Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
«817 »
  • Post
  • Reply
Eggplant Wizard
Jul 8, 2005


i loev catte


HondaCivet posted:

I need litter box advice!

I live in a fairly small one-bedroom apartment with a smallish living room, big kitchen, bathroom and bedroom. My plan is to shut them up in the bathroom when we move to give them a little place of their own until they are comfortable and to help them finish taming down (they're feral kittens). Questions:

1) Should I get them a little night light or something for nighttime? The bathroom has no windows so I'm assuming that it'll be pitch black when the door is closed. I plan on leaving the lights on for them all day and just shutting them off at bedtime.

2) I was thinking of just sticking with one litter box since they happily share one right now and the apartment is rather small. Since it's what they'll be used to by the time we let them out of the bathroom, I was thinking of just leaving it in there. We're also going to have to shut them away once in awhile for their safety when we do weight-lifting exercises so just making the bathroom their room makes sense. Of course, the problem with that is that people are always in and out and opening and closing the door. It's just my boyfriend and I so we can get into the habit of leaving the door open a bit for them when we're just showering or something but the door will of course be closed for five or ten minutes at a time when the toilet's in use. Will they be willing to hold it in for five or ten minutes if the door is closed or will they likely refuse to wait?

3) If the answer to my second question is 'no', could we possibly just move the litter box in and out of the bathroom when we have to, or would that confuse them? Also, is the kitchen a bad place to keep the litter box? It's a decently-sized kitchen but the box would still probably be in a ten-foot radius of where they are fed. Would that be too icky for them?

Sorry for the longness, I have been wracking my brain about this and can't come up with a good answer.

They don't need very much light; they're cats. I wouldn't think it'd be necessary to keep the bathroom light on for them all the time, even during the day, but perhaps a night light would give them something to work with.

If they share a box now I'd say they'll be fine keeping one. And yes, cats can hold it for 5-10 minutes. Sometimes I even shower for 20 and they're fine! Better to leave it there as well so they know where it is without confusion.

edit: ok, since apparently I'm sniping, I'll repeat a question I asked in the stupid questions thread. We have two boxes, one a normal covered one, and one a Booda Dome with stairs. The (3) cats used both of these successfully for several months, but recently one cat (don't know which) has taken to peeing/pooping on the stairs part of the Booda Dome. What can I do to discourage this? Would Cat Attract in the litter part help?

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

demozthenes
Feb 14, 2007

Wicked pissa little critta


I finally have a lease that allows free-roaming pets! My boyfriend is moving in as well, and we are considering adopting an adult cat within the year. (Our work schedules are fairly opposite, so the cat will have someone home for much of the day.) I grew up with a Maine Coon and was responsible for his care, and he's had four cats including two feral kittens that he's raised. (He has much more cat experience, obviously.)

What I want to know is what to look for in a cat at the shelter/rescue. Hopefully, rescues will have a good idea of what their cats are like, but since it can take a long time for them to settle into a home (my family's Maine Coon hid behind the wall unit for three weeks after we brought him home from the rescue), I was wondering if there were markers to check for personality traits. We'd like a laid-back lap cat that won't destroy the apartment or try endlessly to escape to the busy street outside - we both have a lot of attention to give a cat. I know how to check for potential problems or personalities with dogs, since I've worked with them a lot, but cat personalities are a mystery to me.

Also, going back to the comment about allergies, I have odd cat allergies. I am consistently very allergic to calico and tortoiseshell cats, and am not allergic to Maine Coons, Russian Blues, or most all-white or orange cats at all. It's very strange and my allergist can't explain it. (My allergic reactions kick in very quickly and I plan on taking a big huff out of the cat's fur at the shelter before adopting anything, but due to other allergies, Claritin-D is already a part of my daily routine and it won't be a dealbreaker either way.)

HondaCivet
Oct 16, 2005

And then it falls
And then I fall
And then I know




demozthenes posted:

I finally have a lease that allows free-roaming pets! My boyfriend is moving in as well, and we are considering adopting an adult cat within the year. (Our work schedules are fairly opposite, so the cat will have someone home for much of the day.) I grew up with a Maine Coon and was responsible for his care, and he's had four cats including two feral kittens that he's raised. (He has much more cat experience, obviously.)

