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bhsman
Feb 9, 2008

by exmarx


Black Templar power fist

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Angryboot
Oct 23, 2005



Grimey Drawer

Heh you guys should've seen the original wax piece:

thiswayliesmadness
Dec 3, 2009

I hope to see you next time, and take care all

Angryboot posted:

Heh you guys should've seen the original wax piece:



For some reason, I'm having a Borat flashback while looking at that.

crime fighting hog
Jun 29, 2006


Angryboot posted:

Heh you guys should've seen the original wax piece:



I like to think the templar on the right saw it and is looking around going "uhhh...okay...."

Angryboot
Oct 23, 2005



Grimey Drawer

drat, I just realized that little armymen gray officer in the background next to the speaker should've had a caption of "what's going on over there?"

Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


Angryboot posted:

Heh you guys should've seen the original wax piece:



So, that monkey paw you got there... What'd you wish for, and who'd you end up killing to get it?

Captain Invictus
Apr 5, 2005

Try reading some manga!

I buy Steam inventories, add me if interested!




Clever Betty

crime fighting hog posted:

Now THAT'S a powerfist!

Giga Powerfist Breaker.

The only answer to making a fist like that is to add a rocket booster to the back and turn it into a Landspeeder for the Imperial/Crimson Fists. Or Angry Marines, either or.

cakesmith handyman
Jul 22, 2007

Pip-Pip old chap! Last one in is a rotten egg what what.



Captain Invictus posted:

Giga Powerfist Breaker.

The only answer to making a fist like that is to add a rocket booster to the back and turn it into a Landspeeder for the Imperial/Crimson Fists. Or Angry Marines, either or.

Mount it on a spring out the front of a landraider. Roll that fucker right up & smash your opponents Forgeworld toys.

edit: I do not endorse this kind of chicanery.

cakesmith handyman fucked around with this message at 10:32 on Mar 25, 2010

Beer4TheBeerGod
Aug 23, 2004

"I'm cisgender heterosexual white American male.

Fuck you for telling me what "my part" is."

- B4TBG on why they can't be criticized by minorities for being wrong because


Exciting Lemon

You HAVE to start an ork army now, and make that a reinforced ram.

Indolent Bastard
Oct 26, 2007

I WON THIS AMAZING AVATAR! I'M A WINNER! WOOOOO!


That fist is clearly meant to be the counts as Canis-wolfbutt mount for your new crimson fist army.

I R SMART LIKE ROCK
Mar 10, 2003

I just want a hug.



Fun Shoe





Just gotta dry brush the bases and clean up the rims and they are done.

KingMob
Feb 12, 2004
Et In Arcadia Ego

I R SMART LIKE ROCK posted:



Just gotta dry brush the bases and clean up the rims and they are done.

Very nice colour scheme.

Angryboot
Oct 23, 2005



Grimey Drawer

Indolent Bastard posted:

That fist is clearly meant to be the counts as Canis-wolfbutt mount for your new crimson fist army.

Oh god that's just wrong. I may have to do it after it gets graded.

bhsman
Feb 9, 2008

by exmarx


Indolent Bastard posted:

That fist is clearly meant to be the counts as Canis-wolfbutt mount for your new crimson fist army.

Pugnis Fistborn

Barry the Sprout
Jan 12, 2001



Hey PaintVagrant, just wanted to say that I got back to my flat after several weeks away and discovered a bling kit with the caretaker. Cheers, it's absolutely packed with stuff. The tips are also A grade, looking forward to basing soon. Not sure if I'll have time to do it for this months oath though.

Attempt at something approaching on topic content: I bloody hate priming, especially in a flat. It is my single worst thing about the hobby.

stabbington
Sep 1, 2007

It doesn't feel right to kill an unarmed man... but I'll get over it.


