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Mr.Peabody
Jul 15, 2009


The 300 meters of berm on your left as you were going up that hill was to let you know it was going to turn to the right once you got to the top.


Click here for the full 1600x1200 image.

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Mr.Peabody
Jul 15, 2009


While not particularly horrible, my friend's 2006 BMW 328 somehow managed to shear a bolt in the multi-link rear suspension. She suspected something was wrong when her car kept making a funny scraping sound, and I immediately realized something was horribly wrong when she pulled up and her rear wheel was sliding from front to back. Apparently the scraping sound was the tire pushed back against the wheel well. She said she hadn't hit anything, so I'm wondering how a girl who never speeds can shear a suspension bolt?

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Mr.Peabody
Jul 15, 2009


Since we seem to be throwing in accidents lately, I figured this recent video should be included to pay homage to snowpacolypse 2010.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AX_KyLuhdDQ

Mr.Peabody
Jul 15, 2009


I don't know if this stuff is a repost yet, but it's relevant. You'd be surprised how weak metal containers are against gas pressure. Here's a train tanker that someone made the mistake of sealing after the interior was steam cleaned. The air inside cooled, and the pressure difference.. well..

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Mr.Peabody
Jul 15, 2009


Plinkey posted:

That video lead me to this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1wAU...&feature=fvwrel

Which lead me to this even more hilarious burn-out video... but has left me wondering if this is now the YouTube video thread?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AeYsIFmYT6o

Mr.Peabody
Jul 15, 2009


We still doing crash videos here? Here's a crash test of a 59 Bel Air v 09 Malibu

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1_ptUrQOMPs

Mr.Peabody
Jul 15, 2009


Godholio posted:

Please, somebody make a GIF of Mario jumping on that car.

This also sounds like a retardedly fantastic idea.

Mr.Peabody
Jul 15, 2009



"Mr McCormack confided that the air was gradually escaping his body in the way that air usually does."

*Insert fart joke here*

Mr.Peabody
Jul 15, 2009


Farside posted:

I have no idea what is involved with passing hazmat for DOT is but some of the people that drive for us I wonder how they remember to breath.

Hazmat drivers don't inspect safety valves and such. They make sure they have a declaration of hazardous goods, a properly placarded truck, and the MSDS in the cab. The person who signs the Declaration of Hazardous Goods is required to inspect the cargo and prepare the paperwork, but I was never trained on examining safety valves. We just make sure the cylinder is UN certified and properly labeled by Haz Class, the cylinders are segregated and secured properly, and all the paperwork is complete and accurate.

Mr.Peabody
Jul 15, 2009


It might not look like much.. until it cracks and flies off an aircraft.


Mr.Peabody fucked around with this message at 14:44 on May 31, 2011

Mr.Peabody
Jul 15, 2009


Godholio posted:

Ok, I'll bite. What is it?

Well, you're supposed to close the cowl flaps when you fail an engine, otherwise it gets cold really fast.. but this flight school has terrible standards, so most of their instructors don't bother. Over time, it ended up cracking the engine in the process, and when my friend went up in it, he leaked out all the oil, overheated the engine and blew a cylinder. Maintenance gave him that as a souvenir, it's their 5th blown engine this year.

Mr.Peabody
Jul 15, 2009


JD Brickmeister posted:

Did you know that if you use the felt wheel to try and buff out a scratch on a cd, either nothing will happen (because you got the felt wet to be safe) or you will melt a little divot in the CD? There is no in-between.

Automotive polishing 101: Remember you're using a rotary buffer. Keep the pad moving, don't focus for too long on one spot, and don't allow the surface to get hot or you will burn through your clear coat. Don't try to rush the job, polishing takes patience.

Mr.Peabody
Jul 15, 2009


some texas redneck posted:

Every TPMS-equipped car one of my family members has owned has always had the TPMS light on. On the first car he insisted it was broken, but the next 2 cars have been the same way.

This is the same guy that drove 50,000 miles without an oil change though, and just tossed a quart of oil in when the oil light started flicking.

I know we recently rented a U-Haul van (it was brand new with 2,500 miles, it hadn't been abused too much yet) and the TPMS light was on.. yet when I checked the tires, all were at the pressure recommended by the door sticker. I'll stick with the gauge I keep in my glove box, thanks.

The problem with most TPMS is two things:
1. You need to reset it when all the tires are at the correct COLD inflation pressure.
2. Everyone checks their pressure when the tires are warm, which inflates the tire an extra 5-7 PSI. When the tires cool off, and the car is turned on.. they are below the spec and trip the TPMS.

