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kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

You Am I posted:

Suspicious, Microsoft seems to have not made any mention about it on their website nor in any emails.

Did they do any of that for builds 7048, 7068, or 7077?

I would not download this file until it gets wider confirmation, but just because Microsoft doesn't publicize or endorse the release doesn't mean its a legitimate leak.

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kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

LoKout posted:

I still stick by my information that I am pulling directly from Microsoft's partner marketing - Home Premium will be marketed the most to consumers, followed by Ultimate. Hell they have an entire site dedicated to marketing information for Ultimate, there's no way they aren't trying to sell it. The only information I found to the contrary was for OEM system builders. They emphasize selling Home Premium or Professional dependent on what the customer needs.

Then why does Microsoft itself say that Home Premium and Professional are the primary editions of 7?

http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/features/2009/feb09/02-03Win7SKU-QA.mspx

quote:

With Windows 7 there will be two primary editions: Windows 7 Home Premium, and Windows 7 Professional. We think those two SKUs will meet most customers’ needs.
and later

quote:

And certainly there is also a small set of customers who want everything Windows 7 has to offer. So we will continue to have Windows 7 Ultimate edition to meet that specialized need. Windows 7 Ultimate edition is designed for PC enthusiasts who “want it all” and customers who want the security features such as BitLocker found in Windows 7 Enterprise edition.

Paul Thurrott reported from a discussion with Microsoft senior vice president Bill Veghte:

quote:

For this version of the OS, Microsoft and its PC maker partners will market just two mainstream product editions, Windows 7 Home Premium--the recommended choice for consumers--and Windows 7 Professional, which is aimed at enthusiasts and IT professionals.
later in the article, on Windows 7 Ultimate specifically

quote:

Windows 7 Ultimate is kind of a wild-card. It will be available at retail and with new PCs, but Microsoft suggested that it will not be heavily marketed and will instead be "offer-based" via occasional promotions and offers from both PC makers and retailers.

"We're experimenting with the kinds of offers we can make for Windows 7 Ultimate," Veghte said. "It's going to be a low-single digit run rate (i.e. low market share) product. We expect retailers and OEMs to occasionally offer Ultimate with new PCs as part of special promotions. But in terms of run rate, it will be a tiny, tiny percentage of the volume. We will keep the marketing energy on Home Premium and Professional."

This stuff was reported around on the tech blogs a couple of months ago. Either Microsoft is lying or your source is lying/confused. I'm gonna go with the latter.

As for what's in Ultimate that's not in Pro:

quote:

Key features: BitLocker, BitLocker To Go, AppLocker, Direct Access, Branche Cache, MUI language packs, boot from VHD
It really is Enterprise without the volume license. The only thing most people would care about is Bitlocker (and maybe the language packs).

Edit:\/\/\/\/\/ Its in one of the quotes in this post. I'll bold it to make it more obvious.

kapinga fucked around with this message at 16:02 on May 19, 2009

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

CapnBry posted:

Speaking of Remote Desktop, which parts are included on which versions? They say Professional includes Remote Desktop. I'm guessing it means it includes both the server and client, and that Home Premium will include the just client. Or do they mean home won't have either? Either way that means that home won't have "Remote Assistance"-- how will we fix our parents computers now?

If the home version doesn't even come with mstsc.exe that would suck for Professional users who need to access their work PC from home.

It will be exactly the same as Vista and XP: Home has the client and remote assistance, Pro/Business has the server as well.

kapinga fucked around with this message at 01:45 on Nov 18, 2009

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

hobb posted:

Yeah I use imgburn and its just fine, cdburnerxp didn't see my drive using 64 bit.


I think its alright it just started doing that when I tried to load partition magic. Anyway I think I found an answer which is you can't extend the primary partition into unallocated space of the extended partition apparently.

I guess all I can do is nuke my data partition then unallocate it and extend from there, then remake it.

Can you shrink the extended partition? I haven't tried, but its worth a shot before you remove your data.

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

WillieWestwood posted:

I have

Program Files
Program Files (x86)
Program Files (x86) (x86)

What's the third folder for? (this is not a Win 7 question, as these folders were in Vista as well)

Never seen the third one. What's in it, if you don't mind?

