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TheFuglyStik
Mar 7, 2003

Attention-starved & smugly condescending, the hipster has been deemed by
top scientists as:
"The self-important, unemployable clowns of the modern age."

For my compressor setup, I've got a cheap tankless compressor hooked up through a T-junction to an air tank and the brush. Same as the $150 compressor I had my eye on, but with a large 15 gallon tank and cost me less than a hundred. The cheaper tanked hobby compressors I've had either blew out a part in dramatic fashion or just crapped out after a few light uses.

Powdered Toast Man posted:

I chose the Revolution CR because I planned to use it for more detailed work, and a gravity feed topside paint cup is better for that...

I've got the Revolution CR as well and then buddied it up with an Eclipse, and both are great brushes I can't brag about enough. I've shot dozens of paint bottles through both, and they've held up like champs for the most part. Just watch out for the threaded part of the body used to hold the needle in place, since it's pretty fragile on the Revolutions. Let it get a little oxidation on it and you'll have to order a replacement part that ran me half the cost of a new Revolution.

That 40% internet coupon for Hobby Lobby you mentioned makes their usually usurious prices on airbrushes and compressors drop to competitive levels. $50 for a Revolution and $120 for an Eclipse are fairly good deals. Just don't buy a compressor there since the selection isn't that great and the prices are far too high.

ASSTASTIC posted:

Edit2: To add: I have a compressor already, but its a shop compressor. Do I NEED to buy a hobby one? I am assuming there would be adapters + maybe a fine tune regulator I can buy instead of buying a smaller airbrush-only compressor.

If you can stand the noise, the shop one is fine once you use a regulator to drop the pressure somewhere between 10 and 30 psi.

TheFuglyStik fucked around with this message at 03:38 on Jun 6, 2009

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TheFuglyStik
Mar 7, 2003

Attention-starved & smugly condescending, the hipster has been deemed by
top scientists as:
"The self-important, unemployable clowns of the modern age."

Powdered Toast Man posted:

I've often wondered if the lack of a tank would make these compressors wear out faster. I have the "Fusion" brand compressor they sell at Hobby Lobby, and it's worked great so far.

I've heard of tankless compressors being more likely to die from overheating after a long period of use which I suppose makes sense. I use a comically oversized tank because the cheaper compressors pulse out air, and it helps to keep the airflow and psi smoother along with ~30 minutes of reserve air for when noise is a concern at my house.

I also carried it in the car one time when I started getting a flat tire I couldn't afford to have properly repaired at the time.

TheFuglyStik
Mar 7, 2003

Attention-starved & smugly condescending, the hipster has been deemed by
top scientists as:
"The self-important, unemployable clowns of the modern age."

JD Brickmeister posted:

This thread led me to Hobby Lobby yesterday - definitely need to use that coupon, the airbrushes are expensive!

Getting the airbrush there with a coupon is a good bargain, but stay far away from the compressors, accessories, and hoses there. The selection is limited to a few questionable choices quality-wise, and the prices are even more insane. You can get a good hobby compressor for less than $100 and pretty much any airbrush part online. Hoses are best left to being custom cut and fitted at your local pneumatic supply shop due to the dirt cheap prices (6ft. of beefy hose for less than $5 instead of $20 for a dinky 3ft. hose), and their fittings tend to be far more durable. Don't forget teflon tape.

TheFuglyStik
Mar 7, 2003

Attention-starved & smugly condescending, the hipster has been deemed by
top scientists as:
"The self-important, unemployable clowns of the modern age."

EvilMuppet posted:

How about Alien/s kits? I've always wanted some but never gotten around to getting any. A dropship? The Sulaco? Badass Ripley in the loader? APC, ETC, ETC. Or the one I really want but would need a license to have in my country a 1:1 model of a M41A pulse rifle!

I'd kill a sweet old lady for one of those 1/1 vinyl chestbursters. Sadly, I can't even find them at Wonderfest.

TheFuglyStik
Mar 7, 2003

Attention-starved & smugly condescending, the hipster has been deemed by
top scientists as:
"The self-important, unemployable clowns of the modern age."

EvilMuppet posted:

US$15.99 buy it now price. No old ladies required. http://tinyurl.com/nzvj95

Just the fact that one is for sale anywhere amazes me, but the fact that it's a Thai recast has me nervous. I've spent more hours fixing pinholes and chips on a Thai recast of a figure than is humanly bearable.

I may wind up plunking down for it anyway and suffer through the massive amount of repair work ahead. It's one of my loving grail kits.

TheFuglyStik
Mar 7, 2003

Attention-starved & smugly condescending, the hipster has been deemed by
top scientists as:
"The self-important, unemployable clowns of the modern age."

