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IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





ethanol posted:

That sounds right. I wonder how many surviving XJ still have their D35? Maybe a fair amount of people never upsized their tires? Anyways, if you are going to buy a jeep of that era for wheeling, I would take careful attention to what axles are under it, you can find pictures of the diff housing on google so you can check under vehicles. Or figure out if you're comfortable paying upwards of 3k depending on your thriftiness and mechanical experience to replace that piece of poo poo d35 if/when it breaks.

I'd wager a lot of them, given how many XJs are in the hands of "kid who wanted the cheapest Jeep they could find". Even if they blow up the D35, still cheaper to go get another stock XJ axle out of the junkyard than it is to swap to anything else.

Also at least XJs have a few cheap-ish options for axle upgrades - a Ford Explorer 8.8 is a pretty easy swap since getting new leaf perches welded on is inexpensive even if you have to pay someone to do it. Getting an 8.8 set up for a TJ (admittedly, with gears and a locker and a truss too) cost me almost exactly what I paid for the TJ it went in.

Jeeps: Not Even Once

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ethanol
Jul 13, 2007

#essereFerrari


Think I paid $1200 for the two rubicon axle assemblies. Maybe more. They showed up in rough shape and I was very unhappy. The seals ended up being bad so that cost another $600 or so. The suspension was rusted to poo poo so I ended up buying more and more hardware as it went on. Yeah letís just say the just empty every pocket was exactly right for my jeep. When the clutch and ac went I got rid of it. Also the hvac would endlessly burn up switches. I blew up that 35 at a stoplight on pavement btw. Took it to a diff shop and they threw their hands up at it

KillHour
Oct 28, 2007






Wranglers should have come with the same warning sticker that demons came with - it's technically street legal but it's only meant to get you to the trail and back.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





KillHour posted:

Wranglers should have come with the same warning sticker that demons came with - it's technically street legal but it's only meant to get you to the trail and back.

They legit have warning labels about how the doors and roof are only there to try and keep weather off of you.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

IOwnCalculus posted:

They legit have warning labels about how the doors and roof are only there to try and keep weather off of you.

When a friend bought a hardtop Willy's a few years ago, I saw those labels and thought they were a joke. Nope. loving thing leaked from day 1. "It's a Jeep thing" alright.

Applebees Appetizer
Jan 23, 2006



I had two XJs at one time, one auto (99) and one manual (97). They both did very well and I beat the poo poo out of them off road. The manual was better on road, and the auto was better off road, altho with the manual I could put it in second and kind of "creep" along without hardly touching the clutch.

That was back in the 2000's tho when they were a lot easier to find, good luck finding a nice one these days.

powderific
May 13, 2004



Grimey Drawer

I bought my 98 XJ with 153k miles in 2009 for $3500 and it was amazing for the money and I loved it. Now I think youíd pay more for one thatís worse and Iím not sure thereís a newer equivalent. Seems like a lot of folks are going GX470, but they tend to be a bit more pricey even with a lot of miles (and are getting popular enough that theyíre also becoming scarce.)

Hirsute
May 3, 2007


So I managed to get to the ripe old age of 34 without owning a car, but I recently moved away from a city with a functioning public transportation system and now I need one! I'm 99% sure I'm looking to get a used Toyota Prius or Honda Insight, all I care about is reliability and gas mileage to keep costs low. The only thing I'm a little worried about with buying a used hybrid is the battery life, I've heard that (like all batteries) they gradually lose their ability to hold a charge. Is this something I should be concerned about? Is there an age limit on hybrids, say I shouldn't be looking for one older than 10 years or so?

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009



Grimey Drawer

A prius will run with a bad battery pack, and there is a robust aftermarket in both replacements and repairs. Remember, these are taxi fleet cars so you get that economy of scale.

nm
Jan 28, 2008

"I saw Minos the Space Judge holding a golden sceptre and passing sentence upon the Martians. There he presided, and around him the noble Space Prosecutors sought the firm justice of space law."

