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Matty D
Sep 27, 2005




According to wikipedia:

Animation is the rapid display of a sequence of images of 2-D or 3-D artwork or model positions in order to create an illusion of movement. It is an optical illusion of motion due to the phenomenon of persistence of vision, and can be created and demonstrated in a number of ways. The most common method of presenting animation is as a motion picture or video program, although several other forms of presenting animation also exist.

And I agree.

Animation is truly a creative powerhouse art form. Possibly the ultimate collaboration. Everything you see onscreen is created by an artist. It requires drawing, sculpting, painting, cutting, writing, cinematography, lighting, modeling, camera work, editing, design, acting, sound design, a poo poo ton of patience, and lots and lots of people. It's often under celebrated and under appreciated. But animation is almost always fun.

Here I'd like to bring together both animation enthusiasts and animators! Experienced animators and budding animators. People who seriously want to pursue it as a profession and people just looking to learn the basic techniques and process.

Post animation, whether it's yours or something you'd like to share. And please post questions! Let the critique begin.


Here are some animation resources

http://www.amazon.com/Animators-Sur...s/dp/0571202284
The Animator's Survival Kit by Richard Williams - this baby is a must. Like 100 pages in this book alone on walk cycles.

Cartoon Brew https://www.cartoonbrew.com - A pretty cool blog that posts stuff about relevant animators and animated films

Matty D fucked around with this message at Sep 29, 2009 around 01:10

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Matty D
Sep 27, 2005


I'll get this ball rolling here posting a short I really like by a professor I had.

http://video.google.com/videoplay?d...stubble+trouble

Each frame was drawn with a china marker on newsprint paper. He punched holes into every sheet to create the peg slots. Much like seen on the traditional animation paper posted above. The beard on the grinding stone sequence was achieved with using 3D software called Maya. A pretty neat example how seamlessly 3D and 2D can coexist.

And at the risk of making a fool of myself after posting that gem above, here is the film I just finished creating in a 5 week span over the summer with a friend of mine. It was our first gig so we are still pretty excited about it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VaLb7kItA_o

Here is a screen:


The female lead was all hand made with paper, paints, and glue and was shot in traditional stop motion format under a camera. All other imagery was made with the ever useful photo shop, and all compositing was done in after effects. Please feel free to ask questions/critique. If there is enough interest I'll do a write up with some pictures that will show the process in depth!

Matty D fucked around with this message at Sep 29, 2009 around 01:12

An observer
Aug 30, 2008

where the stars are drowning and whales ferry their vast souls through the black and seamless sea


Whoa, this thread is right on time. I'm planning to do a 7 minute animation with whatever spare time I get in the next ... year. It's probably gonna take me forever.

Here's some inspirational stuff:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vORsKyopHyM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_IivEGxl8qU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IuUwDuV8GNY

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vg3QHDlVfAg

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pCxPEB-uu20

^ that one is better to watch on they guy's site because the graphics are a hundred times better.

Matty D
Sep 27, 2005


Oh poo poo the first one is like a 21st century Prince Achmed. Post some preproduction stuff observer!

An observer
Aug 30, 2008

where the stars are drowning and whales ferry their vast souls through the black and seamless sea


Haha, I will. This will be my first real-length animation (when I was 15 or so I would do some 30 second shorts, nothing too great though). Approximately 8400 frames though...

Ghost Hat
Jun 25, 2009

WILL AMOUNT TO NOTHING IN LIFE.


My old demo reel. (I have no new one.) Some of it I still like.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wgzoPdoxOJ0

In case you're wondering, all the information except for my name is now defunct. I have nothing to hide.

9nine
Sep 1, 2005



Ahh! Yes! I was wondering where all my animation homies were at. I've got an independent study this year with a really great professor and I've already finished the storyboard for a ~10 minute animation. I've already finished some scenes, but I don't have them on my computer yet. I'll definitely upload them here whenever I get the chance, though.

As for things I've made in the past, here's a clay/ paper on glass animation I made last year: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_HDkgmLQulo
It has it's flaws, but I made it in a 3 week time period, so I'm pretty happy with the results.

The year before that, I made a 2-d animation, but never finished it. I don't really plan on finishing it, either, since it was more of a series of exercises for myself than a whole short: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MRqr9kJr888

As far as inspirational animators go, I'm a fan of Jan Svankmajer (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1KFAuVXu3-A) and Igor Kovalyov (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YecjiKzZStg), who was the guy that worked on Rugrats and Aah real monsters.