Could try switching to gesso, especially if your weather is lovely. The downside is that brushing it on takes forever, you occasionally have problems with tiny bubbles messing up the texture of your model if you're not careful (I still haven't completely conquered this issue, can probably be solved with a bit of thinning), sometimes you have to do a second coat for full coverage, and it takes about a day for it to dry fully. On the upside, you'll get overall better coverage than primer (well, non-airbrush primer), less detail loss, and none of the general aggravation that comes with having to deal with cans of spray paint.

PaintVagrant
Apr 13, 2007

~ the ultimate driving machine ~


Barry the Sprout posted:

Hey PaintVagrant, just wanted to say that I got back to my flat after several weeks away and discovered a bling kit with the caretaker. Cheers, it's absolutely packed with stuff. The tips are also A grade, looking forward to basing soon. Not sure if I'll have time to do it for this months oath though.





If anyone else is interested in sweet basing stuff

http://forums.somethingawful.com/sh...hreadid=3271910

I R SMART LIKE ROCK
Mar 10, 2003

I just want a hug.



Fun Shoe

Real men use gesso through an air brush. That's how I did these, well this is after the base coat spray but you get the idea:





Personally I use black gesso, but I've been debating on using grey. I also may try white then spray white as the base coat. So I get the white base without the oh no I don't get awesome coverage or I sprayed too much trying to get awesome coverage. And all the ladies will love me .

Beer4TheBeerGod
Aug 23, 2004

"I'm cisgender heterosexual white American male.

Fuck you for telling me what "my part" is."

- B4TBG on why they can't be criticized by minorities for being wrong because


Exciting Lemon

Okay, that's it. Definitely using the proceeds from selling my video games to get a decent airbrush and compressor setup.

Point me in the right direction goons. I have money to spend, and I need inspiration fast before I use it something stupid like nice clothes or my wedding.

!amicable
Jan 20, 2007


Awesome undercoating: black base, full overage. white, less coverage, heavier on top.

It will give you some "natural" shading and leave raised areas white for highlights.

You can thank me later.

Barry the Sprout
Jan 12, 2001



As I understand it, it is ill advised to use white gesso?

I wouldn't mind priming so much if I had somewhere well ventilated to do it. It's the whole having the flat of a glue sniffer that I object to.

stabbington
Sep 1, 2007

It doesn't feel right to kill an unarmed man... but I'll get over it.


I haven't heard anything, positive or negative, about white gesso. I've had good results with grey (liquitex), and I've seen many other people do well with black.

e: also seconding airbrush info, holy poo poo. (and if we can get a definitive airbrush info post for PV to link in the OP, that would kick rear end, because that comes up all the freaking time)

The Saddest Robot
Apr 17, 2007


I R SMART LIKE ROCK posted:

Real men use gesso through an air brush. That's how I did these, well this is after the base coat spray but you get the idea:





Personally I use black gesso, but I've been debating on using grey. I also may try white then spray white as the base coat. So I get the white base without the oh no I don't get awesome coverage or I sprayed too much trying to get awesome coverage. And all the ladies will love me .

Huh, I hadn't even considered that. I thought that gesso would be too thick for an airbrush.

Do you thin it down? Water, airbrush cleaner, what?

I've heard people not liking white gesso, I've used it for touch up when the spray primer has worn off and haven't had any problems with it. I haven't tried priming a whole model with it.

I R SMART LIKE ROCK
Mar 10, 2003

I just want a hug.



Fun Shoe

Gesso is water soluable, so I just use water. http://www.liquitex.com/Products/surfprepcolorgesso.cfm is what I use, I use half gesso half water personally. Let it dry for about 30 minutes then do a 2nd pass real quick so when it shrinks it won't leave bare metal spots.

From the 40k thread:


Where do I find a good airbrush?

Here are some words of goon wisdom on the subject:

Pagan posted:

As far as airbrushes go, Harbor Freight is where it's at, 100%. The quality may not be the best, but at the price, who cares? In a year, I've gone through two of their airbrushes (one was my fault, the other just stopped working right); I'm on the third one now. Not counting the cost of the compressor, I've spent a grand total of $45. That's certainly a fair price to pay for the ease of use of a real airbrush.

