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Patrat
Feb 14, 2012



It is worth comprehensively checking with all immediate neighbors, when one of my cats stopped coming home last year it ended up being that the people with the house 'behind' mine had literally adopted her. She was only just over the fence at the bottom of the garden but remained with them for weeks, playing with their kids, sleeping in their house, etc.

Basically the kids played with and adored her whilst also sneaking her meat and treats constantly so she decided to move into their house instead. She was happy to see me when I went around to collect her! But not at all happy to be brought home.

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mistaya
Oct 18, 2006

Cat of Wealth and Taste



ZearothK posted:

One of my cats has been missing since Tuesday and I am literally developing gray hairs.

Is there strong reason to believe the cat is outside of the home? I "lost" Sam for three days after we adopted him because he had wedged himself UNDERNEATH the kitchen cupboards through a baseboard that only bent one way and we put up posters and went insane looking for him outdoors (the door had been left open when our new mattress was delivered so we had cause to believe he'd gotten outside.) I only found him because I heard meowing inside of the walls and I thought I was going bugnuts crazy until I figured out where it was coming from.

Indoor cats aren't likely to roam very far if they get out, they'll find someplace they can hide and hunker down. I hope you find them, really, but I'd double check absolutely everyplace inside the house, they might have got stuck somewhere.

ZearothK
Aug 25, 2008

The only mystery left,
is what I put in your tea.


mistaya posted:

Is there strong reason to believe the cat is outside of the home? I "lost" Sam for three days after we adopted him because he had wedged himself UNDERNEATH the kitchen cupboards through a baseboard that only bent one way and we put up posters and went insane looking for him outdoors (the door had been left open when our new mattress was delivered so we had cause to believe he'd gotten outside.) I only found him because I heard meowing inside of the walls and I thought I was going bugnuts crazy until I figured out where it was coming from.

Indoor cats aren't likely to roam very far if they get out, they'll find someplace they can hide and hunker down. I hope you find them, really, but I'd double check absolutely everyplace inside the house, they might have got stuck somewhere.

The only reason to believe he's outside the home is that we haven't found him inside it, he does go up the wall and roof of the house and nearby houses, so it is possible that he could get in a fight with a another cat and be scared into falling, but it is really weird, because this happened between midnight and five AM.

We have scoured several times every compartment that could possibly contain him. There aren't really boards he could get under, as the house is mostly concrete. We also do have other cats, one of whom, Cookie, is particularly fond of the missing cat, Omolú and he has taken to sleeping on spots Omolú used to, he's really missing his adoptive brother and I think he'd be around a place where Omolú could be heard if we have overlooked anything, no matter how faint the meow.

Patrat posted:

It is worth comprehensively checking with all immediate neighbors, when one of my cats stopped coming home last year it ended up being that the people with the house 'behind' mine had literally adopted her. She was only just over the fence at the bottom of the garden but remained with them for weeks, playing with their kids, sleeping in their house, etc.

We do have a cat that permanently relocated to a neighbor because some of our local cats kept fighting with her and she gets along better with that neighbor's cats, so it is not without precedent.

I do worry that he could be trapped somewhere nearby, I've personally spoken to every neighbor in the block on all sides, some of whom even let me search their property, to no success. So he's either not in those places, concealed/trapped where they can't see or we have been lied to.

pidan posted:

I think there's not much more you can do. One thing I've noticed is that "lost cat" posters I've seen have always urged people to look in their garages and cellars, where the cat might seek shelter without being noticed.

I hope you find him!

That could help, a lot of people have enclosed garages that he could sneak into.

Unfortunately the old man who had seen him on Saturday turned out to be another false positive (he sent a picture of the cat he thought was Omolú). I think we've contacted most people who feed the neighborhood's cat colonies and do rescues, but we've decided to put posters in those as well, though one man did raise the point that if he's a house cat he might be unwilling or unwelcome to integrate amongst stray cats. We've spoken to so many people in the surrounding blocks that I think that if he popped up anywhere we'd be contacted, but I am continuining nightly searches. I really do think he's either trapped somewhere nearby, been stolen (in which case our hope would be for him to escape and find his way back to our general area), taken to an entirely different neighborhood or had an accident and the corpse was disposed of long ago. I've discarded the possibility of poisoning as there are several stray cats in the neighborhood that clearly walk around a lot and they've been the same regulars for years now.