Also, mad props to you, Matty D- I love paper cutout animations, especially when they actually work.

e: found a better quality Svankmajer film

9nine fucked around with this message at Sep 29, 2009 around 08:26

Elentor
Dec 14, 2004



Great thread. I should really read the Animator's Survival Kit again. I only read once some years ago.

This is my first, and only animation I made it one day when I was bored, opened Photoshop, used the paint-like tool to draw the pixels and went wild frame by frame:

Final Gloom
Sep 27, 2009


Elentor posted:

Great thread. I should really read the Animator's Survival Kit again. I only read once some years ago.

This is my first, and only animation I made it one day when I was bored, opened Photoshop, used the paint-like tool to draw the pixels and went wild frame by frame:




One thing I'd recommend: coloring all the frames with solid colors and then adding the shading and highlights once you've got everything else in order. Right now the colors just sort of glob around their "segments" merely as shades of colors and don't really emphasize her movements.

tuna
Jul 17, 2003



Matty D posted:

The Animator's Survival Kit by Richard Williams - this baby is a must. Like 100 pages in this book alone on walk cycles.

Everyone loves recommending this book first and foremost but I honestly believe everyone should be reading "The Illusion of Life" as a more important book, at least once every 1-2 years. It's obviously a more comprehensive and longer read compared to the (fantastic) Animator's Survival Kit, but in the extra time you spend to read Illusion of Life, you take in 4x as much insight into two of the nine old men's teachings. There's a lot to think about all at once with animation and you'll never remember it all or see it all (which is why critique and co-workers/supervisors are so important) and this book is the same. No matter how many times you read it, you'll realise something you've never realised before reading it for the 2nd, 3rd, 5th and 10th time.

It's about time we got another animation thread in here! I'm animating at Blur right now and since I sent off my reel a while ago I can't show anything I've been working on yet! But I have some fun personal stuff in early stages I wanna get on with.

9nine posted:

As for things I've made in the past, here's a clay/ paper on glass animation I made last year: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_HDkgmLQulo
It has it's flaws, but I made it in a 3 week time period, so I'm pretty happy with the results.

This is great stuff, and I love the Jan Svankmajer animation you referenced. It's great when you watch a short animation and realise it's actually pretty clever, and you then have to re-watch it to figure out where the gag overtook you. Then again when you realise it works on more than one level.

On another note in my long boring post in this thread, I found Superjail to be an absolutely fantastic animation on TV, reaffirming the idea that TV animation can be good (and not flash cheated or pop culture gag randomness with no thought put into it like almost everything else on adult swim, with the exception of spots of greatness like these)

Also want to point you guys towards this fantastic pencil test blog which is pretty fantastic: http://www.penciltestdepot.com/

Matty D
Sep 27, 2005


quote:

Observer - 8400 frames
According to my math you did 11.67 shorts then, since the golden standard is 24 frames a second!

quote:

Ghost Hat
I watched your reel, and I really liked the uncolored pencil test animations. Good work. I'm not sure why, perhaps because I was more intrigued by the character design and the action in those shots. I'll sleep on it

quote:

9nine
I'm happy to see you animate. I've seen some of your work in the daily drawing thread, and you have a wonderful sense of design. I watched the clay animation on glass, and I was impressed. I haven't seen much competent clay animation worth a drat where I go to school, and your design sense really shines through. I know how much a bitch it was to follow the line of action on all those blue pieces flying about. Overall I'm not really sure what is going on in the piece, but I didn't really care because it was fun to watch.

Jan Svankmajer is the poo poo and I was super close to including him in the op. Top class pixelation. When I first saw him it was an eye opener for me, because I was naive and thought for it to be animation it had to look like Animaniacs or some poo poo. Boy was I wrong.

10 minute film eh? Kiss your social life goodbye. But hey, that's animation.

Also thanks for the compliment on my film. Cut outs have accidentally turned into my "thing".

quote:

Elentor
I applaud your gusto for doing something quite complicated for your first shot at the craft, especially in photoshop! For a tip in future animations, this piece you posted is very 'in-betweeny'. What I mean by that is, in some spots its too slow. Key frames are typically the the concrete drawings if you know all of this already please excuse me. They are essentially poses. Everything in between keys, is an in-between, or a tween. To make the characters spin seem more visceral and convincing, try deleting a couple drawings. Often times when I animate, I over animate. I go back, remove a drawing or two, or perhaps change a drawing from a 2 to a 1, and it just feels right. What makes movement convincing is often times the speed, and the drawings with tinnnnny little movements that settle into key frames.