What I want to know is what to look for in a cat at the shelter/rescue. Hopefully, rescues will have a good idea of what their cats are like, but since it can take a long time for them to settle into a home (my family's Maine Coon hid behind the wall unit for three weeks after we brought him home from the rescue), I was wondering if there were markers to check for personality traits. We'd like a laid-back lap cat that won't destroy the apartment or try endlessly to escape to the busy street outside - we both have a lot of attention to give a cat. I know how to check for potential problems or personalities with dogs, since I've worked with them a lot, but cat personalities are a mystery to me.

Also, going back to the comment about allergies, I have odd cat allergies. I am consistently very allergic to calico and tortoiseshell cats, and am not allergic to Maine Coons, Russian Blues, or most all-white or orange cats at all. It's very strange and my allergist can't explain it. (My allergic reactions kick in very quickly and I plan on taking a big huff out of the cat's fur at the shelter before adopting anything, but due to other allergies, Claritin-D is already a part of my daily routine and it won't be a dealbreaker either way.)

Try a rescue that does a lot of fostering. Many cats act differently in a shelter environment than they do in a loving home. Unless the foster parent just got the cat, they should have a pretty good idea of the cat's temperament.

Oh, and since you want a pretty chill cat, you might want to try getting an older (7+ years old) cat. There are lots of awesome lazy loving senior kitties stuck in shelters and rescues just because their old people owners died or whatever. That and everyone wants kittens so old kitties take forever to get adopted. Remember that cats can get to be 20+ years old so even "old" cats will have lots of years left in them if you take care of them.

demozthenes
Feb 14, 2007

Wicked pissa little critta


HondaCivet posted:

Oh, and since you want a pretty chill cat, you might want to try getting an older (7+ years old) cat. There are lots of awesome lazy loving senior kitties stuck in shelters and rescues just because their old people owners died or whatever. That and everyone wants kittens so old kitties take forever to get adopted. Remember that cats can get to be 20+ years old so even "old" cats will have lots of years left in them if you take care of them.

That's the plan!

There are a couple of reputable cat rescues around here, some do foster work. I was going to try to adopt from the shelter where I worked, since I trust their vet, but none of the animals there go into foster care. I'm sure there are connections, though.

MixMasterMalaria
Jul 26, 2007


Question - my cat (a 17 year old domestic shorthair) this morning has one very dilated pupil and one normal one. She seems otherwise normal, should I be worried?

Crooked Booty
Apr 2, 2009
arrr

MixMasterMalaria posted:

Question - my cat (a 17 year old domestic shorthair) this morning has one very dilated pupil and one normal one. She seems otherwise normal, should I be worried?
I would take her to the vet. It could be a bunch of different things, some of which are serious. If your cat goes outside, you should also know that one big pupil is a very common presentation of FIV and FeLV.

MixMasterMalaria
Jul 26, 2007


It it a "take her to the vet today" kind of thing or "ok to wait until monday" kind of thing? It's a rough day but obviously Hobbes' health comes first.

edit; also thank you for your quick initial response!

Crooked Booty
Apr 2, 2009
arrr

MixMasterMalaria posted:

It it a "take her to the vet today" kind of thing or "ok to wait until monday" kind of thing? It's a rough day but obviously Hobbes' health comes first.

edit; also thank you for your quick initial response!
She may have gotten scratched or bumped in the eye, in which case it probably wouldn't be the end of the world to wait until Monday. But if there's no redness, discharge, etc., it could be a lot more horrible things: brain tumor, abscess behind the eye, FeLV, some sort of nerve damage, or in a cat that old, she could have blown out her retina due to high blood pressure (has she had her kidney function checked lately?) and now be blind in that eye (and be about to go blind in the other). I am not a veterinarian, and it could still be something like a scratch or infection, but with her age and those other possibilities, I would take her to the vet today if it were my cat.

MixMasterMalaria
Jul 26, 2007


Thanks again, I'm on it.

