Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
«394 »
  • Post
  • Reply
Mode 7
Jul 28, 2007

im gonna be sick

Horror authors that aren't Poe, Lovecraft or King? I crave horror stories lately and I have almost no idea what's out there.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Gravy Jones
Sep 13, 2003

I am not on your side


Sodomy Non Sapiens posted:

Horror authors that aren't Poe, Lovecraft or King? I crave horror stories lately and I have almost no idea what's out there.

Can you give some more information on what aspects of horror you enjoy? It's a fairly broad genre and it's hard to tell from your post if it's no Poe, Lovecraft and King because you don't like them, or because you do like them and have read everything!

If you do like short form horror like Poe and Lovecraft it might be worth checking out Clive Barker's Books of Blood. I enjoy his longer books as well, they sort of a blend of horror and grotesque fantasy (similar to some of King's Stuff).

Ballsworthy
Apr 30, 2008

yup

Sodomy Non Sapiens posted:

Horror authors that aren't Poe, Lovecraft or King? I crave horror stories lately and I have almost no idea what's out there.

Perennial book barn recommendation: The Dark Descent, a 1000 page horror story collection. It has stories by all three of those guys, but a lot more besides; it's basically a textbook on 20th century horror stories and it's loving excellent.

Here on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_g...ds=dark+descent

Here on Google Books: http://books.google.com/books?id=pN...escent#PPP13,M1 (It says limited preview but it doesn't look that limited to me.)

Tuxedo Catfish
Mar 17, 2007

You've got guts! Come to my village, I'll buy you lunch.


Sodomy Non Sapiens posted:

Horror authors that aren't Poe, Lovecraft or King? I crave horror stories lately and I have almost no idea what's out there.

Someone's already mentioned Clive Barker, which would have been my response, so instead I'll say that if you want old-school horror in the same vein as Poe or Lovecraft you should check out Arthur Machen.

TraderStav
May 19, 2006

It feels like I was standing my entire life and I just sat down


timeandtide posted:

I'm interested in non-fiction books about nuclear weapons in a few areas: 1) history, 2) the sociological/cultural effects on Japan post-war or the world at large, and 3) any sort of philosophical books about the topic. Also, any Internet sites, online articles, etc. are fine too if you have a good one to recommend.

I am interested in a similar topic, but moreso on the Nuclear Energy side of things. How the reactors work on a technical level (but not TOO textbookish) and maybe some good stories that can give the layman a good understanding of what happens inside a Nuclear Plant. I've read the howstuffworks articles on Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Radiation but still trying to get a sense of what the hell Nuclear reactions are on a practical level. For example, a book that explains the nuclear reaction and how/why it does not become a chain reaction that completely destroys the world. Hoping to find a regarded authority on the topic that isn't heady and overly scientific.

In a NON-related topic. I am looking to read some on Confucius. Is there a good book that would be a great place to start? I'm looking to understand his teachings and maybe a book that has a good author who gives good scenarios and interpretations of them.

Thanks much.

Death Hamster
Aug 21, 2007
Is this a two-bagger I see before me?

spixxor posted:

What should I read when I finish up the Song of Fire and Ice series? I'm only halfway through the first book at the moment, but I read pretty quickly, so I'd like to have some good recommendations lined up for when I finish. Does anyone know of any other good fantasy series that's pretty close in quality and scope?

I've already read through as much of the Wheel of Time series as I can stand, so we can skip those.

If you want to stick to fantasy, I recommend Lois McMaster Bujold's Chalion Books.

The Curse of Chalion
Paladin of Souls (Winner of Hugo and Nebula Award)
The Hallowed Hunt

I have also heard a lot of good things about The Malazan Book of the Fallen Series by Steven Erikson

Encryptic
May 3, 2007



Yeah, the Chalion trilogy is pretty good and the Malazan series (what I've read of it) is good also.

I'd also throw out J.V. Jones' Sword of Shadows series as a possiblity, though it's not finished (3 books out of a projected 4-5 book series, I believe). It does have the same gritty feel of Song of Ice and Fire as well as a very well-realized fantasy world.

There's also the Coldfire trilogy by C.S. Friedman, for a series that's actually been finished for years. Very well-written dark fantasy with a touch of sci-fi.

Edit: Also going to suggest Robin Hobb's original Farseer trilogy (Assassin's Apprentic, Royal Assassin and Assassin's Quest). I'm not that fond of Hobb's later work but this trilogy is pretty solid.