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

Zuffox posted:

I'm trying to delete a folder which I, for whatever bloody reason don't have the permissions to delete, but I can't enter Safe Mode.

Is it still F8 at boot, or have they created some new swanky system that I am unaware of?

It's still F8 at boot. Have you tried taking ownership of the folder? Once you take ownership you can then give yourself the appropriate permissions.

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

Orgophlax posted:

Just an update, I was able to figure out bcdedit last night and get my XP partition booted into. Had to copy the ntldr, ntdetect.com and boot.ini from my wife's computer, but it worked.

The other option would have been to run the 7 installer again and select repair. It autodetects windows installations and should have offered to fix the booloader options.

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

All Too Much For Me posted:

Okay, I've been having a rather strange problem ever since I installed the RC.
Whenever I click All Programs, I just get a blank start menu.

The other reports of this say the problem is something to do with the number of items to the right, but that's had no effect.



Any ideas?

I'm surprised it took this long for someone to run into that here. It's supposedly related to the number of items in the All Programs folders. My roommate suffers from this bug, but I do not, even though I have 84 odd entries.

Take a look at this discussion on the Windows 7 forums http://windows7forums.com/windows-7-support/4354-program-icons-missing-all-programs-menu.html

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

coffeetable posted:

I just updated from the beta to the release candidate and I'm having some issues that I think have to do with permissions. Namely, I have to explicitly run a lot of programs as an administrator (as in, right click -> run as administrator) for them to work properly. If I don't, they won't seem to save my preferences or my login details and in the case of my mp3 player (musikCube) it won't be able to play anything.

I've had a quick browse around the permissions menu and everything seems to be ticked, so what am I missing? For one, turning off UAC doesn't seem to change anything.

What happens if you try to create a new text file in %appdata%?

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

Bean_ posted:

I'm trying to pin my music folder to the taskbar. Win7 is pinning my general "Libraries" folder the taskbar, rather than my music directory. Is there any way to fix this and get it to do what I want?

Google doesn't seem to be of too much aid.

Two options:
Since you've already tried to pin the music directory to the taskbar, you should be able to right click (or click-drag up) the explorer icon to get to the jump list, which should have your music folder pinned.

The other option is to add your music folder as a toolbar. Right click the task bar, select toolbars > New Toolbar..., and choose your music folder.

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

soj89 posted:

what does this do other than format and partition the usb drive then copy the iso onto it? The most confusing thing of this whole "install from USB" nonsense is that some guides have you install the BartPE onto the key, then boot from that into the install, whereas others just have you copy the windows iso whole onto the key.

Isn't the bootsect command required? How else would the computer know the USB is supposed to be bootable?

Is there a easy to follow guide to compile a bunch of different windows installs onto one key? XP/Vista32/Vista64/Win7/Win764/Server2k3/WHS etc? That would be pretty kickass.

"Active" is Windows code for "boot". No one knows why (well, I don't).

If you have a USB external harddrive, it's very easy to install from it - make a 4GB FAT32 partition in Computer management, set it as active, and tell your BIOS to boot from USB HDD.

Edit:
I actually got really bored this spring and made a multi-boot USB key that has Backtrack, GParted, and a partition for arbitrary 7 (or Vista) installs. The big trick is that Windows, for some reason, only allows devices marked as "Removable Media" to have 1 partition. If you add other partitions using Linux or something, Windows will only show the first one. I found some random utility that I don't trust very well to flip the removable media bit on the key, causing Windows to treat it exactly like an external hard drive. From there it's trivial to just copy the contents of the ISO to a FAT32 partition and mark it as active, as I said before.

The series of commands given above can also be done in Computer Management > Disk Management in Vista/7. It's been so long since I've messed with XP I'm not sure if you can work with USB keys from there in XP.

kapinga fucked around with this message at 19:27 on Jun 5, 2009

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

Ur Getting Fatter posted:

I've been looking for that program (I believe it's called BootIt) for ages now, but every link to it is either dead or throws off an alarm in Avast for it being a possible trojan.

Do you still have the file? Could you throw it up in rapidshare or something?

You're in luck, it managed to survive all the OS reinstalls and general fuckery that I've been doing on my laptop. It's in a file called lexar_usb_format.zip and I have no idea why, the exe is still BootIt.exe

lexar_usb_format.zip

My own hosting, but I have 1TB of bandwidth left.