Mr.Peabody
Jul 15, 2009


Ola posted:

Someone posted something really funny huh? That person probably owes you a new one.

I'm pretty sure "spilled a drink" is a euphemism for "masturbated all over"

Mr.Peabody
Jul 15, 2009


nevermind.

Mr.Peabody fucked around with this message at 17:14 on Jun 28, 2011

Mr.Peabody
Jul 15, 2009


Phy posted:

You could almost certainly build a Bridge-Toilet-Evacuate-Holdoff system that'd work pretty well. Have a "this is a loving bridge" broadcaster ahead of each problem bridge, and a sensor in each loco that could send a "CLOSE TOILET DUMP VALVE" signal to each car with a crapper. The problem would be, would it be cheaper than just straight-up building sewage tanks into human-carrying cars?

I think it would be far more economical to have a lever to close the valve that is activated by a strategically placed pole. You know basic mechanics vs complex electronics and all. Then again, I don't know how "uneconomical" it is to add a storage tank. It's like, a tub of plastic.

Mr.Peabody
Jul 15, 2009


Lowclock posted:

They're just as easy to do as discs as long as you have the right tools (which are cheap). It's usually more stamped pieces vs. cast pieces which is cheaper, requires less machining, and they're just as reliable and powerful as discs for every day driving. If anything I would ask why modern non-performance cars even bother with disc front brakes.

e: Actually I wouldn't be surprised if drums are more powerful until you get into heat fade since they usually have more swept area and are somewhat self-assiting.

You can look at the history of racing to know why cars use disc brakes. Mercedes v Jaguar back in the 50s most specifically. The SLR used huge inboard shaft-linked drums that were bigger than the 16" wheels, but Jaguar who had a less powerful motor, invented the disc brakes that were smaller, lighter, more powerful, more reliable, and encountered less wear during the endurance races like Le Mans. As a result of later, more powerful braking Jaguar started winning races and pushed the Mercedes to its limits. Then at Le Mans a Merc couldn't stop fast enough and launched an Aston-Healy into the crowd. It was the worst accident ever in racing, and Mercedes quit motorsports for like 25 years after that.

So I suppose car companues probably have a decent reason to use disc brakes as the primary brake on cars.

Mr.Peabody
Jul 15, 2009


14 INCH DICK TURBO posted:

Boss diagnosed the Safari brake issue. Fault with the abs computer sent an electrical charge through the brake line somehow ( ) and when our tech disconnected the caliper it found new and interesting paths to ground, causing the abs computer and pump to eat itself alive and try to melt the hard lines. Got some pictures, gonna see how imgur mobile works out and try to get them uploaded.

F5 F5 F5 F5 F5

Mr.Peabody
Jul 15, 2009


14 INCH DICK TURBO posted:

They were definitely orange at the point I looked but there was absolutely no tactful way to take a picture what with the managers and smoke and extinguishers at the ready.

We should have a picture of this for the workplace safety newsletter.

Mr.Peabody
Jul 15, 2009


Motronic posted:

I did a quick search, but I probably don't know what to look for terminology wise: how do they recycle it then? Do they have to distill it again to get the molecule chains that are too small out or some other petrochemical wizardry?

You're on the right track. Basically with modern oil the problem of reaching it's shelf life is more likely because it is no longer capable of capturing coke. Basically, like sugar in water there's a saturation point of oil where it can no longer absorb the coke and fine ash and that's when it needs recycling. Also, the acidity of the oil slowly increases as the carbon ash converts to carbonic acid. So the recycling process involves separating the absorbed carbon from the oil.

Mr.Peabody
Jul 15, 2009


Geirskogul posted:

The Chrysler Neon is simply the worst car in the entire world, nothing more. I mean, Hitler didn't hurt me personally, but I still loathe the guy, so I can see why he rages on the Neon.

It's still better than the PT Cruiser, but I think we get the idea.

Mr.Peabody
Jul 15, 2009


bolind posted:

What is going on here? What's that cable hanging off the back?

That Porsche took a poo poo on the track and is getting winched onto a flatbed.

Mr.Peabody
Jul 15, 2009


Space Gopher posted:

It's the early 1900s, and you've got a problem: you need a lightweight, small, high-power engine for one of those newfangled "aeroplanes." Unfortunately, gas engines in those days tended to run pretty rough, and needed a big heavy flywheel - not what you'd want to cart around when power-to-weight was critical. Solution: make the engine block the flywheel. As a bonus, they could get to pretty impressive power levels for the day without worrying about cooling problems; spinning the block gets you very good air cooling.

