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Minto Took
Dec 4, 2002



Fun Shoe

thealphabetsez posted:

Again with the magical green 86! Also loving the green VT plate.

It's an Illinois environmental plate.

Thinking of getting an Eagle Scout plate at renewal to keep the fuzz off my back.

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nadmonk
Nov 26, 2017

The spice must flow in and through me.
The fire will cleanse me body and soul.


While replacing the parking brake cable, I noticed this:


So I fixed it with my crimpers:

(not pictured: it slathered in liquid electrical tape to protect it)

But in the process, I did this:

That's the line for the aftermarket oil pressure gauge.

Fast forward to today when I received the most adorable compression union:




No leaks with it running, we'll see how it holds up.
The slathered where they ran it through the firewall with a bunch of silicone from the looks of it, so yanking the old line out would have been a pain.

chrisgt
Sep 6, 2011



nadmonk posted:

While replacing the parking brake cable, I noticed this:


So I fixed it with my crimpers:

(not pictured: it slathered in liquid electrical tape to protect it)

But in the process, I did this:

That's the line for the aftermarket oil pressure gauge.

Fast forward to today when I received the most adorable compression union:




No leaks with it running, we'll see how it holds up.
The slathered where they ran it through the firewall with a bunch of silicone from the looks of it, so yanking the old line out would have been a pain.

I'd honestly get rid of that gauge. The line broke that easy, what's gonna happen if you whack it with the toe of your boot. Also, you're never going to look at that gauge down in the footwell anyway. I'm not a big fan of mechanical oil gauges in the car. My old mercedes has one factory and it always kinda gives me the heebie jeebies.

nadmonk
Nov 26, 2017

The spice must flow in and through me.
The fire will cleanse me body and soul.


chrisgt posted:

I'd honestly get rid of that gauge. The line broke that easy, what's gonna happen if you whack it with the toe of your boot. Also, you're never going to look at that gauge down in the footwell anyway. I'm not a big fan of mechanical oil gauges in the car. My old mercedes has one factory and it always kinda gives me the heebie jeebies.

Thankfully, where the line is run there isn't a risk of kicking it. The line got broken when I was taking out old AC line and a bracket caught it.
If it fails again I'll take it out.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

nadmonk posted:

Thankfully, where the line is run there isn't a risk of kicking it. The line got broken when I was taking out old AC line and a bracket caught it.
If it fails again I'll take it out.

The point is that the next time it fails there are better than average odds that it will fail in a way that fills the passenger compartment with hot engine oil.

Plenty of good reasons no one uses those things anymore. They are antiquated and prone to very disastrous failure. Technology has moved on so long ago that every last one still in service is a ticking oil bomb.

Failure would be fine if they just "stopped working" when they failed. But that's not the failure mode. One way or another they pump out your engine oil. You either don't know and trash the motor or you do know because the cab is full of it.

But you do you.

Motronic fucked around with this message at 01:07 on May 16, 2020

casque
Mar 16, 2009


Motronic posted:

You either don't know and trash the motor or you do know because the cab is full of it.

To be fair, he should know because he's got an oil pressure gauge.

taqueso
Mar 8, 2004









Fun Shoe

stripping paint from the ebay wheels


Got these fresh lug covers and fancy S80 center caps to go with. The wheels and center caps are going to be darkened candy rootbeer, but I'm trying to decide if I should do the lug covers in the same color, other color, or leave them as is. They look better in person than that ebay picture, but it's still just plastic.

nadmonk
Nov 26, 2017

The spice must flow in and through me.
The fire will cleanse me body and soul.


casque posted:

To be fair, he should know because he's got an oil pressure gauge.

It dropping to zero does tend to be a pretty good indicator something has happened.
More that likely I'll take it out and plug it before long. I wanted a quick fix that was slightly less sketchy than my temporary fix, which was to melt a bit if the open end with a lighter.

chrisgt
Sep 6, 2011



nadmonk posted:

It dropping to zero does tend to be a pretty good indicator something has happened.
More that likely I'll take it out and plug it before long. I wanted a quick fix that was slightly less sketchy than my temporary fix, which was to melt a bit if the open end with a lighter.

It's hard to tell exactly from the picture, but it appears to be in the footwell area where you can't easily see it while driving. If it's a slow leak it might not read zero while it pumps out all your oil.

taqueso
Mar 8, 2004









Fun Shoe

Scraping paint is less fun the second day

BigPaddy
Jun 30, 2008

That night we performed the rite and opened the gate.
Halfway through, I went to fix us both a coke float.
By the time I got back, he'd gone insane.
Plus, he'd left the gate open and there was evil everywhere.