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

xamphear posted:

Looks like none of the Home versions support remote desktop. Almost everyone I know likes to remote into their PCs from work or from a laptop at home.

This is basically why I will definitely be getting pro. Also because that's the only version school gives out for free.

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

ElProducto posted:

I know nobody had details yet, but maybe this is an easy question. I hope to buy the upgrade version of W7, but I know that a wipe and reinstall from an upgrade disc requires a full version disc of XP or Vista. I have a full version license of Vista, but Lenovo didn't see fit to send me an actual DVD. I've reinstalled before using a downloaded DVD and the key that came with my laptop. Will I have to reinstall Vista before I can install the W7 upgrade so that I can prove I own a full copy?

If you have a working copy of Vista or XP on the machine, that should be all it needs.

Edit: Assuming that it works like Vista, since it hasn't come out yet.

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

ElProducto posted:

I know that, but I guess I didn't specify that I already have the RC installed. So I can't just wipe it clean, I have to reinstall Vista and then wipe and install W7.

I don't think we'll really find out until it's released. Fortunately, people will figure it out pretty quick.

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

free bowl of soup posted:

Is anybody having problems actually installing? I burned the 64 bit .iso to a disk, booted from the disk and got to the screen with the blue background and white stripe things. After that, it just hung forever, nothing happened. I tried burning other disks, even burning one from a mac.

I have no idea what to do at this point. There's no menus or anything coming up, although I get a mouse cursor and that's it.

Anybody

How long is forever?

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

Have you verified the image downloaded correctly?

SHA1:
(x86): 7D1F486CA569EFFFFB719CFB48355BB7BF499712
(x64): FC867FE1AB2E0A9796F9E4D155B44EA6998F4874

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

Xenomorph posted:

What?

No. That is how Windows has done it for years. There is nothing different in Windows 7 as far as I know.

In XP, I made sure to create a user with a password, and that the NTFS permissions of the share allowed everyone access.

Then I could share it.

I can't say for certain how it was in NT4/2000/XP Gold or SP1.

I have definitely set up shares with no password (but not guest) on XP SP2 machines.

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

Mensur posted:

Until I can see processes from all users in task manager with an annoying UAC prompt it's staying off.

Since this is the Windows 7 Megathread and not the Hurr Vista $ux thread you should know that Windows 7 default UAC settings do not do this.

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

Relambrien posted:

This would be it then. Ventrilo needed to be set to Vista compatibility so that Push-to-talk would work when the window isn't in focus. WoW needed to be set to compatibility so that the game wouldn't freeze upon loading (this probably has something to do with my interface though).

And of course, the launcher program for Starcraft is completely understandable, since it needs to make modifications to how the game normally runs.

For reference, Starcraft is in C:\Program Files\Starcraft (installer default directory), and WoW is in C:\Users\Public\Games\World of Warcraft.

As others have mentioned, if you give yourself modify/delete permissions for the Starcraft folder, it should allow you to run the game as yourself and not the admin.

Re: WoW/Vent running with Vista compatibility - Vista compatibility mode does not automatically enable UAC (XP and lower do). Have you tried running them without elevating privileges?

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

Ziploc posted:

Is 7 64bit going to care where I put my games? Will they perform differently depending on whether or not I put them into 'Program Files x86' 'Program Files' or 'Game Files'?

I asked this in the Windows thread and never really got an answer. But I still don't understand what the point of the x86 Program Files folder is for.

No, Windows doesn't care at all about where a program is. Things only break if the program uses hard coded paths or you move it after installation.

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

El Diabolico posted:

I just got around to popping this on to try it out and I'm really liking W7 (it runs as good and snappy as XP on this hunk of junk)...except for one thing.

I am getting this bizarre network issue where, for whatever reason, the DNS will not resolve and the internet generally ceases to function. It seems to work by typing IPs in. I can connect to my router and anywhere else if I use the IP but it wont connect normally. Firefox and IE times out. Also, the network stuff says that everything is connected fine but when I run a diagnosis it tells me it mysteriously cant connect to the internet.

