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KYOON GRIFFEY JR
Apr 12, 2010




Unsinkabear posted:

Thanks for this. Are their offers actually worth taking, or did you mean take it as a baseline and then add like 15%?

carvana is going to give you a market clearing offer. you could maybe do a little better but you're not going to do better without a lot of hassle in private sale territory.

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Applebees Appetizer
Jan 23, 2006



AWD is pointless for Florida driving, that's why you don't see many Subarus driving around here.

If the car you really like happens to have AWD no big deal, but you don't need it at all.

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


Unsinkabear posted:

Edit: Nevermind, comment below about extra fail points is a good one. Screw it, then.
Yeah it's not just the option price, AWD has a continuous cost of ownership.

Re. Tire strategies, the absolute best economy option to have a car you can drive in snow is two sets of rims, one with all season/summer and one with winter. You need somewhere to store the rims and tires and somewhere to put them on and off yourself to take most advantage.

All weather work nearly as good in the snow but the economy breaks down because they wear down super fast because you are running a tire that's like half winter tires during summer conditions. The economy breaks down less when you don't have room for rims or doing the switch. But if you're talking about going on tour during snow but don't live in snow you almost definitely don't want all weather.

Running all season and planning your trips around weather or being able to bail on travel plans if the road is too dicey for all seasons is always an option.

luminalflux
May 27, 2005



Unsinkabear posted:

I've never seen this advertised anywhere, not even seeing it at Patelco. Is it just something you get if you're doing a loan through them, or will they still help you if you're buying cash? I'm in the latter category and I was considering shopping through Costco's program. But I'm a member of a few credit unions, so if it's an option from them I could try that to? Either way, I would very much like to avoid dealer bullshit while also not taking the risk of buying from a total rando.

I want to sell my 2013 Honda Accord coupe and use the resulting money to replace it with something more practical. I don't mind selling it myself. What is the best way to figure out what this thing is actually saleable for in my area (Tampa Bay)?

I've only ever bought one car and when I did it I got financing through my CU. They were like "ok your loan is pre-approved but do you want us to help you find one?" and I was like "hell yeah"

It seems they've moved to using AutoSmart now when I look under the "vehicle loans" section on their website.

Unsinkabear
Jun 8, 2013

Ensign, raise the beariscope.







KYOON GRIFFEY JR posted:

carvana is going to give you a market clearing offer. you could maybe do a little better but you're not going to do better without a lot of hassle in private sale territory.

This is what I was hoping to hear, I don't have a ton of time to gently caress around right now so that's very appealing. How subjective is their valuation, do I need to worry about cleaning/detailing before they come get it like I would for a private sale?

KYOON GRIFFEY JR posted:

don't get AWD. you've named zero situations where AWD would be useful and it's going to increase cost, increase the number of points of failure, and decrease your fuel economy.

I think the solution to the problem is mostly "git gud" and stop driving all the way over curbs but if you want more ground clearance there are plenty of options. FWD CX-5 would be my personal pick for the use case.

Everyone made good points, we'll strike AWD from the list and cross the rims/tires bridge when we come to it (I don't currently have a place to store an alternate set, or anywhere to put them on). I thought you guys might say that and I appreciate the feedback. But as for gitting gud, never. I'm over 30, if I was going to stop doing stuff like dumb curb strikes I would have by now. I'm just a cripplingly scatterbrained person sometimes and there's not a lot I can do about that, so it's better to own the flaw and purchase with it in mind imo. FWD CX-5 looks like an interesting place to start.

KYOON GRIFFEY JR
Apr 12, 2010




Yeah I mean fair, that is what it is. I do encourage you to you know, not drive over curbs.

Their valuation is pretty objective. Cleaning the car won't make much of a difference unless it's actually trashed inside/out.

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005


Oven Wrangler

Unsinkabear posted:

Everyone made good points, we'll strike AWD from the list and cross the rims/tires bridge when we come to it (I don't currently have a place to store an alternate set, or anywhere to put them on). I thought you guys might say that and I appreciate the feedback. But as for gitting gud, never. I'm over 30, if I was going to stop doing stuff like dumb curb strikes I would have by now. I'm just a cripplingly scatterbrained person sometimes and there's not a lot I can do about that, so it's better to own the flaw and purchase with it in mind imo. FWD CX-5 looks like an interesting place to start.

You're getting real good advice here, glad to see you're taking it to heart. My parents live in Florida and they surprised me with "we want to get a Subaru!" for AWD and I was able to talk them out of it. They have a CX-5 now and couldn't be happier.

Unsinkabear
Jun 8, 2013

Ensign, raise the beariscope.







KYOON GRIFFEY JR posted:

Yeah I mean fair, that is what it is. I do encourage you to you know, not drive over curbs.

Their valuation is pretty objective. Cleaning the car won't make much of a difference unless it's actually trashed inside/out.

