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InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


Remember this one?


Click here for the full 1405x790 image.


That was his transmission.
http://www.easycarblog.com/2009/01/...nsmission.html/

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InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


Lord Yod posted:

Probably lost traction and slid sideways into a curb doing something upwards of 50mph. One of my buddies in high school stole his parents' 325i and did this, ripped all the wheels off the car. Wish I had pics.
By a curious coincidence, I used my 325i to haul someone out of a ditch who'd done the same.

The best bit was that the police turned up, searched the car, and found some weed. Then the kid's parents turned up, and it became clear that it was their car lying in a ditch with its wheels folded under the floorplan.

So the Plod just told the parents all the details, then hosed off and left them to it.

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


ZombieLicker posted:

I'll tell you what it wasn't. The tow hook.
Even if it was, on most stuff they're really just meant for tying the car down to a transporter, or the gentle pull to roll the car behind something else, not for dragging the thing bodily when it's been beached.

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


GWBBQ posted:

I remember, from my unfortunate time as a lube tech, the old Mercedes-Benz diesel engines had a small lever next to the intake manifold that had "STOP" printed on it. I can't find a picture, but I'm sure someone here knows what I'm talking about.
On the Thwaites dumper truck my dad's got, the only way to shut down the (diesel) engine is to pop the engine cover, and flick a lever which jams the exhaust valve open and kills compression. Because its idle isn't set up quite right, it would eventually stall out anyway if left alone, but that's not a design thing.

To start it, you flick the lever so there's less resistance to work against while you spin the starter handle, then flick it closed when you've got a few rpm. You also have to have the front wheel (yes, singular, it's a 3-wheeler) on full lock so your knuckles don't hit it while you're cranking, and because the fuelling's out of whack, you use a piece of binder twine wrapped round your foot to pull on the throttle so she'll start.

Seriously, no bastard's ever going to steal it. Even if by some miracle they started it, the pedal layout's set to the pre-war standard of centre throttle, right brake, and the gearbox is impossible to navigate even having driven Fiats for over a decade...

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


ACEofsnett posted:

This is epic. However, someone's probably going to steal it now, given the detailed instructions you've provided. Do you think it could handle the tongue weight of a small car trailer with an integra type-R on it?

Nevermind, if it's the same as this thing, its' so it boggles the mind. It could probably pull a house down, albeit at 5 mph.


Yep, that's the one. In fact, that's the same stock photo I've used when describing it to people

Yes, it would tow a trailer with a ton or so of Honda on it. No, it wouldn't go very fast, and God help you if you needed to stop. Single leading shoe, rod-activated drums on the rear axle...

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


ab0z posted:

Holy crap AWD escort? I need this information yesterday.
Is it related to the AWD versions of the RS2000 we got in the UK in the 90s?

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


sw0cb posted:

It looks like its actually set up well, and judging by the other posters response, I don't think there is any reason to give this guy poo poo, that happens when your wheeling in a rock garden. Props to him for using his tussed up suburban properly.
It's not an umcommon thing to get a similar failure with a live axle - come off a ledge, drop the drag link or track rod on a rock, and suddenly you have decidedly wonky alignment.

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


You Am I posted:

No. The Euro Escort AWD was based off a shortened Sierra AWD chassis. The US Escort is based off the Mazda 323 platform.
No, it wasn't, the Escort Cosworth was. The RS2000 used a transverse I4 16v engine, and is completely different.

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


BigKOfJustice posted:

As for the cast steering knuckles being an issue....



That's one from my H1, and mine has been jumped, and beat on for over 10 years. No issues. It's not widely different from what's on SUV's these days, including the H2.

If the steering knuckles are an issue on the H2, then it's an issue on most GM truck platforms as there are shared parts on everything from the Silverado up to the Escalade [GM 800]
It's entirely possible that they just had a batch of duff knuckles that went to the H2 production line - all it'd need would be an incorrect heat treatment to make an otherwise "right" part failure prone.

It's like how you see all the comedy crash test videos of Chinese copies of older western or Japanese designs, because they're simply cosmetically similar, and aren't as well designed or built.

