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YggiDee
Sep 12, 2007




Fallen Rib

There's another ADHD thread in E/N.

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Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


This one better one because you can't edit in E/N which isn't exactly ideal for ADHD discussion

AtomikKrab
Jul 17, 2010

Keep on GOP rolling rolling rolling rolling.


As a question I'd like to ask. Do any of you all experience daytime sleepiness? IE: Not tired, but not doing anything or moving and just... sorta pass out and can't stop it? I would like to get other people's takes on it.



I used to get it while driving but that stopped once I figured out I have sleep apnea (hooray hosed up airways.) and got that treated so I actually get rest now.

I still get it during work meetings when nothing interesting is happening. Luckily I work in mental healthcare as my primary job so that my co-workers are understanding. However even though I'm basically asleep and my eyes are closed, I can still answer questions if asked and fully remember the conversation during the meeting.


I will note I do not currently take medications due to getting severe side effects.

Laserface
Dec 24, 2004

THERE IS NO PLANET B


Yes. Medication stops it.

Mechafunkzilla
Sep 11, 2006

If you want a vision of the future...


AtomikKrab posted:

As a question I'd like to ask. Do any of you all experience daytime sleepiness? IE: Not tired, but not doing anything or moving and just... sorta pass out and can't stop it? I would like to get other people's takes on it.



I used to get it while driving but that stopped once I figured out I have sleep apnea (hooray hosed up airways.) and got that treated so I actually get rest now.

I still get it during work meetings when nothing interesting is happening. Luckily I work in mental healthcare as my primary job so that my co-workers are understanding. However even though I'm basically asleep and my eyes are closed, I can still answer questions if asked and fully remember the conversation during the meeting.


I will note I do not currently take medications due to getting severe side effects.

I do, it's partly just a part of ADHD pathology and for me partly a comorbid sleep disorder. Stimulant meds help a lot.

Turpitude II
Nov 10, 2014


what kind of symptoms do meds treat, and what do they not? it sounds like alertness, concentration, etc. are positively effected. do they do anything for memory? emotional dysregulation?

Angry Diplomat
Nov 6, 2009

Winner of the TSR Memorial Award for Excellence In Grogging

Turpitude II posted:

what kind of symptoms do meds treat, and what do they not? it sounds like alertness, concentration, etc. are positively effected. do they do anything for memory? emotional dysregulation?

Yes and yes, though YMMV as always. Depends on the medication, too, and a lot of the emotional stuff has to do with the relief and validation of finally feeling like you have any kind of conscious control over your poo poo brain.

Eediot Jedi
Dec 25, 2007

This is where I begin to speculate what being a
man of my word costs me



Depends on the person and the meds. For me, alertness, concentration definitely. Memory yes but lack of sleep kills this very quickly. When I first started stimulants, I found that I was tracking passing time much better. I didn't need to set reminders while cooking, my brain would just send up a flag that it's been X time, and it was accurate, but that disappeared over time. Still better than unmedicated.

When I started meds it cut through procrastination insanely well, it was so easy to do things, but that's faded as well. Currently fighting with my psychiatrist, I want to try other medications, they believe it's psychological.

Emotional dysfunction yeah incredible benefits. Emotions aren't as sudden, or as overwhelmingly compelling. I'm not blunt, things still hurt, still give me joy etc, but I have little insulation. Sometimes I can leverage that to do CBT style stuff to change my actions. Before it was like a lightning bolt and the chance of successfully intervening was minuscule.

AtomikKrab
Jul 17, 2010

Keep on GOP rolling rolling rolling rolling.


Biggest thing the medications did for me was allow me to respond in timely manner to people speaking to me when I am focused on a task outside of "speaking with people"

Eediot Jedi
Dec 25, 2007

This is where I begin to speculate what being a
man of my word costs me



Knobb Manwich posted:

I'm on concerta and I had noticed I was sometimes struggling after lunch more than I used to. I did not connect that to the soft drink habit I'd developed. More testing is needed.

Re soft drink and extended release meds, concerta in particular. Since I stopped getting a coke with lunch the afternoon struggle at work hasn't been as bad. I think it also carries into a better evening too. It's not empirical proof but it's enough for me to stick to water.

Laserface
Dec 24, 2004

THERE IS NO PLANET B


Ritalin was way more effective for memory retention (short term) than dexamp is, but ritalin has a lovely body load for me that makes it uncomfortable to use regularly.


also, while ritalin was pushing me to get poo poo done, it was doing it in the worst way. it was 'hey do this now or you'll lose your job and you will be homeless and die' whereas dexamp just turns off the 'little' distractions that break my train of thought and get me looking to do something else.

