Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us money per month for bills, and since we don't believe in showing ads to our users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
 
  • Locked thread
Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


Crosspost from the Warhammer thread, because PV is awesome and also threatened us with violence.
I'll go a little more in-depth here than I did in GBS:



These two handsome gentlemen were pretty much a simple kitbash. The inspiration for it was historical, as I've seen more mounted riders with polearms rather than with giant swords. The first one I did a little extra pretty basing with--a severed arm with the flame bit from the Chaos Lord on Juggernaut kit. Yes, mold lines, I see them now. Both have a plasticard cobblestone motif that I will (in theory) paint to look like a road of some kind.



And this big guy has been, so far, my largest and most thought-out conversion. To me, the original stance was a bit, well, goofy. So, with a bit of inspiration from the 40k daemons codex for the pose, as well as having watched the Dark Crystal recently, I got this guy out of it. It's my first major use of green stuff to rebuild a model, but I think it came out nice. I'm proud of it overall.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


!amicable posted:

I'm totally stealing the polearm idea for my BC's.

Helpful tip: When trimming the sword from the hand, leave the grip intact and remove only the pommel in back, and use a sharp knife to trim the hilt to a spike--instant pins that are actually part of the model, thus saving you a shitload of time and frustration when you drill holes to attach the polearm halves to. Found this out by accident, but hey, it worked really well.

Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


!amicable posted:

Were they the chaos knight polearms?

As Bhsman said, they are: I picked up the box for a semi-related reason, and found myself too impressed by the polearms to simply let them go unused.

Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


bhsman posted:

WIP Chaplain kitbash.

Looking good so far. Any idea how you're gonna do the legs yet?

Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


Aranan posted:

Does anyone have any suggestions as to how I could go about making bases like these on my own?

PV pretty much already said it, but that is by far the easiest way to do it. If you look at the bases on the bloodcrushers I put up pictures for earlier, you can see the same idea, but in cobblestones rather than bricks.

Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


Fyrbrand posted:

Woot






I actually did edge highlights but they're pretty subtle and the lighting washes them out. The shinguard in the 2nd pic shows it reasonably well.

Snot green with Scorpion edging? Looks good, whatever you used.

Also, Broken Loose, you should paint more stuff that isn't a tyranid: your stuff looks good.

Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


bhsman posted:

You've got samurai warrior in my steampunk!

You've got steampunk in my samurai warrior!

Seriously, what the hell is going on here?

Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


PaintVagrant posted:

I should make a OP post with all my recipes

Yes, please.

Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


Their white is pretty good too. Doesn't pool like other white primers I've used. The redshirts often remind me (sigh) about how their primers are specifically formulated for miniatures. While that may or may not be true, 15 bucks a can is loving expensive.

Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


^^^^^
Aww. Well, at least it's further proof of how awesome Sabol is.

Sabol Designs makes some great cases and foam trays. They are, in my opinion, the best value in terms of expense versus quality.
If you have a lot of money to spend, you could give Battlefoam a whirl. They cut their trays to the exact shape of your minis once you send them some tracing. This option is the most expensive I've found so far, but if you are super-paranoid about your minis, this is the best way to go.

Alternately, use the power of magnets!
Moderately expensive, affixing magnets to your minis and attaching them to a thin steel plate is an awesomely effective way of keeping your minis from getting damage. I've seen people take magnet-inserted minis and transport them in steel tool boxes. No damage, and as a sturdy case, well, anything meant to hold 80+ pounds of tools likely won't collapse under normal circumstances.

Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


Anyone have any experience with this stuff?
I love green stuff for the most part, but I find that there isn't enough contrast from light and shadow when I work with green stuff for my taste.

Fake Edit: I've never worked with brown stuff, but I imagine that the darkness of the material will be similar to green stuff, which doesn't fix the problem.

Real Edit: Always fun when the website you link pages to has the same URL for two different pages!

Sole.Sushi fucked around with this message at 09:27 on Dec 1, 2009

Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


Fix posted:

http://stores.ebay.com/paylessrwe

So I just realized that I was bitching and bitching about my grainy primer jobs.

My grainy sandable primer jobs.

If only they made magnetic primer. Actually, that would be pretty sweet, come to think of it.

Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


MasterSlowPoke posted:



Looks like Leonardo DiCaprio.
On other news, you can get dropper bottles from any art and craft supply store (Michael's, Hobby Lobby, etc) near their paints, usually in the same isle. If you mean the eye dropper kind of dropper bottles, try an iodine bottle. I have no idea how much iodine costs, but I don't imagine it would be so expensive that you couldn't buy it for just the bottle.

Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


NecronSchmecron posted:

Also, feel free to critique. I can take it. Right now it's going to be Salamanders and BFG Necrons.

BFG Necrons? Jerk.
They look good though.
Maybe your salamanders could do with some washes, or perhaps more emphasized highlights. But, as you said, it could just be the photos bleaching out the contrast.

Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


Your work gets better every time I see it, PV. I cannot express how much envy/hatred I have towards you.
Oh, wait, I can:

NecronSchmecron, mixing paints isn't that bad--use a couple of eye-droppers and get a mix ratio down. For example, making a highlight for Snot Green by adding Scorpion Green into it, you could drop two drops of Snot and one of Scorpion. If you like how it looks once you mix it, just write down the formula.
Doing it in small drops means you don't waste a lot of paint, and it also makes it far easier to keep track of your ratios.

Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


Shaky hand syndrome can be fixed by slowing down on the coffee, but if you drink coffee on a daily basis (I.E. have a caffeine addiction), don't stop suddenly or you'll get the shakes something fierce.
While you paint, steady your arms by resting your elbows on a table, and steady your wrists by keeping your hands close together. Having your wrists touch while you hold a model in one hand and paint with the other is nice, but really you just need to keep both your hands in your field of vision. Some kind of "I see it, I know it's there" psychological bullshit, but hey, it works for me.
Lastly, before you begin to paint, and while you paint, take deep, slow breaths to calm your nerves and lessen your jitters. A little zen goes a long way. Again, I know it sounds like bullshit, but it does work.
Some people just have naturally jittery hands, and if you find that it gets in the way of your painting, bite the bullet and keep at it. The more you do it, the more accustomed your body is to keeping your hands steady, and over time they will naturally set into that position.
If you have some kind of medical condition that causes your hands to shake, twitch or jerk, repeat this mantra: Midgard Models ain't got poo poo on me. Trust me, you may end up with Picasso Marines, but it will still look a ton better than their crap.

Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


Off topic in a sense, but has the Warhammer thread moved or something? I cannot seem to find it.

Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


So, I might be crazy, but I'm basing my Salamanders with a snow theme!
I've found some pretty awesome snow tutorials thanks to this thread, so I've been eager to try them out. Plus, I like the whole "fire and ice" thing.
Any ways, I've decided that I would lay a foundation of slate on the bases before adding the snow, to give it a little something apart from bland white. For anyone interested in using slate, head on over to Lowel's. They keep it in stock at all times as far as I can tell (most flooring places don't), and if you take their already broken tiles off their hands, you can get them for $.25 a square foot.

I'll post photos of work in progress soon, but if anyone has suggestions or advice from working with snow bases before, I'd love to hear it.

Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


Kestral posted:

Thought for a potentially neat base: use Water Effects or something similar to simulate the snow melting from the heat of their flamers and other heavy weaponry. Hell, maybe you can even get steam, though I have no idea how you'd pull that off.

It's a good idea, and something I forgot about. I'll have to plan that out though, probably going with that slush tutorial I saw someplace. I believe it's just water effects with some kind of opaque white aggregate mixed in (snow powder maybe). Absolutely something to test out, and thank you for reminding me about this.


That thing is pretty expensive. Cool idea though.

Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


Kestral posted:

Hot drat. This could be a fun project.

I might do that for a scenic carrying display when I get that far, but for now, I need to focus on the army. God damned this hobby!
Anyways, picture time!

Here are four out of at least 20 I'm going to do, plus five terminator bases. I've decided to build up the bases a bit before priming, painting and adding the snow.

Starting with slate, I built up with the mixed scree and a bit of talus with PVA.

A close up of the mixed scree.

For binders, I used Sumo glue to affix the slate to the bases, assisted with a bit of superglue to assure the slate will stay in place until the sumo cures. The Black Lava was used on the bare parts of the base to build texture, so when the snow is applied it sits unevenly, as to be more natural. Comments and criticism always welcome!

Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


If you still can, pull up the grass and apply some contact cement to both the grass and the cork. They make some spray stuff that works rather well, but make sure you spray that crap outside.

Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


PaintVagrant posted:

Scurvy continues to shoot his models with a flash despite me smacking his knuckles with a ruler like a catholic nun

Do you think the Sisters do this? Or maybe they use power weapons. Power rulers.
... Tape measure?

As far as Scurvy's photo goes; base your poo poo, dude.

Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


Crossposting from the Warhammer thread.






I used to play necrons, and I got really sick of the same pose over and over. They aren't done 100%, still need epoxy to fill in the joints, but they will likely never, ever get done.

Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


Dr. Lenin posted:

When greenstuff dries, should it still be somewhat elastic or should it be rock hard? Because I rolled som scrap bits into a ball, flatened it to a brick, and after more than 12 hours I can still bend it. It eventually unbends to its original shape, but it's supposed to become super hard right?

There will always be some elasticity to green stuff, even after a full cure. It's not going to be a rock-hard product no matter what you do to it. As far as I know, only epoxies that have actual metal in them (like JB Weld) cure to anything of significant hardness.
If you want something that will air-dry into a solid, non-flexible brick, good ol' play-dough will do that. It shrinks considerably, however. There are more expensive alternatives with non-bake clay polymer products, many of which shrink very little.

EDIT: as far as I am aware, epoxies have no true shelf-life limitation. So long as the components are separate, they should last indefinitely.

Sole.Sushi fucked around with this message at 09:01 on Dec 17, 2009

Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


To Dr. Lenin:
For adding detail and fine work with a two-part epoxy, don't use one that hardens in 20 minutes. It will start to harden shortly after being mixed, which makes the adding of detail all the much harder, and thus takes more time, which means you might not get everything that you want out of it. Gale Force 9 makes green stuff in large tubes for a reasonable price if I'm not mistaken--I bought mine at least 5 years ago, and I have yet to go through half of them.
Using the epoxy as you did, however, seems to work just fine, and would work for building a base to use green stuff to add detail later, and since it's cheap it's good to use if you want to try something new, creative and generally silly without having to worry about loss of product.

To Gravitas Shortfall: Most two-part epoxies will not react with any kind of plastic, no matter what shape or form its in. In fact, it's non-reactive with most materials, so feel free to make a foam core for your Hellpit Abomination (or what-have-you) and give it a coat of green stuff for detail.

Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


Dr. Lenin posted:

On a side note, any advice on getting greenstuff to stick well to legs / sides of space marines? I've been using my knife and a pen to shape it, but it always peels off the plastic first with very little effort. Ends up taking a long time to get anything to stick.

If you're working with green stuff, you'll have the bright yellow-green stuff, and the blue stuff that makes the wonderful dark green stuff we all know and love. If you want to make your green stuff more tacky so it will stick to a surface, add more of the yellow-green (60/40 mix works fine) and it will be considerably more adhesive. However, by doing this the final hardness of the green stuff can turn out to be far more flexible than you'll want. The other option is to take a hobby knife and score up the areas that you will be putting green stuff over, then take a file and further rough up the area. This will provide more surface area (tooth) for the green stuff to take to, which should prevent it from peeling.
Additionally, I've seen people talk about using vaseline to coat their tools to prevent sticking. Considering out tenacious that vaseline is, I avoid it completely and simply use water. Once you get your ball of putty mixed up, dip it into a cup of clean water to keep it from sticking to your fingers and tools, apply it to your surface, then dip your sculpting tool in water before bringing it to the putty. Keep in mind, it doesn't need to be drenched, just wet enough to prevent adhesion.
The only other thing I can think of is that your green stuff is getting too stiff to work with. I've been finding out while working on my latest project that green stuff will sometimes just not want to stick to anything. I just pitch that piece, or shape it into a rock to use on a base or something.

EDIT: The project that I spoke of might be relevant to your interests. I can post some photos and a step-by-step if you'd like, as it involves adding green stuff to marines.

Sole.Sushi fucked around with this message at 18:21 on Dec 18, 2009

Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


Dr. Lenin
As promised, a step by step of my current project: Scale-pattern shoulderpads for my Salamanders.

Here's everything that I used. Well, more than everything but you get the idea. On the left is the GF9 green stuff, and the center is the ProCreate two-part epoxy. While far, far superior (in my opinion) to green stuff, I promised a green stuff tutorial. Aside from that is a set of GF9 sculpting tools, and a goblet of water. Some fancy poo poo right there.

