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Powdered Toast Man
Jan 25, 2005

TOAST-A-RIFIC!!!

Liquid cement. Lacquer paints. Solvents. The list goes on. Don't believe the hype about pride in a well-constructed model, because we modelers DO IT FOR THE INHALANTS.

Hopefully, I can draw out some fellow scale modelers on the forums with this thread, because I know you've got to be out there. Let's share tips and tricks of the trade, pictures of our work, and make promises about when we'll finish a model that we don't deliver on...

For the first post, how about some good information on getting started if you've never even touched a model before? Modeling can be a very relaxing and satisfying hobby, but it helps if you start out right to keep from getting needlessly frustrated.

Getting Started

First and most importantly, stay away from standard modeling cement (Testors and the like) because it's complete crap. You'll drive yourself nuts, make a mess, and there are much better products available today. As your first purchase getting your feet wet with the hobby, other than a model kit of course, I recommend the Touch & Flow Applicator: http://www.micromark.com/TOUCH-N-FL...aign=GoogleBase

You'll also need some liquid cement to go with that. My personal favorite is ProWeld non-toxic (smells like oranges!) because it's less caustic and works well, but Tenax 7R and Tamiya Liquid Cement are also excellent. Go with what you can get from your hobby shop.

Pick an easy kit for maximum modeling satisfaction! The problem here is that the outward appearance of kits can be deceptive. Many don't show the parts themselves anywhere on the outside of the box, so it's difficult to know how well the kit is engineered, how detailed it is, and how good the instructions are. I'm predisposed towards aircraft, but if you like cars, go for it. Tanks are great, but you're not ready for them yet, believe me.

1:72 scale aircraft are a good starting point. The kit is likely to be simpler, with fewer pieces, but even at that scale you will still get some nice detail. Go for a Revell, Airfix, Italeri, or Tamiya. My personal favorite brand is Hasegawa, but they go for insane detail and I don't want you to end up throwing your model against the wall.

For basic tools, you're also going to need an X-ACTO knife, a file, and whatever paints your model calls for. Paint is such a large topic on its own that I think I'll go into it later. Concentrate on assembly before you perfect your painting techniques.

A few more things that are handy, but may not be necessary at first include modeling putty (for filling cracks and voids), masking tape (for holding things together temporarily or protecting things from paint), and masking fluid (again, for protecting things from paint).

Putting It Together

Plastic models are made of injection-molded polystyrene for the most part. Some are made of resin, more on that later. The process of injection molding necessitates that the parts be attached to a "tree" or sprue. Thus, to begin putting those parts together you must cut them from the sprue, and then trim the excess plastic. There are a couple of different ways to do this, but don't be fooled by fancy "sprue cutters"; they are essentially wire cutters and nothing more. Leave a little bit of sprue material hanging off the part.

At this point, I feel the need to mention that X-ACTO and similar knives are surgically sharp. They will cut into your fingers effortlessly, and so you need to be careful about how you're holding a part while you're trimming it. By the same token, you can also cut off too much plastic and destroy detail on the part if you are careless or push too hard with the knife. Trimming excess plastic with the knife works fine, but some people prefer to use a file instead for more control.

Paying close attention to the kit's instructions, once you have some parts to put together, you're going to want to "dry fit" them first. Most parts will have pins and holes that engage with other parts in the kit, simplifying the assembly process and aiding with alignment. However, there can be imperfections when the kit is manufactured, such as warping or "flash". Flash is excess plastic, usually quite thin, protruding from the edge of a part. It can easily be trimmed off with the dull edge of your knife. Check the fit of the parts and look for any imperfections in the plastic that might prevent a good fit.

Once you are comfortable with the fit, it's time to make it permanent. With liquid cement and a Touch & Flow, the procedure is as follows:

1. Get your Touch & Flow charged with liquid cement. It comes with instructions on how to do this.
2. Hold the two parts together firmly with one hand.
3. Touch the Touch & Flow to the seam between the parts and move it along to the end. It's hard to describe how this will work, but this is a well-designed tool and it's very easy to use.
4. Continue holding the parts together after cementing the entire seam. Occasionally let go a bit to check if it has started to set. Liquid modeling cement works by partially melting the polymers in the plastic, and as it evaporates the plastic again becomes solid-but joined together! This usually only takes about 10-15 seconds, but if you are dealing with parts that "want to" come apart due to warping or the general shape, you are going to want some sort of clamp to hold it together for a longer period until the bond strengthens.