And I'm using those brushes several times a week. From what I've seen of the GW airbrush, it looks like a plastic POS that would break after serious use.

To thin paints, I use a mix of soapy water and future floor wax. I thin my paints about to the same level I paint with a regular brush, about the consistency of milk or so.

Btw I have http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ct...temnumber=95630 , and it works just fine. I plan on upgrading to a gravity fed airbrush but I haven't had any real problems with the siphon fed. In terms of air brushing knowledge I watched youtube videos of WW2 minis dudes and Les from AwesomePaintJobs. Actually read this article it'll get you into basic knowledge, and what you should and should not be looking for, http://blog.brushthralls.com/?page_id=3024. Also practice practice practice, you want to go smooth and clean strokes and get the right consistency in your paint. There's explaining and doing in terms of that, I kinda hosed up at first but after a few tries I got it down pat, and now can base coat and entire army in an hour tops.


I R SMART LIKE ROCK fucked around with this message at 18:34 on Mar 25, 2010

Fast_Food_Knight
Nov 23, 2007

Be nice, He's a knight!
He's just a fast food knight.


stabbington posted:

I haven't heard anything, positive or negative, about white gesso. I've had good results with grey (liquitex), and I've seen many other people do well with black.

e: also seconding airbrush info, holy poo poo. (and if we can get a definitive airbrush info post for PV to link in the OP, that would kick rear end, because that comes up all the freaking time)

One goon did an awesome airbrush rundown, I think it was Pagan or Cakefool but not too sure. I'm sure it got linked or saved somewhere too.

Fast_Food_Knight fucked around with this message at 18:33 on Mar 25, 2010

Ashcans
Jan 2, 2006

Let's do the space-time warp again!


Barry the Sprout posted:

As I understand it, it is ill advised to use white gesso?

I wouldn't mind priming so much if I had somewhere well ventilated to do it. It's the whole having the flat of a glue sniffer that I object to.

I don't know if I would call it 'ill-advised'. There isn't really anything wrong with white gesso except that it doesn't have as good coverage as black - you can usually get a good prime with a single coat of black (or gray) gesso, but white can often need two coats.

On the other hand, it is probably easier to give something two coats of white gesso as a primer than the use black gesso and then have to use something like dheneb stone or a several coats of regular paint for a lighter end shade.

I would love to try some airbrush gesso, but it has a similar problem to regular spray - I only seem to get time to work on stuff at 10-11pm, when I'm not really able to work outside, and spraying in the house isn't really feasible.

I R SMART LIKE ROCK
Mar 10, 2003

I just want a hug.



Fun Shoe

On the plus side gesso doesn't give off noxious fumes like spraying does. I personally do it in the bathroom with some cardboard. It wipes off pretty easily ( just a moist rag will do ) and with the air brush I have a pretty decent control of where the over spray is going anyway.

lighttigersoul
Mar 5, 2009

Sailor Scout Enoutner 5:
Moon Healing Escalation


Fast_Food_Knight posted:

One goon did an awesome airbrush rundown, I think it was Pagan or Cakefool but not too sure. I'm sure it got linked or saved somewhere too.

I'm pretty sure it was in the Tale of Goon Wargamers thread, but I don't have archives so can't go find it.

Beer4TheBeerGod
Aug 23, 2004

"I'm cisgender heterosexual white American male.

Fuck you for telling me what "my part" is."

- B4TBG on why they can't be criticized by minorities for being wrong because


Exciting Lemon

lighttigersoul posted:

I'm pretty sure it was in the Tale of Goon Wargamers thread, but I don't have archives so can't go find it.