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


chem42 posted:

This truck is rated to haul 800,000lbs, whats another 200,000 going to do?
Straw, camel, back.

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


ab0z posted:

Don't try to shift the focus of the conversation
You're just clutching at straws now.

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


JnnyThndrs posted:

I thought people had some pretty good splines, personally.
I'm sorry, but I fail to see how that has any bearing on the matter?

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


Elviscat posted:

I think it's cool that their thoughts are all synchro'd up.
Now that's pretty brassy. I'd baulk at saying something like that.

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


Hey, it's Frank!

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


Prolapsed axle? Nasty...

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


Skyssx posted:

Because some person must be found at fault. Mechanical failure is never the issue. Say J.D. Smith worked on some bearings 300 hours ago. Those bearings shot out and ruined the whole engine. Therefore, it was J.D. Smith's fault.
Hmm, for our nonconformance reports, human error is never an acceptable root cause. You can have lack of training, lack of instruction, insufficiently robust system of working, whatever, but never "Inbred Jed just hosed up, sorry".

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


Purple Haze PS3 posted:

How does something like this affect the longevity of an engine? I'm sure it would fail sooner, but do you think he would get less than half the life of a well maintained engine?
Years ago, one of the bike mags had an article on someone who ran a CBR with zero maintenance for years, until it eventually died. At main dealer prices, they found it was more economical to gently caress an engine and rebuild it than to follow the full schedule, but that doesn't allow for hassle or doing your own servicing or getting an independent mechanic, which is obviously way cheaper.

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


drzrma posted:

To contribute picturewise, since I've been a failure at that so far, I give you this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MV_Elwha. Yes, in the wiki picture she looks fairly functional, but that's a temporary condition. She's about due to run aground, hit something, or catch fire any day now.
Hahaha, oh poo poo:

quote:

After an investigation, Captain Charles Petersen was found to have violated four sections of the ferry system's Code of Conduct on July 25, 1996 when he took the Elwha 15 miles off her designated route... Along with being charged with putting his vessel, passengers, and crew in jeopardy with the unauthorized detour, Petersen also tested positive for Marijuana use during a urine test following the incident

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


With aerospace engineering, it's usually taken as a given that it's best to learn from someone else's mistakes. As such, the training information you get presented at seminars etc often contains some absolute gold.

Training Presentation posted:

A KC-135 Aircraft was being pressurized at ground level. The outflow valves which are used to regulate the pressure of the aircraft were capped off during a 5 year overhaul and never opened back up. The post-investigation revealed: that a civilian depot technician who, "had always done it that way," was using a homemade gauge, and no procedure.

The technician's gauge didn't even have a max "peg" for the needle and so it was no surprise he missed it when the needle went around the gauge the first time. As the technician continued to pressurize the aircraft, and as the needle was on its second trip around the gauge the aircraft went "boom" - the rear hatch was blown over 70 yards away, behind a blast fence!













And this is what a tiny crack in a turbine component can do:

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


Sponge! posted:

What the bleeding gently caress did he do to it that he requires a full block *AND* both turbos? Head on into a girder or something? Jeezus.
As sacre said. Captain, we are shipping water. Full astern both, prepare to come about!

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


Boat posted:

I'm just curious as to where the nimrod who was pressurizing the thing was at the time
Nah, it's a KC-135, not a Nimrod!
Nimrods are the patrol/reconnaissance aircraft built by BAE

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


sharkytm posted:

So...0.1% are lost at sea. Maybe its as high as .5%, but thats a LOT of containers. The worst thing is that, depending on whats inside, they can remain "floating" (usually just barely above the surface) for weeks. Major loving navigation hazard.
I imagine it's a seriously bad thing to come across in a small vessel, but I'd have thought that for an ocean-going ship, hitting a lightly-loaded (hence still buoyant) cargo container would be like a car hitting an empty coke can.