Cyanoacrylate (super glue) is another option, especially for pesky seams that don't want to stay together. To make things even better, you can get Zip Kicker: http://www.micromark.com/ZIP-KICKER-SUPER-GLUE-ACCELERATOR-8-OZ-LIQUID,7577.html (I know it seems expensive, but a little bit goes a LONG way)

Zip Kicker accelerates the hardening of cyanoacrylate glues, and by "accelerates" I really mean "sets instantly". This stuff is really nasty, and as I've found out first hand you don't want to get it in a fresh cut from your knife...but you haven't cut yourself because you're being careful, right?

Coming Soon: My favorite specialized tools, including the coolest clamps ever created by man!

Powdered Toast Man fucked around with this message at 00:57 on Jun 5, 2009

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tunnel for cars
Oct 20, 2004


I'm trying to build a double planked hull on this model of the HMS victory but the wood keeps fuckin snapping when I bend it and I can see why this hobby is basically for old faggots that are used to life being disappointing and lovely 24/7

Elector_Nerdlingen
Sep 27, 2004




College Slice

Awesome idea for a thread. I used to build model planes when I was a kid, and it was heaps of fun. Hopefully this thread inspires me to get back into the hobby. I think I'd like to build a model WWII ship of some sort.

Powdered Toast Man
Jan 25, 2005

TOAST-A-RIFIC!!!

TOOOOOOOOOOLS

I love tools and gadgets. In fact, I find it difficult to make it out of Hobbytown USA without buying some nifty new gadget. Sometimes this has fantastic results, as in the case of the Berna Hobby Clamps:

http://www.micromark.com/BERNA-HOBB...P-SET,8990.html

(by the way, if you can't tell already, Micro Mark is a great store)

The genius of these clamps is how flexible they are. Traditional clamps only clamp in a single direction and typically are only effective with flat surfaces. Springs clamps are way too strong for plastic models. Berna clamps work by simple friction, in basically any position, and they're reasonably priced. They're the best tools I've ever bought.

Sanding sticks are my preferred method for getting rid of excess plastic. I use these, which you can also get at Hobbytown or Hobby Lobby:

http://www.micromark.com/5-PIECE-FLEX-PAD-SET,7367.html

Liquid mask is fantastic for protecting parts that you don't want to paint, or masking off areas of different color when painting. It works especially well for protecting aircraft canopies! Just paint right over it, and when you're done it rubs off easily, paint and all. The different model supply companies all have their own versions which are basically equal, although I use Gunze Sangyo/Mr. Hobby because I get a kick out of their products being mister this or mister that. Every single product they sell, no kidding.

The best tools do come at a price, but they will last you forever and work much better. It seems that Japanese guys are extremely serious about their hobbies, so the Japanese tools are the best, no question. Tamiya and the aforementioned Mr. Hobby make a full range of stuff you probably had no idea even existed. Hasegawa also makes a few specialty tools.

This thread needs more PICTURES so here is a Tamiya store in Japan...except, something seems a bit odd about it...


Click here for the full 600x800 image.

VanguardTruth
Mar 11, 2006

Da Troof

Class is out, summer is here and we just moved to a house with a big basement, so I want to set up a table for doing this type of thing. I've built a few in the past with my father who has been doing this since he was a kid, and I even built one a few years ago that I was fairly proud of, but it's lost in storage somewhere. I'll definitely be posting in here to exchange tips etc.

By the way, that touch-n-flow looks cool, and the clamping kit looks like a gift from god. Might have to pick these up.

Also, does anyone know of a good online resource for picking up scale plastic car models? There is a hobby store not too far from here but the selection isn't all that great as the guy is mostly devoted to trains and planes.

Looking forward to a cool thread!

EDIT: Whenever I build a car, the body paint done with a spray can doesn't come out very satisfying. Should I be looking into an airbrushing system or jut take more time and do a million thin coats for a more even look with the spray can?