Corte
Jun 28, 2005


Regarding ingesting Vitamin C within an hour of taking your meds, does this apply to Dexedrine? I have been taking my morning dose with my vitamins and other meds but haven't noticed a significant difference compared to my afternoon dose. That said I have a hard time to identifying and separating out such issues.

Arcsech
Aug 5, 2008


Similar question: any foods/drinks I should be avoiding with Strattera/atomoxetine? I havenít found anything yet but figured Iíd ask.

Other than alcohol, which is the only one my doc told me about.

Freudian
Mar 23, 2011

God Can't Hate Forever



Arcsech posted:

Similar question: any foods/drinks I should be avoiding with Strattera/atomoxetine? I havenít found anything yet but figured Iíd ask.

Other than alcohol, which is the only one my doc told me about.

Grapefruit - messes with a lot of medications, since it blocks the enzyme that breaks them down.

Arcsech
Aug 5, 2008


Freudian posted:

Grapefruit - messes with a lot of medications, since it blocks the enzyme that breaks them down.

If that's it, then great! Grapefruit is a disgusting, awful fruit anyway.

Lemony
Jul 27, 2010

Now With Fresh Citrus Scent!


AtomikKrab posted:

As a question I'd like to ask. Do any of you all experience daytime sleepiness? IE: Not tired, but not doing anything or moving and just... sorta pass out and can't stop it? I would like to get other people's takes on it.



I used to get it while driving but that stopped once I figured out I have sleep apnea (hooray hosed up airways.) and got that treated so I actually get rest now.

I still get it during work meetings when nothing interesting is happening. Luckily I work in mental healthcare as my primary job so that my co-workers are understanding. However even though I'm basically asleep and my eyes are closed, I can still answer questions if asked and fully remember the conversation during the meeting.


I will note I do not currently take medications due to getting severe side effects.

Huh, that's interesting. I used to pass out in class in high school and university. It would happen even when I was interested in the lecture topic and when I wasn't feeling particularly tired. I'd be able to wake up and be at 100% basically instantly when there was stimuli, such as someone saying my name. When that would happen I would generally remember the last minute or two prior to waking.

I always blamed poor sleep habits and probable low blood sugar from not eating lunch. Now that I've been diagnosed with ADHD, that might be an alternate explanation.
I also now suspect that the undiagnosed ADHD caused my poor sleep habits. I hated lying in bed staring at the ceiling with my brain racing through anxiety states. So I got in the habit of staying awake until I was tired enough to sleep as soon as my head hit the pillow.

Mechafunkzilla
Sep 11, 2006

If you want a vision of the future...


ADHD fucks with sleep in a lot of ways. Your prefrontal cortex (the part of the brain that is developmentally impaired with ADHD) is what regulates your day-night cycle, so that can cause issues, but there's also some research that suggests the ADHD brain is susceptible to something called "theta wave intrusion" when understimulated, which is that "ok you're going to sleep RIGHT NOW" feeling that a lot of us experience. I think this article does a decent job laying out some of the connections between ADHD and disruptive sleep: https://www.additudemag.com/adhd-sleep-disturbances-symptoms/

YggiDee
Sep 12, 2007




Fallen Rib

Anyone here use weighted blankets? I've been looking into them because my ideal sleeping formation is "being smooshed under the layers of my bedding" and a weighted blanket seems like the obvious solution. Anyone else feel this way? Is this an ADHD thing or a Me thing?

Edit: I don't think I have an unusual level of sleepiness but I'm prone to staying up late reading and when I was younger I could fall asleep under literally any circumstance when I was tired. Like when I was getting my braces installed.

Canadian Bakin
Nov 6, 2011

Retaliate first.


Arcsech posted:

Grapefruit is a disgusting, awful fruit anyway.

On behalf of grapefruit, I challenge you to a duel. Pistols at 50 paces, sir! Pick your time.

More seriously: I made the decision to step down from my managerial duties and revert back to my old job of being a baker after roughly 2.5 weeks of constant stress and a really loving bad reaction to 54mg of Concerta. I had the Bad side effects. 36mg does alright for me so my doctor agreed to keep me on that dose, even though he's disappointed that I haven't seen a miraculous improvement. It's a bit easier for me to drag my focus back to where it needs to be when doing mind numbing tasks, but that's about it. However, if the lower dosage allows me to keep myself on track more often without suicidal thoughts, I'm pretty drat okay with this.
It's been 3 weeks and while I regret the loss of pay, I have no regrets about reducing my stress and moving back to something that allows me to function. If I really wanted to be a dick I could probably get work into trouble over refusing to accommodate my request of having a scheduled paperwork day for better focus, but that seems like more effort than it's worth. In the end, I am less stressed out which means more cheer, more positive thoughts, more overall health improvements and the ability to better take the time to figure out this whole ADHD brain thing.