When working with green stuff, I find it best to keep the ratio at 50/50. You can get other effects by changing the ratio, extending or shortening curing time by going from 40/60 or 60/40, green and blue respectively.

This is the color you're looking for with 50/50. As you'll also notice, I've put water on the epoxy as well, enough to get a good coat over the whole thing.

To get the effect I want, I take several small pieces, roll them into balls and press them firmly into the surface of the shoulder pad. To relate, smooth surfaces can hold epoxy with little trouble if you work quick enough (about 10-15 minutes), but after that it might be needed to rough up the area you wish to apply to. As a reference as to how small that piece is...

... It's loving tiny.

Several balls of various sizes pressed into the shoulder pad later, you end up with this. If you look close, you can see my fingerprints. Not to worry, as we'll clean that up in the next step.

Out of all the tools in the kit, I only use these two for this project. If you don't have access to sculpting tools (or simply don't want to buy some), your hobby knife will do just fine.
Flatten out each ball by pressing the flat tool (or the flat end of your hobby knife), then use the bladed tool (or the blade of your hobby knife) to go back and create the trenches between the scales. Remember to dip your tools in water before you use them. If you flood the details of whatever you are sculpting, just blow on it a bit to clear it out. I wanted to have an angular sort of scale pattern, but no scales are hard-edged, so I wasn't concerned with making the edges straight. If you make a mistake, just flatten it out once more and try again.

In the end, this is what came of it. Fun stuff, easy to do, and good practice. Bonus pictures of other ones that I've already done!


Hope this helps you out, at least partly.

Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


CyberLord XP posted:

God I love you for doing this. It gives me so many ideas for my next chaos creation.

No problem. If you guys want to see different step-by-steps with photos of different things, feel free to ask, and I'll see if I can do something that doesn't suck.

An observer posted:

Out of curiosity, why? Is it as smooth? Thanks for the tutorial by the way!

I picked it up because it came highly recommended from other forum members, and I wasn't disappointed. Smoother than green stuff, easier to see detail on, and to make it even better, getting different ratios of resin and hardener can produce GW-kind green stuff, a middle range if you do equal parts, or brown stuff. A bad-rear end product. It's made by a company called Kraftmark, and while you can pick it up from the CMON store, it's a bit cheaper to order it direct from the company's website.

LewdMonocle posted:

Can we sticky this or something? This needs to be saved. gently caress dude maybe you should start a From the Warp blog.

A what-now blog?
Also, those armatures are looking pretty sweet so far.

Sole.Sushi fucked around with this message at 05:15 on Dec 20, 2009

Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


What you have right now is sort of like a dorsal version of a marsupial pouch, which is pretty cool. But, the animal world is full of crazy things, and perhaps some inspiration for you.
Some kinds of fish do the mouth-breeding thing: they hold the eggs inside their maws, and even after they hatch, they keep them inside for most of the time until they are ready to fend for themselves.
If you like that idea, perhaps you could have the beast "vomit" forth gaunts. It could store eggs in a specialized stomach/ovipositor within the back under a really dense carapace, and when it's ready, it sends out a chemical signal to the eggs to cause a random number (3d6 of them) to awaken, hatch, and regurgitate in rapid succession. The hatched eggs would then regenerate within the stomach at a rapid pace, replacing those lost in minutes or seconds.

From a fluff standpoint, it sounds cool. From a modeling standpoint, it gives you an excuse to make something not terribly huge that can reasonably put out 3d6 gaunts every turn, and it should be easy to model a gaunt being vomited forth to make the mechanic center-stage.

Certain kinds of spiders carry their eggs on their backs when they move about. Similar to what you have already, the idea is to have the gaunts ride on the back of the beast in a dormant fetal state, where they act like back armor. When the Tervigon makes 3d6 of them, they can simply "shingle" off, awakening and sliding from the back. Like shark's teeth, new gaunts could be grown underneath the older ones, coming to the front in rapid succession when needed.

Again, I think the idea is pretty cool, and to model, you'd just need some gaunts, a carnifex, some bits and green stuff. It would also be easy to model fresh gaunts awakening and peeling off the back, exposing some dormant gaunts underneath. The whole thing might be a little big in the end, but it would likely be the easiest to convert.

Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


Looks pretty sweet, dude. I don't play fantasy at all, but I can assure you our resident Skaven players will love you for years to come for this guide. At least until GW makes a different bell/furnace model.

Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


Danger - Octopus! posted:

Been busy for what used to be the GBS thread. Crossposting without remorse, since I'm pretty happy.











Looks nice. People who don't play the game will look at it and say "Wow, this is what Christmas in WWI looked like!"

Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


MarionetteOwl posted:

I figured I'd drop in here to ask this. I'm working on a Skink chief for my Lizardmen army and I want to model his cloak of feathers on him. I'm still pretty new working with green stuff, but if anybody knows any good method for sculpting feathers or a feathery texture, I'd love some help.

Expect a photo tutorial from me soon, if someone doesn't help you out beforehand.

Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


Aranan posted:

Do one anyway!

'Kay.
Apologies beforehand for crappy photos.
For this tutorial, here are the tools that I've used.

The leftmost is a pointed tool that is bent towards the end. Again, if you don't have access to such a specific tool, there are several ways to mimic the edge shape--anything pointy and wedge-shaped would work, bent or not. The middle is a flattening tool. The back of your hobby knife would work, though for this application, a toothpick might be best. Lastly, a trusty old hobby knife.

Here's some green stuff I've put atop some card stock to demonstrate proof of concept. It's simply flattened out with both my fingers and the flattening tool. Really, just smooth it to an even surface.

Using the wedge tool, start out from the bottom and press a wedge into it. In the row above, shift slightly so that the next line comes to bridge with the others in a feathered pattern, as shown above. As a note, it really does pay to keep your pattern even and consistent; I kind of rushed through with this one, but for demo purposes it works.

Here, I've taken the hobby knife and cut lines into the green stuff. First, cut a vertical line along the length of each feather to represent the core, then make downward-facing lines with the knife at steep angles from the core to make the feathery parts. The smaller your feathers, the sharper the edge of the tool that you want, which is why I prefer to do this with a hobby knife rather than a sculpting tool.

Here's a Sternguard model that I'm working on. Aside from the drake scale cloak, I've decided to put it on a model with a cloak already--a Sergeant should have more badges of honor, so I originally thought to put a fur cloak underneath. Feathers are sweet though, and make a nice contrast to the scales. To help the epoxy stick, I've scored the model, as shown above. However, for the model I won't be using green stuff, instead I'll be using ProCreate.

This is a 50/50 mix of ProCreate. I thought about getting a stiffer putty to make sharper lines, but in the end I figured that since the feathers will be rather small, it would be better to blend them in to hide my mistakes.

Here's the epoxy put onto the cloak. You'll notice it is pretty thick, and masks a lot of the details the cloak originally had. This is intentional, as I've yet to see a feathery cloak with sharp folds.

Here's the feather pattern base. If you are extremely patient, you could use this pattern for a nice scale cloak if you line things up right. I might end up doing this with a different Sternguard model--so, thank you for making me do this, as I never would have found out otherwise!

And with some knifework, we are done.

As always, feel free to ask for other demos. It's good to help you guys out, and it's good practice for me.

Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


D'aww.
Like I said, if anyone has ideas for more tutorials, I'll gladly put something together. If it doesn't end up looking like crap, I'll post it up here.

Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


Sure thing.

Green Stuff (GW, GF9, etc.)
PROS: Relative ease to work with, generally cheap, holds shape well, great for beginners and experts alike. Can be sanded and filed after curing.
CONS: Poor color contrast in material makes intricate details difficult, relatively short work life (approximately 25-30 minutes). Mixing vastly different ratios will cause product failure (anything greater than 40/60 or 60/40).

ProCreate
PROS: Easy to work with, holds shape very well. Can be sanded and filed after curing. Gray color makes great color contrast, allowing detail work to be extremely precise. Relative long work life (approximately 40-50 minutes); curing process can be halted indefinitely by freezing the product.
BONUS: The ratios can be varied to get pretty much any kind of putty you want, from Green Stuff to Brown Stuff.
CONS: Expensive. Ultra-fine grit makes it a poor material for beginners. Some surfaces may require scoring for proper adhesion.

Kneadatite: Brown Stuff
PROS: Strong material when cured. Takes extremely well to sanding, filing, etc.
CONS: Mono-Tasker (Does one thing, but does it very well).

Mighty Putty
PROS: Dirt loving cheap. Product is essentially pre-mixed. Good for doing under-structure.
CONS: Extremely short work life (10 minutes), grainy. Product will go bad regardless of handling (Between 6 months and 1 year).