With that all said, your character keeps consistent scale and is on model! That's half the battle.

zaepg
Dec 25, 2008


Alright here are three animations I've done. Fortunately, or unfortunately I was caught up in sad plots at the time, and going through some weird poo poo in life, so a lot of the stuff here is only of what I made then. Two of which I can actually say I like.

When I was 16 I thought I knew just what the gently caress I was doing. This was done for a school class, and don't get me wrong the effort I put in is outstanding. But the story absolutely SUCKS. This is due to-
(1). This was the first animation I've ever really done. So with it I tried to do everything, and soon realized that what I intended simply wasn't possible with my restrictions.
(2). 85% of the animation was completed on the last two days, on a no sleep marathon.

PART 1 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p4y39daGZHk
PART 2 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X-I9O9Cc4Us

My second animation came like a week after the previous animation. I tried to address all the problems I felt my previous animation failed at - story, and simplicity.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SDBgyz78xTA

A month after that I did one last "depressing" type film.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ttQ4LEA4Wfw

I like the last two, but I really want to make a more happy upbeat, creative animation in the near future.

zaepg fucked around with this message at Nov 1, 2009 around 23:36

NC Wyeth Death Cult
Dec 30, 2005

He lost his life in Chadds Ford, he was dancing with a train.

Pet peeve time:
One thing I am always going to suggest to a lot of people starting out is to spend a little more time with sound design. A pop filter is your friend when recording dialogue. To hear how bad sound design and recording can adversely affect a project, listen to a few Foamy the Squirrels. The last syllables of almost any of his dialogue makes that annoying crackle that is easy to get rid of.

Here's my question:
What is your usual workflow? How do you break down such a monumental task? Right now I am starting on my first coherent short (about seven minutes) and while I am starting to put together my storyboard I've started working on backgrounds and sound design (I have several people who need to read for me and I eventually have to deal with someone doing composition). I just feel like I am all over the place. Should I just pull back and really work the hell out of the storyboad? What's the best way to manage a project?

An observer
Aug 30, 2008

where the stars are drowning and whales ferry their vast souls through the black and seamless sea


Matty D posted:

According to my math you did 11.67 shorts then, since the golden standard is 24 frames a second!

I actually meant the one I'm gonna do is about 8400 frames. It's kinda daunting thinking about that, for me.

9nine
Sep 1, 2005



NC Wyeth Death Cult posted:

Here's my question:
What is your usual workflow? How do you break down such a monumental task? Right now I am starting on my first coherent short (about seven minutes) and while I am starting to put together my storyboard I've started working on backgrounds and sound design (I have several people who need to read for me and I eventually have to deal with someone doing composition). I just feel like I am all over the place. Should I just pull back and really work the hell out of the storyboad? What's the best way to manage a project?

Absolutely work on your storyboard first and foremost, since it's way easier to make corrections to that than it is to rework an entire scene, or re-record something you thought was right. I usually break each scene down into little thumbnails- work on the composition and layout in the thumbnails, and below them, write down what actions will be going on, or what sound will be heard. It's easy to get antsy and dive headfirst into a project, but storyboarding and thumbnails will help you see your animation as a whole cohesive piece. It will also be easier to point out continuity errors, or scenes that just don't work. The thumbnails themselves don't need a lot of detail. It's mostly just for scripting everything out.

Crocobile
Dec 2, 2006


Oh yay! Animation thread! I'm boarding a film right now too; if all goes as planned it will be mostly 2D with a wee bit of stop-motion.

I got kinda lazy about uploading my 2D work, mostly 'cause the film I tried to do last Spring did not come together very well...we learn from our mistakes, I guess? Hopefully I'll have some new stuff to upload in the next couple of months.

Here's a run cycle I did in Flash a few months back? The edges on the body are off, but I got tired of it.
Run run run!

Here's a film I did in the Spring of '08. The animation is pretty limited because I didn't have a lot of time and I didn't really have any animation experience, so I tried to keep it simple.
Its a dinosaur western.

And some stop-motion stuff I was dicking around with:
Sculpey on a downshooter
Meow.
Something retarded.