The sleep chat is fascinating to me as I had never made the connection with being a so called night owl with my brain functioning differently than other peoples, mostly because I associated it with my mother's behaviors(protentional bi-polar, confirmed clinical depression). My father, the parent who for sure has ADHD, has always had a good sleep schedule so it just didn't click. But the whole period of work BS clued me in to the fact that left to my own devices, my ideal day starts at roughly 10am and ends at around 12pm/1am.
I've thought about getting a weighted blanket but the price makes me hesitate and I question if it'll actually be effective or even comfortable and I just go back to layering my blankets again.

And oh look, it's almost noon and I haven't eaten yet. I'm gonna go fix that. But at least I remembered my Concerta!


Edited for typo!

Canadian Bakin fucked around with this message at 18:31 on Oct 29, 2020

Laserface
Dec 24, 2004

THERE IS NO PLANET B


I saw a video on instagram that said Potassium and protein rich foods can help amphetamines stay in your system longer

it was a tongue in cheek video telling people who take dexamphetamine recreationally how to get the most out of their drugs but the science is sound.

https://prescriptionhope.com/blog-how-to-make-adderall-last-longer-and-stronger-a-guide/

video appears to be gone now. either way, hes talented and funny and does some self-help videos with topics that most ADHD patients can relate to, so check out his channel anyway https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c?struthless?

AtomikKrab
Jul 17, 2010

Keep on GOP rolling rolling rolling rolling.


YggiDee posted:

Anyone here use weighted blankets? I've been looking into them because my ideal sleeping formation is "being smooshed under the layers of my bedding" and a weighted blanket seems like the obvious solution. Anyone else feel this way? Is this an ADHD thing or a Me thing?

Edit: I don't think I have an unusual level of sleepiness but I'm prone to staying up late reading and when I was younger I could fall asleep under literally any circumstance when I was tired. Like when I was getting my braces installed.

Weighted Blankets are nice, they help. I also enjoy layers because it does help with reducing the STAYING AWAKE.

I am on CPAP due to sleep apnea these days and I find the pressure of the mask helps me fall asleep faster.

The ANY circumstances if tired is 100% a thing with me as well. I can fall asleep at a traffic light if I don't have enough sleep.

Also if you are tired all the drat time, get a sleep study conducted please. It can really help you out both physically and even reduce symptoms if you can fix your sleep up. Yes you may end up wearing a silly mask, the good sleep is well worth it.

AtomikKrab fucked around with this message at 05:34 on Nov 1, 2020

Dr. Red Ranger
Nov 9, 2011



Nap Ghost

Does anyone with a diagnosis have experience trying to learn languages? I loved learning them when I was younger. I took Spanish in high school, French in college, and enjoyed it greatly, but its all well past gone now. I've spent the last three years trying to learn Japanese, and it's become the same frustrating experience everything else has since I was about ~24 or so. Nothing sticks, ever. It's like my brain is actively resisting new information and even then things I want to do slide off a thick teflon coating of irrepressible compulsive daydreaming and poor memory. I try to listen to training podcasts while I run and drive to work, and I can feel my mind resisting the entire time. This sucks, and It causes my anxiety and depression to spin up harder because I ~want~ to do this; traveling and working in other countries has been a dream of mine since undergrad, and now that I'm 34 in a dead end career it feels like I'll never make it unless something fundamentally changes in my brain chemistry.

Mechafunkzilla
Sep 11, 2006

If you want a vision of the future...


Dr. Red Ranger posted:

Does anyone with a diagnosis have experience trying to learn languages? I loved learning them when I was younger. I took Spanish in high school, French in college, and enjoyed it greatly, but its all well past gone now. I've spent the last three years trying to learn Japanese, and it's become the same frustrating experience everything else has since I was about ~24 or so. Nothing sticks, ever. It's like my brain is actively resisting new information and even then things I want to do slide off a thick teflon coating of irrepressible compulsive daydreaming and poor memory. I try to listen to training podcasts while I run and drive to work, and I can feel my mind resisting the entire time. This sucks, and It causes my anxiety and depression to spin up harder because I ~want~ to do this; traveling and working in other countries has been a dream of mine since undergrad, and now that I'm 34 in a dead end career it feels like I'll never make it unless something fundamentally changes in my brain chemistry.