It was HKR. Here are the relevant posts:

HKR posted:

Instead of using Gesso (gently caress the poo poo) or canned spray primer, I decided to mix some of my own primer and shoot it through my airbrush. Why in the world would I want to make my own primer when I could just buy some krylon for $3? There are a few reasons:

-Greater control. With canned spray primer it's shake and pray. It's hard to control the amount of paint that comes out and it's consistency. Variances between cans can sometimes ruin minis. White spray primer is especially guilty of these flaws.

-Ultra thin layers. Like good painting, with priming you want to use extremely thin layers. Canned primer can be extremely hard to control in this regard. With an airbrush you have a fine control over the amount of primer being sprayed.

-Using the materials I used, you can obtain a grey that is closer to white then most canned primers.

So let's get started:



Materials:

-Good beer
-Mr. Surfacer 1200
-Mr. Color leveling thinner

Mr. Surfacer is a brush on liquid putty used for filling gaps and comes in various degrees of grittiness (500, 1000 and 1200). 500 is usually brushed on large gaps and then sanded down, while 1000 and 1200 are used to fill small gaps or scratches. 1200 is also fine enough to be shot through an airbrush, if properly thinned.

There are two ways you can thin Mr Surfacer. The first is using generic Lacquer thinner with a few drops of paint retardant (Mr Retarder). The other is to use Mr Color Leveling Thinner, which is their lacquer thinner (Mr Color Thinner) with their retarder.

Why the retarder? Because the liquid putty dries incredibly fast, and can dry mid air when being sprayed. This can cause spider webbing on the model, which looks horrible. The retarder prevents this.

(A note of availability. Mr Color products are becoming really hard to find in the US because of the cost of importing. Most places don't have Mr Retarder these days).

Make a mix of 30:70 Mr Surfacers 1200 and Mr Color Leveling Thinner. Thin milk is what you're aiming for. Do a test spray. Wear your damned respirator, this poo poo is dangerous to breath in.




Tomorrow: More beer and paint plans.

Beer4TheBeerGod
Aug 23, 2004

"I'm cisgender heterosexual white American male.

Fuck you for telling me what "my part" is."

- B4TBG on why they can't be criticized by minorities for being wrong because


Exciting Lemon

Post number two...

HKR posted:

Wow this took way too long to write up. I'm going to post this in multiple places so a bunch more people see it.

---

Imagine this scenario. You wake up after a drunken night of slinging dice at your local hobby store. Glancing over, you look in horror as you realize at some point you thought it would be a good idea to buy 12 boxes of space marines. The store has no return policy. You need to get these painted fast! Because, uh, that's what you do.

Here's another. You just finished building your Baneblade and you realize in horror you have to base-coat the entire thing by hand.

How about the prices of gloss and flat spray varnish? Criminal isn't it. If only there was a cheap way to protect your minis...

All of these problems, and many more, can be solved with an airbrush.

Of course, buying an airbrush, let alone using one can be more problematic, especially with all the different kinds you can get and all the different techniques involved in using one. Each kind has a specific purpose, and each one has strengths and flaws.

While I'm not an expert, I have done a good bit of research on airbrushes and have used them for various tasks. While I'm still learning all I can about it, I figure what I've learned up until now will help some of you out. So let's do this.

There are a few things you need when using an airbrush, along with a few optional things. These are, in no particular order:

-A compressed air source.
-An airbrush with something to hold paint in
-Paint
-Propellant/thinner
-A mask so you're not breathing in fumes

Optionally, you'll also want:

-a spray booth to suck up fumes
-a rotating base that can hold models and pieces so there is less direct contact

Let's break it down:

A Compressed Air Source

There are two sources of compressed air you can use. A can of compressed air and an air compressor. With that being said, you should never used cans of compressed air to airbrush with. Airbrushes need constant air pressure to paint properly, and cans of compressed air cannot deliver the consistency needed.