Hirsute posted:

So I managed to get to the ripe old age of 34 without owning a car, but I recently moved away from a city with a functioning public transportation system and now I need one! I'm 99% sure I'm looking to get a used Toyota Prius or Honda Insight, all I care about is reliability and gas mileage to keep costs low. The only thing I'm a little worried about with buying a used hybrid is the battery life, I've heard that (like all batteries) they gradually lose their ability to hold a charge. Is this something I should be concerned about? Is there an age limit on hybrids, say I shouldn't be looking for one older than 10 years or so?
The age limit on Pruises is 2004, the second gen Prius (but the first people remember), the first was kind of miserable and they seemed to have a few more issues (also there were far fewer so less options for people who can fix batteries, etc). Anything past then should be good. All generations have some minor issues like, gen 2 priuses have waterpumps that start to leak, but nothing that will strand you or cost you a ton of money as long as you maintain the car (for example, the waterpump leak should be found during regular maintenance long before you run out of coolant).
Do get a PPI, particularly on anything really old, avoid rentals or salvage titles.

Some generations of honda hybrids, esp the manual ones, actually had real legit battery issues and should be avoided, but I'm not sure which.

KillHour
Oct 28, 2007






You didn't say your budget, but you should also consider that newer generations of car (:cough: prius :cough:) are going to have MUCH better safety features. The stuff that has come out in the last 10 years as far as safety assists has made it such that I'd have a hard time considering something older unless I truly couldn't afford it - especially if you're someone with less experience behind the wheel.

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


Besides budget, expected driving habits are important to make sure you don't fall into your 1% doubt range. That's going to be hard to do as a late comer to driving but it's worth thinking about because a hybrid MPG comes with a premium price bump and a lot of people are shocked when their total cost of ownership breaks even after 10 years because they just go to work and get groceries around the corner and don't have a hell commute that breaks even in a year. Hybrids are a home run for a huge swathe of the american driving lifestyle but there's exceptions.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





zedprime posted:

That's going to be hard to do as a late comer to driving but it's worth thinking about because a hybrid MPG comes with a premium price bump

If you're comparing a new Prius to a new anything else, sure. But if your requirements are "cheap to buy, cheap to run, cheap to maintain", it's hard to beat any of those with anything that isn't a Prius, and you can get a Prius at any price point from $new to $2000 beater with 300k taxi miles on it already.

Hirsute
May 3, 2007


Thanks for the advice! I actually have a good amount of driving experience, just never owned my own car, mainly because I've always preferred biking and buses/subways. I live in a fairly bikeable area now and will probably continue to try biking as much as possible, I mainly just need it for getting to my parents' place (about 45 minutes away) and getting to classes starting in the fall (about 30 minutes away). A hybrid appeals to me just on a visceral level mainly I guess, with my planned moderate usage I suppose something else would work too. Whatever I get, I'm trying to keep it under $10,000.

KillHour
Oct 28, 2007






Given the amount you plan on driving gas mileage is pretty much the last thing you should worry about. Focus on getting the most modern car you can with the best safety features for the money. A Prius might still be a good option for the reliability but I'm not sure I'd take an older Prius over a newer Corolla for the same money in your situation.

A Leaf/Volt might actually be a good option if you have a place to charge it.

Chad Sexington
May 26, 2005

You say 'in bed with the Russians' like it's a bad thing...

Hello thread. I have some car questions as we start looking.

Currently we just have one car: a 2012 Kia Forte that my wife bought and paid off fully a few years ago. We lived in D.C. proper for a while and I walked to work while she either took the bus or drove. We recently moved to a house in the burbs, but with WFH, the one car has continued to be fine. But work from home is likely to end or at least change in the fall and we are planning to have our first kid in the next year. (And maybe a second?) So we need not just a second car for commuting, but a kid-friendly second car with room for strollers and whatnot.

We're looking for something new with a good amount of cargo space but not so much of a tank that we couldn't easily park it in the city ó I assume this is a CUV these days but I'd consider a wagon too if it has space. Reliability and safety are important and I'd obviously prefer something with good gas mileage. My office is only about 10 miles away and most groceries and retail is within 4 miles of us, so I don't anticipate putting a ton of miles on a vehicle. We are not car people at all and I don't really care about names or the perceived "luxury" of a vehicle, though like a stereotypical millennial I want a decent modern infotainment system that can connect to my phone. We have good credit, have cash for a down payment and can probably technically afford something north of $40,000, but as I say, we're not car people so I don't really want to spend to the budget if I don't have to.