Awesome. In that case, I just need to get the oil changed, and then we can find out what Carvana will offer me and really get the discussion rolling with a known budget range for the next car. Right now I'm thinking $10k, but the black book value on a clean 2013 with 60k miles is making it look like I might get a bit more.

I say oil change first because there's currently a check engine light that just turned on, which I'm desperately hoping is related to the "15% oil life" message that it's also nagging me with. Are there decent places to get that done? I used to always have my mechanic do it because the ones around here were all shady upsellers, but I recently moved and haven't sought out a new mechanic.

Internet Explorer posted:

You're getting real good advice here, glad to see you're taking it to heart. My parents live in Florida and they surprised me with "we want to get a Subaru!" for AWD and I was able to talk them out of it. They have a CX-5 now and couldn't be happier.

I knew it wasn't necessary for Florida, I just have a flexible job and mad dreams of being able to drive up to Beech Mountain and go skiing the next time the conditions and my partner's time off line up. Let me have this, universe!

Unsinkabear fucked around with this message at 19:35 on Apr 1, 2021

Leperflesh
May 17, 2007






Unsinkabear posted:

I knew it wasn't necessary for Florida, I just have a flexible job and mad dreams of being able to drive up to Beech Mountain and go skiing the next time the conditions and my partner's time off line up. Let me have this, universe!

You could just rent an SUV for the four times a year you do this or whatever? It's better to buy a car to suit the thing you'll do with it 98% of the time and rent an option for the 2%, than buy a car that compromises efficiency or cost or features etc. to land halfway between those two use cases.

BRAKE FOR MOOSE
Jun 6, 2001

It Could Save Your Life
HUNDREDS OF COLLISIONS



Unsinkabear posted:

I knew it wasn't necessary for Florida, I just have a flexible job and mad dreams of being able to drive up to Beech Mountain and go skiing the next time the conditions and my partner's time off line up. Let me have this, universe!

Yeah, even then, you'd be fine in any car. I always drove up to VT/NH ski areas with whatever economy rental Enterprise would give me, usually something like a Sentra. My buddy drives an Elantra and doesn't have snow tires. The east coast doesn't really tend to have gnarly passes that would actually require notable traction (and at least in the Northeast, the gnarly passes are closed in winter)

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005


Oven Wrangler

Unsinkabear posted:

I say oil change first because there's currently a check engine light that just turned on, which I'm desperately hoping is related to the "15% oil life" message that it's also nagging me with. Are there decent places to get that done? I used to always have my mechanic do it because the ones around here were all shady upsellers, but I recently moved and haven't sought out a new mechanic.

Yeah, you should really not be driving around with a check engine light on. I'm not sure about a message that tracks oil life, never had a car that fancy. I assume it is just judging by time/mileage since the last oil change. Stop what you're doing and get your check engine light code read. Then get your oil changes on the regular, manufacturer suggested interval. It's basic stuff like that that will greatly reduce the life of your car, regardless of it's purported reliability.

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



Unsinkabear posted:

a check engine light that just turned on, which I'm desperately hoping is related to the "15% oil life" message that it's also nagging me with

guarantee it's not, go to autozone and pull the code for free to see how urgent it is

and then even if its not urgent still get it fixed because it could hide other more important CELs

KYOON GRIFFEY JR
Apr 12, 2010




BRAKE FOR MOOSE posted:

Yeah, even then, you'd be fine in any car. I always drove up to VT/NH ski areas with whatever economy rental Enterprise would give me, usually something like a Sentra. My buddy drives an Elantra and doesn't have snow tires. The east coast doesn't really tend to have gnarly passes that would actually require notable traction (and at least in the Northeast, the gnarly passes are closed in winter)

Sometimes around Beech they make you chain up if the weather's bad. I was always proud of myself for running winter tires on my 1-series when I lived in NC the two times a winter it snowed. Also, skiing at Beech is useless and you should get on an airplane instead.

Unsinkabear posted:

Awesome. In that case, I just need to get the oil changed, and then we can find out what Carvana will offer me and really get the discussion rolling with a known budget range for the next car. Right now I'm thinking $10k, but the black book value on a clean 2013 with 60k miles is making it look like I might get a bit more.

I say oil change first because there's currently a check engine light that just turned on, which I'm desperately hoping is related to the "15% oil life" message that it's also nagging me with. Are there decent places to get that done? I used to always have my mechanic do it because the ones around here were all shady upsellers, but I recently moved and haven't sought out a new mechanic.

Don't change your oil before the valuation, they don't give a gently caress bout that. Do make sure the CEL isn't illuminated. Pull codes at Autozone.