Helanna
Feb 1, 2007



Crooked Booty posted:

one big pupil is a very common presentation of FIV and FeLV.

Is that one big pupil specifically, or the eye itself? One of my foster kittens has one eye smaller that the other, but the vet wasn't overly concerned (not my usual vet, but one who seems to be filling in while my vet is away) - he speculated that it could have been due to the mother cat having feline panleukopenia, and took some photos to show other people/colleagues/vet students. He didn't seem to want to do any tests though, since the kitten otherwise seems healthy.

Should I be concerned enough to go back and push for blood tests?

flutterbyblue
Oct 29, 2007

I'm a little cat in a pretty hat!


Hi guys. I just got a new little 5 year old persian yesterday and was hoping you guys could give me a little advice since she's having a couple of issues. Currently she's secluded in her own bathroom so she can't come in contact with my other cat and she has a vet appointment for Monday (soonest I could get at the clinic I wanted).

1) She's not eating the most/hardly at all. I've heard cats can go off their food for a little while when they're in a new place, but I'm particularly concerned because she's only 4lbs 12ozs and skin and bones. She did eat a couple of teaspoons of tuna last night, but she's barely touched any of her normal food or any of the other stuff the shelter suggested I put out to entice her. Should I get her some pedialite and a syringe and try force feeding her tonight if she doesn't show signs of eating? Is it ok for me to give her a little more tuna?

2) She has accidents. I knew this would be an issue and I'm prepared to deal with it. She will not go in a litter box that is even the least bit dirty. I try to get it as soon as I can, but since she's having runny poops right now since the shelter just put her on Science Diet ID, she's gone outside of her box a few times. She has two litter boxes with her in hopes of combating this a bit (it's also why she's currently in the bathroom and not a bedroom). Is this something that will hopefully improve as she has more consistent bowel movements? Has anyone else dealt with this? I'm home most of the time since I'm a writer, so checking the boxes every couple of hours isn't a problem. There will be days where I will be gone for 8hrs plus though, so I have my concerns. However, since our floors are tile in most of the house, I don't mind cleaning up accidents.

3) she has gone poop/pee three times since we brought her home despite drinking and eating little? Is this a huge concern or is it a good sign that she's actually having bowel movements?

The Modern Leper
Dec 25, 2008

You must be a masochist


Tagging onto Honda Civet's question:

I've recently taken in a feral cat. The next door neighbors have been "entertaining" him for the past month or so, but I haven't seen any signs that they've been feeding or sheltering him (he was really thin when I got him in the house). I also was worried about what would happen when the school year started for the child of the house. He's an unknown age, but I would say close to or just over a year (definitely not a big-headed kitten). If someone thinks that I should've just left the cat with the kid, please let me know (it's only been a few days).

I've put in a bit of thought before bringing him in, but I'll be honest and say that I haven't done a tremendous amount of research. My family took in an abandoned cat when I was growing up, but a lot of the "early" vet stuff had already been done (neutering, vaccinations) before we got to him. He's got a litter box, and I'm free-feeding him IAMS "Proactive Health" kibble for the time being. My question is: how do I foster trust with a feral cat so that I can eventually (soon, hopefully) get him into a cat carrier and take him to a vet for the checkup/neutering? He currently doesn't like to be picked up AT ALL. I'm not starting at kitten stage, so I don't know if there's more that I should do beyond the standard "treat him right" things.

EDIT: Found my answer, which was man up and pick him up. No scratches, and he's staying overnight at the shelter for vaccinations and neutering (6 mos. old appx.)

The Modern Leper fucked around with this message at 22:34 on Aug 9, 2009

somethingawesomer
Nov 16, 2005



Alterian posted:

Has anyone used a diaper genie for scooping out their litter boxes? Is there a better cat equivalent?

