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Takes No Damage
Nov 20, 2004

The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents. We live on a placid island of ignorance in the midst of black seas of infinity, and it was not meant that we should voyage far.




Grimey Drawer

So there's a colony of ferals behind the parking garage at my office. I had a few cans of pate' cat food that gives my cats the shits so I started crawling back there a couple of times a week and leaving it out on little paper plates. That seemed to go over pretty well and I've got a lone can of tuna sitting next to me that I'll probably dole out to them in the same way. If I wanted to get some food just for that purpose, what's the best way/kind? Is there a brand that's cheap in bulk but also decent quality for any range of random cats? There are at least 2 kittens I see regularly and 5 or 6 adults I recognize. Stick with canned foot or dry and maybe put some cheapy little bowls out in the bushes for them?

I'm not the only one doing this, but somebody else just dumps canned and dry foot on the ground back there, probably from an above-ground level of the garage, and it just sits there and rots and stinks, that can't be good for them...

kw0134 posted:

Bored cat + work call == no bueno.)

Now try working from home with a tortie vying for your attention

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Puppy Galaxy
Aug 1, 2004



Litter robot is great, this thread was right all along. Thought my cat might be reluctant as I had to use different litter and I waited to set it up after I moved, but he took to it right away. Which means he truly did poo poo in my pants out of spite that one time.

Crocobile
Dec 2, 2006


Okay, that makes more sense. Honestly I think he still has rear end in a top hat kitten energy; Iím a deep sleeper but thereís been several times Iíve woken up before 5am to the sounds of him zooming around and bouncing off the walls. And thatís even after making him jump & dash for a string-toy for 30-40mins at night. Iíve lived with cats before but they were a bit older so even the playful ones got tuckered out way quicker.


When I do find him sleeping now heís usually in his pumpkin cave I got him

Crocobile fucked around with this message at 01:09 on May 1, 2021

Cretin90
Apr 10, 2006


Partner and I got a 2-3 year old rescue cat on Wednesday night and tonight was the first time weíve let him roam freely around the place. We have a 9 year old 4 pound chihuahua. Both have been behaving themselves - not staring at each other, mostly ignoring each other, basically minding their business. However... I saw some fuzz on the chihuahuas head and looked closer and there was a loving cat claw embedded in her scalp. It was definitely one of the ďshedĒ claws that is old and ready to come off. We suspect she got a little too close and he tried to ďwarningĒ bat at her head and it got stuck. He also had full length sharp claws coming from the shelter (partner has since clipped his nails a bit, he was an angel during it) which would have made it even easier for an accident like this. Weíre kind of freaking out - sheís tiny, fragile, has bulbous eyes, and a soft spot. We cleaned the site, called the vet (who said clean it but itís probably fine) and itís healing fine so weíre not worried about the scratch itself...

Iím just wondering if we should be worried going forward. Her eyes are like 30% of her head and she has a soft spot so thereís just not much room for error.

Our plan is to closely supervise them at all times for the next week or so, separate them whenever we leave or one of us wonít be here, and thatís about it. Thoughts? Heís been basically a total sweetheart and has total kiddie gloves on with us humans and has no history of fighting with other cats at the shelter.

DarkHorse
Dec 13, 2006

Vroom Vroom, BEEP BEEP!

Nap Ghost

Was it a full claw, or just a shed layer? Was there actual damage to your chihuahua's skin or was it just kind of poking out?

If it was the latter I'd be inclined to not worry about it too much as cat claws shed sideways instead of just growing longer like nails. It was just part of the outer shell that happened to stick after the cat swiped at your dog. My (admittedly larger, but still thin-skinned) dogs occasionally show up with one stuck to their snout or in their hair but it never seems to bother them, and I've personally seen it happen with just a gentle bat. It's more like a burr than a blade in those cases. If your dog isn't acting fearful or timid around the cat I wouldn't worry too much beyond continued observation.

If it's an actual full claw you should probably take the cat to the vet because that's a pretty serious loss and is probably painful for the cat.

Cretin90
Apr 10, 2006


DarkHorse posted:

Was it a full claw, or just a shed layer? Was there actual damage to your chihuahua's skin or was it just kind of poking out?