Trunk hinge snapped in half due to how it was strapped down during transport and the whole hinge system is just spot welded into a panel under the rear window... ok time for fiberglass trunk I guess

tehk
Mar 10, 2006

[-4] Flaw: Heart Broken - Tehk is extremely lonely. The Gay Empire's ultimate weapon finds it hard to have time for love.

So do I plumb these radiators in series or parallel?





Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



My thoughts are:

1. whatever is easier to plumb
2. series because then you won't have potential for two different temperatures of water to enter the engine (hot spots) and it'll be more uniform.

DrChu
May 14, 2002



I think today may have been the last day in this cycle of BRZ maintainence/upgrades. Recap of the week:


I left the doors as the last thing to soundproof since I can only open one at a time in my garage. While the panels were off I used that as an opportunity to update the window switches to the revised version. On the early years, the windows would drop about a half inch when opening the doors. Over time this would cause the weatherstripping to bunch up when shutting the doors. The only fix is to install the updated switches, I guess they have drop amount hard coded in them. My weatherstripping still gets pinched a little, but it seems like it won't be enough to let rain drip in. Going to look if there's some product that can help lubricate them a bit, as getting new pieces are $100+ per door.


The reverse camera is all wired up and working correctly. The only thing I don't like is I see a bit too much of the rear bumper (the blue strip at the bottom). The kit I bought was cheap and didn't include any shims to help change the angle. Works well enough though, when my routines reverts back to driving to work every day I'll appreciate this when having to parallel park multiple times a day, since the rear visibility out of the BRZ is terrible.

The rest is all clutch related. Yesterday was the hottest day of the year so far and I drove around a bit with the windows down. I noticed I was getting a light whine when the car was in gear from about 2K-3K RPMs (higher than that it would be drowned out by other noises). This would go away as soon as I tapped on the clutch. I was worried it was the throwout bearing, but I just replaced that last summer and haven't driven even 3,000 miles since then. Also the clutch pedal started squeaking after not too long (which was also a problem before I replaced the TOB). I spent way too long going through forums and Youtube videos last night, and decided my course of action today was to lube up the clutch fork (there's some access from the top of the transmission, and lube up the slave cylinder. It was a bit cooler today, but I drove for about an hour and didn't hear either noise, so I'm hoping that was a success.

Before driving I also removed the clutch assist spring:

Letting out the clutch pedal has always felt bad. I know in other cars people complain about clutch delay valves which would cause too much slip, but this felt the opposite. I think the spring mostly assists in pushing the pedal down, but it seems to have a snap-back effect as well. With the spring off letting the clutch out feels much better, at a cost of being noticeably harder to push in. I may try the MTEC spring Minto Took mentioned earlier as a middle ground. That little e-clip is a pain to deal with though, and my hand is scraped up from all the sharp edges up there.


Besides a wash I think I'm done for a while. Once my area goes to "Yellow" I'll get some new summer tires (I'm thinking Firestone Firehawk Indy 500 in stock size), and then install a TRD Quick Shift kit and replace some exhaust gaskets I probably should have last summer when I removed the midpipe to drop the transmission.

taqueso
Mar 8, 2004









Fun Shoe

You need two more radiators so you can run 2s2p.

more seriously, I think parallel means more flow, but I don't know much about what actually matters re things like hot spots

Achtane
Apr 2, 2008


I've been trying to eliminate the poorly installed and unsafe start button on the 1993 Hardbody I just got. I finally figured out why the drat key will turn the electrics on and cause the relays to click, but not start the engine. The piece that the key turns is so worn out that it isn't able to turn the ignition switch over all the way; it just barely falls short.

The only reason I figured this out is because I took the switch off in exasperation and turned it with a screwdriver.
So now I've got a new lock cylinder thing coming in. Yay!

STR
May 12, 2006

I thought I was a nice jester


That might also be the switch itself being worn out. Replace both while you're at it.

Achtane
Apr 2, 2008


STR posted:

That might also be the switch itself being worn out. Replace both while you're at it.

Yeah, I was actually trying it on a new switch. That's why I was like "what the fuuuuuuuckkkkk" until it hit me. So it turns out that the old switch was still working ok. But, it's best to just go ahead and replace it anyway.

jamal
Apr 15, 2003

I'll set the building on fire

Parallel should get more efficient use of both radiators as they will both get fully hot water and have a larger temp difference to the airflow going through them.

TrueChaos
Nov 14, 2006




tehk posted:

So do I plumb these radiators in series or parallel?

Saw this, was about to post exactly this:

jamal posted:

Parallel should get more efficient use of both radiators as they will both get fully hot water and have a larger temp difference to the airflow going through them.

If you're concerned about equal flow to each rad, you could run a dole valve in each line. They ensure a constant flow over a wide range of pressure. Not sure this is the right application given the temperatures (or pressure, I have no idea what pressure range a cars cooling system normally operates at) it will be operating at, but there may be an option available.