PageMaster
Nov 4, 2009


My wife owns a RWD base level glc300 which we both use since I sold my loaded 2016 Audi A4 a couple years ago and we went to a single car household. Wife is now looking for a job so we will need another car again. I love car tech (Android auto, I cruise control, land assist, etc.), Care more about interior cabin feel and quality vs exterior styling, and while not an enthusiast driver I find the Mercedes incredibly boring to use and drive. I'm looking for a 4 door small car for a daily commuter to take me and the kid to school that is reliably low maintenance with above safety/tech features (I don't think 360 camera or HUD are going to be very viable without going to top level trims, unfortunately) that's under 15k used, 25k new, and at least engaging to drive. I know replacing the Audi is not gonna happen, and the Mazda 3's seem to have gotten expensive, but I have a soft spot for Korean value (my second car was a Corsa blue optima with everything and it was the coolest car to me). Note that I have no baseline knowledge on what is or isn't realistic on car pricing outside of the luxury level so if this is completely crazy and impossible feel free to let me know. In a perfect world i'd get rid of the wife's Mercedes for a Palisade for telluride for our family driver, but in the meantime just need to find something that's not a beater to get around.

Also considering leasing but that's a whole other topic on lease vs buying...

PageMaster fucked around with this message at 20:22 on Apr 1, 2021

Throatwarbler
Nov 17, 2008

Oct 3, 2016 00:06: SO I'm also in 1st year classes and it's going pretty well I think.

Dec 9, 2016 15:46: Well I just took my first law school final exam. I think I've made a huge mistake.

Unsinkabear posted:

This is what I was hoping to hear, I don't have a ton of time to gently caress around right now so that's very appealing. How subjective is their valuation, do I need to worry about cleaning/detailing before they come get it like I would for a private sale?


Everyone made good points, we'll strike AWD from the list and cross the rims/tires bridge when we come to it (I don't currently have a place to store an alternate set, or anywhere to put them on). I thought you guys might say that and I appreciate the feedback. But as for gitting gud, never. I'm over 30, if I was going to stop doing stuff like dumb curb strikes I would have by now. I'm just a cripplingly scatterbrained person sometimes and there's not a lot I can do about that, so it's better to own the flaw and purchase with it in mind imo. FWD CX-5 looks like an interesting place to start.

Back into parking spots.

Inner Light
Jan 2, 2020





I've been backing in for years, it is truly the superior way.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

Inner Light posted:

I've been backing in for years, it is truly the superior way.

I drive a 23' long truck. Backing in is the way.

knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.

360 degree cameras are transformational if you have a car with poo poo visibility or is big.

KillHour
Oct 28, 2007






knox_harrington posted:

360 degree cameras are transformational if you have a car with poo poo visibility or is big.

Guillotines solve the same problem but more permanently.

rifles
Oct 8, 2007
is this thing working

I'm a senior in my undergrad and was hoping that the school would be flexible in the Fall and offer most of my classes online.. long story short I'm going to be unavoidably commuting 58 miles one-way every day of the week. I thought about getting an apartment for the year but they're ridiculous and I'll still have a 20+ minute commute from a place under $1200 a month. Normally I drive a 94 ZJ and it does 20 mpg highway at best, dropping to about 18 at 75 mph and is way worse on winter gas. It meets my needs very well normally but I'll have almost $380 a month in gas at 18mpg and $2.85 a gallon (at what it will actually do, 16.5 on winter gas at 75 mph I'll have $3200 in 8 months for gas alone). So now I'm looking for a used econobox that will be dead-reliable and eat 19k miles of highway driving in 8 months, ideally in the range of $16-17k (8k or so down, but cheaper is better, if I could get something around 10k and not have a payment that'd rock) and that I can sell a year or two from now with minimal depreciation.. what's looking like the best options these days?

I'd prefer a manual but it doesn't really matter since I won't be keeping it or using it for much more than mind-numbing highway commuting, don't care about any options other than Bluetooth, cruise, and not riding so poorly on a concrete freeway that my teeth fall out. I'm in Ohio but if there's going to be horrible weather I can take the jeep (or if I can find a cheap enough shitbox I'll grab a set of steelies and throw snow tires on it). Is a Civic or a Fit going to be my best option, or should I be looking at a Yaris or something?

I really didn't think I'd be able to justify it but after doing the math, having the cash to put down, and knowing I can get most of it back out of a Civic or a Fit (or whatever flavor of Toyota) when I'm done and working (and can grab something else, probably some flavor of truck), I'm looking at less money in gas + a tiny $120-150 car payment (or none at all) than I'd be in gas alone in the Jeep, all without having to worry about breaking down or abusing something I'd like to keep in decent shape for non-commuter use.

Nitrox
Jul 5, 2002

Slur, your fighting style is extremely problematic!

rifles posted:

I'm a senior in my undergrad and was hoping that the school would be flexible in the Fall and offer most of my classes online.. long story short I'm going to be unavoidably commuting 58 miles one-way every day of the week. I thought about getting an apartment for the year but they're ridiculous and I'll still have a 20+ minute commute from a place under $1200 a month. Normally I drive a 94 ZJ and it does 20 mpg highway at best, dropping to about 18 at 75 mph and is way worse on winter gas. It meets my needs very well normally but I'll have almost $380 a month in gas at 18mpg and $2.85 a gallon (at what it will actually do, 16.5 on winter gas at 75 mph I'll have $3200 in 8 months for gas alone). So now I'm looking for a used econobox that will be dead-reliable and eat 19k miles of highway driving in 8 months, ideally in the range of $16-17k (8k or so down, but cheaper is better, if I could get something around 10k and not have a payment that'd rock) and that I can sell a year or two from now with minimal depreciation.. what's looking like the best options these days?