Just remembered one more: Tad Williams' Memory, Sorrow and Thorn trilogy. Is a bit slow-paced in the beginning, but it's an excellent epic fantasy trilogy once you get into it, IMHO.

Encryptic fucked around with this message at 18:32 on Jun 11, 2009

Ikrizzle
Dec 30, 2006

hi i'm


So I finished Infinite Jest about a year ago, and have been hunting for that sort of non-linearity while staying difficult, but still manageable. I liked Pynchon's The Crying of Lot 49 and Eggers's You Shall Know Our Velocity!, so if that gives anyone an idea of something I would like, I'd be grateful!

edit: by staying manageable I probably mean no Joyce

Ikrizzle fucked around with this message at 22:32 on Jun 11, 2009

JayJay
Jun 16, 2005

TEHHHHHH Jetplane!



Can anyone recommend a good science fiction space pew pew lazers "epic" series. Aka spanning multiple books with the same characters. I do not like when books end. What would be the science fiction equivalent to the Wheel of Time?

Ikrizzle
Dec 30, 2006

hi i'm


JayJay posted:

Can anyone recommend a good science fiction space pew pew lazers "epic" series. Aka spanning multiple books with the same characters. I do not like when books end. What would be the science fiction equivalent to the Wheel of Time?

I can't guarantee that it's space pew pew lazers enough for you, but I'd strongly have to say start out with Ender's Game if you haven't read it. It's really great on its own, has three sequel novels out, a parallel (less sci-fi) storyline, lots of short stories supporting it, etc etc. In short:

It won't quit on you too quickly.

Warning: After Ender's Game they get less and less pew pew lazers and iirc, more philosopho-sci-fi. Still awesome imo.

JayJay
Jun 16, 2005

TEHHHHHH Jetplane!



Ikrizzle posted:

I can't guarantee that it's space pew pew lazers enough for you, but I'd strongly have to say start out with Ender's Game if you haven't read it. It's really great on its own, has three sequel novels out, a parallel (less sci-fi) storyline, lots of short stories supporting it, etc etc. In short:

It won't quit on you too quickly.

Warning: After Ender's Game they get less and less pew pew lazers and iirc, more philosopho-sci-fi. Still awesome imo.

Sorry, should have said that I read Ender's Game and a few of the other books in the series. The only thing that bugged me was, the series really split up the characters and is all over the place in reading order/time & space. Other than that though, I really liked the series. Speaker for the dead was probably my favorite even though it barely had any pew pew. I guess im looking for more of a straight forward scifi epic.

Also that chart kicks rear end, I wish I had that back when I was trying to figure out the reading order on wikipedia.

colonelsandy
Dec 28, 2006

"We in comparison to that enormous articulation; we only sound and look like badly pronounced and half finished sentences out of a stupid suburban novel."

Sodomy Non Sapiens posted:

Horror authors that aren't Poe, Lovecraft or King? I crave horror stories lately and I have almost no idea what's out there.

Dude...Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu

timeandtide
Nov 29, 2007

This space is reserved for future considerations.

Need some non-fiction and fiction recommendations on these topics:

1. Non-fiction: The West, the frontier, gold rush, stuff leading up to the Civil War, etc. Basically, any major stuff in American history from 1820-1850, specifically about the West though. I did pick up "The American West" by Dee Brown, but couldn't find too much else.

2. Fiction: Westerns. What're the major ones in the genre I should read? Any cross-genre stuff like the Dark Tower?

Encryptic
May 3, 2007



Sodomy Non Sapiens posted:

Horror authors that aren't Poe, Lovecraft or King? I crave horror stories lately and I have almost no idea what's out there.

Dan Simmons' older horror stuff might be up your alley - Song of Kali, Summer of Night, etc.

timeandtide posted:

Need some non-fiction and fiction recommendations on these topics:

1. Non-fiction: The West, the frontier, gold rush, stuff leading up to the Civil War, etc. Basically, any major stuff in American history from 1820-1850, specifically about the West though. I did pick up "The American West" by Dee Brown, but couldn't find too much else.