Qubee
May 31, 2013




Is there a thread in this forum for motorbikes (Harley Davidsons in particular)? Need some advice on how to sort some issues out and don't know where to turn to.

Imperador do Brasil
Nov 18, 2005
Rotor-rific

Qubee posted:

Is there a thread in this forum for motorbikes (Harley Davidsons in particular)? Need some advice on how to sort some issues out and don't know where to turn to.

Cycle Asylum is a sub-forum of AI. There is a motorcycle questions thread among others.

nadmonk
Nov 26, 2017

The spice must flow in and through me.
The fire will cleanse me body and soul.


I finally received all of the parts I needed to repair the exhaust on the '88 4Runner.


The sections of exhaust that fell off were actually in relatively good shape, it was just the clamps and joints between them that gave out.


Despite the appearance of this joint, it isn't moving and appears to be solid. Mostly likely a combination of sketchy welding and rust. Yes, it is actually sketchy as hell, no, I'm not going to replace the entire exhaust from exhaust manifold back right now. This is a "get our weekend farm truck slightly quieter" repair.

The muffler was held up by a bunch of wire. Weirdly, the stock rubber mounts are still there and in great shape. I took it off to make repair easier.
Then I discovered this:

Not sure if the previous owner did a sensor delete here or if it just fell out, but I didn't see a sensor or wiring flapping around.

I cut off the studs and ground it flat(ish), drilled and tapped bolt holes:


Snipped a bit off the end of the tailpipe for a period and look correct cover plate:


Carefully shaped the plat and found matching bolts to complete the aesthetic and a plug of JB Weld to ensure it doesn't leak. Looks like Toyota OEM!


A good old PBR can acting as a bit of a gasket to ensure minimal exhaust leakage:


I used a local micro brew can for the other clamp.


Despite everything, the muffler itself is fine (considering the weird hillbilly custom 2.5" exhaust they put on the 4Runner). The tail pipe did also fall off, but I need an additional clamp to hold that on. I would have welded all of this, but I don't have a welder, so that seemed like a bit of a non-starter.

The exhaust they installed is loud anyway, but after the repair, the noise level is (perhaps unsurprisingly, considering an entire section of the pipe fell out and there was a large hole just before the muffler) more tolerable.

Next up, I probably need to replace the idle air control. When it's warm out and the engine gets up to temp it will sometimes rev high.

stevobob
Nov 16, 2008

Alchemy - the study of how to turn LS1's into a 20B.


nadmonk posted:

I finally received all of the parts I needed to repair the exhaust on the '88 4Runner.

God I fuckin hate exhaust work

MrOnBicycle
Jan 18, 2008
Wait wat?

stevobob posted:

God I fuckin hate exhaust work

One of the first things I ever did on a car was swapping out the muffler with a hole in it (fails inspection). Of course all the bolts were rusty as gently caress and I had the most basic of tools. Basically spent an hour or so with a metal saw blade going back and forth in tiny motions as there was no drat room. I sucked.

Olympic Mathlete
Feb 25, 2011



The front section of exhaust on the Prelude I'm putting back on the road blows at the flex section so I'll be taking that to the garage to fix because I'm fairly sure it's the stock section from 30 years ago... Not messing with that one.

KakerMix
Apr 8, 2004

8.2 M.P.G.


Top Cop



I spent way too long trying to figure out how to white-letter the Land Cruiser badges on our 70. They came to us already painted black, which looks cheap and garbage like to my eyes, so naturally I wanted the letters themselves to be white for contrast.

First I attempt to plastidip the whole badge white and then peel out the insets leaving the original black underneath. Not successful.
Then I tried painting the while letters in via brush. Technically successful but looked like hot garbage.
Finally plastidipped the whole badge white, then painted them black with acrylic, THEN used 91% isopropyl to rub the areas I wanted white clean, leaving the white plastidip exposed and leaving clean lines at the letter edges.

chrisgt
Sep 6, 2011



nadmonk posted:

I cut off the studs and ground it flat(ish), drilled and tapped bolt holes:


On my toyota, the ears of that flange actually rusted off and the studs just fell out... Both sides. It stayed like that for a year or two and then the sensors blew out about 2 weeks apart. I fixed it by tying them in with bailing wire at the roadside, then welding them in when I got home. Just a tack weld mind you.

This is what baffles me, though. If you've ever tried to replace one of those loving things, YOU HATE YOUR loving LIFE, THEY DON'T loving COME OUT!!!! But let the sensor sit there nice and happy? Well poo poo, it's gonna come out all on its own.

nadmonk
Nov 26, 2017

The spice must flow in and through me.
The fire will cleanse me body and soul.


chrisgt posted:

On my toyota, the ears of that flange actually rusted off and the studs just fell out... Both sides. It stayed like that for a year or two and then the sensors blew out about 2 weeks apart. I fixed it by tying them in with bailing wire at the roadside, then welding them in when I got home. Just a tack weld mind you.