I'm really interested in stop-motion and 2D, though I've got a very very long way to go with both. I'm hoping to get a lot of practice in this year.

scrub lover
Apr 22, 2005


Might as well plug my 2D final film, Hamsterman. Everything but one voice done by me:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mOfiGYffKAU



I got married a few weeks ago, and instead of my best man giving a traditional speech, we recorded it ahead of time and I animated to it. Unfortunately, it was a lot more time-consuming to make than I thought it would be, so time constraints made it look a bit rushed in parts (sometimes choppy lip sync, no background)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qtQMzNSLjzg



Oh, and I guess there's my avatars, my current one included.


scrub lover fucked around with this message at Sep 30, 2009 around 03:28

9nine
Sep 1, 2005



Uncle Jenkins posted:

Might as well plug my 2D final film, Hamsterman. Everything but one voice done by me:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mOfiGYffKAU

Haha, that was great, man. I envy your lip-syncing abilities, seriously.

Matty D
Sep 27, 2005


NC Wyeth Death Cult posted:

How do you break down such a monumental task? Right now I am starting on my first coherent short (about seven minutes)

Honestly, I would just make it shorter. 7 minutes is a tooooooonnnn of work, especially if you are going at it alone. I know a lot of kids that wanted to do these 6-10 minute shorts on their own, and almost every time they lose interest and don't finish, or they compromise quality.

Not that it's impossible. Just sometimes less is more.

Jenkins, that was funny. I liked the close up mouth shots. Very Ren and Stimpyish. The polaroid sequence at the end is great.

Matty D fucked around with this message at Sep 30, 2009 around 03:37

NC Wyeth Death Cult
Dec 30, 2005

He lost his life in Chadds Ford, he was dancing with a train.

9nine posted:

Absolutely work on your storyboard first and foremost...

Thanks, I knew I was getting ahead of myself.

Uncle Jenkins posted:

Might as well plug my 2D final film, Hamsterman. Everything but one voice done by me:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mOfiGYffKAU


I have to say that last April I went to see a film festival and that was much better than any of the animated shorts I saw. Really decent timing and direction. The closing credits were pretty creative, too.

Matty D posted:

Honestly, I would just make it shorter. 7 minutes is a tooooooonnnn of work...

Not that it's impossible. Just sometimes less is more.

I kind of agree. It's very dialogue driven though with three parts that are really physical so I think that a lot of it's going to be not as difficult (but still pretty hard to do). I am trying to approach it by breaking it down into chunks. I might scrap it and go with something easier. I consider it a learning process though even if I learn that I shouldn't try anything longer than a few minutes.

Tank!
Oct 29, 2008



this was my final project of Animation 2 last year but it ended up more like an animatic and i'm hoping to re-do it at some point
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2zFsd0O5amk

anyone in the Ottawa, Canada area or in the northeast of the US should check out the Ottawa International Animation Festival in October

Matty D
Sep 27, 2005


Here is a collage-esque model sheet for a walk and sit animation exercise I'm working on.

Really Big Shoe
Sep 11, 2001

HEY HOW DID THIS SHOE GET ON MY LAP ITS SO BIG OH GOD SEND HELP

This is all amazing, guys! Awesome thread so far.

I'm assuming just by the attitude in this thread, you are all happy with going to school for animation? I've been considering it for the last year or so, and finally just went back to school and am taking some preliminary classes in the time being, but next semester I'm going to start on some animation courses. What exactly can one look forward to, realistically, as an animator? Is the field oversaturated, or just not as many opportunities? I definitely would like to go for 2D. Now that many of you have gotten this far, is that a silly option with the influx of 3D coming out? Thanks friends!

Ghost Hat
Jun 25, 2009

WILL AMOUNT TO NOTHING IN LIFE.


^^Speaking for myself, pick your school very carefully. Take a look at how many of their students succeed and what they end up doing. You can go ahead and learn the 2-D stuff, but make a serious effort to learn Flash animation or 3-D animation (Or both, preferably.) You'll want to keep your options open. The market is extremely competitive.

I really wish had paid attention to this advice. Things would have been a lot smoother.

Ophelia Swims
Aug 5, 2009

like a puff'd and reckless libertine.

I'm not an animator but I regularly read this great blog that focuses largely on animation and illustration with tons of interesting articles on the history of animation and animators. Thought you guys might want to check it out:

http://www.animationarchive.org/

keyframe
Sep 15, 2007

I have seen things

Really Big Shoe posted:

This is all amazing, guys! Awesome thread so far.