VanguardTruth fucked around with this message at 19:02 on Jun 5, 2009

Powdered Toast Man
Jan 25, 2005

TOAST-A-RIFIC!!!

VanguardTruth posted:

Whenever I build a car, the body paint done with a spray can doesn't come out very satisfying. Should I be looking into an airbrushing system or jut take more time and do a million thin coats for a more even look with the spray can?

I don't really do cars, but if you think about the finish that you're aiming for - glossy, smooth, uniform - then an airbrush most definitely makes sense. People are often intimidated by them, but they're really just a matter of practice. Spray cans suck. They clog easily, sputter, and often cause orange peel due to uneven spray.

Fortunately, the most expensive component of an airbrushing system, the compressor, has been coming down in price over the past few years.

I have an Iwata Revolution CR and I absolutely love it. Double action gives you excellent control, and yet it can still put out an impressive volume of paint for covering large areas. It is also easy to take apart and clean after painting.

I got my compressor with my favorite hook up for otherwise expensive items: Hobby Lobby, if there is one near you, frequently puts out a 40% off coupon that is good for anything in the store. That's a big savings on a $120 airbrush compressor!

Coming soon: Kickass modeling websites for help and buying! (but please, please, support your local hobby store; they are a dying breed)

VanguardTruth
Mar 11, 2006

Da Troof

Powdered Toast Man posted:



I looked up Iwata's site, downloaded the PDF parts guide and skimmed through it, looks like a cool piece.

Just so I understand, I have to buy this, and a compressor also that is compatible with the CR? Or does it come in a neat little package compressor included?

Going along with what you said earlier, there really is nothng like visiting your local hobby store. Even though his primary focus is trains and planes, the owner is a great guy and runs his business just so he and his hobbyist friends can have a place to hang out drink coffee and talk shop. Great place to support with your hard earned ducats.

VanguardTruth fucked around with this message at 20:58 on Jun 5, 2009

ASSTASTIC
Apr 26, 2003

Hey Gusy!

Can you guys recommend me a excellent airbrush?

I'm looking at Badgers or Iwatas, but I really can't decide. I plan on using it for modeling, but also smaller art projects/paintings. I want a dual action per my friends recommendation, but what should I get?

Edit:

I am a retard and should read previous posts before replying. Any other good airbrushes people can recommend?

Edit2: To add: I have a compressor already, but its a shop compressor. Do I NEED to buy a hobby one? I am assuming there would be adapters + maybe a fine tune regulator I can buy instead of buying a smaller airbrush-only compressor.

ASSTASTIC fucked around with this message at 22:55 on Jun 5, 2009

Powdered Toast Man
Jan 25, 2005

TOAST-A-RIFIC!!!

Selecting an Airbrush

Iwata is the only brand that I have personal experience, and an airbrush is a very personal thing. However, it's pretty obvious that there are airbrushes intended for detailed model painting and illustration, and airbrushes intended for making tacky tee shirts and vanity plates. Iwata belongs in the former category.

From what I have seen, and from talking to the knowledgeable guys at my hobby store, Badger and Iwata are typically the best, whilst Paasche and Aztek tend to be inferior. For any kind of model painting I strongly recommend double action because you get so much more control. I chose the Revolution CR because I planned to use it for more detailed work, and a gravity feed topside paint cup is better for that. Larger scale work doesn't require that level of control, so a siphon-fed paint cup is fine for that.

If you want to blow even more cash, I know of Japanese guys who have both. They use a siphon-fed airbrush for priming and painting the base coat, and a gravity-fed for details. One possible additional advantage of this is your detail paints will usually be acrylics, which require only water and standard airbrush cleaner to clean up, while primers are lacquer and must be cleaned up with lacquer thinner.

(oh, and did I mention I got my airbrush for 40% off at Hobby Lobby, too? hehe.)

Compressors

Airbrushes do not really require a large volume of air or a lot of pressure. Your airbrush will include specifications on how the air supply should be regulated for best results. Compressors that are specifically made for airbrushes are best because they're going to be intended for indoor use, and will thus be quieter in operation. Then again, maybe you enjoy the sound of a loud air compressor. I don't.