There are a few things you need to look into when choosing a compressor, the most important being compatibility with your airbrush of choice. Usually airbrush manufacturers also sell compressors, so if you stick with the same brands you'll be fine. You can use different brands of airbrushes on different brands of compressors, but they'll most likely need some sort of adapter.

The second most important thing to look into is how much PSI the compressor can deliver. Most airbrushes need between 10-20 PSI to paint properly, depending on what type of job you're trying to do and the paint you're using. Make sure your airbrush can deliver that much (And try to read some reviews as some compressors don't tell the truth).

Next, a good compressor should come with a moisture trap and a pressure regulator. Moisture traps prevent water from the air getting in the line and ruining your spray, while pressure regulators allow you to adjust the amount of air pressure going through your brush.

Optionally, you'll want to see if your compressor of choice has an air tank attached. This will prevent the compressor from having to run all the time, but it will increase the price of the compressor fast.

You'll also want to see if the compressor has an on off switch or if it simply powers down by unplugging it.

An Airbrush

The most important decision. These range in price from super cheap $15 single action jobs to $500+ professional tools. How much you want to spend is entirely dependent on what you need your airbrush to do and how reliable you want it, and price does tend to be a good indicator of quality.

There are many types of airbrushes that do all sorts of things. Let's define some terms.

Airbrush vs Spray Gun

Both essentially do the same thing, but each one has it's specific purposes. Spray guns are best for doing broad strokes and laying paint down over a large area, and most have trouble doing detail work. Airbrushes are better for detail work but can also lay down paint over a large area. If all you want to do is lay down a base-coat on some figs or a tank, a spray gun will work fine. If you see yourself attempting detail work with your brush, you'll want an airbrush.

Single Action vs. Dual Action

There are two types of airbrushes; single action and dual action. Cheaper airbrushes tend to be single action while better ones are dual. What is the difference?

Single Action: Single action brushes are much like spray cans. You press the button and paint is expelled out at a fixed amount. Some allow this to be slightly adjusted, but for the most part you won't have control over how much paint is coming out, much like a spray can. This is fine for doing base-coats but if you want more then you'll need a dual action. Most spray guns are single action.

Dual Action: These airbrushes tend to be more expensive, but they have finer control over how the paint comes out. Dual action works by having two actions on the trigger. Pressing in allows air to come out of the brush, and pulling back expels paint. The further you pull back, the more paint comes out. This allows a super fine level of control and allows you to pull off come crazy awesome tricks. Depending on how good your airbrush is, you could hard line tanks with it. If you see yourself doing any sort of detail work with a brush, get a dual action.

Gravity Fed Vs Bottom Fed

This is how the paint is fed into the airbrush for mixing.

Bottom Fed

Air pressure is used to siphon paint up a tube and into the airbrush. The advantages of this is it allows you to use external jars which can hold a lot of paint and be changed quickly. The disadvantage is it requires more air pressure then gravity fed brushes and is harder to maintain a fine mist. If you see yourself changing paint colors often or wanting to do a large number of models in one go, get a bottom fed airbrush.

Gravity Fed

Gravity is used to feed paint into the airbrush. This requires less air pressure then bottom fed brushes, and thus allows a finer spray for more detail. However, most gravity fed brushes have a built in paint canister, which means you won't be able to swap out containers to change colors fast and you won't be able to hold a large amount of paint in it. If detail is what you want though, gravity fed is the way to go.

Internal Mix vs External Mix

Where the air and paint mix.

Internal Mix

The air and paint are mixed in the tip of the brush, which creates a finer atomized "mist" of paint.

External Mix

The Air in an external mix leaves the brush before coming in contact with the paint and can create a course stippled effect. Most cheaper airbrushes are external mix. They should be avoided if you are looking for fine detail work.

So let's recap. If you just want a cheap airbrush for base-coats, a single action, bottom fed external mix airbrush is fine. If you want a bit more control, then a dual action, internal mix brush is what you want.

