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Books On Tape
Dec 26, 2003

Future of the franchise

Looking for recommendations of good, hard sci-if that takes place within our colonized solar system. I read The Expanse series and it was fantastic. Looking for stuff like this.

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ulvir
Jan 2, 2005



GorfZaplen posted:

I want to read In Search of Lost Time.

yeeeeees

funkybottoms
Oct 28, 2010

Funky Bottoms is a land man

Aardvark! posted:

Looking for a serial killer detective mystery/thriller. I can't name any reference books other than The Outsider and Mr Mercedes by Stephen King, and I'd prefer non supernatural. I'd love something like the korean detective movies Memoir of a Murderer, Memories Of Murder, etc

Keigo Higashino's Professor Galileo series is good, although I don't remember there being serial killers. For something more King-like, dark-rear end murder mysteries are a Scandinavian cottage industry; check out Jo Nesbo and Henning Mankell.



Books On Tape posted:

Looking for recommendations of good, hard sci-if that takes place within our colonized solar system. I read The Expanse series and it was fantastic. Looking for stuff like this.

Goon favorites Blindsight and Echopraxia by Peter Watts.

tuyop
Sep 14, 2006

Every second that we're not growing BASIL is a second wasted


Fun Shoe

Books On Tape posted:

Looking for recommendations of good, hard sci-if that takes place within our colonized solar system. I read The Expanse series and it was fantastic. Looking for stuff like this.

Pushing Ice, Aurora, and 2312 might do it for you. I have lots more to recommend if not!

AngusPodgorny
Jun 3, 2004

Please to be restful, it is only a puffin that has from the puffin place outbroken.

Does anyone have recommendations on Marcus Aurelius? Either the best translation of his Meditations, or a good biography of him. Or really any other philosopher-king, since I'm more fascinated by the idea of a philosopher leading a nation to war than Aurelius in particular.

uXs
May 3, 2005

Mark it zero!

tuyop posted:

Pushing Ice, Aurora, and 2312 might do it for you. I have lots more to recommend if not!

This doesn't seem to fit the 'within the solar system' requirement.

tuyop
Sep 14, 2006

Every second that we're not growing BASIL is a second wasted


Fun Shoe

uXs posted:

This doesn't seem to fit the 'within the solar system' requirement.

Oh poo poo, Aurora is out then but the other two are in the solar system I think!

Punkin Spunkin
Jan 1, 2010

Catching up to god quicker



Any recommendations on good historical fiction, preferably pre-renaissance...like, classical antiquity to early middle ages maybe...I'd love anything involving the ancient world particularly but I'm willing to settle for whatever period.

In terms of the sorta stuff I'm looking for...I adored all I read of Mary Renault and Robert Graves, and also recently got into some Alfred Duggan who is quite good as well. Also enjoyed all of Gore Vidal's books in this area (Creation, Julian). Also been trying to get a copy of Memoirs of Hadrian by Marguerite Yourcenar.
Looking for some quality novelists, not like, Michael/Jeff Shaara or Steven Pressfield level dad-book stuff (as much as I liked them as a kid). Might give Adrian Goldsworthy's novels a try I guess.
I've seen Masters of Rome tossed around a lot but it didn't really intrigue me, nor do ancient rome murder mystery series or whatever.

Punkin Spunkin fucked around with this message at 01:32 on May 14, 2021

3D Megadoodoo
Nov 25, 2010

- Ska du ha maito i kaffet?


Punkin Spunkin posted:

Any recommendations on good historical fiction, preferably pre-renaissance...like, classical antiquity to early middle ages maybe...I'd love anything involving the ancient world particularly but I'm willing to settle for whatever period.

In terms of the sorta stuff I'm looking for...I adored all I read of Mary Renault and Robert Graves, and also recently got into some Alfred Duggan who is quite good as well. Also enjoyed all of Gore Vidal's books in this area (Creation, Julian). Also been trying to get a copy of Memoirs of Hadrian by Marguerite Yourcenar.
Looking for some quality novelists, not like, Michael/Jeff Shaara or Steven Pressfield level dad-book stuff (as much as I liked them as a kid). Might give Adrian Goldsworthy's novels a try I guess.
I've seen Masters of Rome tossed around a lot but it didn't really intrigue me, nor do ancient rome murder mystery series or whatever.

