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Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Elviscat posted:

I slammed my Mustang into a curb at ~30 mph one time (doriftuuuu) and absolutely destroyed one of my wheels, almost folded it in half, took it in for an alignment after replacing the wheel.... 0 damage to the suspension

People make jokes about truck suspension, but no, really, Ford makes all their vehicles that tough.

At Sebring during the ALMS this year, a Porsche hit one of the Ford GTs and completely snapped one of their suspension links. Limped the Porsche into the pits and had to spend a half hour replacing bits. The Ford never stopped.

e: Jesus, my typing.

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Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Aircraft brakes most certainly can catch on fire.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


I do recall an EMERGENCY marked lever in the cab of the 5-ton I drove in 2004. It was attached to a cable that pulled a lever somewhere on the left side of the engine, probably a fuel cut.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


The programming in FBW computers is fairly robust. The Hunter UAV is totally FBW, or rather, it can fly itself, but accepts directions from humans. We landed one with no left aileron in '04. The pilots didn't even notice a difference.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Sockington posted:

OH - and for all of you with ZX2s etc - there's a company producing new rear subframes that let you install a Toyota Celica rear diff/axle setup in a FWD Escort GT/ZX2 chassis. There's tons of info about the Toyota trans swap + this new AWD setup if anyone wants it.

Mind you, the adapter plate that's currently out there (about $270usd) only works for the BP motor (which can be installed into a ZX2 easily).

drat you. I'm working on my sister's ZX2 right now, if you missed the post in your project thread. Does the AWD rear preclude use of the ZX2 S/R discs (which I may be swapping in)? Either way, a full driveline and engine swap is probably out of the scope of what i'm looking to do.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


incredibull posted:

What better way to find out your load limits than to just pile on poo poo until the rear tires rub on the wheelwells? This is the preferred loading method for all compact pickups. Bonus points if you can get the shackles to flip.

I was surprised that I didn't even get halfway to the bump stops when I completely filled my bed to the rails with wood this summer. We packed it tightly, too. If you're rubbing, you're probably at double your payload rating.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Previa_fun posted:

I stalled for about a minute looking for the pun here.

Fang does puns better than anyone else on SA. I get overloaded.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


N183CS posted:



I love how a crew member thoughtfully installed the before flight item on that engine nacelle. Preventing FOD damage is important, even when there's no loving engine or gearbox there.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Pipkin posted:

The Ford 4.6 hates spark plugs for no apparent reason.

No, it's every Mod Motor in one way or another.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


frozenphil posted:

Just because a few dozen people on some truck forum had it happen to them doesn't make it a common occurrence on an engine platform with installed numbers in the multiple millions. Yes, it's a known issue with some Mod engine platforms, but it's far from endemic to the family.

I know it doesn't happen to everyone, but Ford has TSBs out for every mod motor ever for one or the other spark plug issue. Just yesterday I was at the local parts counter getting Zetec bits and some guy came in looking to buy the removal tool because his plug threads had stayed behind in the engine head of his work truck.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


BatDan posted:

An important requirement of these engine cases is to contain the pieces of the engine in case of failure.

Because some person must be found at fault. Mechanical failure is never the issue. Say J.D. Smith worked on some bearings 300 hours ago. Those bearings shot out and ruined the whole engine. Therefore, it was J.D. Smith's fault.

I'm just bitter. I had 4 years of flawless maintenance on aircraft, which is just as much luck as skill. I saw plenty of good people hosed by the system in that time though.

So who ruined that turbine?

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


InitialDave posted:

Hmm, for our nonconformance reports, human error is never an acceptable root cause. You can have lack of training, lack of instruction, insufficiently robust system of working, whatever, but never "Inbred Jed just hosed up, sorry".

AAI and Northrop Grumman will blame a service member 100% of the time. "There's no oil in this plane! The crew chief is at fault!" Yeah, because the plane crashed upside down, cracked the oil tank and then laid in a field that way for two hours. Of course there's no oil left in the tank! rear end.

And they were UAVs, too. So there was no loss of life and max payout was under 1 million. Every loving time, "oh it was the soldier".