Paints and Propellant/thinner

The big question a lot of people have is what kind of paint you have to use with an airbrush. The good news is that you can use any paint you want with it. The bad news is each paint, nay, each brand of paint, has it's own way of having to be handled and mixed in an airbrush. First, let's go over thinning your paint for airbrush use.

There are three things you want to happen when you spray paint through an airbrush. The first is that the paint goes through it without clogging it up. The second is that paint sprays finely without spattering. The third is that the paint dries quickly without leaving the model wet for an extended period of time.

Thick paint can clog an airbrush, so you have to thin it. How much depends on what type of paint you're using, but you want your paint to be pretty thin. Thinner then 2% milk is a good guideline, along with the rule that paint that's too thin is better then paint that's too thick.

In order to get a quick drying time, you need to use a different thinner other then water. Water cannot be misted properly by an airbrush and can cause the paint to spatter, as well as increasing the drying time, allowing paint to pool up in recesses. What you need is an alcohol based thinner. While what the best airbrush thinner is will be debated until the end of time by nerds, there are distinctly three different choices you have.

Expensive: Hobby specific airbrush thinners, like Tamiya Acrylic Thinner. Expensive like all hobby specific products, but a lot of modelers swear by the stuff.

Cheap: Isopropyl Alcohol 91% to 99%. Available at any local drug store. Fairly cheap. Make sure you get a grade that's at least 91%, as anything lower will have too much water in it to be useful.

Super Cheap: Windex. Seriously. While I haven't tried it myself, A lot of people swear by this stuff. Apparently the blue tint doesn't affect the color of the paint at all. I'm a bit suspicious but at that price you can't really go wrong.

As far as your paint selection goes, for the most part any acrylic paint can go through an airbrush, even metallics. Which paint you use will determine how much you have to thin it. I'll give a brief rundown of paints I have experience with:

Citadel Paints: These are perfectly fine to be airbrushed with. My paint to thinner ratio for these is about 50:50. Foundation paints are another story however. Since the concentration of pigments is far higher, the paint to thinner ration needs to be somewhere between 30:70 and 40:60. I've come to the conclusion that unless I cannot come up with a perfect color match, I will not use foundation paints in my airbrush.

Tamiya Acrylics: These paints are far thinner then GW paints and can be mixed from 60:40 to 70:30.

Testors and Model Masters Acrylics: 60:40 is a good ratio for these but testors is a horrible company that is responsible for the decline in model building in America so don't use them.

A word on masks and safety in general

If you're using an airbrush to spray paint, you should wear a mask. End of story. Even painting acrylics can damage your system over time if continuously inhaling the alcohol and paint. Especially if you plan on spray priming. That poo poo will kill your lungs.

On why you might want a spray booth

If your paint area gets no ventilation, you might want to get a spray booth.

Spray booths are basically boxes with fans attached that suck out paint fumes to the outside. You can build one for fairly cheap or you can spend a ton of money on a professional one. If you live with others who are not as enthusiastic about your painting, this will help keep the complaints low.

Airbrush basics

So now that you have your airbrush and compressor set up, how do you use it?

While this is all dependent on the type of airbrush you got, there are a few basic guidelines.

Practice with the airbrush for a bit before you lay down a spray on some minis. This will show you what it's capable of and allow you to get used to it. Keep making adjustments to it to learn where the sweet spot is.

When you spray, always start with just air, then slowly pull back the trigger. Don't pull the trigger on the minis. Instead start elsewhere and move to the mini once you're satisfied that the paint isn't going to splatter. Keep the airbrush moving to avoid the paint pooling. When you're done, don't stop the air while still pointed at the mini, as this may cause the paint to spatter. Pull away from it and then let go of the trigger.

Cleaning your airbrush

Every single time you're done spraying a color, you need to give your airbrush a quick rinse. Use Isopropyl alcohol, lacquer thinner or Acetone. Once you run that through, run some clear water through it.