If it was the latter I'd be inclined to not worry about it too much as cat claws shed sideways instead of just growing longer like nails. It was just part of the outer shell that happened to stick after the cat swiped at your dog. My (admittedly larger, but still thin-skinned) dogs occasionally show up with one stuck to their snout or in their hair but it never seems to bother them, and I've personally seen it happen with just a gentle bat. It's more like a burr than a blade in those cases. If your dog isn't acting fearful or timid around the cat I wouldn't worry too much beyond continued observation.

If it's an actual full claw you should probably take the cat to the vet because that's a pretty serious loss and is probably painful for the cat.

Thanks for your response. We actually found it quite a bit comforting. Still worried as the dogís pretty fragile, but it really sounds like it was a total accident and wonít happen again if we keep the cats nails clipped and he uses the scratching posts more.

To answer your questions: It was a shed layer. When my partner examined his claws while clipping, all were whole and present. There was a bit of damage to the chihuahua in that it had penetrated the top layer and was bleeding slightly, but it pretty much coagulated as soon as we removed the claw. Dog is not acting fearful or timid, in fact she continues to ignore him.

Fleta Mcgurn
Oct 5, 2003

Porpoise noise continues.


Cretin90 posted:

Dog is not acting fearful or timid, in fact she continues to ignore him.

Glad your doggo is okay <3

Honestly, it does sound like she just got bopped and the shed claw stuck. If she's not scared of the cat, then either she didn't get hurt or it wasn't a big enough ouch to make her register the cat as dangerous. Also you should probably post pics of them just in case.

Fleta Mcgurn fucked around with this message at 13:07 on May 1, 2021

Cretin90
Apr 10, 2006


Fleta Mcgurn posted:

Glad your doggo is okay <3

Honestly, it does sound like she just got bopped and the shed claw stuck. If she's not scared of the cat, then either she didn't get hurt or it wasn't a big enough ouch to make her register the cat as dangerous. Also you should probably post pics of them just in case.

Thank you.

Fleta Mcgurn
Oct 5, 2003

Porpoise noise continues.


Cretin90 posted:

Thank you.



ohhh pretty babies! I love chihuahuas.

SkyeAuroline
Nov 12, 2020



I love to hear back from adopters that really go well. We had a deaf cat (who came from a really bad home situation) go home a couple weeks ago and just heard back from the adopter. Lady is putting a ton of work in to help her be comfortable, and is even managing to teach a couple of simple sign language things (mostly "food" and "down" from the sound of it). Little girl's doing great.

You love to see it.

Lady Demelza
Dec 29, 2009




Lipstick Apathy

Strawberry Pyramid posted:

What's the recommendation on timer feeders? I really need to break my cat's association with me getting up with getting her food. I remain steadfast in only feeding at 7 am on the dot every morning, but she's just gotten more determined to get her food earlier. She's started trying to claw the bed and sheets, and me ignoring her isn't detering the behavior.

I don't need wifi or a camera or whatever, and she's the only pet in the house. I just need a reliable, preferably battery operated timed solution so that she gets her vet mandated half a cup of dry food everyday independent of my lumbering out of bed.

I got a cheap, simple battery operated one with a timer clock that ticks round and spring lid. It works fine, although the first two nights the cat didn't realise food would magically happen, and I had to go and shove his nose in it at stupid o'clock in the morning. The only small issue is that he will get impatient some nights and start thumping it around, trying to get in. One day he will flip it upside down or wedge it under some furniture, and it won't be able to spring open.

Levin
Jun 28, 2005


My folks have been taking care of my cat and have essentially adopted him. They have a winterized cottage roughly 2-3 hours away from their home that they've been visiting for extended periods of time regularly. An issue they are running into is what they have dubbed "poopgate". The poor guy doesn't seem to be able to make it the length of the trip without pooping. I believe they have tried not feeding him for a period before travel but that's about it. They seem to take it in stride and have a system now for disposal/cleaning that works for them but I was wondering if there's anything they could try to help him last the trip.

Separate from that they may eventually switch to more regular back and forth between the two locations which would mean traveling every 3-4 days potentially, could this be an issue? I have made it clear that I consider the cat my responsibility and am willing to take him back if need be but they have grown quite attached to the little guy so I'd hate to do so if that's not what they want.