The Etruscan

Lockback
Sep 2, 2006

All days are nights to see till I see thee; and nights bright days when dreams do show me thee.


Punkin Spunkin posted:

Any recommendations on good historical fiction, preferably pre-renaissance...like, classical antiquity to early middle ages maybe...I'd love anything involving the ancient world particularly but I'm willing to settle for whatever period.

In terms of the sorta stuff I'm looking for...I adored all I read of Mary Renault and Robert Graves, and also recently got into some Alfred Duggan who is quite good as well. Also enjoyed all of Gore Vidal's books in this area (Creation, Julian). Also been trying to get a copy of Memoirs of Hadrian by Marguerite Yourcenar.
Looking for some quality novelists, not like, Michael/Jeff Shaara or Steven Pressfield level dad-book stuff (as much as I liked them as a kid). Might give Adrian Goldsworthy's novels a try I guess.
I've seen Masters of Rome tossed around a lot but it didn't really intrigue me, nor do ancient rome murder mystery series or whatever.

A little later timer period, but have you read Eco yet? Baudolino might be a good pick if you want a really easy story to read but still written really really well.

Punkin Spunkin
Jan 1, 2010

Catching up to god quicker



Lockback posted:

A little later timer period, but have you read Eco yet? Baudolino might be a good pick if you want a really easy story to read but still written really really well.
Haha, I was contemplating including "Just read Baudolino recently and loved it" when I wrote out the post. Guess I could finally read The Name of the Rose/The Island of the Day Before/The Prague Cemetary when it comes to more historical fiction from him.

3D Megadoodoo posted:

The Etruscan
Oh yeah I need to look into Mika Waltari, I've just heard his books got some terrible translations

3D Megadoodoo
Nov 25, 2010

- Ska du ha maito i kaffet?


Punkin Spunkin posted:

Oh yeah I need to look into Mika Waltari, I've just heard his books got some terrible translations

Huh, well that sucks but it's also weird because his writing isn't exactly complex.

A human heart
Oct 10, 2012



Punkin Spunkin posted:

Any recommendations on good historical fiction, preferably pre-renaissance...like, classical antiquity to early middle ages maybe...I'd love anything involving the ancient world particularly but I'm willing to settle for whatever period.

In terms of the sorta stuff I'm looking for...I adored all I read of Mary Renault and Robert Graves, and also recently got into some Alfred Duggan who is quite good as well. Also enjoyed all of Gore Vidal's books in this area (Creation, Julian). Also been trying to get a copy of Memoirs of Hadrian by Marguerite Yourcenar.
Looking for some quality novelists, not like, Michael/Jeff Shaara or Steven Pressfield level dad-book stuff (as much as I liked them as a kid). Might give Adrian Goldsworthy's novels a try I guess.
I've seen Masters of Rome tossed around a lot but it didn't really intrigue me, nor do ancient rome murder mystery series or whatever.

Hubert's Arthur by Frederick Rolfe is a really stylistically wild pseudo medieval romance set mostly during the reign of King John, it's very sick although be warned that it is quite anti-Semitic at times. He also wrote a book called Don Tarquinio that is set in renaissance Italy although I haven't read that one yet so not sure what it's like, but I imagine it's also good like most of his writing. I am sort of tempted to recommend The Death of Virgil by Hermann Broch but it is an incredibly dense high modernist sort of thing rather than being 'historical fiction' as such even though it's about Virgil.

Hieronymous Alloy
Jan 30, 2009


Why! Why!! Why must you refuse to accept that Dr. Hieronymous Alloy's Genetically Enhanced Cream Corn Is Superior to the Leading Brand on the Market!?!



