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DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

I've pulled apart a couple of old inline sixes that were bent. Generally, the front of the block sags down in front of the engine mounts. It's not really noticeable until you strip it down and straight edge it though.

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DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

Hello, shock loads! This used to be a carrier cap. There may also be some ring and a little pinion mixed in to taste.

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A0zqtlIiS4E

There were pictures of the aftermath floating around, I think.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XI_gNQLmTM0

Are you joking? Are you joking?

DELETED fucked around with this message at 00:58 on Nov 6, 2009

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

teh jhey posted:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=et-g4P8SbJQ

Jesus gently caress, this guy must have dropped it into reverse to pull off something like this.

Hahaha, I love the guy in the background.

E: Holy poo poo there are multiple angles

DELETED fucked around with this message at 01:27 on Nov 6, 2009

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

ab0z posted:

Probably these pictures are just geared toward a different crowd.

What a mesh

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

2ndclasscitizen posted:

Bingo. Some sort of backfire through the intakes because it was running nitrous (can't remember the specifics) that blew the airbox out and the tank off.

Nitrous pooling, maybe. If you're running a wet kit and hit the juice at low RPMs, the engine can't process the intake charge, which means that raw fuel/nitrous pools up in your intake runners, which results in a nice kaboom

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Twb4I8_-OU

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

My rings are shot and my carb is out of adjustment. I have another carb sitting around I can rebuild, but I'm lazy.


Click here for the full 1879x1056 image.

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

Yup, if they stay in long enough it will start to turn into ash but they usually foul to the point of not working before then. I have to pull and clean them every few hundred miles, I'm pretty much just seeing how long an engine can run like that at this point. Being an AMC 258, I'm not holding my breath.

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

oxbrain posted:

Run hotter plugs.

That's my plan next time I get paid, but I'm making these plugs last a little while at least. The biggest problem areas are when you take too long cranking it, and if it idles too long. I would need one of those anti-foul for each cylinder. A few are worse than the others, but they're all bad. The carb running rich doesn't help but my hands are tied there, I have a million projects going on at once and I'd rather this thing runs poorly instead of not running at all.

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

IOwnCalculus posted:

If you're fouling plugs that quickly, "performance" is defined by "is it running".

Yeah, by that point having optimum ignition in the combustion chamber is a drop in the bucket. It's been knocking for thousands of miles now, which makes me think it's just pistons slapping around in the bores instead of a bad rod. Doesn't matter to me, as long as it goes down the road for a while longer. I'll try and get pics once I finally tear it apart. I'll have to get some mics and stuff so I can see just how hilariously out of spec this engine is. Maybe I'll put my protective case on my camera and take video of the exhaust pipe during a cold start later

DELETED fucked around with this message at 18:03 on Apr 20, 2010

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

anonumos posted:

You are going to have to explain this further. Semis don't usually jump out at you; rig jockies aren't exactly mobile and tend to be very good about staying in their own lanes.

I knew a driver who was hauling a double, a 45' with a 28' pup trailer on the back, and had it jump out... and then it kept going. The wind caught it, the pup wasn't fully loaded so it lifted and gained enough momentum to yank the big trailer sideways and he went flying like something from 'Twister'. He said he felt the truck shake, looked in his mirror and saw the pup as it was drifting across the left lane. He had enough time to think "Oh sh" before the maiden flight of his experimental aircraft.

Another driver I knew was pulling 2 28' trailers and half of the roof from the back trailer sheared off at some point. He didn't even know until he got to his destination and some lucky unloaders got a skylight for a bit. There were pictures floating around but I broke the phone they were on long ago.

DELETED fucked around with this message at 00:17 on May 5, 2010

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

On the opposite end of the spectrum from giant rear end train engines exploding, we have this 5.5hp Briggs & Stratton, which shot a rod through the side of the crankcase.


Click here for the full 960x720 image.

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

LloydDobler posted:

It has relatively large intermittent torsional loads due to opening and closing the valves though. I'd guess it was a flaw in the metal that caused that one to break, unless it's on an engine that is notorious for cam snap failures.

Also, if you have a journal larger than the rest, then that can cause it flex a bit as it rotates since it doesn't have the proper support in that area.