Many airbrush compressors are tankless and only run when you are actually spraying, via an automatic relay system. There are some combination airbrush/compressor sets available from various companies, but I have yet to see one that's priced less than they would be individually.

No matter what your air source is, it is very important that the air is both filtered and dried. Compressed air has water vapor in it just like the air you breathe, but the problem is that when that compressed air is released and expands, it cools and the water vapor condenses out of it and into your airbrush (see the Ideal Gas Law for the physics behind this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ideal_gas_law). This causes spotty, uneven spray patterns. Some airbrush compressors come with an air drier already attached. If not, don't worry, any place that sells airbrushes and compressors will have all of the hardware you need.

Airbrush Care & Feeding

You're probably going to be surprised by how little paint an airbrush actually uses. Just don't forget that unless the paint specifically says that it comes ready to airbrush, it needs to be thinned in some way before you use it. Acrylics should be thinned with airbrush thinner/airbrush medium. The formulation of acrylic paints varies, and so you'll get the best results if you get thinner that is the same brand as the paint. Cleanup is simple and quick with basic airbrush cleaning fluid. Obviously, follow the cleaning instructions that came with the airbrush.

Lacquers are nasty, but boy do they ever paint well. They must be thinned with...you guessed it, lacquer thinner. Cleanup is also done with lacquer thinner. Wear a respirator unless you want to get violently ill.

Airbrushes also require lubrication! Use only specialized airbrush lube for this, such as Iwata Super Lube, which is teflon-based. WD40 IS NOT A LUBRICANT, it's a cleaner. Sorry, that's a pet peeve of mine, but don't use it to clean your airbrush, either. If all you ever paint with are acrylics, you probably won't need to lubricate often. With lacquers, the thinner is going to break down the lubricant rather quickly, so you'll have to lubricate much more often. As with all airbrush-related things, read the instructions for lubricating your airbrush that came with it carefully.

TheFuglyStik
Mar 7, 2003

Attention-starved & smugly condescending, the hipster has been deemed by
top scientists as:
"The self-important, unemployable clowns of the modern age."

For my compressor setup, I've got a cheap tankless compressor hooked up through a T-junction to an air tank and the brush. Same as the $150 compressor I had my eye on, but with a large 15 gallon tank and cost me less than a hundred. The cheaper tanked hobby compressors I've had either blew out a part in dramatic fashion or just crapped out after a few light uses.

Powdered Toast Man posted:

I chose the Revolution CR because I planned to use it for more detailed work, and a gravity feed topside paint cup is better for that...

I've got the Revolution CR as well and then buddied it up with an Eclipse, and both are great brushes I can't brag about enough. I've shot dozens of paint bottles through both, and they've held up like champs for the most part. Just watch out for the threaded part of the body used to hold the needle in place, since it's pretty fragile on the Revolutions. Let it get a little oxidation on it and you'll have to order a replacement part that ran me half the cost of a new Revolution.

That 40% internet coupon for Hobby Lobby you mentioned makes their usually usurious prices on airbrushes and compressors drop to competitive levels. $50 for a Revolution and $120 for an Eclipse are fairly good deals. Just don't buy a compressor there since the selection isn't that great and the prices are far too high.

ASSTASTIC posted:

Edit2: To add: I have a compressor already, but its a shop compressor. Do I NEED to buy a hobby one? I am assuming there would be adapters + maybe a fine tune regulator I can buy instead of buying a smaller airbrush-only compressor.

If you can stand the noise, the shop one is fine once you use a regulator to drop the pressure somewhere between 10 and 30 psi.

TheFuglyStik fucked around with this message at 03:38 on Jun 6, 2009

Powdered Toast Man
Jan 25, 2005

TOAST-A-RIFIC!!!

TheFuglyStik posted:

For my compressor setup, I've got a cheap tankless compressor hooked up through a T-junction to an air tank and the brush. Same as the $150 compressor I had my eye on, but with a large 15 gallon tank and cost me less than a hundred. The cheaper tanked hobby compressors I've had either blew out a part in dramatic fashion or just crapped out after a few light uses.

