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ZebraBlade
Mar 26, 2010

Something is rotten in the state of Denmark

I am seeing some strange wear marks on my TRR8 and I dont know if its normal or not. They are on the side of the cylinder towards the front. I am away from home until next Wednesday so I cant photograph the exact marks but here is a lovely MS paint of where its wearing the finish down.



The cylinder isn't rubbing at the top or bottom of the frame so IDK what is causing it. There is some carbon/powder buildup there but I can imagine that would cause the finish to wear away.

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tarlibone
Aug 1, 2014

Am I a... bad person?
AM I??





Fun Shoe

This is normal.

From what I have learned, this is more common on revolvers with adjustable rear sights, especially newer ones. There is likely a front screw for the adjustable rear sight, and they drill the hole for it all the way through the top strap of the frame. It is above the cylinder and before the forcing cone.

So, when you shoot, hot gas and carbon escape from the cylinder gap, and that little hole helps more of it than you expect to find that one spot on your cylinder as it rebounds off the frame and into the cylinder's exterior. I think this happens to a slightly lesser degree with revolvers that don't have that hole.

I'll post a pic in a little bit, but I get the same marks, especially on my 686.


Edit: pictures of my 686.

First, the dirt spot. On my stainless revolvers, I'm able to really get in there with a brass brush and clean the everloving carbon off of every surface, and if that fails or I'm feeling fancy, I get out a polishing cloth. Here, you can just barely see a bit of burn that I didn't bother to clean off last time. After shooting, these circle the whole cylinder and are immediately noticeable.




Here, according to at least one source on YouTube (which may or may not be fully correct), is the likely culprit: the front screw hole for the rear sight. Since it's drilled straight through and the screw is shorter than the bore length, this creates a divot, and it's a nice place for hot gas and carbon to go when a round is fired. It also seems to direct some of that straight down onto the cylinder.



A couple months ago, I did notice that the front sight screw had actually backed out a lot, and the problem was much worse that day. It was during one of the shooting challenges, and I think it's visible in one of my pictures. I didn't notice it until I got home.

tarlibone fucked around with this message at 14:03 on Dec 8, 2020

Missing Name
Jan 5, 2013



made new fren



posurp 64-3

Quickshanks
Oct 3, 2011

So damned good.

infrared35 posted:

I say do it. It's a 28, not a 27.

Man. I honestly like the 28 more than the 27. It is the exact same thing of the exact same quality differing only in that it has a working man's finish and was intended for working man's work. The added collectibility that comes from being a pre-dash pre-# is exactly the same on a 28 as on a 27.

I mean, I fully admit that the fact that a pre-# is considered more valuable -- or even somehow better made -- than the same gun but made after they switched to model numbers might be a completely bogus concept made up by collectors who simply want to pretend their stuff is better than yours. But still, even if the concept is purely a construct of an elitist collector culture, the monetary value is objectively higher because of it. You can sell a Pre-28 (if its in good enough shape to have collector appeal) for enough to buy two decent condition 28-2s that shoot and feel exactly the same and then you can have one with a 6" bbl and a scope on and one with a 4" sticking to irons. Unless there is any reason the gun is already compromised for collector snobs, it just makes more sense to leave it alone.

Hell, there is probably enough pre-28s out there that someone has already put a scope on -- and thus killed the value except as a shooter -- that it probably wouldn't be hard to trade or sell the one and swap it for one already scoped. And thus end up with one you don't need to pay someone to drill and tap, maybe get a free scope in the bargain, and probably still also get a couple of bills as a bonus to even things out.

Hey, doctorballs. Is it wearing original coke bottle grips? (Post pics if you don't know how to tell them apart from non-cokes and we'll tell you.) If so that kicks its value up a further notch or even doubles it on top of what its extra screws and missing digits already would.