Morbid Hound

Punkin Spunkin posted:

Any recommendations on good historical fiction, preferably pre-renaissance...like, classical antiquity to early middle ages maybe...I'd love anything involving the ancient world particularly but I'm willing to settle for whatever period.

It's off-period to your request but the only historical fiction writer I'm aware of who is on the same level as Mary Renault is Patrick O'Brian. Similarly The Agony and the Ecstasy is a historical-fic biography of Michaelangelo that's quite well done.

Umberto Eco is his own thing but I don't really classify him as "historical fiction" in my head because Eco is his own genre. His stuff tends to be about modern themes and sometimes almost edges over the line into magic realism.

Sham bam bamina!
Nov 6, 2012

ƨtupid cat




Punkin Spunkin posted:

Any recommendations on good historical fiction, preferably pre-renaissance...like, classical antiquity to early middle ages maybe...I'd love anything involving the ancient world particularly but I'm willing to settle for whatever period.
Sword at Sunset, by Rosemary Sutcliff. Really interesting take on King Arthur ("Artos"), focused on the tension between the Romans and the Celts in the sixth century.

3D Megadoodoo posted:

Huh, well that sucks but it's also weird because his writing isn't exactly complex.
Yeah, there's just no excuse for the treatment The Egyptian got in English. It's insane that there still hasn't been a real translation after 70 years.

Wikipedia posted:

The Egyptian saw an English release in August 1949. It was translated by Naomi Walford, not directly from Finnish but rather Swedish, and abridged even further,[41] losing about a third[4] of the text: aside from the excision of repetitions, the philosophical content suffered,[2] and key facts were omitted.[5]

Sham bam bamina! fucked around with this message at 16:20 on May 14, 2021

yaffle
Sep 15, 2002

Flapdoodle

Punkin Spunkin posted:

Any recommendations on good historical fiction, preferably pre-renaissance...like, classical antiquity to early middle ages maybe...I'd love anything involving the ancient world particularly but I'm willing to settle for whatever period.


I really enjoyed Arthur Rex by Thomas Berger, a somewhat irreverent retelling of the Arthurian stories. (More Jabberwocky than Sword in the Stone, if that makes sense).

PatMarshall
Apr 6, 2009



Punkin Spunkin posted:

Any recommendations on good historical fiction, preferably pre-renaissance...like, classical antiquity to early middle ages maybe...I'd love anything involving the ancient world particularly but I'm willing to settle for whatever period.

In terms of the sorta stuff I'm looking for...I adored all I read of Mary Renault and Robert Graves, and also recently got into some Alfred Duggan who is quite good as well. Also enjoyed all of Gore Vidal's books in this area (Creation, Julian). Also been trying to get a copy of Memoirs of Hadrian by Marguerite Yourcenar.
Looking for some quality novelists, not like, Michael/Jeff Shaara or Steven Pressfield level dad-book stuff (as much as I liked them as a kid). Might give Adrian Goldsworthy's novels a try I guess.
I've seen Masters of Rome tossed around a lot but it didn't really intrigue me, nor do ancient rome murder mystery series or whatever.

The Iron King by Maurice Druon is a cool series of historical novels about the end of the Capetian dynasty and the beginning of the hundred year war. Kinda pulpy, but pretty cool. There's an english translation in paperback, which is what I've been reading. Seems OK, but I don't speak french.

KingKalamari
Aug 24, 2007

Fuzzy dice, bongos in the back
My ship of love is ready to attack


Anyone got any recommendations for works that blur the line between science fiction and fantasy? I've enjoyed Gene Wolfe's Book of the New Sun, Vance's Dying Earth and Iain M Banks' Inversions and am interested in reading more "Fantasy stories told in a sci fi setting"/"Science Fiction masquerading as fantasy"

tuyop
Sep 14, 2006

Every second that we're not growing BASIL is a second wasted


Fun Shoe

KingKalamari posted:

Anyone got any recommendations for works that blur the line between science fiction and fantasy? I've enjoyed Gene Wolfe's Book of the New Sun, Vance's Dying Earth and Iain M Banks' Inversions and am interested in reading more "Fantasy stories told in a sci fi setting"/"Science Fiction masquerading as fantasy"

A lot of the Hainish Cycle books by Ursula K LeGuin might scratch that itch. Iirc Rocannon’s World is that fantasy-but-Sci-Fi style.