Thanks, everyone! I hope we find him too!

ZearothK fucked around with this message at 13:43 on Mar 1, 2021

Rescue Toaster
Mar 13, 2003


I've got a younger cat (2yo) that is seriously stressing out the older one (13yo) with fairly mild attempts at play/stalking and I'm not sure what to do. Mainly it consist of stalking/charging/jumping on the back around meal times and when we're getting ready for bed. Normally the older cat will hiss/walk away but has gotten some minor scratches here and there, and is now terrified of the upstairs hallway leading to our bedroom because the younger one always jumps out at her in there. The older cat now has some opportunistic respiratory infections due to stress and has to go on antibiotics.

My thoughts/theoretical solutions:

a) There's no real way to create a space that only the older cat can go, using microchip cat doors isn't a great option as I suspect the older cat will just end up trapped in whatever room. But it's in theory possible?
b) It's virtually impossible to 'tire out' the younger cat through play. She likes to stalk and watch and occasionally attack, not run around constantly. And even extensive play sessions don't get her to calm down for more than half an hour.
c) Trying to yell/spray the younger cat doesn't work, as a lot of it happens when we're in another room or otherwise can't react quickly. She just learns to pounce and then run off, still stressing out the older cat. The older cat also gets really freaked out by us yelling/spraying near here even if it's not at her.
d) There are small shock collars and though I would never consider using a shock on her, I'm I guess intrigued by the idea of the ones that produce an annoying noise/vibration since we could react quickly when she lines up an attack. When she's zeroed in and crouched watching the older cat, I just can't distract her in time normally, but in theory a remote control collar could. I don't know if the noise 'works' if they don't associate it with pain from the shock though, which I'm not really comfortable with.
e) Getting another younger cat for her to play with. This SEEMS good in theory and we're open to the idea of three cats, but if the two of them together both gang up on the older one, that would be catastrophic (ha) I'm sure.

Any suggestions?

Rescue Toaster fucked around with this message at 20:27 on Mar 1, 2021

Sentient Data
Aug 31, 2011

My molecule scrambler ray will disintegrate your armor with one blow!


How about a collar/harness with a bell so the younger one can't sneak as well?

kaworu
Jul 23, 2004



231w

edit: Well, my cat Jackie made this post by tromping across the keyboard whilst I was reading this thread Sorry guys. Maybe she wanted to communicate something

kaworu fucked around with this message at 19:35 on Mar 3, 2021

Martman
Nov 20, 2006

SEXY... defines my posts and my ride


She wants you to give her 231 treats. Wimmediately.

Sefal
Nov 8, 2011


Fun Shoe

lmao

Len
Jan 21, 2008

Pouches, bandages, shoulderpad, cyber-eye...

Bitchin'!



kaworu posted:

231w

edit: Well, my cat Jackie made this post by tromping across the keyboard whilst I was reading this thread Sorry guys. Maybe she wanted to communicate something

Sounds like somebody needs

https://www.bitboost.com/pawsense/

Neddy Seagoon
Oct 12, 2012

Hi, Everybody!



Looking at that website's design feels like Dorian Gray staring at his own portrait and turning to dust as age catches up with him.

GallienKruger
Nov 25, 2005




Rescue Toaster posted:


e) Getting another younger cat for her to play with. This SEEMS good in theory and we're open to the idea of three cats, but if the two of them together both gang up on the older one, that would be catastrophic (ha) I'm sure.

Any suggestions?

Local rescues are always looking for fosters. It might be a chance to find out if this is viable without the commitment. I'm in a similar situation and baby cat is much more interested in playing with a willing party as opposed to an angry one.

Our household does a lot of rescue work, and in doing so the cat colony can get pretty stressed out. Sometimes the new tenant fits right in, sometimes there is a god drat holy war. These cats are often trap and release cats that have demonstrated that they were at one time domesticated and we take it on to try and get them an actual home. Another is an outright feral that will not allow touching, but does coexist well with us, the other cats, and dogs. She'll take some time but we're getting little gains every week.