We sell this thing at my work and I have heard nothing but rave reviews.

http://www.luckychamp.com/index.php...o&products_id=4

HondaCivet
Oct 16, 2005

And then it falls
And then I fall
And then I know




The Modern Leper posted:

Tagging onto Honda Civet's question:

I've recently taken in a feral cat. The next door neighbors have been "entertaining" him for the past month or so, but I haven't seen any signs that they've been feeding or sheltering him (he was really thin when I got him in the house). I also was worried about what would happen when the school year started for the child of the house. He's an unknown age, but I would say close to or just over a year (definitely not a big-headed kitten). If someone thinks that I should've just left the cat with the kid, please let me know (it's only been a few days).

I've put in a bit of thought before bringing him in, but I'll be honest and say that I haven't done a tremendous amount of research. My family took in an abandoned cat when I was growing up, but a lot of the "early" vet stuff had already been done (neutering, vaccinations) before we got to him. He's got a litter box, and I'm free-feeding him IAMS "Proactive Health" kibble for the time being. My question is: how do I foster trust with a feral cat so that I can eventually (soon, hopefully) get him into a cat carrier and take him to a vet for the checkup/neutering? He currently doesn't like to be picked up AT ALL. I'm not starting at kitten stage, so I don't know if there's more that I should do beyond the standard "treat him right" things.

EDIT: Found my answer, which was man up and pick him up. No scratches, and he's staying overnight at the shelter for vaccinations and neutering (6 mos. old appx.)

When it comes to stuff like the vet, you sometimes just can't really be nice about it. Heck, even non-feral cats usually have to be dragged to the vet so you shouldn't feel bad. Other than that, there are a billion great guides online for working with ferals. There are lots of organizations around the country (Alley Cat Allies, Urban Cat League, etc.) that offer resources on their websites so check those out.

I have my own question: How many meals a day do 4-month old kittens need? Can we get away with 2? At their foster parents' place, they currently get fed wet food maybe twice a day but they also have dry food available all day. We plan on just feeding them wet food twice a day, no dry, when they are adults. Are they old enough for this or should we leave out kibble like their foster parents do? We won't be around enough for three meals a day unless we feed them later at night or something.

Meow Cadet
May 2, 2007


friendship is magic
in a pony paradise
don't you judge me

HondaCivet posted:

When it comes to stuff like the vet, you sometimes just can't really be nice about it. Heck, even non-feral cats usually have to be dragged to the vet so you shouldn't feel bad. Other than that, there are a billion great guides online for working with ferals. There are lots of organizations around the country (Alley Cat Allies, Urban Cat League, etc.) that offer resources on their websites so check those out.

I have my own question: How many meals a day do 4-month old kittens need? Can we get away with 2? At their foster parents' place, they currently get fed wet food maybe twice a day but they also have dry food available all day. We plan on just feeding them wet food twice a day, no dry, when they are adults. Are they old enough for this or should we leave out kibble like their foster parents do? We won't be around enough for three meals a day unless we feed them later at night or something.

Pretty sure its recommended to have food available 24/7 until a cat is about 1 year old. Then you can transition to feeding times if you want.

HondaCivet
Oct 16, 2005

And then it falls
And then I fall
And then I know




Meow Cadet posted:

Pretty sure its recommended to have food available 24/7 until a cat is about 1 year old. Then you can transition to feeding times if you want.

Sounds like their stomachs are too small for them to eat enough otherwise so I guess you are right. Is it necessary to "moisten dry food with water" like some sites say? The foster parent hasn't been doing that so far but I don't know how much of the kibble they eat. They always act like they are starving when we bring them wet food so maybe they can't handle it (either that or kittens always act like they are starving when tasty food is present).

Meow Cadet
May 2, 2007


friendship is magic
in a pony paradise
don't you judge me

Cats and kittens will always act starving if there is a new tasty food available.

When my kitten was sick and had a low appetite, I could fool him by the simplest thing. He'd eat a bite or 2 of food (super stinky prescription wet food), and not want anymore... until I would pick up the dish and put it 6-12 inches away. OMG new food! He'd eat another bite or 2, and we'd repeat 5 or 6 times until he ate it all.

Ceridwen
Dec 11, 2004
Of course... If the Jell-O gets moldy, the whole thing should be set aflame.



Zeus only ever had wet food and I gave it to him 3 times a day when he was young, and twice a day once he hit six months. He never seemed to have an issue with it and the vet never commented that there was anything wrong with it.