Also, Children of Time might work too! And I want to say Ringworld but I don’t remember it that well.

CrypticFox
Dec 19, 2019

"You are one of the most incompetent of tablet writers"

KingKalamari posted:

Anyone got any recommendations for works that blur the line between science fiction and fantasy? I've enjoyed Gene Wolfe's Book of the New Sun, Vance's Dying Earth and Iain M Banks' Inversions and am interested in reading more "Fantasy stories told in a sci fi setting"/"Science Fiction masquerading as fantasy"

Ninefox Gambit by Yoon Ha Lee is mostly science fiction, but has a fantasy feel. It's somewhat difficult to describe, but it definitely blurs the lines.

Starship's Mage by Glynn Stewart (book one of a large series) is another one, it is an interesting combination of space opera and fantasy. The premise to the series is FTL travel is only possible through mages magically jumping starships through space.

Hieronymous Alloy
Jan 30, 2009


Why! Why!! Why must you refuse to accept that Dr. Hieronymous Alloy's Genetically Enhanced Cream Corn Is Superior to the Leading Brand on the Market!?!



Morbid Hound

KingKalamari posted:

Anyone got any recommendations for works that blur the line between science fiction and fantasy? I've enjoyed Gene Wolfe's Book of the New Sun, Vance's Dying Earth and Iain M Banks' Inversions and am interested in reading more "Fantasy stories told in a sci fi setting"/"Science Fiction masquerading as fantasy"

Lord of Light by Zelazny is your ur-text here for sf-fantasy.

For more like Gene Wolfe, try Viriconium.

tuyop
Sep 14, 2006

Every second that we're not growing BASIL is a second wasted


Fun Shoe

I'm looking for a short story collection of like, really short fiction. I'm thinking 500-1500 words. YA is good but not essential. Any ideas?

Franchescanado
Feb 23, 2013

Someone you know is Gay
Someone you know is Bi
Someone you know is Trans
Someone you know is French
Maybe even someone you love

Grimey Drawer

tuyop posted:

I'm looking for a short story collection of like, really short fiction. I'm thinking 500-1500 words. YA is good but not essential. Any ideas?

"60 Stories" by Donald Barthelme
Any of Etgar Keret's collections.
Any Raymond Carver collection
The Complete Short Stories of Ernest Hemingway
"Sum" by David Eagleman
Exterminator! by William S. Burroughs, but it's surrealist absurdism.

Sham bam bamina!
Nov 6, 2012

ƨtupid cat




Yasunari Kawabata's Palm-of-the-Hand Stories. Italo Calvino's Invisible Cities might also hit that spot.

tuyop
Sep 14, 2006

Every second that we're not growing BASIL is a second wasted


Fun Shoe

All these look very good, thanks!

KingKalamari
Aug 24, 2007

Fuzzy dice, bongos in the back
My ship of love is ready to attack


Really good recs for mine as well. I've read some of Zelazny and Le Guin's other work and quite enjoyed it so I'll definitely give those a read!

MockingQuantum
Jan 20, 2012




KingKalamari posted:

Really good recs for mine as well. I've read some of Zelazny and Le Guin's other work and quite enjoyed it so I'll definitely give those a read!

CS Friedman's Coldfire trilogy also checks the box for a fantasy/sci-fi hybrid. It's basically a gothic-esque fantasy (think Castlevania, sort of) set on a post-Earth colonial planet.

3D Megadoodoo
Nov 25, 2010

- Ska du ha maito i kaffet?


tuyop posted:

I'm looking for a short story collection of like, really short fiction. I'm thinking 500-1500 words. YA is good but not essential. Any ideas?

Maybe too short: István Örkény's Egyperces novellák if it has been translated to your language of choice. e: Apparently has been translated to English, at least.

