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timeandtide
Nov 29, 2007

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I'm interested in non-fiction books about nuclear weapons in a few areas: 1) history, 2) the sociological/cultural effects on Japan post-war or the world at large, and 3) any sort of philosophical books about the topic. Also, any Internet sites, online articles, etc. are fine too if you have a good one to recommend.

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timeandtide
Nov 29, 2007

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Need some non-fiction and fiction recommendations on these topics:

1. Non-fiction: The West, the frontier, gold rush, stuff leading up to the Civil War, etc. Basically, any major stuff in American history from 1820-1850, specifically about the West though. I did pick up "The American West" by Dee Brown, but couldn't find too much else.

2. Fiction: Westerns. What're the major ones in the genre I should read? Any cross-genre stuff like the Dark Tower?

timeandtide
Nov 29, 2007

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Sodomy Non Sapiens posted:

Horror authors that aren't Poe, Lovecraft or King? I crave horror stories lately and I have almost no idea what's out there.

Besides the others mentioned here, which I second, check out Peter Straub (he does more psychological horror, or quasi-thrillers; I'd recommend Lost Boy Lost Girl, Floating Dragon, or The Throat), John Farris (Scare Tactics, All Heads Turn When the Hunt Go By), Bentley Little for a more "gross-out" style horror (I liked The Return, The Collection, and University, but not much else of his was worth reading), Richard Mattheson (Hell House, Duel, and I Am Legend), Shirley Jackson (Haunting of Hill House), and Robert R. McCammon (whatever plot sounds most interesting to you.)

timeandtide
Nov 29, 2007

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Still looking for recommendations on Western fiction/non-fiction, but I had a question that fits this thread: where does the line "America is not a young lad" come from? I vaguely remember it from a thread here, and I want to say it's from either Ballard or Burroughs.

timeandtide
Nov 29, 2007

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CloseFriend posted:

I just finished Cities of the Red Night and I'm looking for more stuff like it. Not so much the ejaculation during hanging or the complete mess of the last part, but I like some of the concepts behind the way the story was told. For instance, in the first part of the book it seemed like the plot moved through different characters as opposed to the characters moving through plot elements (if that makes any sense). I also dug the surreality of it, which reminded me of Robert Anton Wilson or David Lynch or Grant Morrison (although I'm sure they were influenced by Burroughs).

So what's some more good Burroughs or weird surreal mind-bendy sci-fi beat fiction? Is Naked Lunch the classic I've heard it is?

Cities of Red Night is the first of a trilogy, actually. The Place of Dead Roads is the second book and The Western Land is the third one.

timeandtide
Nov 29, 2007

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Turbo Fikus posted:

Hmm. Tried to post this a minute ago, but it would appear to have been eaten. Forgive me if there's some kind of time-delay, I'll check back in a bit.

Dear Litnerds,

I was reading Luciano Berio's "Remembering the Future", a set of lectures/essays on late-20th century Music Aesthetics, and I began to stumble a bit when he moved from talking about how the greatest critique of a symphony is another symphony into him talking about reading music heuristically as "texts". Since Berio was a good friend of Umberto Eco, I thought it appropriate to read up on semiotics and other fun lit theory ideas, but I don't know where to start, and am intimidated by the primary literature. Any good primers you can suggest are greatly appreciated.

I haven't read it, but Eco did write a book called Theory of Semiotics which is where he established his ideas for it. It might be worth just tracking down that and seeing how easily you understand it.

Also, if you feel you have troubled with in-depth explanations, you could always browse their Wikipedia pages and see if you "get it" from that.

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timeandtide
Nov 29, 2007

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Rob Filter posted:

I really enjoyed the night / day / twilight / final watch books. Its not brilliant literature, but its a enjoyable light read. Go for it.

So you think the last book is decent enough? I enjoyed the original trilogy, but wasn't sure if I should pick that one up since I had never heard of it.

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