Quickshanks fucked around with this message at 08:26 on Dec 10, 2020

Doctor Dogballs
Apr 1, 2007

driving the fuck truck from hand land to pound town without stopping at suction station


Quickshanks posted:

Man. I honestly like the 28 more than the 27. It is the exact same thing of the exact same quality differing only in that it has a working man's finish and was intended for working man's work. The added collectibility that comes from being a pre-dash pre-# is exactly the same on a 28 as on a 27.

I mean, I fully admit that the fact that a pre-# is considered more valuable -- or even somehow better made -- than the same gun but made after they switched to model numbers might be a completely bogus concept made up by collectors who simply want to pretend their stuff is better than yours. But still, even if the concept is purely a construct of an elitist collector culture, the monetary value is objectively higher because of it. You can sell a Pre-28 (if its in good enough shape to have collector appeal) for enough to buy two decent condition 28-2s that shoot and feel exactly the same and then you can have one with a 6" bbl and a scope on and one with a 4" sticking to irons. Unless there is any reason the gun is already compromised for collector snobs, it just makes more sense to leave it alone.

Hell, there is probably enough pre-28s out there that someone has already put a scope on -- and thus killed the value except as a shooter -- that it probably wouldn't be hard to trade or sell the one and swap it for one already scoped. And thus end up with one you don't need to pay someone to drill and tap, maybe get a free scope in the bargain, and probably still also get a couple of bills as a bonus to even things out.

Hey, doctorballs. Is it wearing original coke bottle grips? (Post pics if you don't know how to tell them apart from non-cokes and we'll tell you.) If so that kicks its value up a further notch or even doubles it on top of what its extra screws and missing digits already would.

Hello! More on my Pre-28. I certainly don't intend to drill & tap it. I got one of these https://www.ebay.com/itm/Smith-Wesson-N-Frame-Scope-Accessory-Mount-Base-SATIN-STAINLESS/312009795695?hash=item48a53ba86f:g:qYkAAOSwTuJYvbk5 in black. That link has photos of the mount's instruction sheet, and it seems to be made for non drilled & tapped N-frames. I saw on another forum someone saying non-D&T scope mounts don't hold up to the recoil because of the small screws. (Don't know if there was a specific manufacturer they were talking about.) I'm not sure about that. My 64 already has very little recoil and this thing is half a pound heavier than that. Recoil should be very mild, at least with .38 spl.

If you guys really think it's a terrible idea to try this mount because it could break something, I will defer to you and not attempt it. If the only concern is scratching the bluing, I'm not as concerned with it. The bluing is already rubbed off, scratched and dinged.

It does not have coke bottle grips. It has dumb baby grips - the ones that leave the entire cavity behind the trigger guard. Is there a name for those besides "Small grips"?

Recessed cylinder


Huge, highly textured hammer spur face.


It also has this enormous trigger-face bolted on. I don't know why. It feels "cool" because it's big. I like it, but I don't know if I like it better than the smooth, normal width trigger on my 64. If anyone knows more about these weird triggers, I wouldn't mind hearing it.


Last thing, does this "Q" inside the yoke mean anything?



Missing Name posted:

made new fren



posurp 64-3

Congratulations! I have a this exact gun. It's good!

tarlibone
Aug 1, 2014

Am I a... bad person?
AM I??





Fun Shoe

The little grips are service grips. Altamont sells them in two flavors for K/L frames: service panels, which are flat and typical of the cheap, stock stocks; and classic, which are the same size but more rounded and nicer. I got a pair of each for my 686, and I shoot OK with them. When/if I get my T-Grip, I'll post a picture.

Also... I caught myself looking at Model 64s on Gun Broker. They had some funky ones where the manufacturer and caliber marking were both on the right side of the barrel, with nothing on the left. Looked odd to me.

Grenrow
Apr 11, 2016


I have a model 64 as well, it's what got me hooked on revolvers.

Quickshanks
Oct 3, 2011

So damned good.

They're called Magna grips. The thing on the trigger is called a trigger shoe and I'm sure it's removable, whether it uses a tiny flathead or tiny allen wrench to undo the tiny screws on the side.

