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univbee
Jun 3, 2004





Xachariah posted:

They make computers with 4GB hard-drives? My USB thumb drive is twice that and cost me a fiver.

Probably a bad idea to run Win 7 on a 4GB hard drive.

Semi-beaten, but the first-gen Asus EEE Laptops had 4 gig SSD hard drives, and even a lot of the later ones (their biggest is I think 20 gigs) has a 4 gig fast OS drive and then the rest on a slower data drive (the system actually has two physical drives). Newer systems like the Dell Mini 9 will either have a traditional hard drive with platters, or a large, single SSD. Basically, I wouldn't run 7 on a comp with less than a 16 gig drive.

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univbee
Jun 3, 2004





Casao posted:

Yes, but they don't expand the SSD, they're a separate partition, just like installing a second hard drive would give you C: and D:. No good for installing an OS to, and with a max speed of roughly 8mbit/s, I wouldn't wanna run anything off of one.

This, plus SD cards aren't designed for the constant reading and writing an OS does and will die very quickly with those kinds of stresses. Yes, it's possible to install it, and people have done it with Windows XP and Vista, but I wouldn't recommend it.

univbee
Jun 3, 2004





ungaungaunga posted:

Wondering if anybody knows of a solution to get my Logitech Quickcam Messenger working in Win 7. I got the drivers installed by using an old XP installer, because apparently the newer versions of the installation package don't even support my webcam, but when I plug it in, the webcam won't install properly.

Alternatively, if I can't get it working, are there webcams that are confirmed to work with Windows 7? I'd prefer to stay with Logitech, but I will go with another manufacturer if necessary.

If that's a webcam whose installer has a version number 8.something, I think you're pretty much SOL, I'm pretty sure they don't even work on Vista. Pretty much anything made by Logitech or anyone else in the last few years should work, though.

univbee
Jun 3, 2004





wang souffle posted:

Is there such a thing as an Upgrade or Full product key? Or are the keys interchangeable with the media simply being different?

The opposite, actually, the media will be universal but the keys will have different patterns; an "upgrade edition" disc will install as a full edition if you give it a full version key, whereas a "full edition" disc will require an activated older OS installation if you try to use an upgrade key.

VV Not legally.

univbee fucked around with this message at 00:40 on Jul 23, 2009

univbee
Jun 3, 2004





The Noble Nobbler posted:

What is exactly is the definition of a production environment? Is my personal machine at home a production environment? What about a development machine at work?

Very roughly, this means you're using the computer in a way that's directly profitable to your business. If you're installing a Technet license on a computer that, if it goes down, is going to cost your company tons of money while it's down, you're doing it wrong.

To put it another way, they're evaluation versions that are on the honor system. Using a Technet license to build a test VM for some software you're developing, or seeing how a certain hardware config performs with Windows Server 2008, is fine. I couldn't then start hosting a customer's website on it, though. If I decide it's working awesomely and want to "keep" it for proper use on my company network, I MUST obtain a proper license for it and change the product key.

univbee
Jun 3, 2004





BizarroAzrael posted:

Edit: oh wait, IE comes on a seperate disk with it.

Edit2: Have I missed something? The MS site says I can preorder for £50, but the linked sites say £75-80. Am I too late or something?

Possibly; I think the UK 50 pound ones sold out in like a day; I'll double check and modify the OP. And AFAIK, the E editions don't come with IE in any form, but you can get a disc with IE on it separately for something like 3 or 4 pounds, or just download it yourself pre-emptively. Also, it wouldn't surprise me if some retailers just included the IE disc for free to spite the EU.

univbee
Jun 3, 2004





Lilac1 posted:

I still can't believe I need to shell out 2x Home premium money to get a version which does not artificially restrict the amount of RAM I can install. 64 GB would be okay, 16 GB is a giant "gently caress you" to the consumers.

What if W7 becomes the next big thing, and people are still using it five years from now, yet are unable to run the newest stuff properly because Microsoft doesn't want them to?