After doing some uneducated comparison shopping the Toyota Rav4 Hybrid and Honda CR-V Hybrid seem to stand out to me. Is there a thread preference? Does it ever make sense to pay a premium for a plug-in EV over a hybrid given our relatively light mileage? The Rav4 Prime looks fancy but I'm having trouble seeing the advantage.

Also parents should feel free to weigh in: am I an idiot for not looking at a Honda Odyssey or a full-sized SUV?

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007

yospos


Toyota RAV-4, Honda CRV, Mazda CX-5, or Subaru Forester all come highly recommended in the thread including the hybrid versions of the RAV-4 or CRV if their gas mileage makes sense for you. I picked up a CX-5 from the threads recommendation after shopping around a little more on strength of it's gadgets vs price compared to the RAV-4 or CRV but I also didn't need a hybrid.

Where standard hybrids are meant for long stop and go commutes, plug ins are great for short trips if you local infrastructure supports a lot of leach charging. If you can plug in at work or at Wholefoods and get off hours pricing for charging overnight at home you can get away with sipping nearly no gas and paying real cheap electrical rates for half your time in EV mode.

If you aren't into hybrids on idealogical grounds there's a bunch of accounting you can do to figure out gas vs hybrid vs plug in.

I'd imagine a family of four can fit into a full size/wagon very easily if you aren't into the extra cargo and size that comes with a CUV. You might be surprised at how strollers and car seats can pack away these days. Being the minivan or third row SUV family comes with downsides in that your whole social circle thinks you're the kid hauler now. Some people are into that though.

KYOON GRIFFEY JR
Apr 12, 2010




good news: everything in your segment is going to get perfectly fine fuel economy, and buying a PHEV or a hybrid is probably worse for the environment based on the amount you're driving it. So get a regular gas CUV of choice, be fruitful, and multiply. Get a CX-5 though because Mazda is a nice company that needs money.

Chad Sexington
May 26, 2005

You say 'in bed with the Russians' like it's a bad thing...

I figured a plug-in wasn't going to be worth it, but is there some sort of calculator or summat that shows where a hybrid actually has gains relative to a regular car? Does it matter if my 10 mile commute still takes 30-40 minutes because of Beltway hell traffic? I'm trying not to do the dumb lib thing of measuring my personal virtue in terms of carbon emissions, but it's kind of hard not to.

FWIW I looked at the CX-5 too after reading previous pages ITT and the trim and features do seem pretty nice relative to the cost. I'll throw it in Costco Auto and see what kind of deal I can get there too. One dealer had the RAV4 Hybrid XLE Premium for $31,000 which isn't half bad.

Maksimus54
Jan 5, 2011


I'm the minivan suggester. Sure you could fit two car seats in a CUV but a van will be way easier and have far more storage. Kids do not travel light and you'll fill up a CRV or RAV4 in a hurry. There are some decent hybrid options on vans as well, the Pacifica even offers a plug-in hybrid with something like 30 miles of electric range.

KYOON GRIFFEY JR
Apr 12, 2010




Chad Sexington posted:

I figured a plug-in wasn't going to be worth it, but is there some sort of calculator or summat that shows where a hybrid actually has gains relative to a regular car? Does it matter if my 10 mile commute still takes 30-40 minutes because of Beltway hell traffic? I'm trying not to do the dumb lib thing of measuring my personal virtue in terms of carbon emissions, but it's kind of hard not to.

FWIW I looked at the CX-5 too after reading previous pages ITT and the trim and features do seem pretty nice relative to the cost. I'll throw it in Costco Auto and see what kind of deal I can get there too. One dealer had the RAV4 Hybrid XLE Premium for $31,000 which isn't half bad.

hello it is me im your personal Hybrid Gainz calculator.

You plan to drive roughly 7,500 miles a year (1.5x your daily commute mileage). Let's pretend, for the sake of argument, that it's entirely city driving. It's not, but this is the maximum savings and positive ecological impact between buying a hybrid and a gas engine vehicle.

