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lapse
Jun 27, 2004



I've been trying e-Cigs since last month, and it's already paid back my investment, and I'm becoming an evangelical for e-Cigs.

lapse fucked around with this message at Nov 26, 2010 around 16:07

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Squidfist
Nov 9, 2010


Smoking works out to a simple formula.

1) A > B, then C.
2) B > A, then D.

A) love of smoking
B) love of being smokefree
C) be a smoker
D) be healthy and loveable

Note: You cannot be both C and D.

Personally, I've been smoking for over 4 years, and when I run out of cash, or become smokeless for a couple days, it's not a big deal. Everyone who I've known to quit has done it cold turkey, so really I can't relate to people who find it to be a super challenging thing to do.

Adjectivist Philosophy
Oct 6, 2003

When you gaze long into an abyss, the abyss also gazes into you.


Squidfist posted:

so really I can't relate to people who find it to be a super challenging thing to do.

How many do you smoke per day when you do have money? When you run out of money have you tried making it a permanent thing, or do you keep reminding yourself it is only a few days? I've never known anyone who has smoked for 20 years and then had no problem quitting, so maybe it is the best time to quit while you find it so easy

WARnold
Oct 30, 2004

You Lack Discipline!

Chiming in to encourage all goons considering quitting.
It's been said many times, but if any of you haven't yet, read Allen Carr's book...
We all know self-help books are rubbish most of the time, but Carr really drives some good points home (points that you already know, but kindof ignore most of the time).

Also, nicotine replacement hasn't worked too well for me in the past, IMO it's just prolonging one's misery/nicotine addicition. Just a heads up for everyone considering it ITT.

As for me, I'm nearly 4 weeks into being a happy non-smoker, and it's great! I can smell again, I don't stink, It's easier to get up in the morning, and exercise is so much more enjoyable even after only a few weeks.
I'm 100% positive that I won't ever smoke again. I've quit for a year before, and regretted my relapse dearly after falling back into the trap. Never again!

WARnold fucked around with this message at Nov 19, 2010 around 11:58

Mein Eyes!
Apr 15, 2002


Posting to say that going two years without a cigarette was almost exactly as hard as going two weeks. You'd be surprised how much of your desire to smoke is based off of the last 200 cigarettes you smoked (Hint: almost all of it).

ChubbyEmoBabe
Sep 6, 2003

-=|NMN|=-


This thread is a fascinating read. It's too bad most people in GBS won't read it.

Especially posts like the guy grieving for his lost friend, the cigarette.

WARnold posted:

Also, nicotine replacement hasn't worked too well for me in the past, IMO it's just prolonging one's misery/nicotine addicition. Just a heads up for everyone considering in ITT.

From what I am seeing in the thread the cold turkey people seem to do much better and have a much shorter withdrawal cycle than everyone else. Maybe the "rip the bandaid off" kind of thing?

insidius
Jul 21, 2009

What a guy!


I have not smoked since Feb of this year when I received my first ecig and I am also vaping less and less as time goes on. I never thought I would would see the day where I would no longer consider my self a smoker.

With the help of ecigs three of my friends have also quit for the same length of time as well as a number of coworkers.

Its a beautiful time.

When I look at a mate smoking now and he offers me one the thought is no longer "I want one but cant have one" its "Why the gently caress would I inhale that smelly poo poo". Its a strange feeling and one I never thought I would encounter.

The Dregs
Dec 29, 2005

MY TREEEEEEEE!

I am about three months now, thanks in part to you guys! I tried e-cigs, but I am absentminded as hell and replacing lost ones was getting expensive. So cold turkey. It sucked.

Killae
Nov 22, 2003
Black rainbow, Ape of God, Rebel from the waist down.

Been quitting for about a week now, had one relapse day where i smoked myself crazy. Had one smoke yesterday and didnt really enjoy it at all. What i do enjoy about smoking is the company since most of my mates smoke and it's something to do, which is dumb because i think there are much better ways to occupy yourself.

Im on the gum, patches made me uncomfortable especially if you forget to take it off before sleeping. The best help I got is my girl offering me a dick sucking every day i dont smoke so any smokers with a partner who doesnt like it try giving something like that a go, its more productive than incessant nagging about smoking which generally made me want to smoke more.

Squidfist
Nov 9, 2010


Traffic Reporter posted:

How many do you smoke per day when you do have money? When you run out of money have you tried making it a permanent thing, or do you keep reminding yourself it is only a few days? I've never known anyone who has smoked for 20 years and then had no problem quitting, so maybe it is the best time to quit while you find it so easy

Yeah, I usually have income to look forward to.

Last time I tried quitting because I noticed it had been a few days anyways, I got to 8 days before drinking many beers and deciding I'd quit later.

Fact: drinking beers is a poor step in your quitting journey.