I'd prefer a manual but it doesn't really matter since I won't be keeping it or using it for much more than mind-numbing highway commuting, don't care about any options other than Bluetooth, cruise, and not riding so poorly on a concrete freeway that my teeth fall out. I'm in Ohio but if there's going to be horrible weather I can take the jeep (or if I can find a cheap enough shitbox I'll grab a set of steelies and throw snow tires on it). Is a Civic or a Fit going to be my best option, or should I be looking at a Yaris or something?

I really didn't think I'd be able to justify it but after doing the math, having the cash to put down, and knowing I can get most of it back out of a Civic or a Fit (or whatever flavor of Toyota) when I'm done and working (and can grab something else, probably some flavor of truck), I'm looking at less money in gas + a tiny $120-150 car payment (or none at all) than I'd be in gas alone in the Jeep, all without having to worry about breaking down or abusing something I'd like to keep in decent shape for non-commuter use.
You can get a very nice Civic/Elantra under $10,000. No need to finance. Don't be afraid of high miles of it's been maintained correctly. Sell or park the Jeep. It's a very bad time of year to buy a used car, everyone has tax return and stimulus money burning holes in their pockets. But a good time to sell.

Mr Interweb
Aug 25, 2004

I posted my food for USPOL Thanksgiving!


alrighty guys, i gave it a bit more thought. i know i said my budget was no more than $20k, but since this is going to be my very first ever brand new car purchase, one that's long overdue, and something that i plan on having for at least a decade, i decided i'm going to up my budget a bit and get something i actually really want, not something i'll settle for. so now it's between $25k-30k.

so i decided i will go with a hybrid afterall. they get great mileage overall, but moreso on the streets and since that's where i still plan on doing most of my driving, it will be quite beneficial. so of the hybrids, i've narrowed them down to the hyndai ionic and the honda insight. the ionic has the better mileage, financing and warranties. but the insight is more fun to drive and has more competent handling. unfortunately, it seems that's the only thing the insight's got going for it over the ionic. the difference in gas mileage isn't a huge deal, but the warranty and financing options leave a lot to be desired.

thoughts?

edit: oh and i guess the insight is also lacking in features too

Mr Interweb fucked around with this message at 03:57 on Apr 3, 2021

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer


You budget went in the wrong direction, but great job trying to justify it to yourself.

Mr Interweb
Aug 25, 2004

I posted my food for USPOL Thanksgiving!


Motronic posted:

You budget went in the wrong direction, but great job trying to justify it to yourself.

i thought ~$25 was supposed to be a nice moderate range? figured 20k limited me and might have only allowed me access to cheap quality?

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005


Oven Wrangler

I've not been following your posts, but IMO if you were looking and you didn't find anything you loved in your budget, it's perfectly fine to extend it as long as you're being honest with yourself.

nitsuga
Dec 31, 2006

It's the only way to live.

Mr Interweb posted:

i thought ~$25 was supposed to be a nice moderate range? figured 20k limited me and might have only allowed me access to cheap quality?

I think it opens up your options a bit for sure. $20,000 can certainly get you in a good car, especially if you're willing to go used. But at any rate either of your choices rank pretty decently. It looks like the Hyundai Ioniq might outrank the Honda Insight, and I'd go for the hatchback over the sedan just about every time.

rifles posted:

I'm a senior in my undergrad and was hoping that the school would be flexible in the Fall and offer most of my classes online.. long story short I'm going to be unavoidably commuting 58 miles one-way every day of the week. I thought about getting an apartment for the year but they're ridiculous and I'll still have a 20+ minute commute from a place under $1200 a month. Normally I drive a 94 ZJ and it does 20 mpg highway at best, dropping to about 18 at 75 mph and is way worse on winter gas. It meets my needs very well normally but I'll have almost $380 a month in gas at 18mpg and $2.85 a gallon (at what it will actually do, 16.5 on winter gas at 75 mph I'll have $3200 in 8 months for gas alone). So now I'm looking for a used econobox that will be dead-reliable and eat 19k miles of highway driving in 8 months, ideally in the range of $16-17k (8k or so down, but cheaper is better, if I could get something around 10k and not have a payment that'd rock) and that I can sell a year or two from now with minimal depreciation.. what's looking like the best options these days?

I'd prefer a manual but it doesn't really matter since I won't be keeping it or using it for much more than mind-numbing highway commuting, don't care about any options other than Bluetooth, cruise, and not riding so poorly on a concrete freeway that my teeth fall out. I'm in Ohio but if there's going to be horrible weather I can take the jeep (or if I can find a cheap enough shitbox I'll grab a set of steelies and throw snow tires on it). Is a Civic or a Fit going to be my best option, or should I be looking at a Yaris or something?