My mom fed her kittens twice a day starting when she got them and her vet said it was fine.

In both cases the cats in question were about 12 weeks old when we started the meals. I can find several food manufacturer and vet clinic websites that said 2-3 meals a day is fine for kittens.

Fire In The Disco
Oct 4, 2007
I cannot change the gender of my unborn child and shouldn't waste my time or energy pretending he won't exist

HondaCivet posted:

Sounds like their stomachs are too small for them to eat enough otherwise so I guess you are right. Is it necessary to "moisten dry food with water" like some sites say? The foster parent hasn't been doing that so far but I don't know how much of the kibble they eat. They always act like they are starving when we bring them wet food so maybe they can't handle it (either that or kittens always act like they are starving when tasty food is present).

By 4 months old, the kitten shouldn't need moistened kibble. That's really something that's good for babies who haven't figured out crunchies yet. I also second free feeding until the cat's over a year old; with high quality kibble, and plenty of it available, the kitten will have the best possible building blocks to growing up huge and healthy and cuddly.

HondaCivet
Oct 16, 2005

And then it falls
And then I fall
And then I know




Fire In The Disco posted:

By 4 months old, the kitten shouldn't need moistened kibble. That's really something that's good for babies who haven't figured out crunchies yet. I also second free feeding until the cat's over a year old; with high quality kibble, and plenty of it available, the kitten will have the best possible building blocks to growing up huge and healthy and cuddly.

what if i want small cats

Just to clarify, "kitten" formula foods are mostly a marketing thing right? We got a free bag of Wellness Kitten kibble when we got them but can we just pick up any good adult food once they go through it?

Fire In The Disco
Oct 4, 2007
I cannot change the gender of my unborn child and shouldn't waste my time or energy pretending he won't exist

For the most part, yes. Most of the premium and ultra premium brands don't even have separate formulas. On the other hand, Wellness is typically good stuff, so you're not going to be harming the babes by feeding them the Wellness kitten.

But for what it's worth, Luna, who's not 6 months old and 6.5 lbs has been eating Innova EVO since she was 5 weeks old. So, if you want small cats, don't feed them EVO. :P (I'm totally kidding guys, I don't know for sure that the EVO's why she's so big already)

HondaCivet
Oct 16, 2005

And then it falls
And then I fall
And then I know




I have a question on claw trimming. As I said, I have two 4-month old kittens. Should I be getting them into the habit of getting their claws trimmed now or should I let them have their little death daggers? I am afraid that if I trim their claws, they will learn to play with each other harder than they should.

Eggplant Wizard
Jul 8, 2005


i loev catte


HondaCivet posted:

I have a question on claw trimming. As I said, I have two 4-month old kittens. Should I be getting them into the habit of getting their claws trimmed now or should I let them have their little death daggers? I am afraid that if I trim their claws, they will learn to play with each other harder than they should.

For your own sake, do it now. At least start getting them used to having their paws touched and the little pressure you need to extend the claws.

Fire In The Disco
Oct 4, 2007
I cannot change the gender of my unborn child and shouldn't waste my time or energy pretending he won't exist

GOD YES, start now. I've even gone so far as to play with my kittens' paws every day, exerting pressure and extending their claws, whether I'm trimming or not. This way they grow used to the way it feels young. The same holds true for grooming-- brush as often as you can now. When cats are older, some enjoy being brushed, but others don't. Brushing now will help them become more of the former.

ChairmanMeow
Mar 1, 2008

Fire up the grill everyone eats tonight!


Lipstick Apathy

HondaCivet posted:

I have a question on claw trimming. As I said, I have two 4-month old kittens. Should I be getting them into the habit of getting their claws trimmed now or should I let them have their little death daggers? I am afraid that if I trim their claws, they will learn to play with each other harder than they should.

Unless you are going to stop grooming them there shouldn't be ant difference. Plus you are getting them used to it. I would start doing it as often as is needed.

BIOJECT
May 12, 2006
Probation
Can't post for 545 days!