Levin fucked around with this message at 05:00 on May 3, 2021

durrneez
Feb 20, 2013

I like fish. I like to eat fish. I like to brush fish with a fish hairbrush. Do you like fish too?


Does the cat seem stressed out in the car? My fat cat sometimes makes a scaredy poop when heís really stressed out in the car.

If your cat seems chill during the trip, and your cat has a regular pooping schedule, would your parents be open to driving to the cabin around his normal poop schedule?

kaworu
Jul 23, 2004



Just to throw it out there, but it is perfectly feasible to get a small little travel-size litter-box for a cat to use in a car - it worked out fine for my cat, when I brought her on several cross-country car trips. It's not exactly ideal, but it was far from inconvenient and worked more or less perfectly for everyone involved. Generally speaking if a cat can use a litter box (even in a car) they will, at least in my experience.

Chief McHeath
Apr 23, 2002



kaworu posted:

Just to throw it out there, but it is perfectly feasible to get a small little travel-size litter-box for a cat to use in a car - it worked out fine for my cat, when I brought her on several cross-country car trips. It's not exactly ideal, but it was far from inconvenient and worked more or less perfectly for everyone involved. Generally speaking if a cat can use a litter box (even in a car) they will, at least in my experience.

I used one of these a few years ago when I moved 9 or 10 hours with my cat. She was on some sedatives the vet gave me, and in her carrier for the most of the trip, but she did use it whenever we stopped.

I hate that I gave her that sedative though, half an hour after I gave her half the recommended dose she was weaving in her stride, then when we were in the car she gave me a "hey you there" mew every 30 minutes.

If I'd known, and seen then how well CBD worked to help pets with stress, Boogie would've got da hemp instead of da drugs.

Bollock Monkey
Jan 21, 2007

The Almighty


Lady Demelza posted:

I got a cheap, simple battery operated one with a timer clock that ticks round and spring lid. It works fine, although the first two nights the cat didn't realise food would magically happen, and I had to go and shove his nose in it at stupid o'clock in the morning. The only small issue is that he will get impatient some nights and start thumping it around, trying to get in. One day he will flip it upside down or wedge it under some furniture, and it won't be able to spring open.

Wednesday used to beat the poo poo out of her timer feeder and yes, on more than one occasion batted it into such a position that it wouldn't open. Damnit cats, just trust that you will not starve!

explosivo
May 23, 2004

Fueled by Satan

Taking our rear end in a top hat Leela to the vet tomorrow, after having her janky teeth removed she was doing so much better temperament-wise but we had a couple incidents this weekend where she attacked my GF again. The second time she literally took a running jump at her, fortunately my GF was wearing jeans and a long sleeved shirt at the time so she only had some minor scratches/bite marks by the time she shook her off and I could come in to run interference but we still went to Urgent Care for antibiotics to be safe. We want to see if she's got other bad teeth maybe that are still causing her pain, the doc said he was pretty confident that at some point all of the rest of her teeth may need to be taken out because of how bad it was so maybe it's gotten aggressively worse since then. I don't know.

I'm sad. Really really sad. We cried a bit after it happened because it feels like something is wrong or something happened to her before we adopted her to make her this way but I don't know if it's something we did. She's so on edge all the time that any time I hear my GF or anything in the house make a slightly louder noise that might set her off I get tense and anxious, just waiting for the next thing to happen. I take precautions to avoid situations where she'd get spooked, any time I'm doing something loud like changing out the laundry or filling up the litter box again I make sure to close the door so I'm in the room by myself. We've been nothing but loving to her since getting her as a kitten and I have no idea why she is the way she is. Fortunately she never attacks Finn, and after every incident she comes out of it like a fugue state and becomes all friendly and cuddly within minutes of calming down as if nothing happened. She's on medication but knows when we're trying to dose her food so she just stops eating if she spots it, I think I need to ask about a liquid form of it and we'll just have to squirt it in her mouth every day instead of hoping she doesn't see the broken up bits of medicine in her food.