Jack B Nimble
Dec 25, 2007




Soiled Meat

Hey, does anyone have a recommendation for a swashbuckling sci fi adventure novel, preferably some sort of classic. I'm going to be playing in a Star Wars game and, rather than actual SW media, I'd like to read something more like a spiritual precursor.

I guess Buck Rogers (is that just comics?) or maybe even John Carter is maybe what I'm talking about?

Humerus
Jul 7, 2009

Rule of acquisition #111:
Treat people in your debt like family...exploit them.




Jack B Nimble posted:

Hey, does anyone have a recommendation for a swashbuckling sci fi adventure novel, preferably some sort of classic. I'm going to be playing in a Star Wars game and, rather than actual SW media, I'd like to read something more like a spiritual precursor.

I guess Buck Rogers (is that just comics?) or maybe even John Carter is maybe what I'm talking about?

Well the John Carter books are public domain so you have only your time standing in the way. Fwiw I read the first John Carter book last year and I liked it enough. It's not long either, it would probably be a novella by today's standards.

yaffle
Sep 15, 2002

Flapdoodle

Jack B Nimble posted:

Hey, does anyone have a recommendation for a swashbuckling sci fi adventure novel, preferably some sort of classic. I'm going to be playing in a Star Wars game and, rather than actual SW media, I'd like to read something more like a spiritual precursor.

I guess Buck Rogers (is that just comics?) or maybe even John Carter is maybe what I'm talking about?

EE "Doc" Smith's (actually Stephen Goldin) family D'Alembert books are pretty swash buckley.

tuyop
Sep 14, 2006

Every second that we're not growing BASIL is a second wasted


Fun Shoe

KingKalamari posted:

Anyone got any recommendations for works that blur the line between science fiction and fantasy? I've enjoyed Gene Wolfe's Book of the New Sun, Vance's Dying Earth and Iain M Banks' Inversions and am interested in reading more "Fantasy stories told in a sci fi setting"/"Science Fiction masquerading as fantasy"

Oh poo poo, I was actually just talking about The Stars Are Legion with a friend the other day. We kind of both agreed that even though it takes place on a weird biological generation ship, it’s definitely actually a fantasy adventure novel. Definitely one of my favourite weird sci fi books, and has awesome feminist arguments throughout.

regulargonzalez
Aug 18, 2006
UNGH LET ME LICK THOSE BOOTS DADDY HULU YES YES GIVE ME ALL THE CORPORATE CUMMIES ADBLOCK USERS DESERVE THE DEATH PENALTY, DON'T THEY DADDY?
WHEN THE RICH GET RICHER I GET HORNIER


Jack B Nimble posted:

Hey, does anyone have a recommendation for a swashbuckling sci fi adventure novel, preferably some sort of classic. I'm going to be playing in a Star Wars game and, rather than actual SW media, I'd like to read something more like a spiritual precursor.

I guess Buck Rogers (is that just comics?) or maybe even John Carter is maybe what I'm talking about?

The Stainless Steel Rat series is kind of like Han Solo: Origins

Selachian
Oct 9, 2012



Jack B Nimble posted:

Hey, does anyone have a recommendation for a swashbuckling sci fi adventure novel, preferably some sort of classic. I'm going to be playing in a Star Wars game and, rather than actual SW media, I'd like to read something more like a spiritual precursor.

I guess Buck Rogers (is that just comics?) or maybe even John Carter is maybe what I'm talking about?

If you're curious about Buck Rogers, the first Buck novel, Armageddon 2149 AD by Philip Francis Nowlan, is available free at Project Gutenberg.

If you're interested in Golden Age SF, you might also want to look up Edmond Hamilton (Star Kings, for instance sounds like what you're thinking about) or Leigh Brackett's Eric John Stark novels (The Secret of Sinharat, etc.).

Alexei Panshin's Anthony Villiers novels (Star Well et al) and Jack Vance's Planet of Adventure or Demon Princes series might suit you too.