I've often wondered if the lack of a tank would make these compressors wear out faster. I have the "Fusion" brand compressor they sell at Hobby Lobby, and it's worked great so far.

cakesmith handyman
Jul 22, 2007

Pip-Pip old chap! Last one in is a rotten egg what what.



I bought an Iwata Revolution CR just a couple of days ago. plus one of these :

for 80 when they're 140 in my local hobby shop. I bought a bottle of vajello air to start, so I knew what to thin to, now I'm thinning normal acrylics to suit. It's great fun, being able to put down a smooth solid basecoat in minutes using just a dozen drops of paint. I wish I'd have bought one 10 years ago.

Powdered Toast Man
Jan 25, 2005

TOAST-A-RIFIC!!!

Looks nice. I welcome miniatures painters in here, btw, because I think there's a lot of lost techniques in painting that never get swapped between scale modelers and miniature gamers. You have to get pretty creative to paint details that small.

For those who were asking about airbrushing earlier in the thread, the doo-hickey on the left end of Cakefool's compressor is a combined regulator/moisture trap. There is a drain on the bottom of it, but I've honestly never had to let anything out of mine. You can also get in-line traps/filters from Iwata and others that attach directly to your airbrush, and then you attach your hose to that.

Today I'm getting my work area cleaned up and organized because it looks like a hobby store barfed on my desk...

MasterSlowPoke
Oct 9, 2005

Our courage will pull us through

Anyone know of any good general camouflage painting tutorials?

Danger - Octopus!
Apr 20, 2008



Nap Ghost

I am by nature a wargamer, but my recent habit of using scale models and kitbashing them into somewhat representative vehicles for Warhammer 40,000





has led me to want to actually make model kits just for the hell of it. The only thing that bothers me is the intense focus on realism in colouring, since it'd bother me to go for realism and get the colour wrong, so I need reference materials really.

I don't have an airbrush, which I really ought to get since you kinda need one for a lot of camo patterns.

At the moment, I mostly have fun playing with the Tamiya Weather Master kits and have just started experimenting with Mig pigments.

I've found the most useful tools are a variety of files, thin ones, big ones, rounded ones and pointed ones for cleaning up the models and ensuring a good fit with parts. There's nothing worse than a cheap kit that needs tons of alteration to make it fit together or look right.

Danger - Octopus! fucked around with this message at 21:55 on Jun 6, 2009

cakesmith handyman
Jul 22, 2007

Pip-Pip old chap! Last one in is a rotten egg what what.



Thanks, toy soldiers is pretty nerdy but hey, it's a hobby.
Workspace for airbrushing:

Click here for the full 600x629 image.
Knocked this up out of the box the compressor turned up in, I'll make something more permanent soon. After having a play I realise I would benefit from some proper airbrush cleaning fluid and somewhere to prop my brush that isn't in the tank I'm painting.

The blue stuff is car screenwash by the way, the chap in my model shop swears by thinning with it, I found it dries a lot quicker than water & I don't need to thin the paint as much, it's pretty good. The compressor is under the desk, it probably ran 1/5 the time I was painting.

I also need some method of unplugging my airbrush without losing all tank pressure, is a quick-release on the brush the norm?

Sorry to turn this to painting/airbrushing, I'm interested in other aspects as well.

Danger - Octopus!
Apr 20, 2008



Nap Ghost

I've heard that zap-a-gap is good. Does it actually fill gaps or is it just easier to use putty?

Powdered Toast Man
Jan 25, 2005

TOAST-A-RIFIC!!!

MasterSlowPoke posted:

Anyone know of any good general camouflage painting tutorials?

This is one of my favorite techniques:

http://www.finescale.com/fsm/default.aspx?c=a&id=788

MASKING WITH SILLY PUTTY!

Plus, it's...silly...

Anyway, if you think about it you're going to want to make uneven, curvy shapes, and silly putty is easy to form. It will not lift existing paint, and it also happens to be pretty cheap. Of course, if you're an absolute badass you can try to freehand airbrush camo patterns. Some people do this, but I don't have the finesse.

Those with a hard-on for hard metal will find plenty of great stuff here:

http://www.armorama.com/

Danger - Octopus! posted:

I've heard that zap-a-gap is good. Does it actually fill gaps or is it just easier to use putty?