I've tried 4 different drivers for my on-board nic, an Nforce4: 32bit in compatibility mode, vista x64, W7 x64, and the ones W7 comes with and they all act the same. Even manually setting IPs and DNS servers doesn't work at all. It acts the same. I managed to find a work around, though. by disabling and re enabling the connection then unsettling and resetting a DNS server (I used opendns in this case)and verifying the connection by checking the box, eventually it starts working normally until you turn it off and then goes back to its previous behavior.

Anyone got any ideas on how to permanently fix something like this? Its tarnishing what would otherwise be the smoothest OS install I've ever done.

I would've dumped this in the support forum but this place seems more appropriate. I've also been hearing others have been having similar networking issues.

Have you taken a look at Internet Options? Is it possible IE is set to use some retarded proxy that doesn't exist, or some other weird connection setting? That's a really strange bug.

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

xamphear posted:

On the actual pinned big fullsize icon? Not the tiny one down in the tray?

It can definitely be done, as that stupid WinFox program added a badge to Firefox with the number of open tabs. It had other annoying traits, but that worked OK.

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

jammyozzy posted:

Christ the EU can be loving retarded sometimes, that's the worst possible solution anybody could have come up with.


Making it even harder to get hold of alternative browsers for the average user? It's easy enough to save an installer to a flash drive before hand, but still, Good work EU. Hopefully Microsoft will kick up a huge stink about this now and get it into everybody's heads that their hands are tied or this could turn into "ARRRRRGH VISTA SUCKS!!!" round 2.

For clarity, the EU did NOT demand MS remove IE from the browser, MS is doing that unilaterally.

The reason that MS is doing so is because they (rightly, IMO) do not want to be in any way associated with the competing browsers. The EU knows that simply removing the browser is a bad solution, for all the reasons outlined here (how does a new user go about getting an alternate browser without first installing IE anyways?). They were therefore considering requiring MS to provide direct links and/or installers for IE's main competitors.

However, since MS is removing IE altogether, it removes the EU's leg to stand on regarding the whole thing. By not including any browser, MS cannot be accused of abusing their monopoly position, nor do they have to support/promote competitor products.

The awesome/ballsy move was to remove it from ALL copies of Win7 in Europe, rather than just doing the Vista N route. By removing the option of any browser what-so-ever for ~5% of the market (direct retail sales) it acts to remind everyone in Europe that this particular suit maybe wasn't really the best option for consumers.

I was half expecting the EU to go ahead and force other browsers anyways, but it appears the whole thing worked: EU reponse.

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

LooseChanj posted:

This thought is what had me chuckling at all the chicken or the egg "how the hell is somebody going to d/l a browser without a browser" comments over the past few pages. Windows Update already has third party drivers, why not third party web browsers? It would also be trivial to include installers for several browsers like they did with online services back in Win95. It's a non-issue on a technical level.

Yes, but do you really expect Microsoft to offer hosting and downloads for one of their direct competitors. It's not like MS is competing at all with the nVidia or ATI drivers they offer to download. If they were going to go that route, they would have stated it as such, not "There will be no browser included."

Syllogism posted:

Most consumers won't notice a thing and the ones that do probably approve. There certainly won't be any sort of backslash for enforcing the antitrust laws approriately.

e: furthermore it's not like it can be known for a long time if this was "the best option" for consumers

e2: Opera doesn't approve http://www.computerworld.com/action/article.do?command=viewArticleBasic&articleId=9134286

Wait, how any of the ~5% of sales that comes from direct retail sales not notice that there's no browser? It's not like you can accidentally miss you're no longer able to browse to mozilla.org to download the latest version of Firefox. Or if you are so oblivious, how can you not notice that your default browser of IE is no longer available?

At best, the "best' option for the consumer would be to force MS to provide the other browsers, but at some point MS should (and does, apparently) have the right to say 'gently caress that' and just not offer anything instead. I fail to see how the current situation will help consumers, but the EU can't really do anything about it.

Nor is it like MS has some indomitable lead in the browser marketplace. Firefox has >28% of the market share, while IE has less than 70%. And this has been fairly steadily increasing for Firefox. I hardly see how the market now warrants intervention, but the one three years ago did not.

And it's not like this changes much from the OEM perspective. OEMs have had the option to install alternate browsers for at least a decade, yet primarily do not do so. How does this change that situation - IE8 will still be free for them to add to the install image?

