatrol posted:

The more I think about it, the more I realize that the cold water pressure is just fine, and all my problems seems to be with the hot water pressure.

The hot water takes about 3-4 minutes to rise above room temperature and there's barely a trickle at full blast. Cleaning out the shower heads and faucets have had little to no change.

Where should I look first?

I'd pull the shower cartridge next. I imagine dip tube pieces are clogging poo poo up in the hot lines. It will clog angle stops and shower valves them self. Pull the shower cartridge and flush it out by turning the cold water on and off.

*remember to turn the water off before you pull the shower cartridge.

poopcutter
Oct 4, 2003

by Ozma


I am almost done remodeling an old bathroom in a furnished basement and I have a plumbing problem.

The bathroom sink drained out its gray water via a pvc pipe that was shoved into a wider vertical lead pipe (leading to the sewer - it also goes up through the roof to vent gas) that someone drilled a hole in and they surrounded the juncture of the two pipes with some kind of putty. It looks like this work is decades old, but it worked fine.

I want to use the same basic system but I would like to seal up the gaps between the PVC and the lead pipe walls. I was thinking that there must be some kind of epoxy or some other malleable substance with which to do this.

I was thinking of using some kind of flexible three-way coupling (like this: http://www.fernco.com/plumbing/flex.../qwik-tees-ells) but I can't get to the rear of the vertical lead pipe without tearing down a bunch of cabinets, which I don't want to do, so I am not sure how I would attach a coupling like this to the lead pipe.

Can anyone point me in the right direction? How should I do this thing?

ihafarm
Aug 12, 2004


I've got an issue with one of the toilets in my home. For the past month or so it has been leaking water from the tank to the bowl - the flap isn't sealing properly on the drain. I replaced the flap, no resolution. I replaced the entire drain assembly, no resolution. If I physically hold the flap down it will seal, but it will eventually start leaking again. It's not a constant leak, maybe once or twice per hour. When I had the tank off I noticed that there was water at the top of the bowl inlet - is that normal? I should also mention that this toilet will clog at the drop of a hat. Any thoughts on how I can fix this?

Turd Herder
May 20, 2008

BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK


poopcutter posted:

I am almost done remodeling an old bathroom in a furnished basement and I have a plumbing problem.

The bathroom sink drained out its gray water via a pvc pipe that was shoved into a wider vertical lead pipe (leading to the sewer - it also goes up through the roof to vent gas) that someone drilled a hole in and they surrounded the juncture of the two pipes with some kind of putty. It looks like this work is decades old, but it worked fine.

I want to use the same basic system but I would like to seal up the gaps between the PVC and the lead pipe walls. I was thinking that there must be some kind of epoxy or some other malleable substance with which to do this.

I was thinking of using some kind of flexible three-way coupling (like this: http://www.fernco.com/plumbing/flex.../qwik-tees-ells) but I can't get to the rear of the vertical lead pipe without tearing down a bunch of cabinets, which I don't want to do, so I am not sure how I would attach a coupling like this to the lead pipe.

Can anyone point me in the right direction? How should I do this thing?

Can you take a picture of and i may be able to suggest something.

Turd Herder
May 20, 2008

BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK


ihafarm posted:

It's not a constant leak, maybe once or twice per hour. When I had the tank off I noticed that there was water at the top of the bowl inlet - is that normal?

When you say its leaking i assume you mean the toilet is running (basicly you can contastly hear the tank filling with water). And not actually leaking onto the floor.

The level of the tank water should be about one inch below the bowl inlet. You can usually adjust that by adjusting the float to hang lover so the water will turn off sooner.

hielonueve
Jul 10, 2004


grover posted:

PEX really is great stuff; I think it gets a bad rap just because it's so simple, so cheap and so reliable that anybody can do it. It's almost too easy... It's lead to entirely new approaches to plumbing- PEX houses often don't have networks like copper houses do, but instead use a manifold near the water heater with runs directly from there to each fixture. (It's about the same price to run 5 individual unbroken 1/2" lines to a bathroom than it is to run 3/4" hot/cold and split them out in the walls.) The worst part was that it required a $100+ crimp tool to crimp the copper sleeves onto the fittings (and you need 3 different sizes...), but new fittings now have made it less of an issue for small DIY jobs. Those shark-bite fittings are pricey, but they're great if you don't have access to a crimp tool, or if the space is simply too tight to use a crimp tool, like it often is under sinks.