All of the above products are non-reactive to plastics and will take to both primer and paint without difficulty.

I have been curious about air-curing polymer clay products (Apoxie Sculpt, etc) and I might give those a try within the near future. Hope this helps.

Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


Indolent Bastard posted:

I used green stuff for the first time a few days ago with so-so results. What I'd like to know is other than liberally covering it and the working surfaces and tools with water how do you stop it from sticking to everything? I was amazed at how tacky it was.
There are several ways besides water, but water by far works the best--it doesn't react with the product, and it will air dry completely without any sort of work from your end. If you don't mind a bit of scrubbing after you're done, you can use petroleum jelly (Vaseline, etc.) to apply a very thin coat to your tools. I dislike doing this as I have accidentally removed detail while trying to get the jelly out of the green stuff. Danger-Octopus! put forth another solution with using body oils. It is kind of gross, but it would work. Baby oil might work as well, but when using any kind of oils, make sure that they A) are non-reactive to the product, and B) you use them very, very, very sparingly. With water, you really don't have to screw around with it too much, and even if you put too much on, you can always get it off.

Combaticus posted:

I'm guessing this is the stuff I should be using to fill gaps in vehicles with, instead of green stuff or procreate. C/D
You can use brown stuff instead of green stuff for nearly any application, as they have similar properties. However, the strength of brown stuff makes it ideal for machining after application; if you have some non-organic structures that you wish to model, go with brown stuff. Even if your model has some rather organic shape to it, you can drill, sand, tap and cut brown stuff without worrying about destroying all of your hard work. It's also the best solution for doing under structures, but I didn't state as such as it is cost prohibitive to do a lot of scratch-built models with brown stuff substructures.
As a note of interest, the term "brown stuff" does not always guarantee that you will be getting Kneadatite brand, so double check. They put actual aluminum into their product, while other brown stuffs might not--those are essentially green stuff with different colors to them.

Danger - Octopus! posted:

Where does milliput fit into this? It reacts very different to water, when compared to greenstuff, but you can sand and even drill it afterwards.
I have never personally used milliput products for any epoxy work, so I couldn't comment on them. How does it react to water?

Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


asbo subject posted:

Just a suggestion here- never done any sculpting myself. Why not use some thing water soluble like KY jelly? Just rinse the stuff off when everything has dried.

Biggest reason is that water will dry 100% when left out in air. Water essentially cleans itself up, and it will do so without any problems. It's also abundant, cheap and absolutely everyone knows how water behaves, which is why I recommend it to everyone. With other lubricants, if you miss cleaning a spot, even a water-soluble product, your primer and paint will not stick. In other words, I'm afraid I'll screw up a model by missing a spot with other lubricants

Using a water-soluble lubricant is a great idea though. I probably wouldn't use KY specifically, but it's certainly worth a try.

Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


Morning posted:

What exactly is in green stuff? My fingertips are all cracked and dried from where I touched it, and I dont remember it doing this before.

Each manufacturer has a specific blend of materials inside their two-part epoxies. While all are safe for handling with bare skin, not everyone's skin is so forgiving. Sometimes there will be chemicals inside the epoxy that cause irritation and dry skin. Just moisturize beforehand, and you should be okay.
As a note: if your fingertips get so bad that it hurts or gets really uncomfortable, congratulations! You are likely allergic to a chemical inside the epoxy!
Never fear, though. Simply wear powder-free latex gloves, keep a bit of water on your fingers, and you'll be fine.

Also: Indolent Bastard, gesso is an acrylic primer that can be thinned and airbrushed onto a surface. Beware, as it shrinks considerably. You may need to spray it twice to get full coverage. Many goons love gesso, while others hate it with a passion. Try it and see if you like it, it's cheap enough that if you don't like it, you won't regret the purchase.

Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


Z the IVth posted:

Also regarding Brownstuff, I was wondering if it had any flex to it at all like Greenstuff, or is it more similar to the putties I've described above?

It doesn't have much unless you purposely sculpt it to be flexible-ish, like a banner or something. Otherwise, it's pretty rigid.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Sole.Sushi
Feb 19, 2008

Seaweed!? Get the fuck out!


crime fighting hog posted:

...a little bit goes a wrong way. Just my opinion though.

I agree. A little bit goes a long way. Less is more, and whatnot. But, I've always been attracted to minimalism as a design style and an artistic expression.

  • Locked thread