Zap-a-gap is tricky to use. The idea is that it's supposed to be stronger than standard superglue, but you lose some of that strength if you use Zip Kicker on it. I find that it's mostly effective for very small gaps. Putty has several advantages, not the least of which is how easy it is to sand once it has dried. Zap-a-Gap, on the other hand, is harder than polystyrene so it's difficult to sand it without damaging the model itself.

Putty is also soluble in lacquer thinner and acetone (nail polish remover works fine), but bear in mind that both of these things will melt polystyrene. It is possible to carefully remove dried putty with a solvent. Use sparingly, and stop immediately if the plastic around the putty gets shiny...that's a sign that it's starting to break down.

Powdered Toast Man fucked around with this message at 22:45 on Jun 6, 2009

TheFuglyStik
Mar 7, 2003

Attention-starved & smugly condescending, the hipster has been deemed by
top scientists as:
"The self-important, unemployable clowns of the modern age."

Powdered Toast Man posted:

I've often wondered if the lack of a tank would make these compressors wear out faster. I have the "Fusion" brand compressor they sell at Hobby Lobby, and it's worked great so far.

I've heard of tankless compressors being more likely to die from overheating after a long period of use which I suppose makes sense. I use a comically oversized tank because the cheaper compressors pulse out air, and it helps to keep the airflow and psi smoother along with ~30 minutes of reserve air for when noise is a concern at my house.

I also carried it in the car one time when I started getting a flat tire I couldn't afford to have properly repaired at the time.

cakesmith handyman
Jul 22, 2007

Pip-Pip old chap! Last one in is a rotten egg what what.



Does anyone have any links to airbrushing miniatures tutorials? I'm too tight to pay 26 for Forgeworlds Imperial Armour Masterclass. Google isn't a lot of help, other than letting me know that most people that airbrush t-shirts have mullets

Danger - Octopus!
Apr 20, 2008



Nap Ghost

Does anyone know of any companies that make modern US military figures in 1/48 scale? There appear to be endless options in 1/35 but I need them for a diorama with something that's 1/48 and I can only find WW2 figures in that scale.

Powdered Toast Man
Jan 25, 2005

TOAST-A-RIFIC!!!

Danger - Octopus! posted:

Does anyone know of any companies that make modern US military figures in 1/48 scale? There appear to be endless options in 1/35 but I need them for a diorama with something that's 1/48 and I can only find WW2 figures in that scale.

I found some Tamiya figures in 1:48, but they were WWII-era. What you seek unfortunately may not exist, which is unfortunate because 1:48 is really the most common scale for aircraft.

That being said, what are you planning?

EDIT: By the way, you did a great job weathering that hummer and getting the look of mud on the tires.

LIIIIIIINKS

Do you like planes? I love them, and these guys eat, sleep, and breathe them:

http://www.aircraftresourcecenter.com/

Try to ignore the horrible site design, because there's lots of good stuff here. Tutorials, and my favorite part, the gallery.

Some good stores and companies:

http://www.squadron.com (watch for sales, and once you buy anything from them you'll get a free catalog every quarter)
http://www.spruebrothersmodels.com (good source for Japanese tools and supplies that are hard to find elsewhere)
http://twobobs.net (fantastic custom aircraft model decals, very high quality)
http://www.Megahobby.com (good prices and sales. bad web design. see a trend here?)
http://www.eduard.cz (ultra high quality detailing kits for aircraft models, photo etch and resin)

Powdered Toast Man fucked around with this message at 23:43 on Jun 8, 2009

Boaz MacPhereson
Jul 11, 2006

Day 12045 Ht10hands 180lbs
No Name
No lumps No Bumps Full life Clean
Two good eyes No Busted Limbs
Piss OK Genitals intact
Multiple scars Heals fast
O NEGATIVE HI OCTANE
UNIVERSAL DONOR
Lone Road Warrior Rundown
on the Powder Lakes V8
No guzzoline No supplies
ISOLATE PSYCHOTIC
Keep muzzled...


Woo! Finally, a good Scale Modeling thread pops up.