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

Hopefully I can get pics later, but my friends just had a good one. A few months back they lost control and slid the front passenger wheel into the curb. I was going to follow them to a shop tonight to get it fixed. As they were backing out of the driveway, there was a loud pop, the wheel lurched forward and broke the plastic cladding around the wheel well. Turns out the A arm was cracked and snapped when my friend turned the wheel at the end of the driveway. The arm snapped and started rotating away from the fram so it yanked the axle out and shot lovely yellow grease all over everything. The stance of the Element is hilarious when the front wheel is several inches forward.

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

Haha, reminds me of over-revving in Need For Speed. WHEEEEEEEEEEE-brrrrrclickclunkclangpingping

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

It's very sudden, let me see if I can find the video

E:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2WJVHtF8GwI

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

slidebite posted:

My guess is it wasn't the engine itself that overheated, it was something close to the engine that overheated due to lack of airflow and revving the piss out of it for an hour.

Several years ago, a guy across the street from my high school had a heart attack while warming up his car. His foot ended up holding down the gas pedal and the engine revved until something caught on fire. Someone finally noticed all the smoke and flames and went over to investigate after about 30-45 minutes of constant revving.

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

"Hey man, my brakes are making some noise. Do you think you could check them out?"




DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

The passenger side rotor was almost new, and the pads in decent shape so there was still some braking power, it just pulled toward that side when you braked. I think the pads were gone by the time the rotor wore through so it was just metal on the outside. The sound was pretty bad, like a freight train.

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

"Yeah, I had a Dodge once. Terrible gas mileage, no power, and it smelled funny anytime I drove it"

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

GnarlyCharlie4u posted:

no but then there was something seriously wrong with mine because it would not idle normally. it just revved to high heaven.

maybe I put something back together wrong?

Those usually have an air vane governor, so the air being pushed by the flywheel pushes on a little arm connected to the carb. The faster the engine goes, the more it pushes the air vane so it feeds less fuel and keeps the RPMs stable and limited. If they get sticky or gunked up then the engine will rev wildly or stall under load.

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

In high school, I took an engine rebuilding class. It was mostly to cheese a credit since I had already rebuilt engines and all that good stuff long before then so I was more or less a teacher's aide. Anyway, this kid was working on a 350 and it was almost ready to run. All we had to to was fill the oilpan, prime the system and stab the distributor. 5 quarts of oil goes in, I show him how to line up and get into the oil pump. He gets on the drill and starts priming. About that time, a Loony Toons-esque oil gusher erupts from the end of the block, near the distributor if I remember correctly. Turns out he forgot one of the galley plugs and it turned into a high pressure stream of oil that doused a nice area of the shop.

I can only imagine how fun that would have been if we hadn't primed it first.

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

Joe Mama posted:





Microorganisms? Stuff can grow in diesel if there's some water in there.

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

KozmoNaut posted:

I vote yes, we need a jerry-rigging/redneck repair/git-r-dun thread.

Ratcheting straps, is there anything they can't do?

(I have a whole bunch of the drat things for securing my bike to ferries etc., the really cheap flimsy ones are the best thing ever.)

I've heard of people using ratchet straps to replace the top "dog bone" engine mounts on '90s era GM cars.

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

Front drum brakes are fun when they get wet

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

b0nes posted:

Change your BMW's oil regularly, every 19K miles.



Mmmm, Bavarian chocolate

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

Motronic posted:

My point is that I believe there is a significant amount of force between the frame bending and anything else breaking. The frame really is ridiculously weak in the problem aream and if it weren't you could do a lot more before you ran into problems.



I'll just leave it at that. If you don't think you can spot the factory-created structural problem in this photo, nothing else could possibly convince you. They are literally placing the highest compressive force that can be generate on the truck on the weakest (only non-fully boxed) portion of the frame. It makes no sense at all to me.

B-b-but we put our special this-poo poo-doesn't-really-work-but-it-will-if-we-half-rear end-it part on the rear end (sort of like using flimsy control arms and bushings to make up for the fact that the Fox 4-link rear is poorly designed)!

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled



"It's actually had diarrhea!"

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

Imagine something just like this but different

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tMt2JheBSls

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

some texas redneck posted:

Did they leave it for a month or some poo poo?