And your last point, of course Opera doesn't like it, they're the whiners who got this suit started in the first place, as your article mentions. Ars:

quote:

Opera wants the EC to take two actions against Microsoft in response to the complaint. The first is fairly predictable: force Microsoft to either unbundle Internet Explorer from Windows or to have alternative browsers preinstalled on the desktop. The idea, of course, is that Opera would be one of those alternative browsers.
Now that MS has chosen option one, it turns out that isn't what Opera wanted at all. What they really wanted was to force MS to advertise for them, for free.

Curiously, despite Firefox's success, Opera has yet to get out of the 1-2% market share. It occurs to me that it's not just Microsoft's fault that Opera isn't popular, and they want the EU to fix it for them anyways. It looks like the EU is happy to at least try.

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

alseyn posted:

Ugh, they can't possibly strip IE completely out. Half the applications embed IE to display their help/parts of program window. This can't be more than just cosmetic change. It would break so many things it would be quite funny. Are there any more details on it somewhere other than that vague article?

MS just put up a blog post regarding their actions and (admitted) reasons for this. http://microsoftontheissues.com/cs/blogs/mscorp/archive/2009/06/11/working-to-fulfill-our-legal-obligations-in-europe-for-windows-7.aspx

quote:

Most importantly, the E versions of Windows 7 will continue to provide all of the underlying platform functionality of the operating system—applications designed for Windows will run just as well on an E version as on other versions of Windows 7.

Means that all they are doing is removing the IExplorer.exe and leaving all the dll's that are used to actually render pages.

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

Casao posted:

Of course it does, but that's the funniest bit - the EU flips their poo poo, Microsoft says it's impossible to remove it without crippling the OS, the EU fines them repeatedly, Microsoft says "Fine, you know what? IE is gone." And all they did was remove a loving shortcut. But this will somehow be a "victory".

I guess they can call it a "victory" since the anti-competitive aspect is from the fact the shortcut is there, not the renderer. Remove the shortcut, it doesn't really matter whether or not the engine was left behind or not (in terms of browser wars).

My beef with this whole proceeding is that I can't tell what made bundling IE in 98/2000/XP/Vista OK that is somehow causing problems now. If bundling wasn't kosher, why hasn't the EU been demanding its removal since it first started watching MS? Why did they wait until the maker of the 5th most popular browser complained (who just happens to be the only European browser maker)? I mean, the browser market is more competitive than any time after the Netscape wars, why does Opera or Firefox need the helping hand now?

Edit:

the wobble posted:

heh. I knew before I hit 'post' that this kind of reaction would show up. The Inquirer are opinionated alright. That's why I keep reading them. What I posted wasn't even one of their articles. It's an anonymous opinion posted after the article.

It's a lovely opinion because it spends a page saying how Microsoft is a evil profit-minded corporate entity without explaining how this case and decision are actually supposed to help the consumer. MS is bad, therefore anything that hurts MS (no matter the collateral damage) is good? That's not even Realpolitik, its vengeance.

Edit2:
http://arstechnica.com/microsoft/news/2009/06/eu-to-pursue-antitrust-case-despite-windows-7-e.ars

Looks like the EU is still out for blood. I still don't see how the EU can rightfully demand that MS actively advertise and support products of its direct competitors, but it looks like they're gonna try.

IMO the EU has the right to exact a huge fine if they so desire, but they should not force MS to support its competitors.

kapinga fucked around with this message at 21:55 on Jun 12, 2009

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

Daktari posted:

Im not sure if its Nightly Tester Tool or something else, but I have a button in the lower right corner of my addons screen that let me override all compatibility; no addons problems at all

Sounds like Nightly Tester Tool with the button and all that. You can also override compatibility checking by adding a boolean field "extensions.checkCompatibility" to about :config and setting it to false.

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

Casao posted:

I have it mapped to Hibernate/Sleep for Button/Close and I like it that way, sometimes I just don't want to sleep for the 30 seconds, mostly because it kills internet.

Guess I can make another profile and use a hot key to trigger it I guess.

You could also look at causing an event (like locking the machine) to switch power profiles. (And of course, unlock to switch back.)

Functionally the same as a hotkey, but you don't have to think about it specifically if you were looking for that kind of functionality.