In the holy war cases, I've been forced to crate the new cat in a large 3'x4' kennel in order to keep things from becoming a brawl. It's a pain in the rear end to manage hygiene, boredom, weight gain while they exist in that space. For the first week, cats used to wandering a trailer park at will are NOT HAPPY with this arrangement, but then they settle in, recognize they're safe, and become remarkably chill.

Which leads me to Anxiety Cat. Anxiety cat is one of our residents, and her sole purpose for existing is one of our kids. Anxiety Cat is also a compulsive marker. I have not before seen a female cat stand up and piss like a tom does. Anyway, having seen the chilling effect of that crate on our reformed feral project cats, and recognizing how god drat dire the household marking was, I decided to give her a go in the cat enclosure.

First week sucks. Always does. Then she started settling in. She recognized the routine of cleaning feeding and play and everything was easy after that. After a month, she was released back into the house. The marking problem completely vanished. No more fighting. She no longer tries to bury the food when she's done with it. It was a remarkable turn-around. It seems like her territorial stress was soothed by being given a space that is entirely hers, no exceptions. If this is a technique with an actual name I'd love to find out more, my googling hasn't turned up anything.

And to the poster I quoted, let me know if you find any other solutions to your problem, because Anxiety Cat is getting harassed constantly by the new baby and is starting to regress. If you find anything that helps alleviate your situation I'd love to know about it.

Patrat
Feb 14, 2012



The biggest Friendly Kitten Induced Stress Remover I found was to move my adult cat's food bowls atop a work surface that the kitten cannot reach yet. They still find him incredibly annoying, but it is mostly if he tries to 'play' with them whilst they are eating or pooping that they hate it. Normal harassment they can alleviate by hitting him or pinning his head to the floor but if he decides that he should steal their meals they are apparently unwilling to actually hurt him while he is impossible to meaningfully intimidate for more than ten seconds at a time.

SkyeAuroline
Nov 12, 2020




New cat just dropped. Always got strays and cats whose owners couldn't keep 'em coming in, sometimes we get lucky and they end up being really friendly like Eve here. I know the crosseyed-ness isn't good but it is cute.

kaworu
Jul 23, 2004



It's actually been just about 10 years to the day since I adopted my cat Jackie, which is... kind of odd to think about, but also pretty cool.

Jackie and I moved to a house where we live with three other cats this past winter, and it's pretty much the first time Jackie has had to live with other cays since I adopted her - barring a year where I briefly fostered another cat. I'm actually extremely impressed with how she's handled herself, since I was a bit worried. But she's managed a good balance between tough and friendly, and I'm like absurdly proud of how good she's been. Everyone seems to pretty much adore her here, humans and cats - except Murfy, because he was the dominant presence and a bit of a bully before Jackie got here, and she immediately stood up to him. Before she got here Murfy would occasionally tear into the other cats pretty badly, but there's been almost none of that lately.

Also, this is going to sound silly, but since I've gotten here I haven't been the one feeding Jackie - my roommate was already feeding three cats, so adding a fourth isn't much of a difference and I just let him do the honors - especially since Jackie was a bit suspicious and hissy around him initially, and I figured it could only help. Which it did - she hasn't hissed at him in months and they get along wonderfully now - but I also wasn't quite sure whether or not I'd fall out of favor with my cat! After all, I'd always been the one providing her food (along with everything else) up until I got here last November, and one can never be entirely sure how much a cat's affection for their human is based purely in practical terms, so to speak. So, I was honestly a bit curious (and somewhat worried) as to what might happen. But it turns out Jackie's affection for me is not strictly food-motivated, or at least it doesn't seem to be.

I have a very difficult time imagining what my life would be like without her, especially after going through 10 years and quite a lot of cross-country travel and scary times coming close to homelessness in the last 2 years. I truly thought I might have had to give her up on several occasions, and at one point I even had made arrangements and was hours away from driving her to some friends who were going to take her in. I couldn't say goodbye and go through with it, in the end, though - and she seemed to know what was going on and really didn't want to go anywhere.