Speaking of Gross Mechanical Failures and Pictures in This Thread:

Click here for the full 2048x1365 image.


This one was the "mechanical failure" of the carbon fiber wings to contain 44 liters of 100LL upon impact with a concrete barrier at 70 KIAS.

90% Pilot, 10% Crew Chief error. The pilot left the aircraft in "sticks" mode, used during pre-flight, and pegged the throttle instead of hitting the "Auto Launch" button. The CC was 10% at fault, because going max throttle in sticks and hitting auto launch make slightly different noises.

Anyway, it went off the launcher rail at 70 KIAS. Max throttle, zero flaps, zero ailerons, zero rudder, full pitch down. The pilot realized his mistake and tried to get it into auto launch, but the plane just followed a perfect arc and impacted a 30' chainlink fence and concrete barrier wall 600m downrange.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


2ndclasscitizen posted:

Crank goes kaboom!

Saying 'drat' for this failure does not properly convey the magnitude of failure. That's a 'drat' where every letter is pronounced. Like "dah-muh-nuh!"

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Low pressure, high volume; like a rescue airbag. He was probably fine.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Sponge! posted:

Is it sad I've often considered an anodized(red) aluminum chainmaile tie?

https://www.theringlord.com Make it out of whatever metal (or non-metal, really) you can imagine.

frozenphil - The hobbyist's metalworking thread is not nearly as goony as you would think.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Fanelien posted:

This, this this. I actually almost bought one, I was so ready I went to test drive one with my best mate with a cheque already written in my pocket. I didn't fit, I couldn't get comfortable driving it, at 6'4 I just wasn't designed to drive the car. I almost cried, great car, just made for little Japanese men.

I took last year's car show as an opportunity to test fit sports cars. At 6'5" and a 36" inseam, my data may be useful to you. The Mustang, CTS-V and M3 are the only cars that fit. Head bumped on the 'vette, could not see poo poo out of the Camaro. All others resulted in my head sticking out above the windshield. Interestingly enough, I would fit fine in a Fiero.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Phy posted:

Huh. My folks had a two-stroke for the longest time and I'm pretty sure the ones I used doing landscaping one summer ran on premix. Learn somethin' new every day.

Lawn Boy was the only company making two-stroke lawn mowers to my knowledge. They were forced to stop for the '04 MY due to new EPA regulations. They switched to Tecumseh for a few years, and are now rocking the bottom end Hondas. It's too bad Lawn Boy went from quirky as gently caress unique mowers to Toro's big box store poo poo brand.

Pretty much, if you want a walk behind mower, you should either buy a $60 shitbox special and only fill it with gas until the first time it doesn't start OR buy a Toro Super Recycler. There's no reason to buy a mower in between those price ranges. There's mowers better than the Super Recycler, but equipment like that is really only necessary for true commercial uses.

That said, I use a sealed lead acid powered electric mower. Except for the lack of self propel, it's the best walk behind ever. Of all time.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


I heard it's got awful problems with mold.

But seriously, how does anyone in America not know that home on sight? It's like saying "What the gently caress is a Ferrari?"

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


My favorite at the bottom end was always nicks on lock wire. "You see that bit there where you scratched the wire pulling it through the fastener? Yep, do it again."

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


oxbrain posted:

MEK will dissolve the glue residue in a hurry.

MEK will rapefuck a planter's wart. You can get it at any paint store or big box store.

That aluminum tape is also available about anywhere. Great for sealing the take down seams on UAVs to decrease drag.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


All two strokes scavenge exhaust. The fresh fuel/air charge pushes the exhaust and itself into the muffler, then get bounced mostly back into the combustion chamber. This is why stratified scavenging has been exploding in the OPE field the past few years.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Mythbusters proved it was not possible to start a fire from friction between rubber and the road.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Godholio posted:

Same here, but the lesson for me was more about not waiting too long to replace tires.

My lesson was when you ask the Firestone dealer for a quote for snow tires, and they never call back, CALL THEM BACK!

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


There is absolutely no upside to purchasing a plasma TV.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Detroit Q. Spider posted:

Plasmas are cheap, that's their big advantage.