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


DefaultPeanut posted:

The Fubar videos were great. Showing how stupidity prevails. After watching a handful of random videos, I have learned a decent amount about diesels themselves, and the entire PowerStroke line.
It's the way the guy enunciates, too. The descriptions of how owners have abused kit has a great "You are one stupid motherfucker son" ring to it.

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


Frank Dillinger posted:

I don't think you need to be secretive...doesn't that fall under salvage?
Salvage isn't really a "keep what you catch" situation, though. Technically you have to claim a percentage-value reward for rescuing someone else's property. In UK waters, at least, cargo remains the property of the original owner.

Luckily, if you're shipping a car in a container, the "total loss" insurance for when the container goes for a swim in the drink isn't expensive, but apparently damage insurance is a complete arse to organise.

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


Jorsh posted:

fourteen thousand dollars!! FOURTEEN THOUSAND DOLLARS!
If it's a work truck, you can bet that the boss/fleet manager is like that when he has the driver responsible in the office.

FOURteen thousand dollars! FourTEEN thousand dollars! Fourteen THOUSAND dollars! Fourteen thousand DOLLARS!

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


Rev. Dr. Moses P. Lester posted:

it was friday afternoon, beer was calling "hey i'm in the fridge come drink me"
Other than airgunning wheelnuts on, I'm enjoying the videos he's got up on there.

drat, we need some more pictures in this thread:


Click here for the full 1600x1200 image.


InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


I don't think that the airbagged truck has the best suspension system I've ever seen (I'm not too keen on the design of some of those brackets, and the whole thing looks a little on the weedy side), but on the other hand the Powerstrokehelp video on fitting a suspension lift pretty much just involves big lift blocks. Now, he does have the nous to fit much beefier U-bolts, and cautions people about getting the diff nose angle tweaked to compensate for the angle the prop will be at, but I just really hate these things:


Horses for courses. That air suspension truck definitely looks more for show than for off-road use, but a hell of a lot of people who lift leaf-sprung trucks do it "incorrectly" as well.

I've churned through a fair chunk of that guy's videos now, and I'm only seeing the odd thing here and there which I actively disagree with. Besides, he's in Georgia, so I'd feel short changed if there wasn't a good bit of going on.

Anyway, carnage for the carnage thread:




InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


Both extremes of truck modification are equally stupid:


And yet with Subarus, it doesn't offend me:

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


incredibull posted:


If you're going to transport it like that, you just have to mount it on bearings so it'll spin as you're driving along.

InitialDave fucked around with this message at 17:08 on Feb 11, 2010

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


Sponge! posted:

I lost almost 30lbs (I was 5'11 175 going in, and 5'11 148 coming out.) Man was it hot as hell in there, even in March-May. I got to wear a cool powered forced air breathing apparatus though.


Working in an injection moulding plant in the middle of summer was bad enough. Anywhere dealing with large amounts of molten metal must be utter hell.

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


InterceptorV8 posted:

Those have to be the worst storage shelves I have ever seen.
I've worked places with those shelves (and with a similar lack of bash-guards at the lower legs) - they're just thin sheet steel folded into sections, not even proper box or tube. They're frightening enough on their own, never mind when you see a loaded one get clipped by a forklift and crumple like the proverbial coke can.

Think foam rubber sounds squishy and delicate? When it's 1) strapped to a pallet and 2) descending from thirty feet up, it'll gently caress up what it hits good and proper.

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


Someone here smacked up their Saxo on the 'Ring, and due to not having facility to trailer it away, had to let them take it away and crush it, on top of paying for the nice men to replace the Armco he hosed up.

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


CommieGIR posted:

Some people fail to understand that your car cannot breathe water
Maybe if you add portholes/vents to the side, they'll act like gills?

This is actually what the vents behind the front wheels on Range Rovers are for - intakes. Apparently the logic is that a good bow wave during wading will help keep them reasonably clear, and that you'd be unlikely to submerge both at once unless you're blatantly being an idiot. To which I say "Umm". I think a snorkel would still be a good idea if you're expecting to go through anything that deep, but there you go.

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


rscott posted:

Hey we make parts for that airplane! Not engine stuff though.
Engine stuff.