2. Fiction: Westerns. What're the major ones in the genre I should read? Any cross-genre stuff like the Dark Tower?

For number one, I'd suggest Men To Match My Mountains: The Opening of the Far West 1840-1900 by Irving Stone. I read it some months ago and really enjoyed it. Stone's style is very engaging and covers a lot of history - Sutter's Landing, the Gold Rush, the Comstock Lode, the Mormon settlement of Utah, etc.

For number two I'll just assume you've already read Blood Meridian since it gets mentioned at least once per thread in TBB, otherwise that's definitely a must-read, as are McCarthy's other Westerns.

Haven't read a lot in the genre myself so I'm interested to hear what else is good.

Encryptic fucked around with this message at 22:30 on Jun 13, 2009

Psychosomatic Tumor
Jul 20, 2006



I'm working my way through The Origins Of Totalitarianism by Hannah Arendt (about the factors leading up to the rise of Nazi Germany/Soviet Russia) and it's a fascinating read. I was wondering if there were similarly well-sourced (socio)political history books out there, as most of the stuff I've seen out there seems to be sensationalist crap. 20th century history in general seems to have caught my interest recently, although it's not like I restrict myself solely to that.

Psychosomatic Tumor fucked around with this message at 00:41 on Jun 14, 2009

timeandtide
Nov 29, 2007

This space is reserved for future considerations.

Sodomy Non Sapiens posted:

Horror authors that aren't Poe, Lovecraft or King? I crave horror stories lately and I have almost no idea what's out there.

Besides the others mentioned here, which I second, check out Peter Straub (he does more psychological horror, or quasi-thrillers; I'd recommend Lost Boy Lost Girl, Floating Dragon, or The Throat), John Farris (Scare Tactics, All Heads Turn When the Hunt Go By), Bentley Little for a more "gross-out" style horror (I liked The Return, The Collection, and University, but not much else of his was worth reading), Richard Mattheson (Hell House, Duel, and I Am Legend), Shirley Jackson (Haunting of Hill House), and Robert R. McCammon (whatever plot sounds most interesting to you.)

Merou
Jul 23, 2005
mean green?



I don't really know what genre what I'm looking for falls under. Its sort of introspective and hosed up. I'm looking for books similar to The Elementary Particles by Michel Houellebecq, or The Stranger by Albert Camus, or to an extent American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis.

I've read everything by the last 2 authors, but not the first as I find Houellebecq's stuff to be a little too far into the lets talk about my boner spectrum.

Does anyone know what I mean?

Philthy
Jan 28, 2003



Pillbug

Two requests:

Historical fiction, based on the pioneer life, or settling of the west. No westerns, or crime, etc. Mostly based around hardships and the actual move. I'm reading Giants in the Earth now, and this is exactly what I want, so I'd like to add something in the queue when I'm done.

Second request is something along the lines of Bukowski. Not his poems, but rather his stories. I love the down and out Chinaski who never seems to get a break, but makes the best of it by drinking himself stupid and picking up ugly chicks for a night or two.

AberrantBassist
Aug 16, 2003

by Fistgrrl


I'm looking for really unique books that are borderline experimental. I love John Zorn when it comes to music and that atonal stuff that no one really listens to, and I'd love to find a John Zorn of fiction. I've read 'House of Leaves' and 'Only Revolutions' and I thought they were amazing. I've gone to http://www.bookarmy.com and I've searched Amazon and while they can recommend me 'similar' authors they're not similar in the a prose/experimental sense.

Does anyone know of any experimental authors?

ashgromnies
Jun 19, 2004

by Lowtax


AberrantBassist posted:

Does anyone know of any experimental authors?

First thing that comes to mind is William S. Burroughs - Naked Lunch. Pretty entry-level though, I'm not a huge lit snob.

ShutteredIn
Mar 24, 2005

El Campeon Mundial del Acordeon


AberrantBassist posted:

I'm looking for really unique books that are borderline experimental. I love John Zorn when it comes to music and that atonal stuff that no one really listens to, and I'd love to find a John Zorn of fiction. I've read 'House of Leaves' and 'Only Revolutions' and I thought they were amazing. I've gone to http://www.bookarmy.com and I've searched Amazon and while they can recommend me 'similar' authors they're not similar in the a prose/experimental sense.

Does anyone know of any experimental authors?