It actually doesn't take all that long for engines to rust like that. When I took an engine rebuilding class, this point was stressed after a student didn't oil their block after putting in the washer. The next day every machined surface on the block had rusted over.

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

The Scientist posted:

How fast would this engine have been revving to have caused this? Also, you guys gonna sleeve that one cylinder?

Even at idle, there is an enormous amount of force being transferred through an engine. Doesn't take a lot for hydrolocking to wreck an engine.

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

Cakefool posted:

Is there a better way to clean your brakes than brake cleaner? Possibly, but why not use brake cleaner?

Gas works pretty good, it's not exactly safe or healthy though

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

The Scientist posted:

Are we talking about like human greasy person grease or like the poo poo you invariably get your arms and hands covered in when doing anything to a car?

New brake rotors come coated in a grease used to prevent them from rusting while in shipping and storage. Now that I think about it, the stuff seems a lot like cosmolene used to preserve old surplus guns for storage. You might be able to just melt it off with a heat gun or even a blow dryer if that's the case.

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

Beach Bum posted:

Brake cleaner should be the only solvent laying around.

It's also the only wasp killer

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

Coasterphreak posted:

We have a winner!

Actually, skin and eye protection are a good idea with pretty much any cleaning agent/solvent stronger than ammonia, especially where prolonged or repeated exposure is involved.

Protip: Brake cleaner destroys nitrile gloves. The typical blue gloves shrivel up and look like they have goosebumps before falling apart.

DELETED fucked around with this message at 22:18 on Sep 19, 2011

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

EightBit posted:

What about nitrile gloves?

Scratch that, I meant nitrile.

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

Godholio posted:

Whatever the typical spray brake cleaner is, it'll make the typical blue nitrile gloves go all pruny, then they just fall apart under the slightest pressure. Kleen-All solvent does the same thing.

I need to get some gloves made out of rubber or something that won't absorb or dissolve in the stuff.

Yeah, maybe the purple ones are different or higher quality but the blue ones can't handle good old non-chlorinated Brakleen and similar brake cleaners. I did get some Gunk brake cleaner once. That stuff sucks, it doesn't smell like brake cleaner should and seems to only mildly inconvenience wasps.

I will say that ATF is a drat good cleaner for metal parts though.

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

My friend had an explorer with a bad thermostat. He was about to move cross country and was getting a new car so he just kept driving it. It sounded like a diesel and smelled like a welding shop driving down the road but it kept going for a few days.

DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

Sponge! posted:

Dear lord wtf am I doing wrong?! These only have like 20K on them.











Something ain't right with #4.

However!

There's no fudge going on with the oil, and there's no oil/fuel in the coolant. I swapped the plugs and wires on Friday after it was running on something less than 4 cylinders for about 50 miles, and she's back to full power and a smooth idle...



How many miles are on the engine? Looks like sludge/ash buildup from burning oil.

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DELETED
Nov 14, 2004
Disgruntled

kastein posted:

Basically. Through advanced differential rust examination (the snowplow bracketry is around 60% as rusty as the rest of the truck) I have determined that it was a plow truck for about the last ten years, which means only being driven on wet, salty, sloppy roads and beat to hell plowing bumpy driveways, then put away still covered in salty slush and left til the next storm, which often means a few weeks or... the entire summer and fall, sitting there with salt and sand packed into every crevice, attracting humidity to the delicious bare metal.

The previous previous owner was a landscaping company, so there is a good chance they bought it new and started using it as a landscaping truck in the summer and a plow truck in the winter immediately. The previous owner never even registered it, just used it to plow his driveway and his parents driveway two blocks over, so I got the landscaping company's title when I bought it, blank except for a signature and a date sometime in '08 or so. All I need it for is to let me scrap the hulk after gutting it, so no big deal...

Landscaping trucks get beat to hell. When it wasn't covered in corrosive road sludge in the winter, it was probably humping dirt, mulch, sod, grass clippings and other slightly damp stuff that finds it's way into everything. It also could have had bags of ice melt or a sand/salt spreader in the back for winter. Hell, when I was doing that gig, I only hosed the back of my lawn truck out 1 time over the course of a summer because it sat full of clippings for several days and the nasty decomposing grass goo was all over the inside and bottom of the bed. In fact, we had a Dodge just like that, and it was showing early signs of the same frame rot.

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