Rotaries had an interesting effect on early fighter tactics, too: that huge gyroscope of a spinning engine block up front made turns... interesting. The Sopwith Camel is one of the most famous examples: the gyroscopic effects were so strong that turns in either direction required left rudder, and while it could make a right turn nearly instantly, left turns were so slow that some pilots just preferred to whip it around 270 degrees to the right if they had to turn in a hurry.

Did anyone think to do a twin engine design with the engines spinning opposite directions, or had they moved on to radial engines by the time there was a twin?

Mr.Peabody
Jul 15, 2009


KozmoNaut posted:

It's also completely irrelevant for anything other than high-end racing series.

Tires, wheels, valves etc. have been designed and built for more than a century to handle atmospheric air and normal moisture levels. The only reason to use nitrogen is to have slightly more predictable pressure fluctuation due to temperature. Or if you live in a swamp and your pump doesn't have a functioning moisture trap, I guess.

Think about it, even if you fill your tires with fancy non-reactive nitrogen, the outside of the tire is made from the same rubber and is constantly exposed to atmospheric air and UV light. They will dry rot and crack long before the insides are harmed to any measurable degree by the oxygen in the air inside them.

I have never seen the inside of a tire or wheel have any noticeable corrosion or damage due to moisture or oxygen, but I have seen plenty of tires that were cracked and dry rotted on the outside, yet looked completely pristine on the inside. As well as steel wheels being covered in rust on the outside from road salt and damage, yet smooth as they day they were made on the inside.

Nitrogen in tires is a gigantic scam unless you're in a high-end racing series.

The only way to pump in the moisture is to use a direct pump like the 12v cigarette lighter plugin deals. Any system that uses a tank is going to have a moisture trap and dry air performs almost identically to nitrogen, since it's already 78% nitrogen. I would say nitrogen is a scam unless you're in an aircraft.

Mr.Peabody
Jul 15, 2009


KozmoNaut posted:

I'm using one of these cheap foot pump dealies, so I'm filling my tires with however humid air is around me at the time. Doesn't seem to affect anything.

You'll never notice, but the water vapor will expand and contract more than dry air with the temperature change in a tire. So you'll have a larger variation between a cold tire reading and warm tire reading than you would if you used dry air.

Mr.Peabody
Jul 15, 2009


Cowwan posted:

That is exactly what I was going to say. Around 115 it already sounds like something is out of balance. In the comments he says they should have a better drive shaft, but I have a suspicion that if his drive shaft fails at 25 mph over the stock limit something else is not too far behind, or at the very least Ford felt it would be hard to control at those speeds.

My father always told me that car manufacturers pay a lot of money to people to design cars, and they are smarter than your dumbass friends or the guy at the parts store.

It's not that the engineer who designed that wasn't smart, it was the production quality control manager who compromised on quality to save money.

Mr.Peabody
Jul 15, 2009


Bogatyr posted:

We all have the lottery fantasies, having a bleeding edge supercar and all that. I have applied my basic sense of frugality to the days after I bought the thing. I would be terrified that I would end up with it impaled or shattered on something or other and forget about leaving it in a parking lot for a moment. Plus the whole ordeal of the service these things require. I don't think I am cut out for it. At least not the Enzo, CGT, Gumpert or what have you level of car. I think for that kind of driving experience, an Ariel Atom would probably be the ticket. Besides for the same amount of money you can have a stable of some respectable cars.

If we're talking lottery rich, forget the Ariel atom, I'm buying enough land to build my own track and picking up last season's Redbull RB6.

Mr.Peabody
Jul 15, 2009


Sir Cornelius posted:

Worst thing is people driving with their rear fog-lights permanently on. If it's dual sided fog-lights you can just hardly see the brake-lights.

gently caress fog-lights.

This 100 times.

Mr.Peabody
Jul 15, 2009


thelightguy posted:

That should be a ticket for having improperly focused fog lights, like there technically is (although not enforced) for headlights. They should be focused low and wide, with the top cut low enough that they land below any other car's bumper.

No it's not tougher enforcement we need, they should just have a program like in Germany. Every October when a car goes into a dealership or service station, they get all their lights checked for function and aim free of charge. The Government pays a small subsidy for each vehicle checked, and it has a demonstrated record of reducing accidents and generating cost savings.

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Mr.Peabody
Jul 15, 2009


Beach Bum posted:

So in this thread we post catastrophe, sometimes involving engine blocks. But, after said catastrophe, what do we do? We rebuild it. Stronger, Faster, More Powerful. But most importantly, with a buttload of pictures, ostensibly to make sure we put it back together right, but sometimes, we make something beautiful.

This is one of Those Things.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=daVDrGsaDME

This was just outstanding.

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