Anyway, forgive the wordy reminiscence... 10 years feels like something worth making note of, though. Scary to think that this means Jackie turns 15 this year, though - barring a couple of ear infections, she's always been very healthy and has slimmed down (in a positive way) since moving out here to Colorado. I don't know if it's a new diet, the altitude, more exercise, drinking aquarium water, or all of the above - but it's very nice to see her hips again. She's probably lost something like ~4 pounds or so in as many months. I can only hope this does good things for her overall health.

edit: And I almost forgot to include a cute pic of Jackie being tortured mercilessly:



I know, how dare I attach such a humiliating device to her. The funniest thing was her attempt to get out of it, which looked like a cat permanently stuck in a 'reverse' gear - a fruitless attempt to back out of it, I think

kaworu fucked around with this message at 09:24 on Mar 7, 2021

Organza Quiz
Nov 7, 2009




Something that might help other owners of skittish cats: if Peridot is lying in the corridor between my living room and the bathroom, she will often think I'm chasing her when I'm just walking to the bathroom and she happens to be retreating in that direction as I walk towards her. I've started walking backwards instead so while I'm moving towards her my back is to her, and she's much happier about that! She will usually just slip past me and head into the living room now.

Pollyanna
Mar 5, 2005

Milk's on them.




InvisibleMonkey posted:

This happened to Katya earlier this year, the vet prescribed some anti-nausea medication that allowed her to eat and she was fine a few days later. Def see a vet and try to feed him something he can keep down in the mean time.
I think it has given her an aversion to wet food though, as it happened after her weekly bag, now she's very fussy about finishing a bowl of the stuff (we tried different brands) and with a ravenous kitten in the house we're probably switching her over to kibble to avoid extra stress.

Speaking of the kitten addition, it's still going very well and they're grooming each other right now.

He’s fine now!! It all stopped after that morning. He’s only barfed once ever since then. I suspect he ate something he shouldn’t have

Queen Victorian
Feb 21, 2018



Gotta post a update. So Renny has been spending her days napping all day in the guest room/my office and she has discovered that the corner by the radiator is warm so she’ll just flop on the floor next to the radiator. Didn’t want to put a bed there because the walls would block some of the heat coming off, and she seemed perfectly happy on the floor. The other day we were at the pet store and I saw some flat bed pads so I bought one and put it in her corner and took this picture ten minutes later:





Also, yarn is loving crack for cats. I’ve recently taken up crochet and the kitties will sit side by side in front of my chair and just stare intently at the yarn and the crochet hook like little creeps. And occasionally try to attack the yarn ball and/or my project. Seamus even tried to eat some yarn but luckily I was able to pull it out of his gullet before he swallowed it all. Ugh.

ImmovableSquid
May 1, 2011


Floss Finder

I'm struggling to introduce a new kitten into a two cat household. I watched videos on it and read, but its taking so long that I wanted to make sure I was on the right track.

My two adult cats are 4 year old rescue siblings and the new kitten is another rescue.

Things we are doing/have done:
1) For two weeks my girlfriend has been sleeping on the floor of the second bedroom with the new kitten and keeping it apart from the other cats. (No issue here, all cats seem ok with this)
2)We have been occasionally switching litter boxes between the main box and the kittens box to get the other cats used to the new kittens smell. (No issue here, I didn't have to clean any unusual marking as a reaction to the new smell)
3)Playing with them by the door to the second bedroom at the same time the kitten is being played with on the other side. (No issue here either, but they don't seem to even notice each other. I'm hoping the cats are being discreet and not that this is having no affect)
4)Same as above but with treats
5)Opening the bedroom door just enough that the cats can smell and see each other, maybe half and inch to an inch? Can't get their heads through (This is where the issues begin. Both adult cats will hiss at the kitten through the crack.)
6)Room exchange. Instead of the adult cats in the rest of the apartment and the kitten locked away, we put the adult cats in the bedroom and allowed the kitten to explore the apartment (No problems here as far as I could tell. I stuck with the adult cats and I didn't see any marking. They were interested in the kitten scent, but seemed about as interested exploring a room they hadn't been in for a little while)
7)Kitty parade in which one of us carries the kitten in our arms though the apartment out of the safety of the second bedroom to meet the other cats from a distance in the living room where they have space to retreat and express themselves. (Mixed reaction. I often break line of sight and distract with toys if the staring lasts more than a few seconds, however they will eventually hiss which usually cuts the parade short)
8)Free roam introduction in which the kitten occasionally escapes from confinement and I try to keep her explorations safe while corralling the other cats until I can get control of the situation or can get help from a partner. (Unplanned but mixed reaction. The adult cats will watch the kitten while it explores, and when it gets either too close to them or starts to touch things they consider either personal or a resource for them, E.G. a new toy, they will attempt to run up to the kitten and hiss in her face, maybe bat at her head. I can't be sure as I have always prevent any physical contact between the kitten and the adult cats.)