OPINIONS ABOUT PEX, PLEASE!

I'm thinking of adding a bath, replacing some fixtures in another bath and possibly a couple outdoor faucets and, I need to replace a few runs of copper that have corroded. I'm fairly certain that without maintaining a water softener I'll have corrosion again. So, I'm thinking of just purchasing a manifold (or two) and running PEX out to everything, then connecting the necessities and the supplies (and then the rest, just as a matter of making sure I don't overestimate my ability to finish in a timely fashion.)
It seems like PEX is much easier and cheaper to install and maintain. Is there anything wrong with this plan? I've read a couple isolated instances of rodents chewing the pipe but, it seems very rare (or possibly an old plumber's tale/myth.)

hielonueve fucked around with this message at 02:31 on Jun 24, 2009

Turd Herder
May 20, 2008

BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK


hielonueve posted:

OPINIONS ABOUT PEX, PLEASE!

I'm thinking of adding a bath, replacing some fixtures in another bath and possibly a couple outdoor faucets and, I need to replace a few runs of copper that have corroded. I'm fairly certain that without maintaining a water softener I'll have corrosion again. So, I'm thinking of just purchasing a manifold (or two) and running PEX out to everything, then connecting the necessities and the supplies (and then the rest, just as a matter of making sure I don't overestimate my ability to finish in a timely fashion.)
It seems like PEX is much easier and cheaper to install and maintain. Is there anything wrong with this plan? I've read a couple isolated instances of rodents chewing the pipe but, it seems very rare (or possibly an old plumber's tale/myth.)

The only disadvantage to Vanguard pex (crimp pex)in my opinion is the lack of flow. The fittings on crimp pex go inside of the pipe. which restricts the flow even more. I use uponor pex system. You expand a plastic rig (basicly its a piece of pipe) You then slide the fittings into the expanded pipe and ring. When its warm out it shrinks down quickly. In the code weather you have to use a heat gun on it.

I beleive you can rent a vanguard pex crimping system from home depot for cheap.
I do not believe you can rent a uponor expander.

Remember when installing pex it needs to be supported alot more. Every 32 inches is code in the Uniform plumbing code.

Turd Herder fucked around with this message at 02:51 on Jun 24, 2009

kid sinister
Nov 16, 2002


ihafarm posted:

I've got an issue with one of the toilets in my home. For the past month or so it has been leaking water from the tank to the bowl - the flap isn't sealing properly on the drain. I replaced the flap, no resolution. I replaced the entire drain assembly, no resolution. If I physically hold the flap down it will seal, but it will eventually start leaking again. It's not a constant leak, maybe once or twice per hour. When I had the tank off I noticed that there was water at the top of the bowl inlet - is that normal? I should also mention that this toilet will clog at the drop of a hat. Any thoughts on how I can fix this?

A running toilet can be a couple things. One is the flap not making a good seal like you said. Another is that the fill valve could be leaking. When you hear the toilet running and first take off the lid, is the water level at the top of the overflow tube or below the top?

The tendency of your toilet to clog isn't related to the tank problems. One thing you can try is to snake its drain, that might help clean out the pipe and give clogs less crap to cling to. Get yourself a pipe snake made for a crapper. They're the ones that run through a short length of pipe shaped like a "J". Be careful not to scratch the porcelain!

cakesmith handyman
Jul 22, 2007

Pip-Pip old chap! Last one in is a rotten egg what what.



Dear plumbing thread, Help.


Click here for the full 640x480 image.

Main tap in the kitchen, it leaks at the swivel-join bit & the water marks are getting annoying.


Click here for the full 640x480 image.

Under the same sink, this feeds the outside tap. It leaks at the turney-handle-stem bit, but more than an annoyance - if I want to use the outside tap for 30 minutes the drips will fill a bucket.

I want to fix both of these, the thing is I've never taken a tap apart. I can isolate the feed to this section no-problem, On the second one, I'm under the impression the hex collar the tap handle goes through should be unscrewed, then black magic happens. I've even less clue about the first one. What tools will I need, what will I need to buy to fix this? (I assume a bumper box of washers).

kid sinister
Nov 16, 2002


Cakefool posted:

Dear plumbing thread, Help.
...
I want to fix both of these, the thing is I've never taken a tap apart. I can isolate the feed to this section no-problem, On the second one, I'm under the impression the hex collar the tap handle goes through should be unscrewed, then black magic happens. I've even less clue about the first one. What tools will I need, what will I need to buy to fix this? (I assume a bumper box of washers).