Is it possible to train a kitten to feel comfortable with a leash?

bamzilla
Jan 13, 2005

All butt since 2012.


BIOJECT posted:

Is it possible to train a kitten to feel comfortable with a leash?

Yes, but I'd also recommend a harness so you don't strain their neck and they don't slip out of the collar.

zex
May 3, 2007



I have some litter questions. Right now I have two cats, 9 months old and 4 months old. Two litter boxes right next to each other, probably going to cut it down to just one soon. I use Best Cat Litter in the World Extra Strength Formula for multiple cats. My problem is litterbox stink. I clean both boxes out a minimum of twice a day, usually three or more times though. My bathroom and room more often than not stink of cat poop pretty strongly. I thought this was just normal but a friend came over and said she has one cat and she only cleans out her box twice a week and it never stinks. This sounds crazy to me knowing how often I clean my box out. She used Arm and Hammer something, except it wasn't flushable I don't think. I'd prefer to just flush everything if possible. What I'm asking is what are some alternate litters I could try in one of the boxes? I can separate the boxes to test the smell and see if they take to the new litter. Any other tips for cutting down smell? Also could it possibly be because of my new younger cat? I remember as the 9 month old aged a little the stink cut back but it could have just been because I got used to it.

edit: Forgot to add the food I use is Blue Buffalo Longevity Kitten Formula. Could possibly moving to a different food make a difference? Maybe Solid Gold?

HondaCivet
Oct 16, 2005

And then it falls
And then I fall
And then I know




zex posted:

I have some litter questions. Right now I have two cats, 9 months old and 4 months old. Two litter boxes right next to each other, probably going to cut it down to just one soon. I use Best Cat Litter in the World Extra Strength Formula for multiple cats. My problem is litterbox stink. I clean both boxes out a minimum of twice a day, usually three or more times though. My bathroom and room more often than not stink of cat poop pretty strongly. I thought this was just normal but a friend came over and said she has one cat and she only cleans out her box twice a week and it never stinks. This sounds crazy to me knowing how often I clean my box out. She used Arm and Hammer something, except it wasn't flushable I don't think. I'd prefer to just flush everything if possible. What I'm asking is what are some alternate litters I could try in one of the boxes? I can separate the boxes to test the smell and see if they take to the new litter. Any other tips for cutting down smell? Also could it possibly be because of my new younger cat? I remember as the 9 month old aged a little the stink cut back but it could have just been because I got used to it.

edit: Forgot to add the food I use is Blue Buffalo Longevity Kitten Formula. Could possibly moving to a different food make a difference? Maybe Solid Gold?

Maybe try Swheat Scoop? It's wheat junk instead of corn junk and I'm pretty sure it's flushable. They have a multi-cat formula that is supposed to be better at odor control so maybe give that a shot.

And yes, kitten poos tend to be worse than cat poos when it comes to stankiness. Also kittens are dumb and often aren't very good about burying their buttbombs.

Meow Cadet
May 2, 2007


friendship is magic
in a pony paradise
don't you judge me

I find a little fan does wonders for dispersing cat box stink. I also just tried some (new) Tidy Cats Power Blend, which was a dollar more than the regular Tidy Cats formula, and it really does the trick. But, it's not flushable...unless you are an evil renter that doesn't care if the plumbing gets messed up.

And seconding that kitten poo poo smells 10 times worse than cat poo poo.

Eggplant Wizard
Jul 8, 2005


i loev catte


HondaCivet posted:

Maybe try Swheat Scoop? It's wheat junk instead of corn junk and I'm pretty sure it's flushable. They have a multi-cat formula that is supposed to be better at odor control so maybe give that a shot.

And yes, kitten poos tend to be worse than cat poos when it comes to stankiness. Also kittens are dumb and often aren't very good about burying their buttbombs.

I know a girl who uses Swheat Scoop, scoops daily and has a covered, filtered litterbox. Her room still reeks of cat pee.

Use Arm & Hammer or Tidy Cat I guess and get used to hauling a little bag of poops out to the trash bin every day. The lack of smell is worth it.

demozthenes
Feb 14, 2007

Wicked pissa little critta


Meow Cadet posted:

I find a little fan does wonders for dispersing cat box stink.