Can you even get consumer-level motherboards that allows for more than 16 gigs of RAM? Also, not only is there still nothing consumer-oriented that has requirements higher than 2 gigs of RAM (and even that's not that common), there are very, very few programs that even use 64-bit instructions (i.e. they couldn't use more than 4 gigs of RAM anyway, or is it 2 gigs per process?); further, with the fact that there are still many, many people on 32-bit OSes, I don't think anything's going to be designed to require even 4 gigs of RAM until the next version of Windows, if not further if they keep the 32-bit train going any longer. I'd be surprised if a game came out with a higher minimum requirement than 2.5 gigs by the time the next Windows OS was released to the public.

univbee
Jun 3, 2004





fishmech posted:

But 640k was just fine for the public for about 5 years after that?

Microsoft isn't saying WE'LL NEVER LET THE HOME USER USE MORE 16 GB OF RAM.

Windows ME was released in 2000 and would CRASH if you had 1 GB of RAM or more so I don't see your point really.

So would any 9x Windows with more than 512 megs of RAM (it would see it as negative RAM, IIRC). The best part about this is that Microsoft asks questions on Vista certification exams about making a dual boot configuration of Windows Vista...and Windows 95. No, not a VM, loving dual boot. So you need exactly 512 megs of RAM (which makes Vista run like rear end) or to hack 95 so it only sees 512 megs of RAM. If I see any such questions on my exam, I'm tempted to give the correct answer and then fill in the end with "...but I will put a loving bullet in my head before actually doing this for a client, seriously are you loving retarded?"

univbee
Jun 3, 2004





drat, tons of interesting developments. Did a quick OP update so people don't mess with modified ISOs, will edit things more thoroughly in a few hours when I'm off work.

univbee
Jun 3, 2004





Lum posted:

So, since the RTM version has leaked, has the EULA been posted anywhere? More importantly (to me) has the -E version leaked and that EULA been posted anywhere?

All the EULA variants on on every disc, here's the important bits:

Windows 7 Professional EULA (Retail version) posted:

2. INSTALLATION AND USE RIGHTS.
a. One Copy per Computer. You may install one copy of the software on one computer. That computer is the “licensed computer.”
b. Licensed Computer. You may use the software on up to two processors on the licensed computer at one time. Unless otherwise provided in these license terms, you may not use the software on any other computer.
c. Number of Users. Unless otherwise provided in these license terms, only one user may use the software at a time.
d. Alternative Versions. The software may include more than one version, such as 32-bit and 64-bit. You may install and use only one version at one time.
3. ADDITIONAL LICENSING REQUIREMENTS AND/OR USE RIGHTS.
a. Multiplexing. Hardware or software you use to
· pool connections, or
· reduce the number of devices or users that directly access or use the software
(sometimes referred to as “multiplexing” or “pooling”), does not reduce the number of licenses you need.
b. Font Components. While the software is running, you may use its fonts to display and print content. You may only
· embed fonts in content as permitted by the embedding restrictions in the fonts; and
· temporarily download them to a printer or other output device to print content.
c. Icons, images and sounds. While the software is running, you may use but not share its icons, images, sounds, and media. The sample images, sounds and media provided with the software are for your non-commercial use only.
d. Use with Virtualization Technologies. Instead of using the software directly on the licensed computer, you may install and use the software within only one virtual (or otherwise emulated) hardware system on the licensed computer. When used in a virtualized environment, content protected by digital rights management technology, BitLocker or any full volume disk drive encryption technology may not be as secure as protected content not in a virtualized environment. You should comply with all domestic and international laws that apply to such protected content.
e. Storage. You may store one copy of the software on a storage device, such as a network server. You may use that copy to install the software on any other computer to which a license has been assigned.
f. Device Connections. You may allow up to 20 other devices to access software installed on the licensed computer to use only File Services, Print Services, Internet Information Services and Internet Connection Sharing and Telephony Services.
g. Remote Access Technologies. You may access and use the software installed on the licensed computer remotely from another device using remote access technologies as follows.
· Remote Desktop. The single primary user of the licensed computer may access a session from any other device using Remote Desktop or similar technologies. A “session” means the experience of interacting with the software, directly or indirectly, through any combination of input, output and display peripherals. Other users may access a session from any device using these technologies, if the remote device is separately licensed to run the software.
· Other Access Technologies. You may use Remote Assistance or similar technologies to share an active session.
h. Media Center Extender. You may have five Media Center Extender Sessions (or other software or devices which provide similar functionality for a similar purpose) running at the same time to display the software user interface or content on other displays or devices.
i. Electronic Programming Guide. If the software includes access to an electronic programming guide service that displays customized television listings, a separate service agreement applies to the service. If you do not agree to the terms of the service agreement, you may continue to use the software, but you will not be able to use the electronic programming guide service. The service may contain advertising content and related data, which are received and stored by the software. The service is not available in all areas. Please consult the software information for instructions on accessing the service agreement.
j. Related Media Information. If you request related media information as part of your playback experience, the data provided to you may not be in your local language. Some countries or regions have laws and regulations which may restrict or limit your ability to access certain types of content.
k. Worldwide Use of the Media Center. Media Center is not designed for use in every country. For example, although the Media Center information may refer to certain features such as an electronic programming guide or provide information on how to configure a TV tuner, these features may not work in your area. Please refer to the Media Center information for a list of features that may not work in your area.