There's not much to it. You got the right idea about turning the water off first. You'll need some wrenches and a screwdriver, probably phillips. You might also need some hex keys, but not all faucets need those.

First off, the faucet. You probably have a rubber washer or O-ring that needs to be replaced. Cover the drains. You don't wait to lose any parts down the drain. Next, unscrew the handles. Some handles have a center cap the hides the screw. Pry that cap off with a screwdriver without scratching the surface. Next, you need to remove the cartridge. Each manufacturer has a different way of getting the cartridge out, so this may require some foresight on your part. If you're lucky, you'll see the broken washer or O-ring right away. Take that to the hardware store and find replacements for all of the washers.

The valve under the sink is more of the same, but a little simpler. Remove the screw from the top of the handle and remove them. Next, get a wrench and unscrew the cover off the valve. Remove it, then remove the packing washer around the stem. You may have to dig it out if it's really stuck in there. Again remove the cartridge. There should be 2 washers, the packing washer, and a little one on the other end of the cartidge. Might as well replace them both.

Don't overtighten anything when putting stuff back together, faucet and valve parts are very easy to break. Also, turning screws for handles feels a little weird since you'll likely turn the valve in its housing just as the screw gets tight. This is normal, just keep turning until the valve reaches its stop, then make sure that screw is tight.

Turd Herder
May 20, 2008

BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK


Cakefool posted:

Dear plumbing thread, Help.



I want to fix both of these, the thing is I've never taken a tap apart. I can isolate the feed to this section no-problem, On the second one, I'm under the impression the hex collar the tap handle goes through should be unscrewed, then black magic happens. I've even less clue about the first one. What tools will I need, what will I need to buy to fix this? (I assume a bumper box of washers).

Where is it leaking at on the hose bib outside? If its coming from behind the handle its just needs to tighten the packing nut. If its coming inside the wall the plumber could have screwed a screw into the hose bib and when its on it will leak.



On the faucet find out the brand. Replacing a cartridge isn't to hard.You may not need to replace the whole cartridge but sometimes its a lot easier.


Sorry if i mssed someing. I got a cold right now so im kind of out of it.

Cross_
Aug 22, 2008


Any general recommendations of how to properly use a snake to get rid of clogs ?
When turning the handle it just seems like the wire gets all coiled up inside the pipe but no debris is actually being removed.

Turd Herder
May 20, 2008

BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK


Cross_ posted:

Any general recommendations of how to properly use a snake to get rid of clogs ?
When turning the handle it just seems like the wire gets all coiled up inside the pipe but no debris is actually being removed.

Sorry i've never actually snaked a drain. Its one of the service things i havent done yet. Not that i'm looking forward to it.

Any of the other plumbers having suggestions on snaking a drain?

Tolstoi
Apr 3, 2001


A quick question, I'm at my mothers house with a water pressure tank with a bladder in it, and it has been clicking on and off, with the pressure gauge going up and down. It's one of those blue tanks and it operates off of a well, out in the country.

Is this an easy enough fix? From what I can tell it's a case of Short Cycling, but I wanted to make sure before I went all crazy working in my mother's basement on it.

I'm thinking I need to replace the switch, but it's also possible that it needs air. It was repressurized two months ago, but she has been out of town and no one was here to know when it actually started, until I got here late/early Monday morning.
I can't really shut it off atm, because she has a couple living in a detached apartment who need what water they have right now.

I don't really know what other info to post, and I need to rest for other family crap in the morning.

Oh, the water goes from hot to cold over and over while taking a shower, which is a rude awakening as well.

Edit: the tank is also connected to a water softener. I've read that it could also be a clogged filter, but I'm not sure if it would be located inside the softener or on the actual tank.

Tolstoi fucked around with this message at 04:20 on Jun 25, 2009

Turd Herder
May 20, 2008

BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK


Tolstoi posted:

A quick question, I'm at my mothers house with a water pressure tank with a bladder in it, and it has been clicking on and off, with the pressure gauge going up and down. It's one of those blue tanks and it operates off of a well, out in the country.