I really didn't think I'd be able to justify it but after doing the math, having the cash to put down, and knowing I can get most of it back out of a Civic or a Fit (or whatever flavor of Toyota) when I'm done and working (and can grab something else, probably some flavor of truck), I'm looking at less money in gas + a tiny $120-150 car payment (or none at all) than I'd be in gas alone in the Jeep, all without having to worry about breaking down or abusing something I'd like to keep in decent shape for non-commuter use.

I'll also endorse the Fit. I certainly enjoyed mine while I had it, and a manual transmission almost always makes cars like those a little more fun to drive. They've stopped selling them in the US as of 2021, but the used market should have a decent number still in your budget. That said, the Civic or Elantra as suggested might offer a better highway driving experience. I didn't mind mine when I had a long commute, but that was mostly county roads, and freeway time definitely did get a little loud in my 2009 Fit.

KYOON GRIFFEY JR
Apr 12, 2010




Mr Interweb posted:

alrighty guys, i gave it a bit more thought. i know i said my budget was no more than $20k, but since this is going to be my very first ever brand new car purchase, one that's long overdue, and something that i plan on having for at least a decade, i decided i'm going to up my budget a bit and get something i actually really want, not something i'll settle for. so now it's between $25k-30k.

so i decided i will go with a hybrid afterall. they get great mileage overall, but moreso on the streets and since that's where i still plan on doing most of my driving, it will be quite beneficial. so of the hybrids, i've narrowed them down to the hyndai ionic and the honda insight. the ionic has the better mileage, financing and warranties. but the insight is more fun to drive and has more competent handling. unfortunately, it seems that's the only thing the insight's got going for it over the ionic. the difference in gas mileage isn't a huge deal, but the warranty and financing options leave a lot to be desired.

thoughts?

edit: oh and i guess the insight is also lacking in features too

The Ioniq is fine, for sure. Can't really go wrong with either car.

The warranty is better but both of these cars are primarily going to be consuming maintenance parts which aren't covered by warranties, like tires, oil, wiper blades, and brake rotors/pads (although your costs for the latter should be very low). I think the odds of the Insight having some kind of catastrophic powertrain failure after 6/60 but before 10/100 is extremely low, to the extent that I probably wouldn't value it in the deal.

Financing costs aren't all that different at least based on what Honda is offering in my area. 60 month term at $17.05/month per thousand vs Hyundai at $16.67. Assuming you buy a $25,000 car, that's $9.50/mo more for the Honda or $670 more over the life of the loan. It's a bit of money but it's not a very big difference and it wouldn't persuade me to buy the Ioniq if you otherwise preferred the Honda.

The fuel economy difference is miniscule. Let's say you keep this car and drive it for 250,000 miles. The Ioniq will consume 4,545 gallons of gas over its lifetime at EPA rated economy. The Insight will consume 4,808. At three dollars a gallon, the Ioniq will save you all of $750 in total fuel costs. You also mention that you will be doing more city driving and the Insight actually does better in the city (marginally) than the Ioniq so your hypothetical advantage is diminished more.

I've not sat in the Insight but the Ioniq felt extremely cheap to me.

bicievino
Feb 5, 2015



I didn't test drive an Insight but we did test drive the Ioniq, and the test drive took it from the frontrunner to ruling it out.
No single thing but lots of annoyances, cheapness, things that just felt wrong.
Most annoying thing: something about their windshield or dash made it so there was a VERY distracting reflection in the windshield, bad enough that we actually got out to see if the windshield was fogged up. Made it noticeably hard to see. Apparently fixed by just wearing polarized glasses, but I'm in Seattle so wearing sunglasses year round isn't really a thing.

jokes
Dec 20, 2012
jokes




I drive a 2019 Insight. I still love it, and I tried a lot of hybrids before buying. The biggest (only) issue was a software thing that got fixed with a software update.

MJP
Jun 17, 2007

Are you looking at me Senpai?

Grimey Drawer

Goons, I could use some input on a three-way choice. I'm looking at three cars in descending preference: a 2018 Volvo S90, a 2017 Lincoln MKZ Hybrid, and a 2018 Acura TLX. My budget is $25k before taxes, licensing fees, and trying to negotiate out the doc fees.

They all seem to fit my absolute must-haves: under 50k miles, quiet and comfy, FWD, not German break/fix or maintenance costs, enough legroom without reaching too far forward, and 26+ combined MPG. I almost never have passengers other than my wife but I do want someone to at least be able to sit behind me if the seat is way back. I am not automotive mechanic inclined so any work would be done by a reliable local mechanic I've worked with plenty of times in the past.

I'm curious what goon opinion is on them. If there's viable alternative cars I'd consider them but I've been through the wringer a few times on that already - unless Peugeot made a comeback, I can't find too much else.