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

Casao posted:

I hoped to do that, but have no clue where to start. Can Autohotkey do this?

It should be possible with the new upgraded Vista/7 task scheduler.

Task Scheduler > New Task.

Give it a name, etc.
Under the triggers tab, click new, in the "Begin the task:" dropdown, select "On Workstation Lock"
Under the Actions tab, click new, leave it on "start a program". Looks like you can change the power profile with the powercfg program. Type "powercfg.exe" into the Program/script box. Add "-setactive" (no quotes) to the arguments box.

You need to figure out what the GUID of the power profile you need is, so open up a cmd dialog and type "powercfg -l". Copy the appropriate GUID and add it to the arguments box of the task window.

Be sure to check out the Conditions and Settings tabs to make sure this will run when you want it.
Note: I have not actually run any of this to make sure it works, but it should.

I really, really like the new task manager, once you get used to it. It's extremely powerful - you can program it to run any program for any event that shows up in the event viewer.

Edit:

Stanley Pain posted:

The touchpad on my Dell was detected as a touchpad, and the Synaptics drivers installed no problem. My only guess is that FlyTB20C's touchpad isn't a synpatics one.

Yeah, not all Dell touchpads are Synaptics, mine is an Alps pad, which does not do multitouch. Grr.
And I found out the hard way that there are no 64-bit drivers for this particular pad. It works as a basic two button mouse, but you lose the right side-scroll wheel.

kapinga fucked around with this message at 18:34 on Jun 17, 2009

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

c0burn posted:

I never understood virtual desktops. You can't see more on screen at once.

It's occasionally handy for when you are doing several disparate activities, each using multiple windows. You can dedicate entire "desktops" to one activity, and easily switch between activities without minimizing and raising several windows.

I have never found it to be as useful as all the zealots do, and I get the feeling MS's desktop design would make multiple virtual desktops non-trivial, and not worth the effort. This is confirmed in part because there aren't any third party modifications to do this without replacing all of explorer.

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

Casao posted:

Thanks, this worked flawlessly. It also got me to figure out that the last task I set up is actually working, but something is killing it on start up and I have no clue why. I see there's a History tab but it's disabled - how do I enable it?

I think Task history can be enabled by clicking "Enable All Tasks History" on the actions pane on the right, when you have any task selected.

Did you check that it can start when the computer is on battery? There's a default setting that new tasks will not start (and will stop) if its on battery. Other than that, I'm not sure.

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

OMGWTFJohnny posted:

Do I need to do a clean install for this version of win 7? I am currently running build 7000 and want to upgrade to 7100, but it doesn't seem to want to let me. I mounted it to a disk as an image and tried to install it that way. From there it told me to take it out of my drive, restart and install it from windows. I did that and it then said I can't upgrade from 7000 to 7100.

edit: 64 bit if it matters.

From the OP:

univbee posted:

Q: Can I upgrade from a Beta or leaked build to the RC?

A: Not officially. Upgrading from a Beta or leaked build of Windows 7 is intentionally disabled and strongly discouraged by Microsoft to avoid the accumulation of upgrade experience data that will be irrelevant when the final hits (they're only interested in Vista-to-7 direct upgrades), although workarounds do exist.

The workaround is detailed here:
http://blogs.msdn.com/e7/archive/2009/04/07/delivering-a-quality-upgrade-experience.aspx

That link should probably be posted in the OP.

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

MikeJF posted:

So for those of us running the RC (64-bit) as our primary OS and planning to do so for a good long while, what's out best course of action in the coming weeks and months? Is Microsoft planning to do an RC2 to test the proposed RTM? If not, are we stuck on an older version until they release and we pay? I assume if we tried to use the 72xx leaks with our RC keys then they'd fail and the system would deactivate.

They're not releasing anything else publicly until it goes on sale. But you can hardly call running the RC as an "older version" since its still the latest legit offering, and very few changes will be made between it and RTM.

If you somehow find a 7200 build, there's no telling if your key will work or not. I'd install to another partition so you can always go back if need.

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

LorneReams posted:

^^^ How do you get a MD5 of a patched ISO? Does MS put them out, and if so, why DL from a pirate site instead of MS.