As for quitting before it becomes more difficult, I may just do that. I just ran out 20 mins ago.

Brekke
Oct 9, 2010


I'm 30 and have been smoking for roughly 13 years. I come from a family of smokers, and for the first 2 years I smoked every time I had one I got a little... high? It was nice anyway. I've tried quitting a few times. It is time to quit again though, and I hope to whoever I can make it stick.

1st time, I was 21. No real reason, just thought I should. Lasted a month. Not sure why I started again, but that was about the time I discovered that I really do love whiskey. Possible connection there.

2nd time, I was 23 and had gotten my first job as a stage manager for a small local theater company completely staffed by mentally inept narcissists. I did not have time to smoke, found myself smoking less and less, then found I felt ill when I did smoke, so I stopped. Lasted about 4 months, which was the exact length of the run of the show. We ended our working relationship with a huge party and a lot of booze. Probable connection there.

3rd time, I was 25 and could not pay my rent. Unfortunately, because I resented the circumstances surrounding my quitting the moment I was back in the green financially, about 2 months later, I ran out and bought a pack.

4th time, I was 26 and was trying to change all of my poor habits. However, at some point I started eating more, gained a ton of weight, and blamed the not smoking. Poor scapegoat . 3 months.

5th time, 28, went on Chantix. Experienced side effects, hard. Nearly killed my assistant at work (she did have it coming, in sane, contemplative retrospect), ended up crying uncontrollably instead and losing my job. Also was having terrible stomach pains. The next day the headlines read that the market was crashing and the economy was doomed. 1 month.

Now, as I mentioned, I am 30. I've been kicking the idea around of quitting again for awhile. Other contributing factors to my decision, in chronological order, are:

1)I'm broke.
2)I'm uh, sort of falling for a non-smoker. >.> (Lies, I've totally fallen)
3)I have gone back on the birth control pill and this is a dangerous no-no.
4)On Sunday night my mother had a heart attack. Not only is this a HUGE smack in the face from the reality of what happens to a life long smoker, she will need to quit and I want to, maybe, try to show her that it's possible.
5)I have only cut down since Sunday and I can already feel the difference. And smell it. Amagad.

Anyway, maybe I can look back at my long winded post in a few months and smile that I was successful. If this is the case, "Hey! Future Brekke! Good job ".

If not, then, "Hey, future Brekke! $7.00*45packs= $315 dollars. That's a few pedicures right there you could have had >: ("

TrueChaos
Nov 14, 2006




insidius posted:

When I look at a mate smoking now and he offers me one the thought is no longer "I want one but cant have one" its "Why the gently caress would I inhale that smelly poo poo". Its a strange feeling and one I never thought I would encounter.

How long did this take for you? I smoked for 3 years, quit as of september 5th. I'm still in the ugh I want one but can't have it phase. Of course, its not nearly so bad as it was, but I just want it to be gone. Also stressful days are that much more stressful.

Adjectivist Philosophy
Oct 6, 2003

When you gaze long into an abyss, the abyss also gazes into you.


Squidfist posted:

As for quitting before it becomes more difficult, I may just do that. I just ran out 20 mins ago.

New study finds that the odds of unplanned quit smoking attempts having long term success are 2.6 times higher than for planned attempts.

Rock that poo poo bro!

Shizmo
Feb 2, 2010

JUICED TO THE GILLS

I do not ever exceed three cigarettes a day and swim and exercise daily; been smoking Luckys for about two-three months. I ask, am I addicted?

That was a serious question...

Adjectivist Philosophy
Oct 6, 2003

When you gaze long into an abyss, the abyss also gazes into you.


Shizmo posted:

I do not ever exceed three cigarettes a day and swim and exercise daily; been smoking Luckys for about two-three months. I ask, am I addicted?

That was a serious question...

86.8% of students who smoke nicotine at least once daily are chemically dependent under DSM IV mental health standards.

Via http://whyquit.com (Probably the best online resource for this kind of stuff. Everything on this site is worth a read if you smoke or are in the process of quitting.) You may not be a student, but I don't think that really affects the meat of the statement.

fireraiser
Oct 28, 2007

I like cute shit

I was able to quit for the first 3 weeks of the year, then I went back to class and a buddy instantly handed me a cig as a kind gesture for me bumming him cigs all the time.

This time I'm more serious. Weened myself down to 2-3 cigs a day with snus and then quit all tobacco products. I'm already on day 13. No problems. Turning down cigs left and right (it's dangerous living with smokers). Saving money and saving my health.

WARnold
Oct 30, 2004

You Lack Discipline!

Shizmo posted:

I do not ever exceed three cigarettes a day and swim and exercise daily; been smoking Luckys for about two-three months. I ask, am I addicted?

That was a serious question...