I'm assuming just by the attitude in this thread, you are all happy with going to school for animation? I've been considering it for the last year or so, and finally just went back to school and am taking some preliminary classes in the time being, but next semester I'm going to start on some animation courses. What exactly can one look forward to, realistically, as an animator? Is the field oversaturated, or just not as many opportunities? I definitely would like to go for 2D. Now that many of you have gotten this far, is that a silly option with the influx of 3D coming out? Thanks friends!

Hahaha oh boy...


good luck finding jobs as a 2d animator. I will tell you what you have to look forward to, lovely flash tv animations with low pay and wrist breaking weekly animation quotas. A lot of unpaid overtime.

I am a feature film animator currently but I have worked in games and tv as well. the market right now is over saturated. For every animation position there are like 1000 animators. I feel lucky i got into the industry when I did because it is very very hard to do it right now.

If any of you are thinking about going animation make sure you have a secondary skill that will help you along the way. I recommend rigging if you are going 3d and marrying a very rich widow if you are going 2d

Tank!
Oct 29, 2008



keyframe posted:

Hahaha oh boy...


good luck finding jobs as a 2d animator. I will tell you what you have to look forward to, lovely flash tv animations with low pay and wrist breaking weekly animation quotas. A lot of unpaid overtime.

I am a feature film animator currently but I have worked in games and tv as well. the market right now is over saturated. For every animation position there are like 1000 animators. I feel lucky i got into the industry when I did because it is very very hard to do it right now.

If any of you are thinking about going animation make sure you have a secondary skill that will help you along the way. I recommend rigging if you are going 3d and marrying a very rich widow if you are going 2d

another plus is going to local festivals and meeting directors and producers. meeting with them and giving them your business card or whatever actually helped a lot of people i know get hired onto movie and tv show projects rather than applying for positions formally

seriously though, if you want to get a job pretty easily, look to Teletoon. but if you want a job where you can actually make quality stuff, avoid Teletoon.

Matty D
Sep 27, 2005


While I'm not a full time professional because I'm in school, from a 2D standpoint at least, there are jobs if you can illustrate/design. I know a lot of 3D people that couldn't draw themselves out of a wet paper bag. So if you truly have those skills, they can be applied elsewhere (storyboards, character design, layout, concept art etc). Not to mention if you fully understand 2D animation principles, you can animate 3D as well, just learn the software.

Matty D fucked around with this message at Oct 1, 2009 around 18:06

tuna
Jul 17, 2003



In this day and age you'd do fine taking a 2D course and keeping current with the occasional (good) 3D animation in Maya/Softimage with a free rig on your own time. After a few years it isn't impossible to be a fantastic artist in both 2d and 3d. However don't be naive. A lot of the work out there is 3D right now, along with a lot of great animators to learn from.

Snack Force
Jun 28, 2009


Man, 2-D animation is not getting the attention it needs these days. 3-D animation is just taking over. Just made me realize that. Anyway, anyone who loves 2-D animation should really know about this film, it's awesome and the animation is just my style- really distinct, purposeful yet simple line-art:

(YouTube Quality sucks rear end):
http://www.apple.com/trailers/sony/persepolis/trailer2/

Here's a few favorites of the animation genre:

2-D:
From a technical aspect this cartoon is just great. Actually the whole thing's great. Forget where I found it (watch in High Quality):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TQt8uVWQyyc
Classic:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LNVYWJOEy9A
I realize that we're sadly getting to the age where people might not even know of the short "Rejected". Ugh. I first heard of it like 5 years ago or something but I'm playing games with like 8 year olds now so God knows. Not that there's any 8 year olds on the SA forums but you never know:

"Rejected" by Don Hertzfeldt:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PJYxCSXjhLI
Billy's Balloon by Don Hertzfeldt:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fpc5vgi9zbM
Ah L'Amour by Don Hertzfeldt:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kYqKucJTn2c

Absolutely NO idea why this is on MTV.com (only place I could find it). Bare with the commercials at the beginning, watch it, it's worth it:
http://www.mtv.com/videos/shows/the...periments.jhtml

Claymation:
Probably the best animated short ever. Not in a technical aspect but the whole message behind hit and how it is delivered:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vHakjC-pLqg
Probably my favorite animated short ever next to the one up top:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RDv5akmlVU4