If it's a way of mounting a scope that does nothing permanent then I have no opinion on it.

Problematic Soup
Feb 18, 2007

My soup has malfunctioned?





If it’s a non drill and tap mount, go nuts.

The Q stamp is probably an inspectors marking, and it seems like something that happens with Smiths from then with letters stamped there.

Quickshanks
Oct 3, 2011

So damned good.

I believe they are usually assembly markings so employees remembered which parts go with which. Once the guns actually leave the factory they have no meaning whatsoever.

ChuckDeNomolos
Jan 10, 2013

"For god's sake, man! Can you hear that? I know it seems like crying, and you always have crying in your head, but can you hear that?"


In another update to my dad's Python hijinks, he has currently mounted a RMR to his. Next range trip will include zeroing it in, will edit in a picture of it once imgur's resolved it's issues.

Edit:

ChuckDeNomolos fucked around with this message at 04:02 on Dec 31, 2020

my turn in the barrel
Dec 31, 2007



tarlibone posted:

This is normal.

From what I have learned, this is more common on revolvers with adjustable rear sights, especially newer ones. There is likely a front screw for the adjustable rear sight, and they drill the hole for it all the way through the top strap of the frame. It is above the cylinder and before the forcing cone.

So, when you shoot, hot gas and carbon escape from the cylinder gap, and that little hole helps more of it than you expect to find that one spot on your cylinder as it rebounds off the frame and into the cylinder's exterior. I think this happens to a slightly lesser degree with revolvers that don't have that hole.

I'll post a pic in a little bit, but I get the same marks, especially on my 686.


Edit: pictures of my 686.

First, the dirt spot. On my stainless revolvers, I'm able to really get in there with a brass brush and clean the everloving carbon off of every surface, and if that fails or I'm feeling fancy, I get out a polishing cloth. Here, you can just barely see a bit of burn that I didn't bother to clean off last time. After shooting, these circle the whole cylinder and are immediately noticeable.




Here, according to at least one source on YouTube (which may or may not be fully correct), is the likely culprit: the front screw hole for the rear sight. Since it's drilled straight through and the screw is shorter than the bore length, this creates a divot, and it's a nice place for hot gas and carbon to go when a round is fired. It also seems to direct some of that straight down onto the cylinder.



A couple months ago, I did notice that the front sight screw had actually backed out a lot, and the problem was much worse that day. It was during one of the shooting challenges, and I think it's visible in one of my pictures. I didn't notice it until I got home.

To add to this I don't think the screwhole would make that much difference. Older revolvers used to have a large divot commonly called a fouling cup in the top strap that was originally added to allow bp fouling to collect and keep from binding the cylinder.

It looks like the trr8 has a replaceable shield to limit flame cutting, it would be directing lead/carbon that comes off the top of the forcing cone straight back from how it bends at the very front.

I wonder if he actually has finish wear or just accumulated lead stuck to the cylinder that looks like finish wear. On my stainless gp100 I have shot 10s of thousands of diy cast/lubed reloads and nothing short of a lead remover cloth would touch the topstrap and cylinder fouling. However I don't know if they make a lead removal cloth for non stainless revolvers. Hoppes elite might work, but it will probably take several applications.

tarlibone
Aug 1, 2014

Am I a... bad person?
AM I??





Fun Shoe

There are lead removal cloths, and there are lead removal cloths.

The only one that I know of that works is [url]https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00AU67BEM/]this one from Birchwood Casey[/url], though some other companies might make a clone. It's a polish-impregnated cloth that comes in a bag that's in another bag to keep it from drying out. And it is amazing at removing burn rings from stainless cylinder faces and making them shine like new. Most other "lead removal cloths" are, far as I can tell, re-labeled silicone gun & reel cloths. They clean up a gun fairly well, in particular the exterior, but they don't do poo poo for things like burn marks. Basically, they're a slightly oily flannel rag.