It's probably stupid but I almost hope at this point that he does find more teeth problems, because at least that would mean we know the reason for it. And considering how kind and lovey-dovey she was after the last surgery she had it makes me think it's not out of the realm of possibility.

Levin
Jun 28, 2005


durrneez posted:

Does the cat seem stressed out in the car? My fat cat sometimes makes a scaredy poop when heís really stressed out in the car.

If your cat seems chill during the trip, and your cat has a regular pooping schedule, would your parents be open to driving to the cabin around his normal poop schedule?

They did acknowledge that stressed cats will poop as a response. He can definitely be a bit skittish, he seems hyperaware of any changes that may indicate him having to travel, even little things like my folks putting on their coats or packing up. He's a rescue and I don't know if he was on the streets his whole life before being picked up or if he previously had a home. I don't think they'd know his poop schedule but I can suggest they try figuring it out and planning accordingly!

kaworu posted:

Just to throw it out there, but it is perfectly feasible to get a small little travel-size litter-box for a cat to use in a car - it worked out fine for my cat, when I brought her on several cross-country car trips. It's not exactly ideal, but it was far from inconvenient and worked more or less perfectly for everyone involved. Generally speaking if a cat can use a litter box (even in a car) they will, at least in my experience.

This is good to know thanks! Just to clarify would you keep her in a carrier then let her out to use the travel litter box or was she freely roaming inside the vehicle?

Chief McHeath posted:

I used one of these a few years ago when I moved 9 or 10 hours with my cat. She was on some sedatives the vet gave me, and in her carrier for the most of the trip, but she did use it whenever we stopped.

I hate that I gave her that sedative though, half an hour after I gave her half the recommended dose she was weaving in her stride, then when we were in the car she gave me a "hey you there" mew every 30 minutes.

If I'd known, and seen then how well CBD worked to help pets with stress, Boogie would've got da hemp instead of da drugs.

I would hope medicating isn't necessary, especially given the frequency of the trips but are there CBD products specifically designed to help calm animals or cats specifically?

kw0134
Apr 19, 2003



If he's that sensitive, I feel your parents are doing him a disservice by moving him so much. If it's only on the trip itself, a larger crate with a big blanket for a cover with the litterbox could be enough, but if he's anxious at the cottage too then that seems problematic.

explosivo
May 23, 2004

Fueled by Satan

explosivo posted:

Taking our rear end in a top hat Leela to the vet tomorrow,

Just got back and it's nothing good. Teeth seem fine so no pain, she's just aggressive. She hasn't been eating her meds so we're switching to liquid so I can mix it in better, and if she still doesn't eat it just syringe it into her mouth. The doctor said outright that if she was a dog she probably wouldn't be with us anymore which kind of caused us both to break down because we knew this was the ultimate outcome of a cat like this but really didn't want to talk about putting her down. Hopefully this new medication helps.

Antivehicular
Dec 30, 2011

I wanna sing one for the cars
That are right now headed silent down the highway
And it's dark and there is nobody driving
And something has got to give


You might want to look into psychiatric medication for your cat if it looks like the aggressiveness is purely psychological. Cat SSRIs and Valium are a thing and can help.

If there are compounding pharmacies in your area, you can also look into alternate formulations of drugs that can be easier to administer. Our friends who have a cat on Valium get it as a cream they can rub into her ears, which by all accounts is much easier than oral dosing.

Boogalo
Jul 8, 2012

Meep Meep






Have you ruled out new cats outside? A new idiot spraying everywhere can set some cats off, even just seeing an intruder can be the trigger and then its misdirected aggression city.

explosivo
May 23, 2004

Fueled by Satan

Antivehicular posted:

You might want to look into psychiatric medication for your cat if it looks like the aggressiveness is purely psychological. Cat SSRIs and Valium are a thing and can help.

If there are compounding pharmacies in your area, you can also look into alternate formulations of drugs that can be easier to administer. Our friends who have a cat on Valium get it as a cream they can rub into her ears, which by all accounts is much easier than oral dosing.

Yeah we have her on medication now but have gone through a few different versions of it because she won't take pills and is a picky eater. We got a version of it that is put into a soft treat that tastes like chicken so we could mix it in her food but any foreign substance in her food makes her stop eating so unless I break it up small enough and mix it in thoroughly enough she will see a fleck of it and stop eating. We're changing to a liquid, I think it'll be easier to administer this way. Plus probably easier to change dosage if it comes to it.