I would do a PPI on any of them, preferably via an actual local mechanic putting it up on the lifts, or with a reputable third-party service provider going to the dealership.

quote:

S90 pros
Really nice and comfortable
Nice interior design
Heated steering wheel
Lanekeeping and adaptive CC were the best of the bunch
Sitting unsold for around 6 months, probably some room to negotiate price
CPO, which is no crutch but doesn't hurt
Auto-parking is pretty cool

quote:

S90 cons
Bluetooth had a weird issue in that it played music over my phone's speaker rather than the car until I re-did the pairing once or twice
Might be too much car - backseats are huge and comfy but nobody's ever really in 'em
Lowest fuel economy of the bunch (26-27mpg combined)
No remote start other than an app (I'd rather have one single fob for everything)
Highest total mileage of the bunch
Might need a specialist Volvo mechanic for break/fix issues?
Giant sunroof which I don't need

quote:

MKZ pros
Most room for my legs, even more than the S90
No sunroof (for me, that's a plus)
Best fuel economy of the bunch
Quietest of the bunch
Lighter color paint and interior (I park outside, so summer heat is a thing)
9 months' basic warranty, 33 months drivetrain warranty remaining

quote:

MKZ cons
No lanekeeping or adaptive cruise control
American car reputation/reliability?
2 owners already, one of which looks like it was just changing the title from one state to another for some reason
No heated steering wheel

quote:

TLX pros
Good amount of leg room
It's basically an Accord, it'll last forever
Lowest mileage of the bunch

quote:

TLX cons
Least backseat space
No heated steering wheel
Remote start is going to run $300 for the fob and however much for installation
Android Auto didn't recognize my phone via the cable
Bluetooth song title/artist/etc. didn't show up on the screen for the first two mins or so of the song
Weird dual screen stereo/info
Lanekeeping wasn't very sensitive or helpful

Unsinkabear
Jun 8, 2013

Ensign, raise the beariscope.







Today I learned that there is a difference between a maintenance light and a check engine light. In related news, an oil change was all the Accord needed. This thing is ready to sell, baybeee!

Nitrox posted:

It's a very bad time of year to buy a used car, everyone has tax return and stimulus money burning holes in their pockets. But a good time to sell.

The only problem is that I'll still need a car, so I would have to turn right around and buy the replacement in this sellers market. I don't need to change cars urgently, so I'm considering waiting. How long do you guys think it will take for the used car supply/demand situation to improve?

mariooncrack
Dec 27, 2008



Modern Volvo isn't very reliable. If that's something you want, steer clear.

The MKZ was probably a lease initially. Not seeing the multiple owners being an issue unless one of them dumped the car after like 1,000 miles.

Personally, I'd go with the TLX. You might just need a different cable. Seems silly to rule out a car because of a $10 cable. As for your bluetooth cons, if you get Android Auto working, are you really going to use bluetooth?

I think you've narrowed things down pretty well. I think it's just down to preference.

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



MJP posted:

not German break/fix or maintenance costs

You should scratch the Volvo off the list then, they are just as bad if not worse

Between the Lincoln and the Acura I'd lean heavily toward the Acura. The MKZ is fine but the TSX is probably better for the long term.

MJP
Jun 17, 2007

Are you looking at me Senpai?

Grimey Drawer

Yeah, I wasn't able to shake the creeping Euro sensation. I'm sure that if I keep up with oil changes and scheduled maintenance it'll always turn on and run, but then there's the "okay Part X is at the end of its usable life, it would be a $400 fix in an Acura but it's $1200 because Sweden". If there's a question of even the starts-and-drives thing, then I'm OK with nixing it. I can live without auto-park until they come out with a proper KITT.

mariooncrack posted:

The MKZ was probably a lease initially. Not seeing the multiple owners being an issue unless one of them dumped the car after like 1,000 miles.

Personally, I'd go with the TLX. You might just need a different cable. Seems silly to rule out a car because of a $10 cable. As for your bluetooth cons, if you get Android Auto working, are you really going to use bluetooth?

I'll definitely give it a shot with a known good cable. This is me being dumb, though - does Android Auto work wirelessly on the 2018 TLX? I thought it was wired for everything.

The MKZ had one owner for 28k miles and 4 years. Bought in FL, serviced in NH, so probably a snowbird car. Sold at auction on 7/20. then again on 11/20, offered for sale in 3/21.

Might also expand my search radius for MKZ Hybrids with the lanekeeping and such. If there's a decent deal to be had and the cost plus shipping doesn't destroy things, I'd love to get that same MKZ with lanekeeping.

powderific
May 13, 2004



Grimey Drawer

Unless youíre a Volvo enthusiast buying an older Volvo where you know what youíre getting into Iím not sure it ever makes sense to buy a Volvo. I had an 06 XC70 for a while that I loved, but even for those years before the reliability got bad it could be a minefield.