You don't want to use the good lead removal cloths on anything but a stainless gun because they're basically polish. They will remove bluing and will probably damage nickel, cerakote, Parkerized finishes, etc.

my turn in the barrel
Dec 31, 2007



Yes, I use the Birchwood Casey ones and I think Kleenbore makes another. Supposedly they use ammonia solution to break down the lead and a mild abrasive like aluminum oxide to scrub it off.

Stainless will not corrode from ammonia but pretty sure that's what causes bluing/plating loss on non stainless guns.

I made a video a few years back about cleaning my gp100. I go over the lead remover cloths, clean using a bore snake, then hoppes 9, brushes and patches. Then I put on hoppes elite and pull out a bunch more lead after a 5 minute wait.

https://youtu.be/FRfbUP3v7rw

And a follow-up video showing cleaning my blued super blackhawk

https://youtu.be/7ALrqE4MRc0


Hoppes foaming elite seems to be safe for any finish and will pull off lead and fouling with minimal scrubbing if you apply and let it sit long enough so it would be my first choice to try to remove the marks on the TRR8 that was mentioned.

Forum Hussy
Feb 8, 2005


I'm carrying an old j frame while my edc is in the shop. If I bought a bobbed hammer off ebay, or just bought a spare and dremeled it, should it drop in fairly easily or will it need a lot of hand fitting?

Azuren
Jul 15, 2001



My mom wants to buy her first gun and I'm thinking of suggesting a revolver. I showed her all my semiautos to see what fit her hands well and she was having trouble racking the slides (she's older), which makes me think a revolver would be a good choice. Problem is, I don't know poo poo about them and have never owned or shopped for one. What am I looking for? She's likely looking for something medium sized (nothing tiny intended for CCW) primarily intended for home defense. I want to recommend something from a reputable, quality brand (S&W still good?) and in a reasonable caliber for personal protection - I don't really know revolver calibers well, I was thinking something chambered in .357 that she can just put .38 special through. I also haven't tried buying any guns since last spring so I'm sure the market is wonderful right now Any suggestions or advice on what to look for?

Beardless
Aug 12, 2011

I am Centurion Titus Polonius. And the only trouble I've had is that nobody seem to realize that I'm their superior officer.


Azuren posted:

My mom wants to buy her first gun and I'm thinking of suggesting a revolver. I showed her all my semiautos to see what fit her hands well and she was having trouble racking the slides (she's older), which makes me think a revolver would be a good choice. Problem is, I don't know poo poo about them and have never owned or shopped for one. What am I looking for? She's likely looking for something medium sized (nothing tiny intended for CCW) primarily intended for home defense. I want to recommend something from a reputable, quality brand (S&W still good?) and in a reasonable caliber for personal protection - I don't really know revolver calibers well, I was thinking something chambered in .357 that she can just put .38 special through. I also haven't tried buying any guns since last spring so I'm sure the market is wonderful right now Any suggestions or advice on what to look for?

S&W actually has a line of semi-autos intended pretty much exactly for this, the Shield EZ series, they're available in .380 or 9mm, with or without a manual safety. I'd look into them, the reload would be easier and they can mount a light.

Problematic Soup
Feb 18, 2007

My soup has malfunctioned?





I love me some revolvers. I carry one, and wouldn’t blink about keeping one as a nightstand gun for myself, and I have done so on occasion. But I also just like the drat things, and can do a lot of my own work on them to make sure they run well.

I would have a hard time recommending any new out of the box revolver for people that aren’t wheelgun enthusiasts for non-range gun purposes, versus something like a Shield-EZ, as Beardless mentioned.

It would be one thing to learn a bit more about a gun someone inherited, especially if they couldn’t afford another gun, or they decided that they liked revolvers, and it’s not to say that revolvers are worthless as “serious” guns, but there is a reason that revolvers are kind of a niche gun versus autos nowadays.

Azuren
Jul 15, 2001



Shield EZ in 9x19 sounds pretty much perfect, thanks for the recommendation.