I've got 4 models in the works now; I'm waiting on some drier weather so I can get some paint on them.

So this post isn't completely worthless, here's a pic of some of my finished work:

Click here for the full 2048x1536 image.

cakesmith handyman
Jul 22, 2007

Pip-Pip old chap! Last one in is a rotten egg what what.



Silly question - I'm airbrushing with acrylics, in a well ventilated room - do I need fume extraction? I think not, but am I going to kill myself?

Powdered Toast Man
Jan 25, 2005

TOAST-A-RIFIC!!!

Cakefool posted:

Silly question - I'm airbrushing with acrylics, in a well ventilated room - do I need fume extraction? I think not, but am I going to kill myself?

Acrylics are relatively harmless. They contain some alcohol, but mostly water. As long as the room is well ventilated, as you say, I don't think you have anything to worry about.

BetterWeirdthanDead
Mar 7, 2006

Ask me why I really
went to see Terminator


Bookmarking this thread because I may be consulting it for tips later this summer.

What good would a public access show set in space be good for without any models?

Mr. Apollo
Nov 8, 2000



I was really big on modelling in highschool and undergrad. However, I just don't have the time for it anymore. I really would like to try an get back into it though. I used to do 1/35 military stuff (mostly tanks and APCs). I've been thinking about doing a 1/32 plane or something maybe. Part of the problem is having the space to store the completed kits.

MasterSlowPoke
Oct 9, 2005

Our courage will pull us through

I need some 1/72 or so scale WW2 or Vietnam jeeps. Flames of War jeeps would be perfect but they're just a bit too small. Anyone know of some good souces? I need at least 5 and I'd rather not spend more than $5 per.

ASSTASTIC
Apr 26, 2003

Hey Gusy!

Just picked up a used Iwata Eclipse HP-BCS + Sparmax compressor from a pawn shop for 70bux out the door.

Even though its not a gravity feed, I think this airbrush is going to do me quite nicely

AnnoyBot
May 28, 2001


Powdered Toast Man posted:

Acrylics are relatively harmless. They contain some alcohol, but mostly water. As long as the room is well ventilated, as you say, I don't think you have anything to worry about.

Do acrylics contain nasty pigments like fine art gouache does? I used to airbrush with gouache on paper a bit, and while there's no volatile solvents, the pigments themselves are nightmarish. Cobalt blue and cadmium red are the two that come to mind.

On the equipment side, I have a DeVilbiss Super 63, and some kind of crappy Badger. The Super 63 will make a line as fine as a sharp #2 pencil, but only holds about .5ml of paint.

EvilMuppet
Jul 28, 2006

Bork Bork Bork


Why the touch and flow thing when you can get essentially the same thing with a bottle of glue on the end? Quality is decent too.

JD Brickmeister
Sep 4, 2008

by Y Kant Ozma Post


This thread led me to Hobby Lobby yesterday - definitely need to use that coupon, the airbrushes are expensive!

I used to do this 20 yrs ago with WWII airplanes when I was in Jr. High/H.S., mostly 1/48, got pretty good at doing it well, despite not having an airbrush. My favorite was a JU-87 Stuka with desert camo - the tan wavy curly lines with dark olive like it's under a net or something (hand painted, yet not retarded looking - in retrospect I am amazed at how it turned out). It had these huge 40mm(?) cannons on pods mounted under the wings, which I later removed and put on a 1/72 F-16 (with the scale change it made for something like 3 or 4 inch cannons!) Now I'm thinking the Tamiya 1/35 kits for WWII tanks look pretty cool. Has anyone had any experience with those? They're kind of high priced - curious if the instructions are adequate, any issues I should be aware of before I decide to drop the money on a whole kit of crap to build one...

Also saw something odd on the shelf - three Revell 1/700 battleships; Missouri, Wisconsin, and New Jersey (can't remember the exact number, but 62,63, and 64 I think...) Anyway, I looked at them for the longest time and couldn't see any difference between them. Same turrets, gun ports, radars, stacks, superstructure, recovery crane, etc. Is the only difference between them the numbers on the decals? Seems pretty cheesy (and a waste of inventory space) to do that, as they could just include the different numbers on the same decal sheet and let you choose which one to build.