It's the last behavior that concerns me the most as both cats still want to get in the kittens face to hiss and...I don't know, define territory? I do not want/will not have any of these cats intimidated in their own home for the rest of their lives, so I need help, if that's possible. I know this is a process that can take more than two weeks, but I would love some advice on what I should be doing. I'm by no means an expert so I'll take whatever advice you give.

Deteriorata
Feb 6, 2005
NOBODY HAS SUFFERED AS MUCH AS BOOMERS AND I WILL DEFEND THEM TO MY LAST BREATH

What you need to do is leave them alone and let them sort it out for themselves. Cats are always going to hiss at each other and swat. It's normal behavior.

It sounds like everything is going fine. None of them are going to be intimidated forever.

Elvis_Maximus
Oct 7, 2007

Relaxing AND Refreshing


Cat introduction update time:

So, last I wrote in the thread, Socks (the adult cat) would chase Sage (the kitten) back upstairs literally everytime she saw him, pretty much as soon as she saw him. At first I thought they were just playing, but I don't think he felt that way as it started to get to the point where he was afraid to come down stairs, and if he did he'd cautiously peek around every corner to make sure Socks wasn't there. If she was he'd just run back upstairs right away.

It didn't seem to be working itself out, so we separated them then and there and started The Reset. At first they didn't get to see each other for about a week or two, then we started feeding them together again (with just the gate they can see through, no doors). At first, Sage wouldn't even come into the kitchen to get his food, he'd just stare longingly at it if he could see Socks eating her food until she left. Over the past 3 weeks or so, and with the help of some Feliway, we've gotten them back to eating on opposite sides of the gate. Now, he doesn't appear to be scared of her at all, at least with the gate up. In fact, he often walks over to the gate to stare at her, and seemingly wants to get to her pretty badly, hopefully to play! He's not really vocal, just the occasional little chirp or trill and every once and awhile meows when he's really excited or frustrated, but when he's looking for Socks he's MUCH more vocal and it's very cute. Not yowls or anything bad, just little chirps as he walks around trying to see her

Unlike last time we were introducing them, his new favorite thing (outside of hours long fetch sessions) is to play footsies with the Adult cat under the door that separates her food area and half of the house from his when he's downstairs. He likes it so much that he constantly goes over to check and see if she's there, and when she is they both take turns sticking their paws under the door while the other one baps them. It seems WAY more promising than it was before!

There's still a little bit of behavior that might be aggressive? He's 8 months old now, and so kinda testing his dominance and place in the house I think, so he likes to sort of run up to the gate when Socks is there then back up when she does it and do it again the instant she walks away once more. I'm presuming he just wants to play, and hopefully she's just playing as well. She did run up to the gate and sorta bat at the air, but it didn't look like there was claws and there was no hissing or yowling or anything so I'm pretty sure it's playful behavior. We'll see how brave he is when the gate isn't there this weekend, but so far it looks WAY more promising. It also helps that he's got a month or so more growth, he's now like 2 pounds heavier than the adult cat at least so hopefully that gives him a bit of confidence.

Kitten tax for my long boring post



Here's hoping the "no gate" time this weekend goes well, and we're near the end of the process! I guess it makes sense that'd take a lot longer for an elderly cat that's never lived with other cats outside of the kittens she had when she was like a year and a half before adoption.

Elvis_Maximus fucked around with this message at 16:28 on Mar 10, 2021

ImmovableSquid
May 1, 2011


Floss Finder

Deteriorata posted:

What you need to do is leave them alone and let them sort it out for themselves. Cats are always going to hiss at each other and swat. It's normal behavior.

It sounds like everything is going fine. None of them are going to be intimidated forever.

So, what are you saying? Allow the kitten to explore the full apartment and try to monitor the fights to make sure no one is injured? I'm more familiar with dogs, so I don't completely understand cat aggression and social behavior on first glance.