Boogalo posted:

Have you ruled out new cats outside? A new idiot spraying everywhere can set some cats off, even just seeing an intruder can be the trigger and then its misdirected aggression city.

We do have a very old neighbor whose cat gets trapped outside of her apartment occasionally. We live in an apartment complex so this means there's a pissed off cat sitting in a hallway outside of this lady's door until she opens it again. The thought had crossed my mind that it may be related to this but the thing is she's had incidents like this before we moved here so it's not like it's necessarily out of the blue. We've kind of been trying to manage this behavior since she was ~6 months to a year old when the first incident happened. We're trying to work with our leasing office to get them to do something about it but they don't want to evict an old woman who doesn't have all her marbles so they keep making excuses for the lady. Definitely something to consider though and I do appreciate you mentioning it.

Quills
Mar 24, 2007


explosivo posted:

Yeah we have her on medication now but have gone through a few different versions of it because she won't take pills and is a picky eater. We got a version of it that is put into a soft treat that tastes like chicken so we could mix it in her food but any foreign substance in her food makes her stop eating so unless I break it up small enough and mix it in thoroughly enough she will see a fleck of it and stop eating. We're changing to a liquid, I think it'll be easier to administer this way. Plus probably easier to change dosage if it comes to it.

Our cat was awful about taking her Xanax until I started hiding it in this disgusting Inaba Churu scallop paste and letting her eat it out of my hand. The flavor of the paste hides the bitterness and more often then not she slurps it down. The hand feeding is the most humiliating thing I do as a cat owner but it keeps her sane.

explosivo
May 23, 2004

Fueled by Satan

Quills posted:

Our cat was awful about taking her Xanax until I started hiding it in this disgusting Inaba Churu scallop paste and letting her eat it out of my hand. The flavor of the paste hides the bitterness and more often then not she slurps it down. The hand feeding is the most humiliating thing I do as a cat owner but it keeps her sane.

Much appreciated, I'll keep this in mind.

Space Jam
Jul 22, 2008



So I think my girlfriends cat has feline hyperesthesia. A week or so ago she began intensely screaming/hissing at her own tail then would be completely fine afterward. She doesnít have any injuries thankfully. She doesnít seem to be chewing or biting herself, no external injuries. Sheís the most loving and affectionate cat Iíve ever seen, which made this so much weirder. Weíre taking her to the vet, but I was curious if anyone else here had any experiences dealing with feline hyperesthesia? It breaks my heart.

DarkHorse
Dec 13, 2006

Vroom Vroom, BEEP BEEP!

Nap Ghost

Space Jam posted:

So I think my girlfriends cat has feline hyperesthesia. A week or so ago she began intensely screaming/hissing at her own tail then would be completely fine afterward. She doesnít have any injuries thankfully. She doesnít seem to be chewing or biting herself, no external injuries. Sheís the most loving and affectionate cat Iíve ever seen, which made this so much weirder. Weíre taking her to the vet, but I was curious if anyone else here had any experiences dealing with feline hyperesthesia? It breaks my heart.

Cat head-brain mad at cat butt-brain. Is cat.

(Sorry she's dealing with this, hope you get it figured out. This is just what we say with our cat who likes to stalk and pounce on her own tail and is mystified why it hurts when she catches it)

Levin
Jun 28, 2005


kw0134 posted:

If he's that sensitive, I feel your parents are doing him a disservice by moving him so much. If it's only on the trip itself, a larger crate with a big blanket for a cover with the litterbox could be enough, but if he's anxious at the cottage too then that seems problematic.

Well in their defense I'm the one doing Hemingway a disservice since I handed him off to my parents. Currently they are traveling roughly every 2 weeks, I'm told he does fine once he's in the car and settles into being either at home or the cottage pretty quickly. He is extremely affectionate with them both and sleeps with them at night. To be fair they did start buying his affection by giving him the leftover milk from their cereal bowls in the morning. They've paid for that though with early morning wakeup calls on the weekends when they want to sleep in.