I've had good luck getting the still wet look like you'd want on a car with a pretty ghetto method, but it works. Still not perfect and still a fair bit of work, but I've had good luck with it.

1) Start by filling microscratches from sanding during surface prep with crayon wax and buffing it before priming. The primer still sticks so long as you buff off excess wax with 2000 grit sandpaper, and the part is slick as glass.

2) Primer sealer works better than regular primer since it doesn't fill in or round out details.

3) Wet sand it all with the same 2000 grit paper.

4) Airbrush as normal with gloss paint. Matte paint is far more likely to get orange peel and leave little paint boogers all over the place.

5) After I'm happy with the base coat, I mix up three parts Future Floor Polish and one part Simple Green and use it for the gloss coat, with a day of curing allowed between the three or four coats I use.

6)Let the last coat cure for at least two more days, then polish it with wax, toothpaste, or whatever you normally use, buffing it off with standard copy paper or a microfiber cloth.

The biggest factors in how I've gotten it to turn out are the number of coats in the gloss (the more coats the better up to a certain point), and letting it cure for at least a day between coats. Just don't go past four coats unless you want your model to look like it's covered in ice.

TheFuglyStik
Mar 7, 2003

Attention-starved & smugly condescending, the hipster has been deemed by
top scientists as:
"The self-important, unemployable clowns of the modern age."

Bobx66 posted:

Does anyone have any experience with the compressors avliable at Hobby Lobby? I'm gonna go buy one with that 40% off coupon.

Look around for the same or a similar compressor online before you buy. Hobby Lobby's prices on anything related to airbrushing are comically inflated, and that 40% coupon may only get you in the neighborhood of still a bit more expensive.

A few years back their coupons and weekly discounts stacked, but they stopped that recently. The manager was pissed when I was able to walk out with an Iwata Eclipse for $70 instead of $240 because of that loophole.

TheFuglyStik
Mar 7, 2003

Attention-starved & smugly condescending, the hipster has been deemed by
top scientists as:
"The self-important, unemployable clowns of the modern age."

Some paint will come out too thin or a goopy mess right out of the bottle, not much that can be done about it other than letting some of the solvent evaporate or adding thinner. If you really want to see an unholy mess, open up a jar of Model Master Light Flesh Base acrylic. After it's properly thinned, that tiny bottle could fill a pint Mason jar with paint.

I use a long scrap of the trees the parts were molded on hammered flat on one end for mixing. Makes matching a mixed paint color to the plastic color much easier if that's something you're trying to do as well. Build a couple of models without tossing out any length of scrap under a few inches and you've got a lifetime supply of the drat things.

I use a 50/50 mix of dish soap and white glue as a liquid mask. No seepage under it like you get with tape. I actually do use tape (Scotch) for this stuff to mask straight lines though. It just works better than a six foot $10 roll of masking tape.

TheFuglyStik fucked around with this message at 09:54 on Dec 22, 2009

TheFuglyStik
Mar 7, 2003

Attention-starved & smugly condescending, the hipster has been deemed by
top scientists as:
"The self-important, unemployable clowns of the modern age."

The results are never as good as you expect once you get the decal on the model. That inkjet film is extremely fragile and very hard to keep from loving up. I say save the money and have custom waterslides made somewhere for roughly the same price.

TheFuglyStik
Mar 7, 2003

Attention-starved & smugly condescending, the hipster has been deemed by
top scientists as:
"The self-important, unemployable clowns of the modern age."

Unkempt posted:

I've never built a resin kit, but I'm sure you can get some tips around here.
You could also try http://www.oldmodelkits.com but some of their stuff is ludicrously expensive.

A quick primer on resin is just that it's a good deal more work, usually more expensive, and generally looks better once you fix all of the flaws from the molding process. I split what I build 50/50 between resin and styrene kits. I'd advise holding off on resin until you've got at least a few styrene kits under your belt since it could easily be overwhelming.

TheFuglyStik
Mar 7, 2003

Attention-starved & smugly condescending, the hipster has been deemed by
top scientists as:
"The self-important, unemployable clowns of the modern age."

Plastic cement brushed onto the model and left to dry works well for creating a corroded texture that looks good under rust paint and a bit of pastel weathering. Just don't go overboard or your part will turn into a puddle or crumple up if it's thin enough.

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TheFuglyStik
Mar 7, 2003

Attention-starved & smugly condescending, the hipster has been deemed by
top scientists as:
"The self-important, unemployable clowns of the modern age."

Vaporware posted:

Go for gloss paint mixed with gloss medium on a matte surface to look wet. The gloss paint is shiny and the medium adds volume.

Future floor polish with a tiny amount of Simple Green is pure sex when it comes to making a finish look wet. It looks exactly the same fresh onto whatever you're coating with it as it does after curing.

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