Deteriorata
Feb 6, 2005
NOBODY HAS SUFFERED AS MUCH AS BOOMERS AND I WILL DEFEND THEM TO MY LAST BREATH

ImmovableSquid posted:

So, what are you saying? Allow the kitten to explore the full apartment and try to monitor the fights to make sure no one is injured? I'm more familiar with dogs, so I don't completely understand cat aggression and social behavior on first glance.

That cats aren't actually fighting or hurting each other. They're just setting boundaries and learning each others' personalities. That just takes some time and interaction.

Kittens are assholes and will deliberately piss off their elders. The elders smack them around in response. It's what cats do.

As long as there isn't any blood, leave them alone.

Our cats have been together for years and they still hiss, swat, chase each other, and rassle around. Some of it is play, some of it is them just being shits to each other.

Rotten Red Rod
Mar 5, 2002



ImmovableSquid posted:

So, what are you saying? Allow the kitten to explore the full apartment and try to monitor the fights to make sure no one is injured? I'm more familiar with dogs, so I don't completely understand cat aggression and social behavior on first glance.

Yeah. An adult cat hissing (or even swatting) at a kitten isn't aggression, but a completely normal instinct. The kitten needs that to learn boundaries and how to socially interact with other cats.

I wouldn't even worry about the "fights" either. Have you ever seen kittens play with each other? They play ROUGH. Our most recent kitten would constantly try and tackle the adult cat 5x his size, and get pinned to the ground by his throat for the effort. It looked violent, you could even hear the "thump" as he was slammed to the ground, and sometimes he would yelp in pain... And then the moment he was released he would go in for another tackle. He LOVED it. And now that he's grown up, both cats are best buds and groom each other often.

Unless you see your cat doing this to the kittens: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mqWqrmsS-uU the fights are not fights. All that hissing, batting, and play fighting... It's completely normal and safe.

Rotten Red Rod fucked around with this message at 16:40 on Mar 10, 2021

pidan
Nov 6, 2012



Queen Victorian posted:

Also, yarn is loving crack for cats. I’ve recently taken up crochet and the kitties will sit side by side in front of my chair and just stare intently at the yarn and the crochet hook like little creeps. And occasionally try to attack the yarn ball and/or my project. Seamus even tried to eat some yarn but luckily I was able to pull it out of his gullet before he swallowed it all. Ugh.

Please be careful with the yarn, I've left yarn lying around and the cat rolled off and swallowed literally like 10 feet of it. Luckily I caught her and was able to pull it out again, but if you're not quick about this it can apparently be very dangerous for cats (depending on the yarn, pulling it out can itself be dangerous). The yarn can block their intestine, which would require emergency surgery to fix.

Just a psa, cats will swallow unreasonable amounts of yarn, make sure to never leave yarn unsupervised where cats can get it.

kw0134
Apr 19, 2003



Rotten Red Rod posted:

Yeah. An adult cat hissing (or even swatting) at a kitten isn't aggression, but a completely normal instinct. The kitten needs that to learn boundaries and how to socially interact with other cats.

I wouldn't even worry about the "fights" either. Have you ever seen kittens play with each other? They play ROUGH. Our most recent kitten would constantly try and tackle the adult cat 5x his size, and get pinned to the ground by his throat for the effort. It looked violent, you could even hear the "thump" as he was slammed to the ground, and sometimes he would yelp in pain... And then the moment he was released he would go in for another tackle. He LOVED it. And now that he's grown up, both cats are best buds and groom each other often.

Unless you see your cat doing this to the kittens: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mqWqrmsS-uU the fights are not fights. All that hissing, batting, and play fighting... It's completely normal and safe.
To add to this, cats who learn to respect boundaries and air their views unambiguously tend to get along better. I introduced a third cat, one who was adopted as a kitten in another home but the older existing cat sort of rolled over and never fought back or otherwise pushed back on his rear end in a top hat kitten energy. For other, unrelated, reasons he was rehomed with me, and there was a pretty rough transition because my sibling cats doesn't take poo poo from anyone. So there was a LOT of hissing and batting. Three years later, they've settled down and the "newcomer" respects those boundaries better, and even my female cat who used to not give him time of day will play with him a bit now he's better behaved (only took three loving years).