Back to wheelgun chat: now I'm kinda eyeing a model 686, what's the sweet spot barrel length for .357? Does going from 6" to 7" barrel have any benefits in velocity/accuracy besides increased sight radius?

Dr_0ctag0n
Apr 25, 2015


The whole human race
sentenced
to
burn


I've said it before ITT but I love the .327 federal. The ability to shoot little mouse fart .32 short and .32 long, the H&R magnum and up to .327 magnum is really under appreciated simply because so few revolvers are chambered in it.

6 shots in a j-frame with 100gr bullets designed to go ~1400fps out of a 2" barrel


(You will probably go permanently deaf if you have to use it indoors)

Dr_0ctag0n fucked around with this message at 02:39 on Jan 26, 2021

stealie72
Jan 10, 2007

Their eyes locked and suddenly there was the sound of breaking glass.


If you want .357, highly recommend looking for a used model 19, the lower the dash number the better.

Since you said you aren't a revolver guy: S&W's number system is that a model will have a number designation and then any changes to the gun's design lead to it being a numbered sub model, so the model 19 was designated, then the first set of major changes on it became the 19-1, then the 19-2, etc. Generally speaking older models are nicer because the engineering improvements were usually ways to manufacture them more efficiently/cheaply.

FWIW, I have a 100 year old model 10 (their most basic model, and technically a Military and Police that was later renamed the Model 10), a 75 year old model 17, and a 40 year old model 19, and the model 10 has the slickest action of the three and is the most fun to shoot even though the other two are "nicer" guns.

Gin and Juche
Apr 3, 2008

The Highest Judge of Paradise
Shiki Eiki
YAMAXANADU


Dr_0ctag0n posted:

I've said it before ITT but I love the .327 federal. The ability to shoot little mouse fart .32 short and .32 long, the H&R magnum and up to .327 magnum is really under appreciated simply because so few revolvers are chambered in it.

6 shots in a j-frame with 100gr bullets designed to go ~1400fps out of a 2" barrel


(You will probably go permanently deaf if you have to use it indoors)

Are you able to find any of those calibers right now though? May be a mute point though since hell if I can even find 38 spl under .75/ro much less 357.


stealie72 posted:

If you want .357, highly recommend looking for a used model 19, the lower the dash number the better.

I love my 19-5, are the new ones that bad though? I know the barrels are sleeved and it has that lock that everyone hates but they seem fine otherwise.

stealie72
Jan 10, 2007

Their eyes locked and suddenly there was the sound of breaking glass.


Gin and Juche posted:

I love my 19-5, are the new ones that bad though? I know the barrels are sleeved and it has that lock that everyone hates but they seem fine otherwise.
As far as I know they're all fine. The older ones are just put together in ways that are no longer economically feasible that make them a little nicer of an experience.

Of course, never seen a blind Pepsi challenge type test, so it could all just be confirmation bias.

ishikabibble
Jan 21, 2012



Gin and Juche posted:

Are you able to find any of those calibers right now though? May be a mute point though since hell if I can even find 38 spl under .75/ro much less 357.


I love my 19-5, are the new ones that bad though? I know the barrels are sleeved and it has that lock that everyone hates but they seem fine otherwise.

It's not a matter of bad so much as 'less good-er'.

Older S&Ws come from a time when the factory could devote a whole lot more man hours to every gun ensuring the best possible fit and finish (Victory model exception on the finish front). So older S&Ws, from the 60s-back, just feel exceptionally nice to handle on the level of what you'd expect out of basically a custom shop gun today. Buttery smooth double actions, feather light single action trigger pulls, etc.

tarlibone
Aug 1, 2014

Am I a... bad person?
AM I??





Fun Shoe

One thing to remember about old Model 19's is that while you get the good, old S&W action, you also get a decent chance at cracking a forcing cone if you feed it a steady diet of magnums. Some last forever, but many don't.