Is this an easy enough fix? From what I can tell it's a case of Short Cycling, but I wanted to make sure before I went all crazy working in my mother's basement on it.

I'm thinking I need to replace the switch, but it's also possible that it needs air. It was repressurized two months ago, but she has been out of town and no one was here to know when it actually started, until I got here late/early Monday morning.
I can't really shut it off atm, because she has a couple living in a detached apartment who need what water they have right now.

I don't really know what other info to post, and I need to rest for other family crap in the morning.

Oh, the water goes from hot to cold over and over while taking a shower, which is a rude awakening as well.

Edit: the tank is also connected to a water softener. I've read that it could also be a clogged filter, but I'm not sure if it would be located inside the softener or on the actual tank.

I gotta ask my boss about the pressure tank

The hot water then gets cold quickly sounds like a dip tube issue in your water heater. Does it start off hot. Maybe last 5 minutes at most then get cold and not get hot again?

Tolstoi
Apr 3, 2001


It starts off fine. I can get it to be warm, then every 15-20 seconds it goes from warm to ice cold, then to super hot, then back to warm. Lather rinse repeat until you get out. I just heard my son freak out in the shower because of it now too.

The pump was off until he started the water just now, now I can hear it running on and off over and over again.

cakesmith handyman
Jul 22, 2007

Pip-Pip old chap! Last one in is a rotten egg what what.



Rd Rash 1000cc posted:

Where is it leaking at on the hose bib outside? If its coming from behind the handle its just needs to tighten the packing nut. If its coming inside the wall the plumber could have screwed a screw into the hose bib and when its on it will leak.

On the faucet find out the brand. Replacing a cartridge isn't to hard.You may not need to replace the whole cartridge but sometimes its a lot easier.

Sorry if i mssed someing. I got a cold right now so im kind of out of it.
It's leaking from the internal stopcock-tap I photo'd, 100% certain.
Stupid question, what bit does cartridge refer to?

kid sinister posted:

Advice

Have at with tools, take washery bits to hardware store. Gotcha. Will post trip report, godspeed me.

Turd Herder
May 20, 2008

BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK


Cakefool posted:

It's leaking from the internal stopcock-tap I photo'd, 100% certain.
Stupid question, what bit does cartridge refer to?


Have at with tools, take washery bits to hardware store. Gotcha. Will post trip report, godspeed me.

Sorry i miss understood the question. Can i get a better picture of where the leaks coming from. IF its the valve inside it could just need the packing tightened.


Here is a site that shows you steps on how to remove a cartridge.

http://homerepair.about.com/od/plum...repair_cart.htm

Its not the same faucet but the principle is the same.

cakesmith handyman
Jul 22, 2007

Pip-Pip old chap! Last one in is a rotten egg what what.



Rd Rash 1000cc posted:

Sorry i miss understood the question. Can i get a better picture of where the leaks coming from. IF its the valve inside it could just need the packing tightened.


Here is a site that shows you steps on how to remove a cartridge.

http://homerepair.about.com/od/plum...repair_cart.htm

Its not the same faucet but the principle is the same.

Useful site, thanks, now I just have to figure out where to get at it. I think the ends of the taps will have screws under the covers.

I can't get a better picture, the first one was a trial'n'error held-off-to-one-side shot, I need to do a bit of work before I can physically get to the tap to work on it.

Turd Herder
May 20, 2008

BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK BALLCOCK


Cakefool posted:

Useful site, thanks, now I just have to figure out where to get at it. I think the ends of the taps will have screws under the covers.

I can't get a better picture, the first one was a trial'n'error held-off-to-one-side shot, I need to do a bit of work before I can physically get to the tap to work on it.


Home depot carries most brand of cartridges. Unless its a really unique foreign brand you shouldn't have a problem finding it.

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kid sinister
Nov 16, 2002


Cross_ posted:

Any general recommendations of how to properly use a snake to get rid of clogs ?
When turning the handle it just seems like the wire gets all coiled up inside the pipe but no debris is actually being removed.

The idea with a snake is that they have a screw on the end of the arm. Basically, you feed the snake down until you reach the clog, then you tighten the clamp on the handle and turn the whole thing clockwise to "screw" into the clog. Once you got a good grip on the clog, you pull and push on the line to work the clog free. Feel free to pull it all the way back and examine the treasure you found!

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