Yeah, I studied Spanish and Mandarin through high school and college and it was always an absolute disaster, even worse than other subjects

Dr. Red Ranger
Nov 9, 2011



Nap Ghost

Mechafunkzilla posted:

Yeah, I studied Spanish and Mandarin through high school and college and it was always an absolute disaster, even worse than other subjects

Well, drat. I strongly suspect that somewhere along the line an underlying ADD diagnosis worsened, or I became unable to cope with it. The performance anxiety and depression are likely comorbid to it then. It's easy enough to mask in a retail pharmacy because everything is chaotic and you're constantly interrupted anyway, but now that I've been part time for so long the symptoms are more obvious. Time to find a clinician and get an evaluation.

Edit: I suppose I should have guessed after so many years of "lol I just can't learn from textbooks, they never help", but you know, pride and social stigma

Dr. Red Ranger fucked around with this message at 19:04 on Nov 4, 2020

Hipster_Doofus
Dec 20, 2003

Lovin' every minute of it.

I started learning Spanish via the Pimsleur program and was doing pretty well at it, despite doing it accompanied by a half liter or more of vodka every night. It was great fun actually and as I learned I came to really love Spanish. It's so much more sensible than English ever was or could be. Like, its rules are actually rules and are very rarely broken.

Said vodka was also my undoing and I ended up homeless for a while, then landed in public housing, where I still am, and I'm still picking up the pieces. Looking forward to picking up where I left off.

Yakiniku Teishoku
Mar 16, 2011

Peace On Egg


Sure, I have a language degree. Iíve studied like 8 languages but only one of them stuck. The structure of school kept me going long enough to reach basic fundamentals, but having hobbies I could hyperfixate on and people I needed to communicate with is what got me the rest of the way.

I think the structure of lessons was really vital for me, but Iím poor at studying, so I needed to find ways to additionally incorporate my language study into my regular life with TV, music, calls with friends, immersion, etc. So if for example I wanted to start learning Portuguese tomorrow, Iíd probably get a book and a lesson, but Iíd also be browsing for popular TV shows and asking my Brazilian friends to practice with me (until I was then comfortable enough to practice with strangers online etc, then local speakers, reading materials etc.)

All of this is less objectively productive on its own than traditional lessons, but itís infinitely more productive to an easily distracted brain to maintain and improve proficiency slowly once you got the basics from lessons.

knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.

Dr. Red Ranger posted:

Does anyone with a diagnosis have experience trying to learn languages? I loved learning them when I was younger. I took Spanish in high school, French in college, and enjoyed it greatly, but its all well past gone now. I've spent the last three years trying to learn Japanese, and it's become the same frustrating experience everything else has since I was about ~24 or so. Nothing sticks, ever. It's like my brain is actively resisting new information and even then things I want to do slide off a thick teflon coating of irrepressible compulsive daydreaming and poor memory. I try to listen to training podcasts while I run and drive to work, and I can feel my mind resisting the entire time. This sucks, and It causes my anxiety and depression to spin up harder because I ~want~ to do this; traveling and working in other countries has been a dream of mine since undergrad, and now that I'm 34 in a dead end career it feels like I'll never make it unless something fundamentally changes in my brain chemistry.

I was good at languages at school and learned French and German without putting in any effort. It's way harder 30 years later. I've moved to French-speaking Switzerland and while my French has improved it's been pretty slow and a bit frustrating. Early this year I did do a basic teaching course in French (kids ski instructor) and I passed but it was pretty hard.

Worth bearing in mind that pretty much everyone describes this getting harder with age, though there are some annoying people who just seem to absorb new languages aged 40+.

Tias
May 25, 2008

Deyr fe,
deyja fraendr,
deyr sjalfr it sama,
ek veit einn,
at aldrei deyr:
domr um daudan hvern.


Forgot the final review of the apartment I moved out of, because I forgot to put it in my calendar. Now I'm probably an extra 3200 USD (equivalent) in hock

Normally I'm kind to myself and recognize that I'm getter better at this all the time, but at this point I'm just worn out. How do you all deal with making the same, costly, mistakes over and over again?

Mechafunkzilla
Sep 11, 2006

If you want a vision of the future...


Tias posted:

Forgot the final review of the apartment I moved out of, because I forgot to put it in my calendar. Now I'm probably an extra 3200 USD (equivalent) in hock

Normally I'm kind to myself and recognize that I'm getter better at this all the time, but at this point I'm just worn out. How do you all deal with making the same, costly, mistakes over and over again?