......

16. PROOF OF LICENSE.
a. Genuine Proof of License. If you acquired the software on a disc or other media, your proof of license is the genuine Microsoft certificate of authenticity label with the accompanying genuine product key, and your proof of purchase. If you purchased and downloaded the software online, your proof of license is the genuine Microsoft product key for the software which you received with your purchase, and your proof of purchase from an authorized electronic supplier of genuine Microsoft software. Proof of purchase may be subject to verification by your merchant’s records.
b. Windows Anytime Upgrade License. If you upgrade the software using Windows Anytime Upgrade, your proof of license is the proof of license for the software you upgraded from, your Windows Anytime Upgrade product key and your proof of purchase. Proof of purchase may be subject to verification by your merchant’s records.
c. To identify genuine Microsoft software, see https://www.howtotell.com.
17. TRANSFER TO ANOTHER COMPUTER.
a. Software Other than Windows Anytime Upgrade. You may transfer the software and install it on another computer for your use. That computer becomes the licensed computer. You may not do so to share this license between computers.
b. Windows Anytime Upgrade Software. You may transfer the software and install it on another computer, but only if the license terms of the software you upgraded from allows you to do so. That computer becomes the licensed computer. You may not do so to share this license between computers.
18. TRANSFER TO A THIRD PARTY.
a. Software Other Than Windows Anytime Upgrade. The first user of the software may make a one time transfer of the software and this agreement, by transferring the original media, the certificate of authenticity, the product key and the proof of purchase directly to a third party. The first user must remove the software before transferring it separately from the computer. The first user may not retain any copies of the software.
b. Windows Anytime Upgrade Software. You may transfer the software directly to a third party only with the licensed computer. You may not keep any copies of the software or any earlier edition.
c. Other Requirements. Before any permitted transfer, the other party must agree that this agreement applies to the transfer and use of the software.

The E EULA has this extra bit:

Windows 7 Professional E EULA (Retail version) posted:

9. NOTICE REGARDING THE ABSENCE OF INTERNET EXPLORER 8. The software does not include Internet Explorer 8. As a result, you will need software from Microsoft or a third party in order to browse Internet web sites. More information can be found at go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=150220.

The two bits I quoted above are in the E EULA as well, but with different numbering because of the IE8 point being slipped in.

Here's the OEM edition EULA:

Windows 7 Professional EULA (OEM Version) posted:

2. INSTALLATION AND USE RIGHTS.
a. One Copy per Computer. The software license is permanently assigned to the computer with which the software is distributed. That computer is the “licensed computer.”
b. Licensed Computer. You may use the software on up to two processors on the licensed computer at one time. Unless otherwise provided in these license terms, you may not use the software on any other computer.
c. Number of Users. Unless otherwise provided in these license terms, only one user may use the software at a time on the licensed computer.
d. Alternative Versions. The software may include more than one version, such as 32-bit and 64-bit. You may use only one version at one time. If the manufacturer or installer provides you with a one-time selection between language versions, you may use only the one language version you select.

...