HisMajestyBOB
Oct 21, 2010




College Slice

Proposed Budget: $30-35k
New or Used: New
Body Style: 3-row SUV or Minivan.
How will you be using the car?: This will be our family car for local driving and longer family trips (post-COVID, naturally). We're looking for something larger like a minivan or 3-row SUV for the passenger and cargo space.

What aspects are most important to you? Reliability is pretty important. Originally we were looking at just minivans, but the Consumer Reports rating on those are all pretty meh, especially compared to large SUVs, so we've expanded to looking at those. Maybe CR is just biased against minivans though? We don't care if a minivan drives like a minivan.

How comfortable it is to drive is also pretty important, but pretty subjective, so we want to narrow down to two or three options to test-drive. Right now I've tentatively narrowed it to the Kia Telluride, Subaru Ascent, or Toyota Highlander on the SUV side and Honda Odyssey or Toyota Sierra on the minivan side based mostly on CR and other reviews. We're waiting until we get vaccinated before we start test-driving (so April? May? June?? Who knows), but will need to get the second car before the end of summer.

HisMajestyBOB fucked around with this message at 02:31 on Apr 4, 2021

skipdogg
Nov 29, 2004
Resident SRT-4 Expert


HisMajestyBOB posted:

Proposed Budget: $30-35k
New or Used: New
Body Style: 3-row SUV or Minivan.
How will you be using the car?: This will be our family car for local driving and longer family trips (post-COVID, naturally). We're looking for something larger like a minivan or 3-row SUV for the passenger and cargo space.

What aspects are most important to you? Reliability is pretty important. Originally we were looking at just minivans, but the Consumer Reports rating on those are all pretty meh, especially compared to large SUVs, so we've expanded to looking at those. Maybe CR is just biased against minivans though? We don't care if a minivan drives like a minivan.

How comfortable it is to drive is also pretty important, but pretty subjective, so we want to narrow down to two or three options to test-drive. Right now I've tentatively narrowed it to the Kia Telluride, Subaru Ascent, or Toyota Highlander on the SUV side and Honda Odyssey or Toyota Sierra on the minivan side based mostly on CR and other reviews. We're waiting until we get vaccinated before we start test-driving (so April? May? June?? Who knows), but will need to get the second car before the end of summer.

Full disclosure, my wife and I have made due with 3 row SUV's since we had kids because we're "not going to be caught dead driving a minivan no matter what" people. We are not logical.

Minivans are hands down the best, most comfortable people movers out there, especially with little kids. The correct answer is minivan. You cannot go wrong with either the Toyota or the Honda, it comes down to preference on those. I'm a big fan of the Sienna in the XLE trim.

Before I recommend an SUV/CUV, I would need to know how many people you plan on regularly hauling around. We're only a family of 4, so the 3rd row in our SUV is there for once in a while use, and spends 99% of the time folded down for extra storage.

The 3rd rows on the 3 SUV's you listed are for occasional use by smaller humans. If you regularly need to travel with more than 4 people, the minivan is the way to go.

I don't know anything about the Subaru, but I'm generally not a fan of Subaru vehicles. Too many issues for my taste. The Telluride is a hot, hot, hot vehicle right now. Tons of people want one, to the point where people are paying over MSRP to get one. It's a very compelling vehicle for the price point. I don't know much about the new Highlander, but Toyota makes a pretty solid product and you can't really go wrong with one.

I would bet you'll like the Telluride the best out of those 3 options, but the SX trim with all the fanciness busts your budget since those start at 42K

B-Mac
Apr 21, 2003
I'll never catch "the gay"!

HisMajestyBOB posted:

Proposed Budget: $30-35k
New or Used: New
Body Style: 3-row SUV or Minivan.
How will you be using the car?: This will be our family car for local driving and longer family trips (post-COVID, naturally). We're looking for something larger like a minivan or 3-row SUV for the passenger and cargo space.

What aspects are most important to you? Reliability is pretty important. Originally we were looking at just minivans, but the Consumer Reports rating on those are all pretty meh, especially compared to large SUVs, so we've expanded to looking at those. Maybe CR is just biased against minivans though? We don't care if a minivan drives like a minivan.

How comfortable it is to drive is also pretty important, but pretty subjective, so we want to narrow down to two or three options to test-drive. Right now I've tentatively narrowed it to the Kia Telluride, Subaru Ascent, or Toyota Highlander on the SUV side and Honda Odyssey or Toyota Sierra on the minivan side based mostly on CR and other reviews. We're waiting until we get vaccinated before we start test-driving (so April? May? June?? Who knows), but will need to get the second car before the end of summer.

Just bought a Honda Odyssey at the end of February, my wife and I greatly prefer it over the SUV we had before. Sliding door make losing two kids into car seats a breeze and be able to slide the seats from side to side make third row access super easy. Third row fold down when not needed for a ton of storage space. We bought the EX-L trim just because my wife wanted the power melody gate but if you donít care about that the LX and EX trims are in your budget.