A box fan in the window, blowing out, works wonders on keeping rat-cage stink down. I assume it would work just as well for cat boxes. My folks used to sprinkle baking soda in the litter and stir it in when it would get smelly, too.

Alternately, train it to use the toilet:

evenworse username
Aug 4, 2006

TRICHER
POUR
GAGNER


exactduckwoman posted:

I know a girl who uses Swheat Scoop, scoops daily and has a covered, filtered litterbox. Her room still reeks of cat pee.

Use Arm & Hammer or Tidy Cat I guess and get used to hauling a little bag of poops out to the trash bin every day. The lack of smell is worth it.

I use Swheat Scoop and don't have the stench problem, although one thing to be aware of is that it tracks a tremendous amount. It is flushable, though, which is nice.

HondaCivet
Oct 16, 2005

And then it falls
And then I fall
And then I know




even worse username posted:

I use Swheat Scoop and don't have the stench problem, although one thing to be aware of is that it tracks a tremendous amount. It is flushable, though, which is nice.

I think it's one of those things where you just have to give it a shot and see if it works for you. Some people think it works great and some don't. Same with World's Best. Same with just about every litter I guess. Maybe it depends on the cat's diet?

Beezle Bug
Jun 5, 2009

I love painting trees.

I adopted a 5 month old baby today, and he is not letting me sleep. He has to be in my bedroom until the older cat stops her "sit by his food, snarl when he comes near it" war tactic (I'm planning a series of meetings until she accepts him, is there a better way?). So like, he's been pouncing on me all night, purring and happy, and while it's the cutest thing ever I just am not getting any sleep at all. How long until he calms down? Will I just be dealing with the most adorable insomnia ever for a long time?

Fire In The Disco
Oct 4, 2007
I cannot change the gender of my unborn child and shouldn't waste my time or energy pretending he won't exist

Wear him out. For the two hours leading up to bedtime, play with that baby incessantly! He still probably won't let you sleep the whole way through the night, but you'll at least have a few hours of rest before he gets up again. And once he and your older cat are getting along better, and he's not trapped in your bedroom all night (I assume you just leave your door open under most circumstances?) he'll probably do his zoomies around the house, and not just in your room.

Beezle Bug
Jun 5, 2009

I love painting trees.

That sounds like a fun and awesome way to deal with the problem, thanks! And yeah, the older cat is free to come and go from the room as she pleases, I think I'm going to wait with him until he fully recovers from his neuter surgery. They seem to be getting along okay now, she doesn't like it when he gets too close but they're content to leave each other alone beyond him chirping at her hopefully sometimes.

soj89
Dec 5, 2005

Kids in China are playing tag with knives, on playgrounds constructed of spinning razorblades and spike traps, because it will make them stronger.

I'm looking to adopt a cat but I've never owned a pet before. I want to make sure I do everything right so input from those with experience would be much appreciated.

I was hoping to adopt from the city shelter (especially since they've lowered their fees immensely until August 31), but was wondering what the difference between adopting from them or a cat rescue would be.

I'm also going to be moving soon afterwards for school. Is the kitty going to be able to handle a 4 hour car ride and re-acclimitize to a new home after coming home from shelter?

I think I'll be looking for an adult cat who can be a bit more independent. There may be times that I won't be able to give super amounts of playtime like a kitten would need. I won't let him out of the house.

I'm also worried about the health of an adoptee - the stories in PI about some shelters not really disclosing possible problems has me very wary.

Finally, I'm worried about cleanliness and smell. Like I said, I've never had a pet before and some of my friends that do have one tend to have a weird smell in their houses. I'm not adverse to the litterbox cleaning everyday but what should I expect in terms of general grossness?

Are there any other considerations I should think about before taking on this huge responsibility?

Meow Cadet
May 2, 2007


friendship is magic
in a pony paradise
don't you judge me

soj89 posted:

I'm looking to adopt a cat but I've never owned a pet before. I want to make sure I do everything right so input from those with experience would be much appreciated.