16. PROOF OF LICENSE.
a. Genuine Proof of License. If you acquired the software on a computer, or on a disc or other media, a genuine Microsoft Certificate of Authenticity label with a genuine copy of the software identifies licensed software. To be valid, this label must be affixed to the computer or appear on the manufacturer’s or installer’s packaging. If you receive the label separately, it is invalid. You should keep label on the computer or the packaging that has the label on it to prove that you are licensed to use the software. If the computer comes with more than one genuine Certificate of Authenticity label, you may use each version of the software identified on those labels.
b. Windows Anytime Upgrade License. If you upgrade the software using Windows Anytime Upgrade, your proof of license is identified by
· the genuine Microsoft Certificate of Authenticity label for the software you upgraded from, and
· the genuine Microsoft proof of purchase label from the Windows Anytime Upgrade Kit you used to upgrade. Proof of purchase may be subject to verification by your merchant’s records.
c. To identify genuine Microsoft software, see https://www.howtotell.com.
17. TRANSFER TO A THIRD PARTY. You may transfer the software directly to a third party only with the licensed computer. The transfer must include the software and the Certificate of Authenticity label. You may not keep any copies of the software or any earlier version. Before any permitted transfer, the other party must agree that this agreement applies to the transfer and use of the software.

The other sections that I checked that looked relevant seem identical, except 3e (talking about storing a copy of the software on a storage device) is REMOVED from the OEM license.

univbee
Jun 3, 2004





According to this: http://www.istartedsomething.com/20...nstall-process/

Unlike Windows Vista, Windows 7 discs will be "unique" to each version of Windows 7. For example, the MSDN ISO will ONLY install Ultimate if left as-is. However, there's a file called ei.cfg in the "sources" folder that specifies which "version" the disc is. If you delete the file, you get a selection screen like with Vista install discs, and that one change effectively gives you a universal install disc (yes, the discs are all identical except for that one file).

univbee
Jun 3, 2004





Lum posted:

Shame it's no good for me as if I were to get the MSDN ISO, it still wouldn't work as I've bought a -E edition.

That particular ISO, yes, but MSDN will have an -E version up. I even have the checksums for it in my OP, I just don't think it's leaked yet.

univbee
Jun 3, 2004





Factor Mystic posted:

If the iso is not yet available on MSDN/Technet... what exactly is the leaked copy? Internal leak?

Probably. Major OEMs got the data already to start playing around with, so it could have come from there too, like some disgruntled worker at Dell China or something.

univbee
Jun 3, 2004





Dbhjed posted:

I should have clicked on the picture it shows "Upgrade" in the corner when you make it bigger.



but computers running xp can also be upgraded to 7 but you have to do a clean install right?

Yup.

univbee
Jun 3, 2004





drat, I was hoping for clarification about Volume Licensing, like if I could install Professional and it would take a Volume License key or not (I know Vista specifically required separate media), but what's on MSDN right now is too vague.

univbee
Jun 3, 2004





Cryptic Edge posted:

7 does too, I just tried my VLA key and it was rejected because I need enterprise, not ultimate. It was picky between the two versions, even though they are basically the same.

Yeah, I suspected as much.

I'm actually having a hard time now finding out exactly what you get as Microsoft Gold Partner. Beyond what we get with MSDN/Technet accounts, we also get internal use licenses; for Vista we got 10 copies of Business and 1 copy of Ultimate, is it the same for 7 (10 Pro, 1 Ultimate) or does it get more hosed-up? Surprisingly, the partner site is down now and has been since the RTM posting, even though Partners aren't supposed to have their keys yet.

EDIT: Found out we get 200 (!) Enterprise licenses, in case anyone else is wondering. Basic Certified Partners get 50.

univbee fucked around with this message at 19:48 on Aug 6, 2009

univbee
Jun 3, 2004





Munkaboo posted:

If an MSDN account is 250 a year, why dont more people just get the thing, get a few serials, then cancel the account? Do the keys go bad?

There's a certain honor system to the legalese. They don't "expire," but you're not supposed to use them in a production environment (i.e. on a system that directly makes money). MSDN exists to give developers and testers an easy way to test stuff, so they can install a couple of VMs and not have to worry about what it's costing them. It's NOT supposed to be a replacement for buying permanent license for a non-test system, even though many people do exactly this.

univbee
Jun 3, 2004





I'm looking at buying a couple of new computers for myself, most likely Dell PCs; I'd like them to support Windows XP Mode, but I'm having a hell of a time determining what PCs Dell sells that support it. I mainly want to know if the BIOS "hardware VT" option is actually there or not; I have an HP laptop whose processor would support the feature, but the BIOS doesn't have the enable option. Is there a master list for motherboard and OEM PCs that support the feature? If there isn't, there really should be, I'd be half-tempted to put something together...

univbee
Jun 3, 2004





Super Dude posted:

Call Dell and ask them for help. Their sales reps are generally pretty knowledgeable.