The new models don't have this issue, but then again, you're getting the current standard S&W action, which is decent, but nowhere near as nice as the old ones. I'm not sure which revision it was that mostly fixed the forcing cone issue.

I have several S&W revolvers, and of all of them, the one with the smoothest double-action trigger is my Model 10-6, which I believe is from the mid-1970s. It was a LEO trade-in from France. And it's got the best trigger by a fairly decent margin. If we're talking new out-of-the-box, the best trigger I've had out of my S&W wheelguns is my Model 629 (44 magnum), followed by my 686. I also have a Model 63, but the DA trigger on a J-frame rimfire is... stout.

As for the question about the 686... I have one with a 4" barrel, and it's very well-balanced, accurate, fun to shoot, etc. I love it. To me, the proportions are aesthetically pleasing: a 4" barrel on an L-frame or K-frame is, to me, the sweet spot. It's long enough so that you don't have to deal with the accuracy issues supposedly inherent to snubbies, but it's not so long that the full underlug drags the muzzle down. That said, I've seen the 6" models, and I would love to have one. Not sure if I'd go longer than that, though.

The 6" barrel looks great on my 629, though. I would not want a 4" barrel on that one.

Dr_0ctag0n
Apr 25, 2015


The whole human race
sentenced
to
burn


Gin and Juche posted:

Are you able to find any of those calibers right now though? May be a mute point though since hell if I can even find 38 spl under .75/ro much less 357.

327 was one of the only calibers I've seen at every gun store so I stocked up but I haven't been to one in a few months. Those same stores were out of most 357 but if they had it they were like $50 for 25. The .327 soft point american eagle "target" ammo was usually $23 for 50. Just checked online and now it looks like $60

I happened to snag a few boxes of magtech 32 short and long early last year and 32h&r mag hornady was usually in stock at those same stores.

All of the guns are expensive to shoot these days

stealie72
Jan 10, 2007

Their eyes locked and suddenly there was the sound of breaking glass.


tarlibone posted:

One thing to remember about old Model 19's is that while you get the good, old S&W action, you also get a decent chance at cracking a forcing cone if you feed it a steady diet of magnums. Some last forever, but many don't.

The new models don't have this issue, but then again, you're getting the current standard S&W action, which is decent, but nowhere near as nice as the old ones. I'm not sure which revision it was that mostly fixed the forcing cone issue.
This is a good point, and I believe S&W has pretty much said "yeah, there's nothing we can do about that."

Honestly, if you just want a revolver for the range because they are awesome, you don't need .357, and there are a ton of nice revolvers out there in .38 special.

Seamonster
Apr 30, 2007

IMMER SIEGREICH


Though it can happen to any SA capable revolver, check for hammer push off. Old Smiths seem to be disproportionately or maybe thats just google.

Quickshanks
Oct 3, 2011

So damned good.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Ornate-Design-Dragon-Pistol-Grips-Looks-To-Be-Celluloid-w-Screws-/124540354976

Celluloid was a weird guess. Wouldn't that make them explosive?

tarlibone
Aug 1, 2014

Am I a... bad person?
AM I??





Fun Shoe


Not explosive, but very flammable.

The thing is, the thicker a piece of celluloid, the harder it is to have it come aflame. Celluloid film could go up if you looked at it funny. I have experience with celluloid plectrums, and I did set one on fire once, but I had to literally hold a lit match to it for several seconds. But once it started going... yeah, that was fun. (Be sure to do this one outside, kids.)

A big chunk like that will burn, but only if you really try to burn it.

Quickshanks
Oct 3, 2011

So damned good.

Yeeeeeah these ain't celluloid.



I'd been having a bit of a dry spell lately but these were a hell of an end to it.

Quickshanks fucked around with this message at 06:41 on Feb 4, 2021

Captain Log
Oct 2, 2006

Captain Log posted:

"I AINT DYING! Choo choo motherfucker!"




Quickshanks posted:

Yeeeeeah these ain't celluloid.