If you buy [X], you will consume [Y[ gallons of gas, costing [Z] dollars and outputting [N] pounds of direct CO2 emissions per year
Toyota RAV4 Hybrid: 183, $550, 3600 lbs
Toyota RAV4 AWD: 277, $833, 5492 lbs
Mazda CX-5 AWD: 313, $937, 6135 lbs.

For approximate lifetime figures you can multiply by 20. So, lifetime cost savings for the RAV4 hybrid in an absolutely optimal situation vs its non-hybrid brother or what I think is the best in class vehicle are about $5-6,000. The purchase premium around $2200 right now so it will pay off in just under ten years if you ignore time value of money, and of course assuming relatively constant gas prices, and constant behavior and life situation.

The best possible ecological choice is not to drive. The second best is to buy a used car. If you really care about your personal carbon footprint or impact, don't buy a new car.

edit: some environmental analysis was wrong because I used the RAV4 prime battery pack (I did think it was awfully big).

KYOON GRIFFEY JR fucked around with this message at 01:17 on May 6, 2021

Godzilla07
Oct 4, 2008



Chad Sexington posted:

Hello thread. I have some car questions as we start looking.

Currently we just have one car: a 2012 Kia Forte that my wife bought and paid off fully a few years ago. We lived in D.C. proper for a while and I walked to work while she either took the bus or drove. We recently moved to a house in the burbs, but with WFH, the one car has continued to be fine. But work from home is likely to end or at least change in the fall and we are planning to have our first kid in the next year. (And maybe a second?) So we need not just a second car for commuting, but a kid-friendly second car with room for strollers and whatnot.

We're looking for something new with a good amount of cargo space but not so much of a tank that we couldn't easily park it in the city — I assume this is a CUV these days but I'd consider a wagon too if it has space. Reliability and safety are important and I'd obviously prefer something with good gas mileage. My office is only about 10 miles away and most groceries and retail is within 4 miles of us, so I don't anticipate putting a ton of miles on a vehicle. We are not car people at all and I don't really care about names or the perceived "luxury" of a vehicle, though like a stereotypical millennial I want a decent modern infotainment system that can connect to my phone. We have good credit, have cash for a down payment and can probably technically afford something north of $40,000, but as I say, we're not car people so I don't really want to spend to the budget if I don't have to.

After doing some uneducated comparison shopping the Toyota Rav4 Hybrid and Honda CR-V Hybrid seem to stand out to me. Is there a thread preference? Does it ever make sense to pay a premium for a plug-in EV over a hybrid given our relatively light mileage? The Rav4 Prime looks fancy but I'm having trouble seeing the advantage.

Also parents should feel free to weigh in: am I an idiot for not looking at a Honda Odyssey or a full-sized SUV?

If you're concerned about parking, you're gonna hate driving an Odyssey, because an Odyssey is as big as Mercedes-Benz S-Class. Meanwhile a CR-V is as big as a Civic, and Honda's interior packaging means that you should be able to fit rear-facing child seats and a stroller without seriously compromising legroom for you and your wife.

waffy
Oct 31, 2010


Chad Sexington posted:

FWIW I looked at the CX-5 too after reading previous pages ITT and the trim and features do seem pretty nice relative to the cost. I'll throw it in Costco Auto and see what kind of deal I can get there too. One dealer had the RAV4 Hybrid XLE Premium for $31,000 which isn't half bad.

Since you have multiple good options and at least a bit of flexibility on price, I personally would first go sit in some cars and do a few test drives before getting bogged down with comparing specific deals. You may end up not liking one of them for some reason you couldnít tell on paper, so itís nice to know that before getting too far.

Like personally when I sat in a CRV I immediately knew I wasnít feeling it for whatever reason. When I sat in and drove a CX-5 I was like ďhell yeah.Ē But I was looking a lot at interior quality/style and not super focused on MPG savings. Also helped that Iím a major fan of using the wheel instead of a touchscreen for infotainment.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

waffy posted:

Since you have multiple good options and at least a bit of flexibility on price, I personally would first go sit in some cars and do a few test drives before getting bogged down with comparing specific deals. You may end up not liking one of them for some reason you couldnít tell on paper, so itís nice to know that before getting too far.