When I upgraded to a new motherboard, my XP activation got scrambled and I had to call to reactivate. I went looking for the key, but couldn't find it. The operator didn't give two shits, and just read off a new key, no questions asked. I'm sure it's not too hard to social engineer a key if you need one.

MS releases new ISOs for each service pack, available for download on MSDN and Technet, but only if you're a member. Hashes of those isos are leaked all over the place since its perfectly legal to do so, even if the download itself is not quite as prevalent.

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

revolther posted:

You can't understand why most people would feel entitled to the only user interface for their personal computer that they have ever known? To most people that Windows logo is what makes it "The Computer".

John & Jane Idiot go out to buy their first computer, pay 1200 dollars then come home, plug it in, it posts and then nothing. They make a phone call and find out that they need to go pay 300 dollars more for a disc that will let THEM "use" it. Bullshit, so they wrap the whole drat thing up and take it back, buy a washer/dryer, the American way lives on probably for the better. You could argue do they feel entitled to detergent or dryer sheets, but those are all simple tangible obvious optional expenses associated with their appliances.

The Windows desktop/UI schemata is so intrinsically tied to the user experience, that they are basically hand in hand with computer usage.

Hahah, what? Is it even possible to buy a computer pre-made that doesn't have an OS on it? Can you even buy desktops (not apple) that don't run Windows?

People who pirate windows either built their own machine and are too cheap for the rest of the parts (software is always a factor in the cost of a PC), or they are looking for a free upgrade to the latest and greatest. John & Jane idiot are neither pirating or installing new OSes unless their kids do it for them.

And that leaves the original question - why do people feel that something as obviously complex to produce as an OS feel they deserve it for free? The answer is the same as anything else people pirate - why pay when you don't have to.

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

revolther posted:

I'm not saying now, I'm saying period. When home computers were a niche market for electricians, engineers, and the technically inclined to blow thousands on with relatively very little expectations, an OS to simplify everything wasn't necessary, it was a luxury.

Now as home computers are a mainstream market, and we are marketing laptops for children in third world countries, a simplified UI moves from luxury closer to necessity.

I imagine 90% of most people on any college campus' have no clue what to do if Windows doesn't load and 99% have no clue how to acquire or install Linux.

And considering most kids can play WoW but have no clue what the gently caress a command line is, I guarantee it's headed towards necessity faster than you think.

poo poo, Europe has no clue how to install Firefox without Internet Explorer.

And yeah, you can walk into just about any Fry's or comparable electronics store and buy a PC without an OS.

You wouldn't buy a cellphone then expect to buy an OS.

So you're taking the literal interpretation of "why do people feel entitled to a free OS" being that the computer is useless without one. That doesn't actually answer the topic at hand, which is why people pirate OSes.

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

Casao posted:

Because to most people, piracy isn't stealing. Using the justification of "It doesn't deprive them of anything, since I wasn't going to buy it anyway", it becomes easy to see why someone would pirate something.

If you could get a free copy of Windows 7 without compromising your moral values, would you do so?

Yes, and I probably will through whatever mechanism my school will provide this fall. I'm just praying they're quick on giving out Windows 7.

It goes back to what I said initially, "Why pay for something you can get for free?" but that's the argument for pirating everything.

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

xamphear posted:

If Microsoft really gave a poo poo (they'll make bazillions just selling all the pre-installed OEM copies) they'd offer something extra with a legit purchase that you can't get by pirating it, like the music, movie and game industries are all doing.

I'd be interested to see how this would work. Unlike music and movies, software is commonly distributed as a straight copy off the CD plus whatever keygen/crack necessary to bypass the authentication. EA's new strategy with games is to make them a "storefront". I'm not sure how well that would go over with an operating system. What additional content could MS sell to people who install Windows, without completely crippling the functionality of the operating system?

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kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

CheeToS posted:

I won one of Engadget's Windows 7 Upgrade Preorder discount codes.

Somebody else quoted this before:


Do you need to have Vista or XP installed for the upgrade to work, or can you just give it a key or something? It would suck if I needed to install Vista first every time I decide to format.

You should be able to use the Windows 7 install as the one you're upgrading from, and just do a clean install from the DVD. It worked in Vista, I don't think they'll change it with 7, although they might.

You will need to have whichever OS (XP, Vista, or 7) installed on the machine though.

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