I really work hard to implement systems that help me make sure I'm not making the same costly mistakes over and over -- and a lot of that means enlisting the help of other people who can help me maintain structures and cover my blind spots -- family, friends, coworkers, therapist, etc.

durrneez
Feb 20, 2013

I like fish. I like to eat fish. I like to brush fish with a fish hairbrush. Do you like fish too?


YggiDee posted:

Anyone here use weighted blankets? I've been looking into them because my ideal sleeping formation is "being smooshed under the layers of my bedding" and a weighted blanket seems like the obvious solution. Anyone else feel this way? Is this an ADHD thing or a Me thing?

Edit: I don't think I have an unusual level of sleepiness but I'm prone to staying up late reading and when I was younger I could fall asleep under literally any circumstance when I was tired. Like when I was getting my braces installed.

I have one! I love it! I wish it was heavier! I feel similarly that being smooshed by layers is an ideal sleeping setup.

I feel so comforted under the lead vest at the dentistís so if you like that feeling, youíd probably like a weighted blanket.

Your braces anecdote is funnyóI fell asleep getting mine removed.

coolusername
Aug 23, 2011

cooltitletext


Does anyone here have books to recommend regarding living with adult ADHD? Especially ones with organisational solutions and cleaning tips?

mfcrocker
Jan 31, 2004





Hot Rope Guy

coolusername posted:

Does anyone here have books to recommend regarding living with adult ADHD? Especially ones with organisational solutions and cleaning tips?

Organising Solutions for People with ADHD by Susan Pinksy.

The tldr is that minimalism is really important in your house rather than some fad; you actively need every act of tidying up to be measurable in seconds or a few minutes and to remove as many barriers as possible. The book is cheap and well worth it though

Crosby B. Alfred
May 20, 2006
Probation
Can't post for 30 hours!


Is there a good ADHD books for adults in the middle of their careers? I'm doing okay but I know I can do more and I keep working way too late.

mfcrocker
Jan 31, 2004





Hot Rope Guy

Gabriel S. posted:

Is there a good ADHD books for adults in the middle of their careers? I'm doing okay but I know I can do more and I keep working way too late.

Honestly, you might do better with coaching or therapy.

Then again, I can't entirely relate. Personally, I've recently happily settled on a stagnant career because my current employer is so drat good with handling my ADHD rear end, putting up with the odd days off for insomnia, giving me work that plays to my strengths etc

Crosby B. Alfred
May 20, 2006
Probation
Can't post for 30 hours!


I really, really, really want to attend a real world Adult ADD Support Group or maybe even a therapist (one that specializes in it specifically) but the current pandemic put those plans on hold.

If anyone has attended one I'd love to hear how things turned out.

Dance Officer
May 4, 2017

It would be awesome if we could dance!


I'm undergoing a diagnostic test for ADHD and I'm now waiting for my mom to be interviewed. That will complete the test.

I think I'm ADD, it would explain a lot. Way more than my autistic diagnosis ever did.

Ayin
Jan 6, 2010

Have a great day.


Hey, remember when a bunch of us found out that citric acid negatively affects our stimulants??

I've always gotten conflicting information on whether or not (or what kind) Strattera is a stimulant, so I figured, why not try the experiment on that too

you see, I was taking my non-adderall meds with soda, because I can leave a bottle on my nightstand and it won't get spilled by clumsy cats

the difference was night and day

So yeah, uh, watch out for that

Laserface
Dec 24, 2004

THERE IS NO PLANET B


Ayin posted:

Hey, remember when a bunch of us found out that citric acid negatively affects our stimulants??

I've always gotten conflicting information on whether or not (or what kind) Strattera is a stimulant, so I figured, why not try the experiment on that too

you see, I was taking my non-adderall meds with soda, because I can leave a bottle on my nightstand and it won't get spilled by clumsy cats

the difference was night and day

So yeah, uh, watch out for that

did you know that you can fill that same bottle with water instead of getting type II diabetes

Ayin
Jan 6, 2010

Have a great day.


Laserface posted:

did you know that you can fill that same bottle with water instead of getting type II diabetes
1. my usual soda is decaff diet pepsi so

2. you're really not supposed to reuse those soda bottles

3. my husband is on a crusade against me leaving water sitting around for long periods of time. something about it encouraging bacterial growth on the container

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mfcrocker
Jan 31, 2004





Hot Rope Guy

Laserface posted:

did you know that you can fill that same bottle with water instead of getting type II diabetes

can't get type II diabetes if you pickle yourself with aspartame first

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