Like personally when I sat in a CRV I immediately knew I wasnít feeling it for whatever reason. When I sat in and drove a CX-5 I was like ďhell yeah.Ē But I was looking a lot at interior quality/style and not super focused on MPG savings. Also helped that Iím a major fan of using the wheel instead of a touchscreen for infotainment.

Wheel for life! gently caress touchscreens. My wife's CX-5 has nary a fingerprint on the screen, we're 100% clickwheel users.

It doesn't have as much room as the CR-V, but it drives much better IMO, and uses a regular automatic instead of a CVT. It also looks miles better, both inside and out.

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



The RAV4 Hybrid is an excellent choice, and I'd personally get one over a CRV. For some reason the CRV just does nothing for me at all, just blah.

I just cross shopped the segment and ultimately came down to the RAV4 Hybrid vs CX-5 Turbo. Perhaps a funny face-off, but they are the two most powerful options in the class.

In person, the CX-5 won in all categories except fuel efficiency and maximum cargo capacity. Since I was shopping fully loaded trims, a RAV4 Limited also costs a lot more than a CX-5 Signature, and a RAV4 Prime even more, and is lacking in features and feels more dated despite being new. The CX-5 feels more premium inside and out, like a lot more thought was put into its design and ergonomics. The infotainment feels a decade newer and is not a touch screen thank god. The driving feel is more connected and less bouncy, just feels good.

But your priorities and tastes may be different, especially around fuel efficiency, so go check things out in person. You'll know within 5 minutes if you like it or not.

Guinness fucked around with this message at 03:26 on May 6, 2021

LionArcher
Mar 29, 2010




Iím loosely in the car shopping stage. Thereís a 2008 Toyota Avalon with 137k miles for 8 grand at a lot. I like the look, and know these are basically nicer inside camrys. Is that priced too high for the mileage? Any big pain points I should know about? Iíd take it to a mechanic before Iíd buy, just curious on threads thoughts.

nwin
Feb 25, 2002

make's u think


Fallen Rib

Chad Sexington posted:

Hello thread. I have some car questions as we start looking.

Currently we just have one car: a 2012 Kia Forte that my wife bought and paid off fully a few years ago. We lived in D.C. proper for a while and I walked to work while she either took the bus or drove. We recently moved to a house in the burbs, but with WFH, the one car has continued to be fine. But work from home is likely to end or at least change in the fall and we are planning to have our first kid in the next year. (And maybe a second?) So we need not just a second car for commuting, but a kid-friendly second car with room for strollers and whatnot.

We're looking for something new with a good amount of cargo space but not so much of a tank that we couldn't easily park it in the city ó I assume this is a CUV these days but I'd consider a wagon too if it has space. Reliability and safety are important and I'd obviously prefer something with good gas mileage. My office is only about 10 miles away and most groceries and retail is within 4 miles of us, so I don't anticipate putting a ton of miles on a vehicle. We are not car people at all and I don't really care about names or the perceived "luxury" of a vehicle, though like a stereotypical millennial I want a decent modern infotainment system that can connect to my phone. We have good credit, have cash for a down payment and can probably technically afford something north of $40,000, but as I say, we're not car people so I don't really want to spend to the budget if I don't have to.

After doing some uneducated comparison shopping the Toyota Rav4 Hybrid and Honda CR-V Hybrid seem to stand out to me. Is there a thread preference? Does it ever make sense to pay a premium for a plug-in EV over a hybrid given our relatively light mileage? The Rav4 Prime looks fancy but I'm having trouble seeing the advantage.

Also parents should feel free to weigh in: am I an idiot for not looking at a Honda Odyssey or a full-sized SUV?

We were in the same boat with one kid. We have a RAV4 now and weíre happy with it.

My wife didnít like the way the CVT drove in the CR-V, so that was out.

The Cx5 is nice on the inside and had the most power/fun to drive factor but the cargo space in the back seriously sucks. If youíve been gifted a stroller for a baby shower or anything-Iíd recommend bringing it with you on a test drive just to see how much room it really takes up.