I've always really loved Klayman's walk animation from "The Neverhood" from a technical standpoint:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=67f9ZaO2WEU
The cut scenes from that game were just hilarious/awesome too:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qIsgRgmT9MA
I'm pretty sure this is the first time I felt emotional attachment to a robot/video game character:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=14xcsz43Kuw

3-D/CGI:

For the one person who hasn't seen this:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sdUUx5FdySs
Everyone knows Pixar is awesome. This is my favorite short by them. Everything about this short is perfect:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r1AwY-KfB3Y
And last but no least for 3-D, the apex of 3-D animation (Colin's Bear Animation):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FiARsQSlzDc

Shmorky has some awesome poo poo too (back to 2-D):
http://shmorky.com/d/20040301.html- sometimes I just dissect his poo poo frame by frame and figure out how they were made.

I think one of his most underrate works is the very "My Anus Is Bleeding" he did for Stile Sux:
http://www.stilesux.com/sux21.html

Also, I always remember this car looking very awesome pulling away and I was right (skip to 7:15 honestly). Some really cool 2-D pixel art/animation in this game:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4yWnnk9fyJE

Snack Force fucked around with this message at Oct 2, 2009 around 13:10

Megera
Sep 9, 2008


tuna posted:

In this day and age you'd do fine taking a 2D course and keeping current with the occasional (good) 3D animation in Maya/Softimage with a free rig on your own time. After a few years it isn't impossible to be a fantastic artist in both 2d and 3d. However don't be naive. A lot of the work out there is 3D right now, along with a lot of great animators to learn from.

Last semester a bunch of us went to the Disney animation studios for a special event called "Inspire Days". There was a seminar on 3D animation, the guy was a 3D animator, and he mostly played clips of Peter Pan and maybe a 30-second clip of The Incredibles.

I bet so many 3D animators had no idea what he was trying to tell them.

VVVV Exactly.

Megera fucked around with this message at Oct 3, 2009 around 05:45

tuna
Jul 17, 2003



Not sure I follow

Happy the Pirate
Oct 2, 2009


I've been wanting to work on cartoons since I was like 3, but I have trouble keeping track of my work.

I'd like to go to a school with a real animation program, but I'm stuck at community college 'cause I haven't figured out how I can pay for any other school. There's an animation class at my CC but it's pretty much a joke.

What schools did anyone here go to and would you recommend them? If so, why?

Highly editorialized, but it has drat useful information for drawing: http://johnkstuff.blogspot.com

But more importantly: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WtW6wS3z97Q

Experience the wonders of this fine art.

Edit: Fun exercise. Watch cartoons with the volume turned down. If you can tell what's going on and are entertained, it's animated well. If you're confused or bored, then it's probably crappy.

Happy the Pirate fucked around with this message at Oct 2, 2009 around 22:20

Matty D
Sep 27, 2005


A pencil test for an animation I'm working on. It's of the cowboy i posted earlier. Still have to tweak, cleanup, add features.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r_7hayUnktg

LiquidPropaganda
Jul 14, 2007

Just a little pinprick.
Therell be no more -aaaanarchy!
But you may feel a little sick.


I feel like a loser and grossly unqualified to post in this thread seeing what everyone else has, but I will anyway. I'm 17 years old and a senior in high school, and I've been loving around in flash since 8th grade and know my way around the program as well as someone in my position can (except for actionscript).

I am looking for good Animation/Illustration colleges to apply to. I live in the chicagoland area and am currently planning on applying and possible attending Columbia, which I heard has a good Animation department (I took the a flash class there over the summer and was profoundly bored, I knew basically everything they covered)

So I guess my question is, what are some good schools? Where are you going/have gone? Any tips for an aspiring animator?

bonus: one of my animations, as bad as it is. Took me an afternoon to do and I submitted it as an afterthought. I do know how animation can eat your life up from experience.
http://www.newgrounds.com/portal/view/474282 (it got frontpaged but in no way do I think it should have been)

Please don't judge me harshly, I'm much better I swear

Matty D
Sep 27, 2005


I'm going to Columbia right now and I'm in my last semester. It's good and it's bad. It's bad because they accept anyone that can front the money, they don't fail people, some teachers are pretty bad, and they have no portfolio reviews to regulate student's progression. So basically under-qualified 'animators' are graduating every semester.

It's good because it opened my eyes to a lot of new things/techniques, it has decent funding, I like living in Chicago, and I have several super talented working teachers that have helped make me what I am.