(Only small bits. But some critical ones)

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


Roflex posted:

Do I really want to know what counts as a non-critical part in an airplane engine?
There's quite a lot of stuff that, while it may cause an engine shutdown if it fails, isn't territory by default.

We make fasteners - something that's holding a cowling on, or attaching random oddments together isn't that critical, and these are made to what most people mean when they talk about "Aerospace spec" for fasteners in terms of quality, traceability and so on. You know which company made it, and with a bit of detective work you could narrow it down a hell of a lot, but you would not necessarily be able to get right back to individual manufacturing batches.

You also have the "If this breaks, we be hosed" things like tierods that hold together a sandwich of multiple rotating components, and the controls for these are on another level entirely. You want to know who fitted the collet to the lathe that did this operation on this batch? Fair enough, that's what you're paying us for, just give us the number on it.

They take this poo poo seriously, too. I get purchase orders occasionally from people which have a note on them basically saying "FFS, don't buy material from _______", and when you look the company up, it turns out the entire upper management were indicted for falsification of certification. Doing that deliberately, and getting someone killed because of it somewhere down the line, can be a life imprisonment and eight-figure fine booby prize.

Hell, the other day we had to have a customer rep come in so we could show him our entire system for control and documentation, simply because one company we occasionally buy from sent out one batch of material with the incorrect heat treat on it, and a less careful manufacturer than us went and made some parts which were then stretching under load. The HT was correct to what was on the material docket, that was fine, but the customer had ordered something else and not checked it properly. The parts were only spotted when one tech putting in one fastener noticed it was showing more bare threads than the others when torqued up.

Needless to say, getting off an end user or major supplier's poo poo list is rather hard work, so you don't gently caress around. Nothing makes you popular like being the guy who gets to tell the Director that nope, that $40,000 worth of parts is going in the bin, and yep, you are going to start again from scratch. A tenth of a thou is as good (well, bad) as a mile.

Holy poo poo . Here's a picture of a turbine that was lonely and wanted a cuddle:

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


Coasterphreak posted:

Haha, that's my father. He runs the NDT division at a local manufacturing plant that mostly does parts for helicopter jet engines. I am always amazed when he explains how much paperwork he has to do if he doesn't want to lose his job/license/freedom, in addition to making sure everyone else does it too (always an adventure in backwoods NC).
If I was an NDT guy, I'd be so tempted to get one of those UV tattoos...

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


dietcokefiend posted:

If I had to guess he is referring to a lot of the dye-based penetrating chemicals they use to non-destructively test parts that help locate cracks under UV light. Having a UV tattoo in that field would be a bit of an inside joke.
Yeah. NDT at our place is generally flourescent penetrant (ASTM E-1417 is a pretty common standard for us), but for ferrous material we'll also use magnetic particle inspection (ASTM E-1444, for example).

If you're going to be about it, NDT is of course any test that doesn't cause damage, but we specifically use the term to mean crack testing.

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


Horrible stereotype failure:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/10475343.stm

BBC posted:

An Arcadia shopping centre spokeswoman said an elderly lady had been driving the car, but the Met is yet to confirm who was in the vehicle when it crashed.

quote:

Referring to the driver, the shopping centre spokeswoman said: "She was parking and thought she'd hit the brake but hit the accelerator.

"She thought the brakes had failed and hit the accelerator again and careered through the wall."

InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


Godholio posted:

I'm pretty sure it was a joke about the use of the word "careered" instead of "careened."
Etymologically speaking it's not technically wrong, but Phil's still right. Especially given that careening is also a term for when you're deliberately running a ship aground...

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InitialDave
Jun 14, 2007

I Want To Believe.


Fayez Butts posted:

Was it like in Fargo?
Worryingly, the conclusion of the investigation was something along the lines of "Worker pulled into woodchipper. Not entirely sure how, exactly. poo poo happens." - They hadn't actually nailed down the full mechanics of where he was standing, what knocked/dragged him in and so on.

So someone could have sneaked up and fed him into it, and there isn't any evidence.

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