I've found quite the opposite, especially for something like this which is pretty much undocumented anywhere.

univbee
Jun 3, 2004





Rubiks Pubes posted:

While we're talking about RDP is there any way to enable it in Home Premium? VNC is super slow for some reason and now I'm using logmein as a last resort.

The closest thing to "enabling" it would be throwing money down and upgrading it to Professional. Home Premium can't be server to an RDP session by design, anything that would "activate" it would effectively be a software crack.

univbee
Jun 3, 2004





plaguedoctor posted:

I have a question about internationalization and the different versions of Windows. In this case, it would now be Win7, but what does "Enterprise Edition" mean? I have the opportunity to get the Enterprise Edition, but, as far as I'm aware, multi-language options for the OS (not IME, rather, multiple language for system files and such) are only in the Ultimate versions.

Is Enterprise the same as Ultimate, but only for mass deployment? Is there any difference?

Short version: Enterprise is the Volume License version, Ultimate is the consumer version. Feature-wise they are identical in Windows 7. With Vista, Enterprise had slightly less (didn't have the Media Center IIRC or the Ultimate Extras) but in 7 Enterprise, every feature is there, including the MUI.

univbee
Jun 3, 2004





C-Euro posted:

On XP Compatibility mode in the OP, how true is the "you won't be running any games on this" statement? I just got a new laptop with 7 Home Premium 64-bit but a license for Ultimate is $20 through my university. I don't have anything terribly demanding (Morrowind is the newest game that I own a physical copy of, and GOG.com is working to make all their games 7-compatible). I guess what I'm wondering is what's more difficult- getting a older game to run in Win7, or getting an older game to run WELL in XP Mode?

There are almost no games that can't be made to work in Windows 7. For StarCraft, register your CD Key with Battle.net to get a newer, mostly pre-patched installation package. While I wouldn't go as far as saying old games are error-free, if it's worth playing, someone on the internet has already hacked it backwards and forwards to make it work (see FF7 Ultima Edition for PC, as well as people who made a whole new installer for Grim Fandango, since while the game itself runs fine on Windows 7, the installer doesn't). Between that and DOSBox you should have all your bases covered. drat near everything on GOG fully works in Windows 7 as-is anyway, they just haven't tested everything to give the seal of approval yet.

Windows XP Mode offers you no graphics acceleration, so essentially no 3D games will work, and since it's based off Virtual PC it's very slow even for basic stuff. It's all about "make this program work at all costs, I don't care if it takes a minute to open and is a little slow" rather than "I want my games to run at over 30fps". I think anything basic enough to work in XP Mode would work fine on Windows 7 as-is.

univbee
Jun 3, 2004





revolther posted:

So you can't just pick whatever corresponding region, then have VLC read the file? It's built in video decoder shouldn't give a gently caress as long as it can read it. Is OSX locking down read/write permissions on non-regional dvds? It doesn't seem very hard to just browse the disc, tell a file to open with VLC and be done with it.

I know that RPC2 drives (i.e. every DVD drive since like 1999) were supposed to "fail" invalid region discs entirely in firmware. The disc's region is a specific single byte in the VIDEO_TS.IFO file where each bit says if a specific region is playable or not, so programming a device to fail a disc with this check is pretty trivial. But then, as AnyDVD showed, so is tricking it so it always return "all regions playable" when it reads that byte. No idea what workarounds exist on Mac.

univbee
Jun 3, 2004






I can personally vouch that the registry hack works. Of course, only do this if you have a legit previous license to upgrade from, or else poor Bill Gates will cry and wind up homeless because you stiffed him like thirty-fifty bucks.

univbee
Jun 3, 2004





My comment was in jest and was more because he'd be most likely NOT to care (or at worst let you pay the price difference and square things up). Bill Gates is pretty much the nicest celebrity billionaire there is, giving away millions for medical research, education, and technology in countries and areas that would otherwise be SOL.