Nabokov's Pale Fire (whole thread on this) and Jesse Ball's Samedi the Deafness: http://www.amazon.com/Samedi-Deafne.../dp/0307278859/
Samedi is pretty amazing even if the plot gets pretty tough to follow. You should have no problem with difficult plots since you like Only Revolutions, which kinda sorta almost has a plot (not really)

Ballsworthy
Apr 30, 2008

yup

AberrantBassist posted:

I'm looking for really unique books that are borderline experimental. I love John Zorn when it comes to music and that atonal stuff that no one really listens to, and I'd love to find a John Zorn of fiction. I've read 'House of Leaves' and 'Only Revolutions' and I thought they were amazing. I've gone to http://www.bookarmy.com and I've searched Amazon and while they can recommend me 'similar' authors they're not similar in the a prose/experimental sense.

Does anyone know of any experimental authors?

I like Gilbert Sorrentino, Mulligan Stew is his most famous and it's pretty fun, but I think Abberation of Starlight is his best.

Death Hamster
Aug 21, 2007
Is this a two-bagger I see before me?

timeandtide posted:

Besides the others mentioned here, which I second, check out Peter Straub (he does more psychological horror, or quasi-thrillers; I'd recommend Lost Boy Lost Girl, Floating Dragon, or The Throat), John Farris (Scare Tactics, All Heads Turn When the Hunt Go By), Bentley Little for a more "gross-out" style horror (I liked The Return, The Collection, and University, but not much else of his was worth reading), Richard Mattheson (Hell House, Duel, and I Am Legend), Shirley Jackson (Haunting of Hill House), and Robert R. McCammon (whatever plot sounds most interesting to you.)

I second the recommendation for Robert R McCammon. I have not read a bad book by this man.

I also really enjoy F. Paul Wilson as an author.

LooseChanj
Feb 17, 2006

Logicaaaaaaaaal!


America sucks because you're...
I've already got:
Black=Native Son, Richard Wright
A poor immigrant=The Jungle, Upton Sinclair (I think, feel free to correct me)

Looking more in the way of fiction.

colonelsandy
Dec 28, 2006

"We in comparison to that enormous articulation; we only sound and look like badly pronounced and half finished sentences out of a stupid suburban novel."

LooseChanj posted:

America sucks because you're...
I've already got:
Black=Native Son, Richard Wright
A poor immigrant=The Jungle, Upton Sinclair (I think, feel free to correct me)

Looking more in the way of fiction.

Poor and White= The Redneck Manifesto by Jim Goad http://www.amazon.com/Redneck-Manif...45147192&sr=1-1
Poor and White (fiction) =Knockem Stiff by Donald Ray Pollock http://www.amazon.com/Knockemstiff-...45147223&sr=1-1
Black (fiction)= Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison http://www.amazon.com/Invisible-Man...45147259&sr=1-1

StroMotion
May 8, 2009


timeandtide posted:

Need some non-fiction and fiction recommendations on these topics:

1. Non-fiction: The West, the frontier, gold rush, stuff leading up to the Civil War, etc. Basically, any major stuff in American history from 1820-1850, specifically about the West though. I did pick up "The American West" by Dee Brown, but couldn't find too much else.

2. Fiction: Westerns. What're the major ones in the genre I should read? Any cross-genre stuff like the Dark Tower?

I don't know about #1, but for #2, Lonesome Dove may be the best American western ever written. Larry McMurtry wrote a bunch of others in that series, including Comanche Moon and some others I can't think of, but Lonesome Dove is definitely the place to start. Incredibly well fleshed-out characters and a great backdrop of the West in its prime. It's a long book, but if you make it past the first 100 or so pages you will be absolutely hooked. It also moves fairly quickly, although widely fracturing storyline can occasionally be frustrating, if you get really into one character and then the book switches for 75 pages.

Also excellent is Cormac McCarthy's All the Pretty Horses . The movie's great, the book is better. Again, a great backdrop, and John Grady Cole is a classic badass protagonist.

Finally, check out Jim Harrison's Legends of the Fall . It's a mini-epic in [100 pages, but it covers a lot of ground. It usually comes in a book with two other short stories, Revenge and The Man Who Gave Up His Name . I was never big on Revenge but the Man Who Gave Up His Name is one of my all-time favorites, although it's not a western in the traditional sense.

criptozoid
Jan 3, 2005


Philthy posted:

Historical fiction, based on the pioneer life, or settling of the west. No westerns, or crime, etc. Mostly based around hardships and the actual move. I'm reading Giants in the Earth now, and this is exactly what I want, so I'd like to add something in the queue when I'm done.