I feel like if he had learned what loving around results in, he'd be a better behaved and better socialized cat. Cats have their own social structures that can only be learned by experience (through a bap on the nose).

pzy
Feb 20, 2004

Da Boom!


RIP Litter-robot referral program, not like they ever paid me out anyway...


quote:

*Please note, we are now awarding $25 store credits for qualified Litter-Robot and Feeder-Robot referrals*

Elvis_Maximus
Oct 7, 2007

Relaxing AND Refreshing


In my case my problem was that the adult cat's boundaries were seemingly: the entire downstairs don't you dare come down

It remains to be seen if we've solved that one though!

kw0134
Apr 19, 2003



Cats are territorial. It's not uncommon for cats to carve out spaces for themselves and woe be unto the other if that line is transgressed. Usually kittens are bolder than that, and it's probable that now the kitten is bigger he'll be braver and can push back a bit, which the adult will likely be forced to cede. Everything is negotiable, one hissing and wrasslin' match at a time.

Deteriorata
Feb 6, 2005
NOBODY HAS SUFFERED AS MUCH AS BOOMERS AND I WILL DEFEND THEM TO MY LAST BREATH

kw0134 posted:

Cats are territorial. It's not uncommon for cats to carve out spaces for themselves and woe be unto the other if that line is transgressed. Usually kittens are bolder than that, and it's probable that now the kitten is bigger he'll be braver and can push back a bit, which the adult will likely be forced to cede. Everything is negotiable, one hissing and wrasslin' match at a time.

That territory also changes a lot. Our cats go through a regular cycle of staking out territory, jealously guarding it, then invading another's space and taking it over, only to lose their original base. So they rotate around as kings (or queens) of various spaces.

Elvis_Maximus
Oct 7, 2007

Relaxing AND Refreshing


kw0134 posted:

Cats are territorial. It's not uncommon for cats to carve out spaces for themselves and woe be unto the other if that line is transgressed. Usually kittens are bolder than that, and it's probable that now the kitten is bigger he'll be braver and can push back a bit, which the adult will likely be forced to cede. Everything is negotiable, one hissing and wrasslin' match at a time.

Yeah that's what I'm hoping.

I don't think she really wants to fight him at all, but he needs to also be a bit more bold and challenge it a bit for sure

kw0134
Apr 19, 2003



I think we also have to think about cat interactions through the lens of a cat. When they bat or wrassle or chase each other, that's not a fight with ill-intentions; that's just what cats do. A cat fight fight is hackles up, claws out, ears pinned to the skull, and a howling noise that indicates death is about to come for someone. There's a huge spectrum of interactions between "cat piles of mutual grooming" and "I WILL loving WRECK YOU DIE DIE DIE" and most everything short of blood is safe, even benign. Hissing and batting and even light biting and bunny kicking is how they "talk" to each other. They might even find that sort of thing amusing! Cat butlers should absolutely not be afraid when their cats get physical, or even a little loud. It's how they are.

Rotten Red Rod
Mar 5, 2002



Yeah, all 3 of my cats love each other but every single grooming session is a countdown to a wrestling match. It's totally normal, and often they'll go back to grooming immediately after.

Queen Victorian
Feb 21, 2018



pidan posted:

Please be careful with the yarn, I've left yarn lying around and the cat rolled off and swallowed literally like 10 feet of it. Luckily I caught her and was able to pull it out again, but if you're not quick about this it can apparently be very dangerous for cats (depending on the yarn, pulling it out can itself be dangerous). The yarn can block their intestine, which would require emergency surgery to fix.

Just a psa, cats will swallow unreasonable amounts of yarn, make sure to never leave yarn unsupervised where cats can get it.

Yeah it was a cut off length of yarn that had escaped from the cabinet where I keep my crochet stuff that they found before I did. We are always super careful about stuff lying around because Seamus usually tries to eat it. I swear he was a gross but friendly dog in a past life because he loves crumbs (including the fully carbonized morsels I knocked off the stove while cleaning it) and tries to get into the garbage can on a regular basis. Both of them will try to eat hair ties. Nowadays I go into a panic whenever I hear smacking noises coming from somewhere I can’t see.

Boogalo
Jul 8, 2012

Meep Meep






ImmovableSquid posted:

I'm struggling to introduce a new kitten into a two cat household. I watched videos on it and read, but its taking so long that I wanted to make sure I was on the right track.