I'd been having a bit of a dry spell lately but these were a hell of an end to it.

Dayum.

Somebody Awful
Nov 27, 2011

BORN TO DIE
HAIG IS A FUCK
Kill Em All 1917
I am trench man
410,757,864,530 SHELLS FIRED




Quickshanks posted:

Yeeeeeah these ain't celluloid.

Well, what are they then?

Dead Reckoning
Sep 13, 2011


99% sure that's ivory.

Quickshanks
Oct 3, 2011

So damned good.

The fact I try to avoid actually saying the word really ought to make me question things.

BadgerMan45
Dec 30, 2009


Y'all will get a kick out of this one. Saw that I had a package arriving from OK and though "it couldn't be.... yep, a tyler t-grip I ordered quite a while ago."

How long ago you ask? 26Nov19, nearly 15 months ago. I'm guessing it is because I wanted a Bronze N-frame grip and I'm guessing they don't make those often, but still.

If you order a t-grip you'll get it, eventually.

tarlibone
Aug 1, 2014

Am I a... bad person?
AM I??





Fun Shoe

BadgerMan45 posted:

Y'all will get a kick out of this one. Saw that I had a package arriving from OK and though "it couldn't be.... yep, a tyler t-grip I ordered quite a while ago."

How long ago you ask? 26Nov19, nearly 15 months ago. I'm guessing it is because I wanted a Bronze N-frame grip and I'm guessing they don't make those often, but still.

If you order a t-grip you'll get it, eventually.

I ordered one in November 2020. They cashed the check promptly.

I did text them cordially in January, and I was told something about polishing a bunch of them and... I don't know, stuff. Seeing as how I hardly ever see any 3R's (round-butt K and L frame) come up in eBay, and they never go for less than 3 figures, and that's for aluminum or black? Yeah, I can wait. Hopefully not another year, but like I said back then, I've spent $40-$50 for dumber stuff.

I've got some regular service panels and some classic panels in "silverblack" for my 686, and when that bronze 3R comes in, I'm going to have one gaudy, but lovable, sixgun.

Pics?

BadgerMan45
Dec 30, 2009


tarlibone posted:

I ordered one in November 2020. They cashed the check promptly.

I did text them cordially in January, and I was told something about polishing a bunch of them and... I don't know, stuff. Seeing as how I hardly ever see any 3R's (round-butt K and L frame) come up in eBay, and they never go for less than 3 figures, and that's for aluminum or black? Yeah, I can wait. Hopefully not another year, but like I said back then, I've spent $40-$50 for dumber stuff.

I've got some regular service panels and some classic panels in "silverblack" for my 686, and when that bronze 3R comes in, I'm going to have one gaudy, but lovable, sixgun.

Pics?

Yeah, I used to snag them on ebay when black 3s and 3Rs were fairly common, but now they're just too expensive. Forget about it if you want any of the less common ones. I've ordered a few from Tyler and I've always gotten my order, it just takes a while. Kind of like doing NFA stuff, order it and try to forget.

I knew someone would ask for pics, I'll see if I can get a halfway decent pic tomorrow.

Problematic Soup
Feb 18, 2007

My soup has malfunctioned?





I did get screwed out of an order, but it was years ago (2014ish?)when they were undergoing a change in terrible management/ownership to slightly less terrible ownership. BK grips doesn’t have all the options that Tyler does, but you actually get your poo poo in a week or so.

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madeintaipei
Jul 13, 2012



BadgerMan45 posted:

Yeah, I used to snag them on ebay when black 3s and 3Rs were fairly common, but now they're just too expensive. Forget about it if you want any of the less common ones. I've ordered a few from Tyler and I've always gotten my order, it just takes a while. Kind of like doing NFA stuff, order it and try to forget.

I knew someone would ask for pics, I'll see if I can get a halfway decent pic tomorrow.

Do round-frame or square-frame T-grips work with round-to-square conversion stocks, I wonder?

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