They wear out in under 7 years, they run very hot, they're quite heavy compared to LCD sets, they absolutely vomit interference on the HF band, and apparently they don't work at high altitude.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Detroit Q. Spider posted:

You want to keep a TV for more than 7 years?

Currently rocking a 55" 1080p DLP. It's approaching 5 years of age and there is absolutely no reason to replace it. $1500 new and I just had the bulb replaced free of charge. I don't anticipate it being outdated in the next 10 years.

And don't even mention 3D. That poo poo is so gimmicky and horrible.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Huge_Midget posted:

Except if you want the best picture quality available, you aren't going to find it on an LCD. Oh yeah, I also like being able to look at my TV from any angle and have the picture look the same. My 2 year old Pioneer Kuro Elite still has a better picture than anything you can buy today for under $20,000. As for EM interference, sure maybe if you bought a "Sorny" or "Samung" TV you might have some, but the well made brands don't have any. The FCC certifications exist for a reason.

I can't speak to high dollar LCDs, but DLP has every bit of picture quality and viewing angle of plasma at a better price per inch ratio. The tradeoff being the packaging. Except when the bulb goes, it's a few hundred instead of a new TV.

No plasma on the market is properly shielded from RF egress, part 15 be damned. You can hear them on a HF receiver from 3 or 4 blocks away, particularly in the 7mhz range.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


The ISS is at maybe half a bar.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


loving balls! At least in IT you never have to deal with biological material.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


That'll buff out.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Captain McAllister posted:

Err, content, so I'm not derailing:

The gearhead and blade on the left are supposed be one with the piece on the right. That driveshaft is supposed to run straight down into the gearhead...in short, it came off with impressive force.



Saw specifically designed to cut down trees with a brush blade installed... and then used to cut down trees. And the wrong guard is on for that blade.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Captain McAllister posted:

We use them for non-woody plants etc. Not used for cutting down trees - we find those guards stop about 90% of the stuff coming at you. Are there different/better ones? Do you work for Stihl?

^^^ Table breakage!

Sorry, I automatically assume broken Stihl stuff has been horribly abused.

I work at a Stihl dealer in Ohio that serves several large commercial organizations. Virtually every day in the summer I get to hear "warranty, warranty, warranty!"

In the U.S., Stihl doesn't offer the two edged blade, only 3, 4 and 8. I've asked why, but my distributor either doesn't know, or won't divulge the answer. European Stihls can be equipped with a two-edged blade and a special guard just for that blade. It attaches about a foot up the cutter shaft and is ellipsoid in shape. I'll try to look up the part at work today.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


The part number for the two-edged blade deflector is 4128 713 4500. The older version is 4119 710 8105, but I doubt that will work with your saw. Still looking for a good picture.


You put this thing on with the guard I listed.

http://uk.catalog.stihl.com/katalog...dder+guard.html

There. Jesus.

Skyssx fucked around with this message at 14:12 on Mar 8, 2011

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


The Third Man posted:

But what could kick something up hard enough to punch through, what, a 1/4" of steel?

1/4" inch would be armor grade skid plates. Oil sumps are like 16 gauge steel.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


IOwnCalculus posted:

So what do you do in that situation? Wait for a service crew to fix it?

Play Warcraft.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


I left a ZX2 on jackstands for a few months on a gravel driveway. Verdict; your asphalt is crap.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Oven cleaner is one cheap way used to remove oxide from aluminum before re-anodizing it. I would recommend against that route.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


$20,000 is a rather extreme amount for a torque wrench. Like Tactical Bonnet points out, it's probably some sort of gang device. CDI (snap-on) wrenches are only a few hundred, max.

Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Aluminum is a room temperature catalyst for sodium hydroxide found in EZ-off. It breaks down the molecule and releases hydrogen into the atmosphere, so do it outside, I guess. Sodium hydroxide is what Tyler Durden was burning the poo poo out of people with in Fight Club. It's basic as gently caress with a pH of 13, so maybe neutralize it with ammonia, then wash with soap? I don't know about that, but battery acid is easily neutralized with baking soda. Soap just spreads it around.

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Skyssx
Feb 2, 2001

by T. Fine


Brake fluid is also a great weed killer.

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