He's only perceived by some to be a typical super-rich guy because "omg Microsoft's so expensive and I called their support line when my internet was down and they wouldn't help me" or something stupid like that; I can't think of anyone who's familiar with his humanitarian efforts who has anything but good things to say about him.

Having said all that, I'm not going to advocate piracy on SA, especially in my own thread.

univbee
Jun 3, 2004





Well this is neat, according to that link, that leaked build has the same build number as this (7601.17514.101119-1850)

univbee
Jun 3, 2004





devmd01 posted:

So who else is F5ing the VLSC to grab SP1? I'm thinking it won't pop until 11 am eastern, as that will be 8 am redmond time. Yeah the final leaked build is out there but seeing as i'm in a corporate environment i'm not about to download an OS service pack from anywhere but microsoft, no matter how legit-looking the site is.

Almost every version is up on MSDN now, I can't find Enterprise 32-bit for some reason though.

Every version of Windows 7 and Server 2008 R2 is now downloadable from MSDN, along with an ISO containing the three versions of the update (32-bit, 64-bit, Itanium).

univbee fucked around with this message at 19:17 on Feb 16, 2011

univbee
Jun 3, 2004





devmd01 posted:

Yeah I can't grab poo poo, it's waaaaay overloaded.

Really? I'm pulling at 360 kilobytes per second at my work, which I think is as fast as this work connection gets.

univbee
Jun 3, 2004





c0burn posted:

Someone tell me if the leak I got a while back matches the official ISO:

They skipped the whole "Wave 0/1" stuff and the only ISO that's up is basically equivalent to Wave 1. I'm not sure if Microsoft will officially push out the Wave 0 installers ever.

univbee
Jun 3, 2004





Dammit, the ei.cfg removal tool doesn't seem to work on SP1 discs yet. Whoever works on it updated it a few weeks ago, though, so hopefully that means he's on-the-ball enough to update it.

univbee
Jun 3, 2004





Thank you fishmech!

frumpsnake posted:

Yep. Just delete it. If you're installing from USB it's easy enough, but if you're using DVD you can rebuild the image with PowerISO, UltraISO etc.

Yeah, this is what I'll end up doing, but it's a pain in the rear end.

univbee
Jun 3, 2004





electricsugar posted:

I just built a new PC and did a clean install of Windows 7 Pro x64. The key for this version I obtained through MSDNAA at my university. I had this OS installed on my previous machine. When I tried to use the Reg key from this version, it was rejected. Apparently these sorts of OEM keys only allow install on one machine.

The version you bought from your school is Pro?

There are two different kinds of Windows 7 Professional keys as far as the software is concerned: single-machine keys, which are most commonly Retail and OEM keys, and volume keys, which are most commonly provided under Microsoft Open/Volume License Agreements. The problem is that both of these have completely different ISOs. You MIGHT be able to get the right ISO and "upgrade" your current install (basically Win 7 Pro 64-bit to Win 7 Pro 64-bit), keeping all your applications and everything, and then it will properly take the key. There's probably also some way of changing some registry values to change what keys the software will take (similar to how you make a fresh Win7 install accept an upgrade key), but you'll probably have to Google around for info on how to do that.

For what it's worth, the above ONLY applies to Windows 7 Professional edition; Windows 7 Enterprise is only for volume licensing, and every other version (Ultimate, Starter and the Home versions) have no volume licensing available.

univbee
Jun 3, 2004





BangersInMyKnickers posted:

Vista and 7 are still virtually identical in my mind and I will continue to use them interchangeably.

For personal use definitely, although both XP Mode and the new RemoteFX stuff in Windows 7 are godsends for the right enterprise environments.

univbee
Jun 3, 2004





Niwrad posted:

:niwrad:

Your options are as follows:

1.) Get an OS disc for whatever version of Windows 7 your HP is running (I'm guessing Home Premium)? If you need to reinstall, use the OEM license sticker. Guarantees a clean install if you need it, which is nice. Keep a disc with at least the network drivers handy, too.

2.) With your laptop as vanilla as possible (e.g. remove/backup everything you can reinstall/restore some other way) do a backup to an external HD using Clonezilla or a similar byte-level backup program.