The RAV4 had better cargo space, the interior is decent, and it has a couple driving modes (eco/sport) and my wife does most the driving and she doesnít mind it. It has enough get up and go to get on the freeway. I notice that it is sluggish, especially if Iím trying to get around someone. We also like the reliability factor and it gets good gas mileage. We opted for the XLE I think and it has decent options like heated seats/steering wheel/etc. itís also super easy to park and parallel park if you go into DC at all.

That being said, weíve got baby 2 on the way and Iím a little concerned about space in it. We can fit the 2 car seats in fine, but for a long road trip/etc I think itís going to be very tight with a suitcase or two plus everything that comes along with kids. We will probably be fine, but having some extra space wouldnít be a bad thing.

KYOON GRIFFEY JR
Apr 12, 2010




LionArcher posted:

Iím loosely in the car shopping stage. Thereís a 2008 Toyota Avalon with 137k miles for 8 grand at a lot. I like the look, and know these are basically nicer inside camrys. Is that priced too high for the mileage? Any big pain points I should know about? Iíd take it to a mechanic before Iíd buy, just curious on threads thoughts.

The Avalon will probably make 200k without too much difficulty but seems overpriced by about $1,000.

nwin posted:

and it has a couple driving modes (eco/sport)

I'm pretty sure all cars in the segment have driving modes and they're all equally pointless.

nwin
Feb 25, 2002

make's u think


Fallen Rib

KYOON GRIFFEY JR posted:

The Avalon will probably make 200k without too much difficulty but seems overpriced by about $1,000.


I'm pretty sure all cars in the segment have driving modes and they're all equally pointless.

I seem to notice a bit of difference when I use the sport mode accelerating. Whatís it actually doing-Just changing shift points maybe?

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009



Grimey Drawer

nwin posted:

I seem to notice a bit of difference when I use the sport mode accelerating. Whatís it actually doing-Just changing shift points maybe?

Shift points and/or throttle pedal mapping at the most for things in that segment.

Chad Sexington
May 26, 2005

You say 'in bed with the Russians' like it's a bad thing...

Thank you thread for all the advice! This has been super helpful. I still have a pretty good amount of time on both the commuting to work and baby-conceiving fronts, so I'll definitely be doing test drives before I commit to anything. The chip shortages are what made me want to start researching, but at least so far there doesn't seem to be much of a problem with inventory, at least where I'm looking.

nwin posted:

That being said, we’ve got baby 2 on the way and I’m a little concerned about space in it. We can fit the 2 car seats in fine, but for a long road trip/etc I think it’s going to be very tight with a suitcase or two plus everything that comes along with kids. We will probably be fine, but having some extra space wouldn’t be a bad thing.

Maksimus54 posted:

I'm the minivan suggester. Sure you could fit two car seats in a CUV but a van will be way easier and have far more storage. Kids do not travel light and you'll fill up a CRV or RAV4 in a hurry. There are some decent hybrid options on vans as well, the Pacifica even offers a plug-in hybrid with something like 30 miles of electric range.

I am very conscious of the fact that you are both probably right in the long term, but we're only just going through IVF stuff now and buying a minivan or an SUV with three rows seems waaaaay premature. If we make it as far as two kids maybe we'd punt the Kia for a minivan, but that's down the road for now.

KillHour
Oct 28, 2007






Chad Sexington posted:

I still have a pretty good amount of time on both the commuting to work and baby-conceiving fronts,

Your username implies that your offspring should be the majority population of a small country by now, a la Gengis Khan. Hop to it, bud

KYOON GRIFFEY JR
Apr 12, 2010




Chad Sexington posted:

Thank you thread for all the advice! This has been super helpful. I still have a pretty good amount of time on both the commuting to work and baby-conceiving fronts, so I'll definitely be doing test drives before I commit to anything. The chip shortages are what made me want to start researching, but at least so far there doesn't seem to be much of a problem with inventory, at least where I'm looking.

I am very conscious of the fact that you are both probably right in the long term, but we're only just going through IVF stuff now and buying a minivan or an SUV with three rows seems waaaaay premature. If we make it as far as two kids maybe we'd punt the Kia for a minivan, but that's down the road for now.