I have advised them that if they switch to travelling back and forth more often, say every 3-4 days that it might be too much for him. I have offered to take him back should that be the case though I know they'd hate to have to let him go. The only alternative would be to leave him alone at one place or the other which and I don't know that they have anyone they can rely on to come give him attention regularly on a consistent basis while they are away.

Quills
Mar 24, 2007


explosivo posted:

Much appreciated, I'll keep this in mind.

They have a variety of flavors to try, I know Target stocks some around me but Chewy also sells in bulk. Hope it works!

my cat is norris
Mar 11, 2010

#onecallcat




Space Jam posted:

So I think my girlfriends cat has feline hyperesthesia. A week or so ago she began intensely screaming/hissing at her own tail then would be completely fine afterward. She doesnít have any injuries thankfully. She doesnít seem to be chewing or biting herself, no external injuries. Sheís the most loving and affectionate cat Iíve ever seen, which made this so much weirder. Weíre taking her to the vet, but I was curious if anyone else here had any experiences dealing with feline hyperesthesia? It breaks my heart.

A friend of mine has a bengal cat with this problem. Plenty of play time drastically reduced the effects. This included providing an automated toy he could chase around (he could turn it on by himself), an exercise wheel, and outdoor walks. While those options may not work for your particular cat, exercise and play time can really help, so I urge you to find a method that'll work for your kitty!

Edit: I think he was on anti-anxiety meds until they got a routine down.

Duckman2008
Jan 6, 2010

TFW you see Flyers goaltending.

Grimey Drawer

So we have a cat issue we are trying to figure out a solution to.

We have 3 cats, 2 that are 11 and 10.5 years, one that is 2-3 ish.

This issue Iím pretty sure is with the 11 year old cat, since itís been happening off and on since before we got the newer cat, and he has way more personality than the 10.5 year old.


Long story short, despite having clean litter boxes, one the cats, likely the 11 year old, occasionally decides theyíre gonna pee on something. Specifically, it tends to be a box of stuff we have lying around , or sometimes on the floor around the litter box. Itís not every day or week, but def every few months to a few times a year.

So if we have a box on the ground, or maybe a bag of clothes, sometimes he pees on it.

We are not perfect, but we have 3 litter boxes for 3 cats.


I legit think he does it when heís mad at us, or maybe stressed. We donít let them in our bedroom at all (partially for this reason), so Iím wondering if they get upset , or whatever.


So , is there anything we can do to break this habit ? Obviously not leaving stuff on the ground , but we just moved so yeah, thatís still a bit difficult.

Weíve gotten feel away and calming collars before when the two cats were fighting (the 11 year old and 3 year old donít quite get along), and it seemed to help there temporarily , but yeah, looking for any help people would have on getting cats to just not pee where they want to.

And cats are all neutered and up to date with the vet for the record.

Hello Sailor
May 3, 2006

we're all mad here


Does "up to date with the vet" mean you've taken your cat to the vet to look into this specific issue? I had a cat that started finding other places besides the litterbox to pee because they'd developed diabetes.

Duckman2008
Jan 6, 2010

TFW you see Flyers goaltending.

Grimey Drawer

Hello Sailor posted:

Does "up to date with the vet" mean you've taken your cat to the vet to look into this specific issue? I had a cat that started finding other places besides the litterbox to pee because they'd developed diabetes.

Well, this same cat years ago had urinate blockages (yeah I know I probably should have thought to mention that). They checked his blood work back in December on his annual checkup , no issues there. That cat specially we do a blood check every checkup.

Chief McHeath
Apr 23, 2002



Levin posted:

I would hope medicating isn't necessary, especially given the frequency of the trips but are there CBD products specifically designed to help calm animals or cats specifically?

There are, some are in a typical CBD oil form, some are infused into treats. Just make sure whatever you're purchasing has third party ISO certified lab results available that test for contaminants and cannabis content.

I don't have any direct experience with cats and CBD, but did spend some time working at a dog boarding and daycare facility, and I've seen CBD oils work for different anxieties (boarding, storm, separation). That was actually my first exposure to CBD on whole.