R. A. Lafferty's "Okla Hannali" fits that description... sort of. It deals with a fictional chief of the Choctaw tribe who settles in Oklahoma after the Trail of Tears.

Liquidator
Sep 27, 2007


I'm doing research for a novel on the post war reconstruction of Japan and would also like to know about the relationship between Japan, Okinawa and the US throughout the post war period and up to the present day. Information about Asia in general from 1939 onward would be appreciated. As would firsthand accounts of military personnel stationed in Okinawa.

I'd also like some good books concerning Afganistan during the US led invasion and the 2003-2005 period in Iraq. Especially concerning being removed from an unfinished job in Afghanistan and being moved to Iraq. Memoirs would be appreciated.

Liquidator fucked around with this message at 22:20 on Jun 16, 2009

Lee Harvey Oswald
Mar 16, 2007

by exmarx


Does anyone know of any books that describe in detail the structure of the Mafia? I've never quite understood how it worked, and am interested in a book that highlights the different levels (e.g. capos, etc.) and the roles they play.

inktvis
Dec 11, 2005

What is ridiculous about human beings, Doctor, is actually their total incapacity to be ridiculous.

timeandtide posted:

2. Fiction: Westerns. What're the major ones in the genre I should read? Any cross-genre stuff like the Dark Tower?
I've got Oakley Hall's Warlock in my to-read pile on the strength of this review:

quote:

Holiday, vol. 38, #6; December 1965, pp. 164-5
A Review of Oakley Hall's Warlock

Tombstone, Arizona, during the 1880's is, in ways, our national Camelot: a never-never land where American virtues are embodied in the Earps, and the opposite evils in the Clanton gang; where the confrontation at the OK corral takes on some of the dry purity of the Arthurian joust. Oakley Hall, in his very fine novel Warlock has restored to the myth of Tombstone its full, mortal, blooded humanity. Wyatt Earp is transmogrified into a gunfighter named Blaisdell who, partly because of his blown-up image in the Wild West magazines of the day, believes he is a hero. He is summoned to the embattled town of Warlock by a committee of nervous citizens expressly to be a hero, but finds that he cannot, at last, live up to his image; that there is a flaw not only in him, but also, we feel, in the entire set of assumptions that have allowed the image to exist. It is Blaisdell's private abyss, and not too different from the town's public one. Before the agonized epic of Warlock is over with -- the rebellion of the proto-Wobblies working in the mines, the struggling for political control of the area, the gunfighting, mob violence, the personal crises of those in power -- the collective awareness that is Warlock must face its own inescapable Horror: that what is called society, with its law and order, is as frail, as precarious, as flesh and can be snuffed out and assimilated back into the desert as easily as a corpse can. It is the deep sensitivity to abysses that makes Warlock one of our best American novels. For we are a nation that can, many of us, toss with all aplomb our candy wrapper into the Grand Canyon itself, snap a color shot and drive away; and we need voices like Oakley Hall's to remind us how far that piece of paper, still fluttering brightly behind us, has to fall.

-Thomas Pynchon

Juanito
Jan 20, 2004

I wasn't paying attention
to what you just said.

Can you repeat yourself
in a more interesting way?


Hell Gem

Lee Harvey Oswald posted:

Does anyone know of any books that describe in detail the structure of the Mafia? I've never quite understood how it worked, and am interested in a book that highlights the different levels (e.g. capos, etc.) and the roles they play.
I read this many years ago, so I can't remember real well, but I seem to recall The Valachi Papers by Peter Maas being pretty interesting.

From Amazon:

quote:

The First Inside Account of the Mafia
In the 1960s a disgruntled soldier in New York's Genovese Crime Family decided to spill his guts. His name was Joseph Valachi. Daring to break the Mob's code of silence for the first time, Valachi detailed the organization of organized crimefrom the capos, or bosses, of every Family, to the hit men who "clipped" rivals and turncoats. With a phenomenal memory for names, dates, addresses, phone numbers -- and where the bodies were buried -- Joe Valachi provided the chilling facts that led to the arrest and conviction of America's major crime figures.

The rest is history.

He had a bounty put on him, and he had to be carefully protected in jail.

Archibald Cox
Feb 11, 2005
How dare you, Mr. Agnew

Merou posted:

I don't really know what genre what I'm looking for falls under. Its sort of introspective and hosed up. I'm looking for books similar to The Elementary Particles by Michel Houellebecq, or The Stranger by Albert Camus, or to an extent American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis.