At the end of every painting session you should be pulling your airbrush apart to give the internals a quick clean. White the needle down with Isopropyl alcohol, lacquer thinner or acetone. Soak the tip in a small pool of the same. Give it a good wipe down. re-assemble and check everything. A well maintained airbrush will last years. A poorly maintained one will last days.

Buying Suggestions

Brands to avoid
Testors, Aztek

Brands to look into
Paasche, Iwata, Badgar

I have three options for you guys.

El Cheapo: Harbor Freight Airbrush and compressor kit. Super cheap airbrush, but it's an internal mix so at least you have that. Compressor is kinda under powered and the airbrush tends to break down after a while, but it's cheap.

Not so El Cheapo: Iwata Silver Jet Studio Compressor and Iwata Eclipse Airbrush Kit (HB-BCS). Iwata airbrushes are really good and highly recommended.

Insane: Iwata Custom Micron CM-C Plus. One of the ultimate detail brushes.

PaintVagrant
Apr 13, 2007

~ the ultimate driving machine ~


that was maybe the most informative post of all time

Fyrbrand
Dec 30, 2002



Grimey Drawer

HKR doesn't gently caress around.

Beer4TheBeerGod
Aug 23, 2004

"I'm cisgender heterosexual white American male.

Fuck you for telling me what "my part" is."

- B4TBG on why they can't be criticized by minorities for being wrong because


Exciting Lemon

I'm tempted to try the compressed gas route. It's cheap, you don't have to worry about humidity, and the cylinders will last for a long time.

Bobx66
Feb 11, 2002

We all fell into the pit


PaintVagrant posted:

that was maybe the most informative post of all time

Add it to the OP.

PaintVagrant
Apr 13, 2007

~ the ultimate driving machine ~


Bobx66 posted:

Add it to the OP.

I cant really add that entire thing to the OP, its huge. I can add a link to the post though, I guess

e: added

cakesmith handyman
Jul 22, 2007

Pip-Pip old chap! Last one in is a rotten egg what what.



Beer4TheBeerGod posted:

I'm tempted to try the compressed gas route. It's cheap, you don't have to worry about humidity, and the cylinders will last for a long time.

It'll give you the taste but sooner or late (sooner) you'll pine for air on tap.

Beer4TheBeerGod
Aug 23, 2004

"I'm cisgender heterosexual white American male.

Fuck you for telling me what "my part" is."

- B4TBG on why they can't be criticized by minorities for being wrong because


Exciting Lemon

Cakefool posted:

It'll give you the taste but sooner or late (sooner) you'll pine for air on tap.

What makes you say that?

I R SMART LIKE ROCK
Mar 10, 2003

I just want a hug.



Fun Shoe

If only because you eventually have to pay to refill the tank. While a compressor costs you nothing but electricity which is just pittance for what you get.

Beer4TheBeerGod
Aug 23, 2004

"I'm cisgender heterosexual white American male.

Fuck you for telling me what "my part" is."

- B4TBG on why they can't be criticized by minorities for being wrong because


Exciting Lemon

I R SMART LIKE ROCK posted:

If only because you eventually have to pay to refill the tank. While a compressor costs you nothing but electricity which is just pittance for what you get.

True.

How loud is the Harbor Freight compressor? The benefits of silent operation may offset the additional cost (about $20 per refill).

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cakesmith handyman
Jul 22, 2007

Pip-Pip old chap! Last one in is a rotten egg what what.



Beer4TheBeerGod posted:

True.

How loud is the Harbor Freight compressor? The benefits of silent operation may offset the additional cost (about $20 per refill).

$20 per refill? gently caress. Not only will a hobby compressor be fairly quiet (I can run mine next to me whilst painting without disturbing wife watching telly in the next room) but the pressure of a tank will change gradually, loving with your flow & control. Get a compressor with a tank, the pump only runs about 25% of the time on mine with a 3L tank

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