The 2021 Sienna is a hybrid power train now so it will have better fuel economy but my wife didnít like the layout and preferred the odyssey. The base Sienna starts at the top end of your budget. We also looked at the Kia Sedona, it has a good factory warranty if that interests you.

Alex on Autos on YouTube has a good review of all three vans and their differences.

Godzilla07
Oct 4, 2008



MJP posted:

Goons, I could use some input on a three-way choice. I'm looking at three cars in descending preference: a 2018 Volvo S90, a 2017 Lincoln MKZ Hybrid, and a 2018 Acura TLX. My budget is $25k before taxes, licensing fees, and trying to negotiate out the doc fees.

They all seem to fit my absolute must-haves: under 50k miles, quiet and comfy, FWD, not German break/fix or maintenance costs, enough legroom without reaching too far forward, and 26+ combined MPG. I almost never have passengers other than my wife but I do want someone to at least be able to sit behind me if the seat is way back. I am not automotive mechanic inclined so any work would be done by a reliable local mechanic I've worked with plenty of times in the past.

I'm curious what goon opinion is on them. If there's viable alternative cars I'd consider them but I've been through the wringer a few times on that already - unless Peugeot made a comeback, I can't find too much else.

I would do a PPI on any of them, preferably via an actual local mechanic putting it up on the lifts, or with a reputable third-party service provider going to the dealership.

If you don't need a new car right now, I would strongly consider saving a bit more so that you can buy a new Kia K5. A new K5 satisfies all your parameters: technology, low running costs, space, comfort, and fuel economy. If the Volvo is your benchmark for active driving assistance, you will be very disappointed with the active driving assistance functionality in the late-model near-luxury cars you're looking at. IMO lane keep assist in that generation of car is only good as a safety net for drowsy or distracted drivers. It is absolutely not something you can rely on to offload some of the work of driving onto. The Highway Driving Assist functionality in the K5 seems much closer to what you want, and from what I've read, the Hyundai/Kia active driving assistance tech is the best you'll get without spending much more.

E: It looks like the cheapest K5 you can get Highway Driving Assist on is a GT-Line with the Premium Package, which is $28K.

HisMajestyBOB posted:

Proposed Budget: $30-35k
New or Used: New
Body Style: 3-row SUV or Minivan.
How will you be using the car?: This will be our family car for local driving and longer family trips (post-COVID, naturally). We're looking for something larger like a minivan or 3-row SUV for the passenger and cargo space.

What aspects are most important to you? Reliability is pretty important. Originally we were looking at just minivans, but the Consumer Reports rating on those are all pretty meh, especially compared to large SUVs, so we've expanded to looking at those. Maybe CR is just biased against minivans though? We don't care if a minivan drives like a minivan.

How comfortable it is to drive is also pretty important, but pretty subjective, so we want to narrow down to two or three options to test-drive. Right now I've tentatively narrowed it to the Kia Telluride, Subaru Ascent, or Toyota Highlander on the SUV side and Honda Odyssey or Toyota Sierra on the minivan side based mostly on CR and other reviews. We're waiting until we get vaccinated before we start test-driving (so April? May? June?? Who knows), but will need to get the second car before the end of summer.

CR's overall score is a mix between their review of the vehicle, predicted reliability, owner satisfaction, and safety ratings. Cars that review well may have poor overall scores due to reliability. For example, the Subaru Ascent has a higher road test score than the Chrysler Pacifica, but the Subaru has a lower overall score than the Chrysler because the Subaru's reliability is significantly worse. My personal vote is for a lightly used Pacifica because the depreciation curve is far steeper for the first owner than it is for the Honda and Toyota, and I like the Pacifica enough to use the savings as a hedge against future unreliability.

That being said, you should really drive everything you might be interested in. This is the second-most expensive purchase you'll make in your life after a house. Cars that sound great on paper might not seem worth the payment once you actually drive them, and cars which you'd consider your 4th or 5th option on paper may suddenly become much more attractive after you've driven them.

Godzilla07 fucked around with this message at 13:47 on Apr 4, 2021

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MJP
Jun 17, 2007

Are you looking at me Senpai?

Grimey Drawer

Godzilla07 posted:

If you don't need a new car right now, I would strongly consider saving a bit more so that you can buy a new Kia K5.

I'd much rather have a not-new car, depreciation and all. Also if the K5 is close to the same size and space as the 2020 Sonata, I wasn't really a fan of the knee room.

Also adding on destination charges and tax and it's north of $30k for a K5 with all the bits I want and need.

If I see any K5 demo models come on the market, I'd give them a look, but I can live with less than perfect lanekeeping and Fun Tech Stuff as long as the interior space and quiet ride make it through. I'm basically down to what differentiates an Accord Touring from a TLX Tech package since at least the Accord doesn't have the oddball dual screen stereo. Also the climate control is not a touchscreen on an Accord, which is definitely better IMO.

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