I've read everything by the last 2 authors, but not the first as I find Houellebecq's stuff to be a little too far into the lets talk about my boner spectrum.

Does anyone know what I mean?

Introspective and hosed up: Try The Tunnel by Ernesto Sabato, and maybe Farabeuf by Salvador Elizondo.
Introspective and self-lacerating: Youth by J.M. Coetzee and Season of Migration to the North by Tayib Salih.
Introspective and just plain mean: The Loser or Old Masters by Thomas Bernhard.

Archibald Cox
Feb 11, 2005
How dare you, Mr. Agnew

Philthy posted:

Two requests:

Historical fiction, based on the pioneer life, or settling of the west. No westerns, or crime, etc. Mostly based around hardships and the actual move. I'm reading Giants in the Earth now, and this is exactly what I want, so I'd like to add something in the queue when I'm done.

You should look at the rest of Rolvaag's trilogy to see if you like it.

Also, O Pioneers!, My Antonia, and The Song of the Lark by Willa Cather; Angle of Repose and Wolf Willow by Wallace Stegner. For the Dust Bowl period, you could look at The Bones of Plenty by Lois Hudson. Peace Shall Destroy Many by Rudy Wiebe is set on the Canadian prairie during World War II, but it is about Mennonites, and preserves the grittiness that you'd associate with pioneer-type novels.

StroMotion
May 8, 2009


Lee Harvey Oswald posted:

Does anyone know of any books that describe in detail the structure of the Mafia? I've never quite understood how it worked, and am interested in a book that highlights the different levels (e.g. capos, etc.) and the roles they play.

There's one by the undercover cop who spent like 2 years in the Mob gathering evidence. It's called Donnie Brasco: AKA Joseph K. Pistone. It's pretty awesome, although there is obviously a lot of attention paid to the law enforcement perspective.

StroMotion fucked around with this message at 13:13 on Jun 17, 2009

Dr. Procrastination
Sep 3, 2006
A practical phD in ...

Could anyone recommend some interesting or essential books for engineering? Perhaps interesting primers on physics and maths.

I SAID LISTEN
Jan 10, 2007
I don't *do* up.

I'm trying to stock up on some books for when I do some house-sitting in a month. I've already got some fiction picked out (mainly from the Hall of Fame thread) so right now I'm looking for some relatively light non-fiction, preferably something science, history, and/or political science related.

Any recommendations?

Supreme Allah
Oct 6, 2004

working from home


Nap Ghost

Wilderness survival stories or books?

A friend was telling me a while back about this book written by a guy who went on a skiing trip with a buddy, and they ended up getting caught in an avalanche and had to survive on their own. The story sounded really interesting - apparently one of the guys had to leave his friend behind when he got hurt, or drama along those lines.

I'm not looking for that specific book or story; I am looking for books in that spirit - especially survival in the desert or at sea, but anything that involves the basic idea of people stranded or lost and having to fend for themselves or survive in harsh conditions.

Non fiction is always best, but fiction is OK too as long as it is realistic and written well

Archibald Cox
Feb 11, 2005
How dare you, Mr. Agnew

Supreme Allah posted:

Wilderness survival stories or books?

A friend was telling me a while back about this book written by a guy who went on a skiing trip with a buddy, and they ended up getting caught in an avalanche and had to survive on their own. The story sounded really interesting - apparently one of the guys had to leave his friend behind when he got hurt, or drama along those lines.

I'm not looking for that specific book or story; I am looking for books in that spirit - especially survival in the desert or at sea, but anything that involves the basic idea of people stranded or lost and having to fend for themselves or survive in harsh conditions.

Non fiction is always best, but fiction is OK too as long as it is realistic and written well

You could try Endurance by Alfred Lansing, or Young Men and Fire by Norman MacLean.

Lee Harvey Oswald
Mar 16, 2007

by exmarx


Thanks for the suggestions. I've been thinking of reading Donnie Brasco and the Valachi Papers sounds right up my alley.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Rush_shirt
Apr 24, 2007



LooseChanj posted:

I've already got:
Black=Native Son, Richard Wright

Have you read Wright's Black Boy (it's a very loose autobiography but reads like fiction)? Also, check out Invisible Man if you haven't already.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply
«394 »