3.) If you've got extra money, chances are good if you call HP you can special-order restore media. I did this successfully back in 2007 with a new laptop that came with XP MCE. It cost something like $20 + shipping for the discs, though. Also, because it would restore the OS and then install EVERYTHING via scripted install it would actually take about 6 hours to do a restore, so this is only if you're really anal about getting the laptop back to exactly that state (and even then option 2 is better).

univbee
Jun 3, 2004





Cheesus posted:

IE9 final is now available for download:

http://www.beautyoftheweb.com/

Interestingly, Microsoft has specifically NOT released the Japanese version of IE9 in order to not cause bandwidth issues during the tsunami crisis. Every other language/version is available now.

IE9 is neat but proving to be a bit of a clusterfuck at work with sites like Kaseya, even with compatibility mode on. Also IE8 has the advantage of being ubiquitous across all currently-support Microsoft OSes, while IE9 isn't available for XP, so we might stick with 8 for a while yet.

univbee
Jun 3, 2004





$40 for Canadians

If you order the 32-bit AND 64-bit versions, do you get two distinct licenses? $80 for two Win7 Pro licenses would be pretty awesome.

univbee
Jun 3, 2004





Factory Factory posted:

$30? I'm tempted just so I can backup my netbook over LAN...

--

Separate question: If you have a full or upgrade key to Win 7 Ultimate, can you enter it as an Anytime Upgrade key in Home Premium? If so, that would save me the hassle of burning an ISO.

You can definitely perform an in-place upgrade from anywhere your live OS can access, you don't have to burn a disc for it or even setup a virtual optical drive; you can literally extract the ISO to "C:\Users\JimBob\Desktop\Windows 7 Installation" and run setup.exe in there and it'll work. I don't specifically know if it'll work with the Anytime Upgrade function, but if you find out let me know.

univbee
Jun 3, 2004





DogGunn posted:

Anyone have any idea why this error comes up whenever I try and install Windows 7?

I had a similar problem for a while attempting to install a language pack, and it turned out the disc I had installed Windows 7 from was a pre-final build I'd forgotten to get rid of. The actual final build of Windows 7 is 7.6100.16385; a few days before that version was version 7.6100.16384, which doesn't have any indication of being pre-final (as they thought it might have been the final build but then they fixed a bug at the last minute). Try checking the "details" of a random Microsoft .DLL file in C:\Windows\System32 and see if it ends with 16385 or not.

If it doesn't, your least-painful course of action is to get a proper NON-SP1* 16385 disc of the same bit architecture you're on now (32- or 64-bit) and do an in-place upgrade install. No guarantees you won't have lingering elements of an old build that'll bite you in the rear end later, but it will at least let you install SP1 afterwards.

* - You can't do an in-place upgrade install using differing service pack versions when sticking with the same version of Windows, unfortunately. A Win7-to-Win7 install HAS to have the same SP version (the same restriction exists with Vista).

univbee
Jun 3, 2004





Crawford posted:

I set up a W7 USB stick for when I rebuild my computer next week, and I'm having a problem with it.

When I plugged it into my laptop (already running 64-bit W7), it booted fine.

When I tried it on my current desktop (running 32-bit Vista) it didn't recognize the USB drive being plugged in and try and boot from it.

I've already checked the boot order, and Removable Drive is at the top.


Is it not working because I can't boot a 64-bit OS onto a system that's already running 32-bit? If so, would reformatting or partitioning my hard drive fix this?

That sounds more like something specific to your desktop; the installed OS has nothing to do with whether or not a disc or removable device will boot. I would suspect something about that USB stick doesn't play right with the desktop; does Vista detect it when it's plugged in? Maybe try a different USB port, like one directly on the motherboard to see if that helps.

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univbee
Jun 3, 2004





Dr Tran posted:

I have 7 ultimate on my netbook. I'd like to get the $30 pro and switch my ultimate license to my desktop. What happens if I buy it?

Not really sure what you're asking here, and there are a few variables in play.

1.) You can't "roll back" or downgrade a Windows install without doing a clean re-install. So if your netbook has Windows 7 Ultimate and you want to convert it to Windows 7 Pro, that will require a reinstall.

2.) If your netbook came with Ultimate (as in the OEM sticker on the case says "Ultimate") that license has to stay with the netbook and can't be transferred. If it's a separate retail install it's transferable, though.

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