Chip shortages are unlikely to have a major effect on customer-perceived inventory, but they will definitely have an effect on pricing. Now is a pretty bad time to buy a new car, but hey, at least it's unlikely to get any better for like six months to a year.

ethanol
Jul 13, 2007

#essereFerrari


Can new msrp change within a model year? I could swear the msrp on Tacomas went up again since 3 months ago

bird with big dick
Oct 21, 2015




Yeah, it's rare but it happens. I've seen identically equipped cars right next to each other on a car lot with ~$500 different prices because something changed in their pricing mid year.

Red_Fred
Oct 21, 2010



Fallen Rib

Guinness posted:

The RAV4 Hybrid is an excellent choice, and I'd personally get one over a CRV. For some reason the CRV just does nothing for me at all, just blah.

I just cross shopped the segment and ultimately came down to the RAV4 Hybrid vs CX-5 Turbo. Perhaps a funny face-off, but they are the two most powerful options in the class.

In person, the CX-5 won in all categories except fuel efficiency and maximum cargo capacity. Since I was shopping fully loaded trims, a RAV4 Limited also costs a lot more than a CX-5 Signature, and a RAV4 Prime even more, and is lacking in features and feels more dated despite being new. The CX-5 feels more premium inside and out, like a lot more thought was put into its design and ergonomics. The infotainment feels a decade newer and is not a touch screen thank god. The driving feel is more connected and less bouncy, just feels good.

But your priorities and tastes may be different, especially around fuel efficiency, so go check things out in person. You'll know within 5 minutes if you like it or not.

One thing that seems to have been missed around the RAV4 Hybrid is that it is way more agile feeling at low speeds because it uses the electric motor up to 40 kph (most of the time, depending on a bunch of factors). For me this really tipped it over the edge compared to at least the CX-30 which felt slower and you had this 4 cylinder engine screaming at you.

Not to mention where I am they are almost $10k cheaper.

LionArcher
Mar 29, 2010




Okay, I found a local corolla I want. 2009, (white color ) third owner, 108K, clean title for 7.5K. We talked on the phone, and he agreed to my term of driving it to a local auto shop I trust to do a safety inspection (which I'll pay for). He's leaving town for ten days tomorrow, and I said that's fine, and he'll call when he returns to set up the day to do this. That all sounds good, but he was then a little vague ramble about title of car, since he bought it recently from a friend, and something about the dmv taking " sixteen weeks for more paperwork"and he's only selling because his job went remote so he doesn't have to drive between the two towns he was planning too.

I'm not an idiot, and (i'll have my father who's a former mechanic with me at the actual sale) but just wanting to know what I need to make sure he has so I don't get screwed over scammed if/when he calls back and agree to before we meet.

Applebees Appetizer
Jan 23, 2006



Lol don't go near it until he has the title IN HAND in HIS NAME

Also that price is pretty steep

mariooncrack
Dec 27, 2008


LionArcher posted:

Okay, I found a local corolla I want. 2009, (white color ) third owner, 108K, clean title for 7.5K. We talked on the phone, and he agreed to my term of driving it to a local auto shop I trust to do a safety inspection (which I'll pay for). He's leaving town for ten days tomorrow, and I said that's fine, and he'll call when he returns to set up the day to do this. That all sounds good, but he was then a little vague ramble about title of car, since he bought it recently from a friend, and something about the dmv taking " sixteen weeks for more paperwork"and he's only selling because his job went remote so he doesn't have to drive between the two towns he was planning too.

I'm not an idiot, and (i'll have my father who's a former mechanic with me at the actual sale) but just wanting to know what I need to make sure he has so I don't get screwed over scammed if/when he calls back and agree to before we meet.

Just walk away, too many red flags.

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got off on a technicality
Feb 7, 2007

oh dear


Applebees Appetizer posted:

Lol don't go near it until he has the title IN HAND in HIS NAME

Also that price is pretty steep

mariooncrack posted:

Just walk away, too many red flags.

Agree. DMVs are legit backed up (took me around 3 months to get title for my TT), but that's not your problem and definitely not worth running the risk

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