A couple of anecdotal illustrations, I remember one dog, I've forgotten her name by now, who had real bad storm anxiety, bad panting, whining, pacing, she was sent with CBD specifically to give her when a storm was coming. A blanket and someone sitting in her kennel with her wasn't enough to keep her from panting and quivering, but a little bit of CBD oil and a blanket, she would still be uncomfortable, but the physical manifestations of her stress just kind of went away, she'd wrap herself in her blanket and let it ride.

Then there was Floppy, who made us institute the "Floppy Rules." At home, she was apparently the most docile, calm, sleep at the foot of your bed type dog, but when she was boarding with us, the separation and boarding anxiety was extreme. We'd open the door to the kennels, turn the lights on, and she'd immediately start violently spinning in circles in her run with no concern that she was running into the walls and bloodying herself, and she'd go into these fits multiple times per day. Her mom and dad got on board with CBD and started sending it with her. The Floppy Rules were we'd open the door and turn on the lights, one person would get a lead and take Floppy out to the yards, another would get her CBD oil ready, meet Floppy outside and administer it. Once we instituted the Floppy Rules, she'd start her AM panic, but we took care of her and she'd be fine the rest of the day.

Sorry for the dog derail in the catte thread, but I'd imagine in cats you'd see a similar calming, but not sedative effect when using CBD products.

Kitfox88
Aug 20, 2007





loving hell if it can help dogs that much maybe I should try it

Joburg
May 19, 2013



Fun Shoe


Youíll need to take your cat to the vet to rule out an infection and diabetes. The usual reason for peeing outside the litter box is pain.

Years ago I had a cat that would do this, sometimes she had an infection but sometimes not. She was declawed (before we got her) and she had arthritis by then so she probably had pain day to day. The thing that fixed the problem was putting her on buprenophine. Whatever pain she was having was managed and she always used the litter box after we started medicating her. (And I canít tell you how glad I was to not have her peeing on the couch anymore!)

If thereís no underlying reason your vet can find for the peeing, see if they will try a course of pain reliever to see if that works for your cat.

DarkHorse
Dec 13, 2006

Vroom Vroom, BEEP BEEP!

Nap Ghost

Just laughed my rear end off at my fierce battle-cat launching herself into a dogfight between my 40 lb mutt and a 55 lb sled dog we're dog sitting (everyone is fine no damage done, they startle each other occasionally)

This is not the first time she's done it. She comes out from wherever she is upstairs and launches into the middle of a fight and sometimes comes away with fluff. The dogs ignore her because she's a fraction of their size. Its bizarre, I've never heard of a cat wanting to join a fight like that.

I love my fierce, constantly angry-looking warrior who doesn't ever back down, even against things five times her size. The only thing she likes is people, she plots murder for every other animal.

dirby
Sep 21, 2004


My cat takes Methimazole for hyperthyroidism, and the vet's bloodwork suggests it's working fine (so the vet confirmed they'd be comfortable with him continuing the current dose for ~6 months until the next blood check). Do I need to get the Methimazole (or a prescription?) from my vet? It seems like I can just buy a bunch to be delivered by Petco which seems easier, but some sites suggest I need a prescription.

I already asked the vet's office and they kinda dodged the question once, so I'm wondering if they just didn't want to lose my business.
Edit: I checked with Petco and it seems they call the vet for approval. I then confirmed with the vet that that should work fine. Thanks for letting me work through this.

dirby fucked around with this message at 17:17 on May 10, 2021

explosivo
May 23, 2004

Fueled by Satan

Lol that's the same poo poo I took when I had hyperthyroidism as a teen. I guess a thyroid is a thyroid is a thyroid?

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durrneez
Feb 20, 2013

I like fish. I like to eat fish. I like to brush fish with a fish hairbrush. Do you like fish too?


im thinking of getting an Aivituvin Outdoor Cat House Indoor Cat Cages Enclosures on Wheels,Large Kitten playpen 70.9" Upgraded with Resting Box,Waterproof Roof

has anyone had one of these, or similar? im curious about the quality and if it will withstand a winter with below freezing temps.
i was thinking of buying some netting and installing it on the rails on our apartmentís patio but that would block the community catsí access to the heated water bowl in the winter. plus with a fully enclosed space, i wouldnt have to worry about my cats jumping over the patio rails.

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