I was hoping to adopt from the city shelter (especially since they've lowered their fees immensely until August 31), but was wondering what the difference between adopting from them or a cat rescue would be.

A rescue tends to foster cats, so they know their personality better. They also guarantee to take the cat back if there is a problem, even 10 years down the road. This gives me piece of mind that my cat has a spot at a no-kill rescue if I end up penniless with cancer or something. Ask around for shelter/rescue reputations. Some are good, some are bad. A good place to start would be your vet.

soj89 posted:

I'm also going to be moving soon afterwards for school. Is the kitty going to be able to handle a 4 hour car ride and re-acclimitize to a new home after coming home from shelter?

Are you a college freshman, new transfer student, or someone out on their own for the first time? DON'T GET A PET. Wait at least 6 months or so. It's a crazy time in your life, don't burden yourself with too much responsibility.

soj89 posted:

I think I'll be looking for an adult cat who can be a bit more independent. There may be times that I won't be able to give super amounts of playtime like a kitten would need. I won't let him out of the house.

Good thinking. A pair of bonded adult cats would be ideal. They will have a friend to keep them company, and pairs are harder to adopt out. If you get one now, and one later, they may never ever get along, and it will be miserable.

soj89 posted:

I'm also worried about the health of an adoptee - the stories in PI about some shelters not really disclosing possible problems has me very wary.

Expect your cat to come with a cold, fleas, and mites. These are common, and easy to treat. Always take your cat to your vet asap after you bring it home from the shelter. Even if the shelter vet gave it a clean bill of health. Ask around at vets, and independent pet boutiques about their recommendations and especially warnings about the rescue groups in your area.

soj89 posted:

Finally, I'm worried about cleanliness and smell. Like I said, I've never had a pet before and some of my friends that do have one tend to have a weird smell in their houses. I'm not adverse to the litterbox cleaning everyday but what should I expect in terms of general grossness?

Cat poo poo is really really foul, and their piss ain't much better. Some cats like to puke once a week, you will step in it barefoot at least 2 times a year. Hairballs are icky. If a lizard/frog/snake sneaks inside, you may see its guts strewn across the floor. Cat hair will be everywhere, even in your food when you go out to fancy restaurants. Your bed will always have tiny grains of litter on it, that you can feel, but not see.

soj89 posted:

Are there any other considerations I should think about before taking on this huge responsibility?

Not only is it a responsibility, it's a huge burden. A potential 20+ year burden. Are you married? If not, are you screening all potential mates for allergies and rejecting them?

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Victor Nightingale
May 11, 2005



I'm about 90% sure that I have an allergy to (at least) cats. The first 19 years of my life I was around 2-3 dogs pretty much all the time at my parent's house with absolutely no effects, but after a few years living away from home now when I'm around cats at friend's houses my eyes start to water, I sneeze more, and my breathing becomes tougher. Usually it starts with light wheezing and works its way up to labored breathing until I get away from the area.

Even when I go home to see my parents it happens a little bit, which is especially annoying.

If I take some generic claritin then most of these effects don't occur.

In two weeks I'm moving to a new apartment. I'd like to get a pet because this apartment will be MUCH closer to my place of work, so getting home won't be a big deal (5 minute bike ride), and the pet won't be home alone for long stretches like they would have been in my current place.

Dogs aren't allowed in the complex, unfortunately.

I'd like to give a cat a try, but I'm worried about my allergies making it hell to live with. My questions are:

1. Are some cats less allergy-causing than others? I doubt this is the case because 5 minutes of reading tells me the issue is their saliva, not the dander/hair as I originally thought.

2. Are there medications that I could take to mitigate the effects of the cat? I could just take this claritin stuff every day (each pill lasts 24 hours), but I'd rather not do that if there's a better option.

3. What's the chance that I would "get used to" the cat, and have less of an allergic effect after a while of heavy medicating?

4. Am I crazy? Is this something that there's no way around, and I need to get some fish instead?

Thanks.

Victor Nightingale fucked around with this message at 10:59 on Aug 16, 2009

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply
«817 »