*snip*

I had actual attacks with my idiots and it took forever for one to stop it.

You've done a good job and hissing and batting is totally fine I'd just let em roam while you're home and see what happens. They might scrap and as long as they stop on their own and there are no injuries or blood drawn they're good. You can check my recent post history in here for a brief summary and videos.

dervinosdoom
Jan 23, 2014




My sweet little 6 month old ragdoll kitten will sometimes go pee not in the litterbox, even when nice and clean. She only seems to do it when I'm around. Only pee though. No frequent urinations to my knowledge, she doesn't seem to be hurting. Just doesn't use the litterbox. I'm stumped.

mistaya
Oct 18, 2006

Cat of Wealth and Taste



Are you using an enzymatic cleaner on the spots where she's peed? If you just use ordinary cleaner the cat will still be able to smell the old piss (even if you can't) and cats really like to piss on top of previous piss. Nature's Miracle is a good one.

Otherwise I've noticed that some cats enjoy pissing on things like towels or floor laundry (soft things) even if there is absolutely nothing wrong with them so tidying up better can help if it's that sort of issue. If she's 6 months old she's still just a big kitten at that point, is the litterbox easily accessed, or is there one box very far away from where she usually hangs out and she can't make it?

InvisibleMonkey
Jun 4, 2004


Hey, girl.

Katya went through a period of pissing on discarded clothes and towels, even on the bed once which suuuucked. Turned out one box that was scooped twice daily in a 1br apartment wasn't enough for her liking, she stopped immediately when we got her a second box.

dervinosdoom
Jan 23, 2014




mistaya posted:

Are you using an enzymatic cleaner on the spots where she's peed? If you just use ordinary cleaner the cat will still be able to smell the old piss (even if you can't) and cats really like to piss on top of previous piss. Nature's Miracle is a good one.

Otherwise I've noticed that some cats enjoy pissing on things like towels or floor laundry (soft things) even if there is absolutely nothing wrong with them so tidying up better can help if it's that sort of issue. If she's 6 months old she's still just a big kitten at that point, is the litterbox easily accessed, or is there one box very far away from where she usually hangs out and she can't make it?

Close, other side of the wall. It's not all the time either. I do have nature's miracle at home, just in case of accidents. I'll keep an eye on her.

PriorMarcus
Oct 16, 2008

ASK ME ABOUT BEING ALLERGIC TO POSITIVITY


Hello all. First time posting here. We've just adopted an 11 year old rescue cat. His previous owner, before he went into foster care, overfed him something shocking and he had a weight problem, predominantly from eating human food. His foster parent got his weight down, and recommended we feed him one pouch of wet food in the morning (Purina 1 Senior we are using for now) and then a scoop of kibble for the rest of the day (Iams Senior). However this seems really low to us given the recommendations on the packet and we don't want to be under feeding him. That said yesterday we gave him half a pouch of wet food in the morning, the other half at lunch and then kibble and he didn't finish the kibble at all but still meowed for food. We will be booking a check up with the vet soon (we have to wait for his vet records to be available to us) but for now any guidance would be great?

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Elvis_Maximus
Oct 7, 2007

Relaxing AND Refreshing


So we let out cats interact for the first time (again) last night, and something really funny happened.

Unfortunately I couldn't get a picture of it, but Socks was chasing Sage as per usual. Unlike last time he would come back downstairs right after he had run upstairs (and socks chased after him) pretty much each time it happened.

However, on the last chase he managed to lose her around the back of the couch since he's much faster than her. He came back around the front and sat in wait watching for her to follow him.

Unfortunately for him, Socks used her superior cat wisdom and... walked around the other side. She actually got right up behind him, like maybe an inch or two away, and just sat there watching him. Eventually he turned around and did a full on double take at his new sister being right behind him patiently waiting for him to notice her.

He was so surprised that he actually hissed for the second time of his life, with his ears going a little back. Afterwards he ran away and she chased him again for a bit and we put the gate back up. We'll let them interact for longer and longer each time of course, but I think the fact that Socks patiently waited for him to turn around without pouncing or bapping or hissing is a very good sign!!

I'm pretty sure his hiss was mostly just being insanely surprised as well, wish I could've gotten a picture

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