It's worked for me because I made it work. All the tools are there, you just have to utilize them, but that's art school. Be ready to be around some kids that aren't good at what they do and really don't care to. If you are serious about being an animator, honestly I'd try to go else where. It's pretty much impossible for schools to really be good with great work consistently coming out of it without portfolio reviews. But then again, I made it work, and I don't regret it!

That's a pessimistic view of a Senior, though. If you have any other specific questions about Columbia/animation school please ask, if I think of anything else I'll let you know.

9nine
Sep 1, 2005



Matty D posted:

art school. Be ready to be around some kids that aren't good at what they do and really don't care to. If you are serious about being an animator, honestly I'd try to go else where.

Oh my god. I go to the Art Institute of Chicago, and it's eerie how similar our sentiments are.

We've got a great animation department with devoted professors, but just like Matty D said, you really have to make it work. I absolutely hate about 50% (edit: no, make that 70%) of the students they accept because, A: they don't give a poo poo, B: they're just spending their parents' money with no intention of actually using the degree they earn, and C: hipsters. I don't encourage you to go here mainly because it's interdisciplinary and you don't actually major in anything, which means you don't get to spend as much time animating. I really do love the place, but frankly, I'm a masochist.

LiquidPropaganda posted:

(it got frontpaged but in no way do I think it should have been)

Hey- gently caress you, that was fantastic.

LiquidPropaganda
Jul 14, 2007

Just a little pinprick.
Therell be no more -aaaanarchy!
But you may feel a little sick.


Matty D posted:

That's a pessimistic view of a Senior, though. If you have any other specific questions about Columbia/animation school please ask, if I think of anything else I'll let you know.

That's actually super helpful, thanks a ton. Do you know of any other animation schools you thought about going to? What made you settle on Columbia? You said you really have to utilize what they have. Are they good about letting you do that? What I mean is, if you want to come in and talk to the teacher/work in the classroom outside of class are they generally good about it?

I was aware that Columbia didn't need a portfolio to get in but I didn't know that they didn't review them as time went on. You know of anyone who basically did jack poo poo and did't get anywhere? It seems like you do.

It kind of sucks where I am right now because I never really looked at any schools outside of the ones in Chicago, but I don't know if I want to go to Columbia. Like you said, they'll take just about anyone (edit: no offense is meant by this), and I kind of feel like I could go someplace else and be challenged a lot more in the classroom (without having to do stuff independently like you said)

drat this is a long rambling post, but these are some of the thoughts that keep me up at night, not knowing exactly where you want to go with the deadline drawing closer is pretty scary.

9nine posted:

Hey- gently caress you, that was fantastic.
Hahahaha thanks! I feel really dwarfed by this topic, and with good reason

LiquidPropaganda fucked around with this message at Oct 5, 2009 around 02:21

Tank!
Oct 29, 2008



Matty D posted:

A pencil test for an animation I'm working on. It's of the cowboy i posted earlier. Still have to tweak, cleanup, add features.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r_7hayUnktg

i liked this a lot! really nice pencil test.

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Matty D
Sep 27, 2005


My route was a bit different. I found myself to be really like drawing and painting in highschool, and it came to me pretty easily. I had some success in art shows, didn't really know what the hell I wanted to do, so I went to NIU for illustration. The program there was actually pretty nice. They have portfolio reviews 2 years into the program, and if you don't hack it, they move you out of the program. I decided I wanted to move on to something else, to avoid being the guy in Idaho that paints ducks really well for a living. I made the hop to Columbia, didn't really consider anything else.

The floor is open 8 in the morning to 10pm. You can pretty much run around and do what you want. Most kids only do things that they have been exposed to though. For instance in my first semester of school I was in animation 1, I wasn't screwing around with building armatures and doing stop motion. But it's still there. You can still be challenged in the classroom. You just have to bring it upon yourself since most teachers won't bust your rear end.

I recommend taking a tour, check out the loop, and if you like it go for it. Good things can happen here. Columbia has a really nice internship and portfolio program.

And also I'd recommend between now and attending school anywhere for animation, draw your rear end off. Draw draw draw draw. I don't care if you are doing 3D or not. Drawing is so loving necessary it makes me sick how many kids can't do it.

If I had a cow for every student that came to school, thinking that cartoons will just draw themselves, I'd enough live stock for a pretty profitable ranch.

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