This is what baffles me, though. If you've ever tried to replace one of those loving things, YOU HATE YOUR loving LIFE, THEY DON'T loving COME OUT!!!! But let the sensor sit there nice and happy? Well poo poo, it's gonna come out all on its own.

I'm pretty sure all exhaust systems exist to cause pain and suffering.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


All exhaust systems that aren't clear through-holes with cheap disposable nuts and bolts, with stainless through-bolted O2 sensor flanges (rather than threaded holes) exist to cause pain and suffering.

E: which is to say, only early 90s Chrysler smallblock manifold collectors and (almost) Toyota O2 flanges are awful. So you are right.

tehk
Mar 10, 2006

[-4] Flaw: Heart Broken - Tehk is extremely lonely. The Gay Empire's ultimate weapon finds it hard to have time for love.

stevobob posted:

God I fuckin hate exhaust work

I always end up just cutting everything off with a cutting wheel any time I touch exhaust under a car. I donít even waste time trying to remove bolts anymore. Tho I am tempted by those new fangle induction heating tools

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





tehk posted:

I always end up just cutting everything off with a cutting wheel any time I touch exhaust under a car. I donít even waste time trying to remove bolts anymore. Tho I am tempted by those new fangle induction heating tools

I'd like to think that this mentality of "just cut it and replace it" is how you ended up justifying putting gigantic turbos on things.

BigPaddy
Jun 30, 2008

That night we performed the rite and opened the gate.
Halfway through, I went to fix us both a coke float.
By the time I got back, he'd gone insane.
Plus, he'd left the gate open and there was evil everywhere.

tehk posted:

Tho I am tempted by those new fangle induction heating tools

Fancy way to say plasma cutter.

Imperador do Brasil
Nov 18, 2005
Rotor-rific

I usually hate dealing with exhaust as we all do, but when I replaced the full system on my 85 RX7, even though it was weirdly janky components, every bit and bolt came out without so much as a squeak, and I didnít even get rust in my eyes. It was an absolutely incredible day. 30 minutes to remove the old poo poo and install a full Racing Beat system.

Wally Joyner
Jul 8, 2004


I finished up the suspension over-haul on our other 740 today!


Its similar lift to what I did to our Ď89 wagon. With this one, we ended up netting 2.5Ē from stock plus another 1Ē from the tires (moving from 185/65 on 15" rims to 215/70 on 16" rims), however, it feels like more than that because the shocks & struts I pulled out of it were the factory shipped OEM components. I was more than happy to end their suffering (230k+ miles later ).

That might explain why the rear-shocks ended up being the hardest part; both lower shock bolts had to be cut out since they were frozen solid.

Here it is, looking less concerned about the lovely state of local roads then ever:



Wally Joyner fucked around with this message at 18:38 on May 21, 2020

STR
May 12, 2006

I thought I was a nice jester


kastein posted:

All exhaust systems that aren't clear through-holes with cheap disposable nuts and bolts, with stainless through-bolted O2 sensor flanges (rather than threaded holes) exist to cause pain and suffering.

E: which is to say, only early 90s Chrysler smallblock manifold collectors and (almost) Toyota O2 flanges are awful. So you are right.

Oh buddy... you need to try the EJ251 + 00-04 Outback/Legacy Wagon combo.

It's crammed way the gently caress up there. It's usually a piece of cake on the EJ251... in every other chassis.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


It's 6 nuts and one bolt to drop the entire ej25 NA exhaust as a unit. Why are you bothering to try doing it in-car?

chrisgt
Sep 6, 2011



A loving SUBARU EXHAUST is hard? ahhahha
Go replace the manifolds on any OHC v8 and tell me you still think a subaru is hard to work on.

Also hate to break it to you, but all the subaru chassis are about the same access to the engine. It's the same engine cradle bolted into a different shaped shitbox.

BigPaddy
Jun 30, 2008

That night we performed the rite and opened the gate.
Halfway through, I went to fix us both a coke float.
By the time I got back, he'd gone insane.
Plus, he'd left the gate open and there was evil everywhere.



Correct front end for a 1963 Grand Prix. Who would guess that parts from 4 different 60s cars of the same model would still need mounting holes and stuff redrilled so it would be bolted together?

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Darchangel
Feb 12, 2009

Tell him about the blower!



Bespoke, hand-fitted. Detroit was known for that, you know. Or wait, was that Italian stuff? Maybe British? I forget.
yes, this is sarcasm

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