Anyway, glad to be here, looking forward to see what comes up in this thread.

Danger - Octopus!
Apr 20, 2008



Nap Ghost

Some of the Tamiya kits are really nice but some of their older ones are a bit ropey. I reccomend searching for reviews first - sites like Armorama and so on have really good detailed build reviews.

ASSTASTIC
Apr 26, 2003

Hey Gusy!

Where do you guys suggest I buy parts/accessories for my new airbrush from?

I need to do a little overhaul in getting a new needle and some lubrication/cleaner and a lot of the local shops don't carry Iwata stuff.

Powdered Toast Man
Jan 25, 2005

TOAST-A-RIFIC!!!

EvilMuppet posted:

Why the touch and flow thing when you can get essentially the same thing with a bottle of glue on the end? Quality is decent too.



This is sexy, but Revell "blue" products (supplies/tools, not models) are somewhat hard to come by in the US. I have yet to see a single thing made by them in a hobby shop other than their models.

ASSTASTIC posted:

Where do you guys suggest I buy parts/accessories for my new airbrush from?

I need to do a little overhaul in getting a new needle and some lubrication/cleaner and a lot of the local shops don't carry Iwata stuff.

Lube:

http://www3.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin/wti0001p?&I=LXTXV5&P=FR

ACCEPT NO SUBSTITUTES! This stuff is great.

Needles:

http://www3.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin/wti0001p?&I=LXTXX1&P=SM
http://www3.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin/wti0001p?&I=LXWBG5&P=SM
http://www3.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin/wti0001p?&I=LXWBG6&P=SM

(wasn't sure which one you needed)

Powdered Toast Man fucked around with this message at 21:00 on Jun 24, 2009

TheFuglyStik
Mar 7, 2003

Attention-starved & smugly condescending, the hipster has been deemed by
top scientists as:
"The self-important, unemployable clowns of the modern age."

JD Brickmeister posted:

This thread led me to Hobby Lobby yesterday - definitely need to use that coupon, the airbrushes are expensive!

Getting the airbrush there with a coupon is a good bargain, but stay far away from the compressors, accessories, and hoses there. The selection is limited to a few questionable choices quality-wise, and the prices are even more insane. You can get a good hobby compressor for less than $100 and pretty much any airbrush part online. Hoses are best left to being custom cut and fitted at your local pneumatic supply shop due to the dirt cheap prices (6ft. of beefy hose for less than $5 instead of $20 for a dinky 3ft. hose), and their fittings tend to be far more durable. Don't forget teflon tape.

EvilMuppet
Jul 28, 2006

Bork Bork Bork


Powdered Toast Man posted:

This is sexy, but Revell "blue" products (supplies/tools, not models) are somewhat hard to come by in the US. I have yet to see a single thing made by them in a hobby shop other than their models.

Really? That's lovely, if it was me though I'd order it from somewhere, I'd rather pay a premium than not have it. It's honestly the easiest cleanest stuff I've ever used. Actually I don't think I've used anything else for about 15 years.

Here's a couple of store finders if that helps at all:
http://www3.revell.com/Find-our-pro...tml?&no_cache=1
http://www2.revell.com/cgi-bin/WRCS57505P.pgm?v=RV2

EvilMuppet fucked around with this message at 15:31 on Jun 25, 2009

cakesmith handyman
Jul 22, 2007

Pip-Pip old chap! Last one in is a rotten egg what what.



Because I just watched James May get shot to the edge of space, and I'm as impressionable as wet clay, I really want to build a really good model of the Saturn 5 rocket. Where would I look for a good one, brand wise?

MasterSlowPoke
Oct 9, 2005

Our courage will pull us through

Buy an ork battlewagon, paint saturn 5 on the side, and mount it on a launching pad.

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Powdered Toast Man
Jan 25, 2005

TOAST-A-RIFIC!!!

Cakefool posted:

Because I just watched James May get shot to the edge of space, and I'm as impressionable as wet clay, I really want to build a really good model of the Saturn 5 rocket. Where would I look for a good one, brand wise?

Revell used to make one that was pretty slick, but it might be out of production. I'll check into this and get back to you in this post.

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