Selachian fucked around with this message at 13:18 on May 20, 2021

Hieronymous Alloy
Jan 30, 2009


Why! Why!! Why must you refuse to accept that Dr. Hieronymous Alloy's Genetically Enhanced Cream Corn Is Superior to the Leading Brand on the Market!?!



Morbid Hound

Jack B Nimble posted:

Hey, does anyone have a recommendation for a swashbuckling sci fi adventure novel, preferably some sort of classic. I'm going to be playing in a Star Wars game and, rather than actual SW media, I'd like to read something more like a spiritual precursor.

I guess Buck Rogers (is that just comics?) or maybe even John Carter is maybe what I'm talking about?

"A Princess of Mars" is the first John Carter book. Very direct inspiration. Racism warning of course.

Another good read would be Dune.

Burning Rain
Jul 17, 2006

What's happening?!?!


tuyop posted:

I'm looking for a short story collection of like, really short fiction. I'm thinking 500-1500 words. YA is good but not essential. Any ideas?

Along with the other suggestions, a lot of Richard Brautigan's stuff is in flash fiction territory and very good. Looking at translated fiction, there's Quim Monzo, Daniil Kharms, Franz Kafka's short stories and Samuel Beckett's "Texts for Nothing". None of which is remotely YA, but mostly very good.

Quandary
Jan 29, 2008


I'm looking for a good book on the history of the California bay area, or maybe of California more broadly if that's too specific. Any good recommendations?

Kvlt!
May 19, 2012

DIG THROUGH THE DITCHES
AND BURN THROUGH THE WITCHES



Looking for a good book or book series in some post-apocalyptic fiction/wasteland fiction. Ideally more of a pulpy, Mad Max/Fallout style stuff, but I'm open to anything that people enjoyed!

EDIT: To give some ideas of what I've liked so far, I really enjoyed Roadside Picnic and Justin Cronin's The Passage series. I also enjoyed The Road as a story but couldn't stand McCarthy's punctuation-less writing style.

Kvlt! fucked around with this message at 17:27 on May 29, 2021

tuyop
Sep 14, 2006

Every second that we're not growing BASIL is a second wasted


Fun Shoe

Kvlt! posted:

Looking for a good book or book series in some post-apocalyptic fiction/wasteland fiction. Ideally more of a pulpy, Mad Max/Fallout style stuff, but I'm open to anything that people enjoyed!

EDIT: To give some ideas of what I've liked so far, I really enjoyed Roadside Picnic and Justin Cronin's The Passage series. I also enjoyed The Road as a story but couldn't stand McCarthy's punctuation-less writing style.

The clearest quality recs I can think of in that vein are Octavia E. Butler’s Sower’s Trilogy and Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake Trilogy.

Less good would be Robert Charles Wilson’s Spin Trilogy, though the first novel is really great.

For non-series entries I recently finished A Boy and His Dog at the End of the World (Charlie Fletcher) and Doggerland (Ben Smith) and they both were great. Doggerland in particular was outstanding, couldn’t put it down.

For stuff that’s a bit more of a stretch:

Check out VanderMeer’s Zone X trilogy. The world is fairly normal but the zone is a very interesting take on decline.

I think Gene Wolfe’s The Urth of the Fallen Sun series is also an interesting take on collapse and that general vibe.

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Sham bam bamina!
Nov 6, 2012

ƨtupid cat




Kvlt! posted:

Looking for a good book or book series in some post-apocalyptic fiction/wasteland fiction. Ideally more of a pulpy, Mad Max/Fallout style stuff, but I'm open to anything that people enjoyed!

EDIT: To give some ideas of what I've liked so far, I really enjoyed Roadside Picnic and Justin Cronin's The Passage series. I also enjoyed The Road as a story but couldn't stand McCarthy's punctuation-less writing style.
Engine Summer, by John Cowley. Was going to suggest Russell Hoban's Riddley Walker too before realizing that you'd probably hate the style even more than The Road's.

On the pulpier end, Zelazny's Damnation Alley.

Edit: Also the turbo-pulp Hardwired, by Walter Jon Williams.

Sham bam bamina! fucked around with this message at 18:44 on May 29, 2021

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