Yes. You may think you can stop any time, but the best time to stop is now, before you get caught up in it.
The nasty thing about nicotine addiction is that it slowly creeps up on you. Stop now, or you'll come to regret it!

Faffel
Dec 31, 2008


I recently quit after about two years of smoking. It began with single cigarillos, then ramped up to smoking a pack of regular smokes to myself across a few days. Me and my roommate just decided to quit one night - she had a lot of trouble with it and got shakes and withdrawls, but I didn't even get a craving to smoke. Probably one of the best decisions I've made - smoking is lots of fun and really pleasurable, but the damage to my lungs just wasn't worth it. I'm just glad I don't seem to suffer from nicotine addiction, but for the rest of you guys keep it up. You'll never regret quitting.

Shizmo
Feb 2, 2010

JUICED TO THE GILLS

Thanks for the insight!
I plan on quitting over Christmas break, since I don't smoke when I'm with my family, and I'll be with them for a month

fuf
Sep 12, 2004

haha

I smoked maybe 5 or 6 fat joints (half tobacco, half weed) every day for around 6 years. I finally quit the ganj, but it turns out the tobacco is much harder to do away with.

I managed to keep my smoking limited to the evenings, which I think has made trying to quit easier - I never really feel like a smoke when I wake up for example.

Right now I am down to one cigarette a day which I smoke just before I go to sleep as a substitute for the old KOJ (knock out joint). I am pretty proud of where I've got to but I've been stuck at this point for a while.

I think the thing holding me back from quitting altogether is knowing I'm going to spend months coughing up all the poo poo in my lungs. Last time I tried to quit the coughing was the worst bit by far. I had to keep a disgusting little spit-bowl by my bed and I would wake up 3 or 4 times a night to cough poo poo up. Then I would spend the first 2 hours every morning in a coughing fit, and spend the rest of the day clearing my throat every 30 seconds or so. It basically made me a horrible person to be around, far worse than when I smoked. In fact people who had no idea that I smoked before thought I had started smoking because of all the coughing. I relapsed after about 3 or 4 weeks, and by then it had shown no signs of letting up, so I really have no idea how long it's gonna last when I quit this time.

I guess even just one small cigarette a day is enough to hold off the lung-repair that causes all the coughing, and part of me thinks one a day is worth it to not have to go through that, which doesn't exactly help the motivation to quit.

GhostDog
Jul 29, 2003

Always see everything.


I didn't cough at all, and I smoked 20 a day for 20 years. Does that mean that my lungs are already destroyed? Or do they have some miraculous self-cleaning abilities and I could have just kept on smoking?

Adjectivist Philosophy
Oct 6, 2003

When you gaze long into an abyss, the abyss also gazes into you.


GhostDog posted:

I didn't cough at all, and I smoked 20 a day for 20 years. Does that mean that my lungs are already destroyed? Or do they have some miraculous self-cleaning abilities and I could have just kept on smoking?

My guess would be super powers. Go grab a carton, Gotham needs a hero.

How they affect everyone will always be different person to person. Odds are your breathing had just become so shallow you couldn't get enough air in there to irritate your lungs into coughing.

Good_Vs_Evil
Sep 12, 2006



Brekke posted:

2)I'm uh, sort of falling for a non-smoker. >.> (Lies, I've totally fallen)
3)I have gone back on the birth control pill and this is a dangerous no-no.
4)On Sunday night my mother had a heart attack. Not only is this a HUGE smack in the face from the reality of what happens to a life long smoker, she will need to quit and I want to, maybe, try to show her that it's possible.
5)I have only cut down since Sunday and I can already feel the difference. And smell it. Amagad.

These should be huge for you -- especially #4. I got married a little over a year ago on a Saturday. Monday morning I had a voicemail that my mother had a massive heart attack (we were already out of the country so there wasn't much I could do and my father didn't want me to come back as it was under control). She was told she needed to change her diet and quit loving smoking. She has smoked probably since she was 15 and watched her mother (a chain smoker) die right in front of her from an exploded heart that was most likely due to smoking. My mother smoked when she was pregnant for me, while raising me, and right up until her heart attack.

It shouldn't be any surprise that I took up smoking when I was 15.

Both her and my father smoke about 2 - 2 1/2 packs per day and always have.

After her heart attack, she got the patches and Chantix. She's blown through all of those and is still smoking. I can't nag her, I can't scold her. My father and I both quit hoping it would be inspirational to her (for myself there were other reasons as well, but this was one of them). It wasn't.

Now all I can do is watch her destroy her life and try to enjoy whatever time I have left with her

It's one of the worst things in the world, and now I know how my wife felt watching me smoke. I hope our kids (as of yet not in existence) will never have to be around that poo poo and pick up the habit. Also, I hope that my mother lives long enough so that they can remember her and not just hear stories about her.

I hope.

Spitshine
May 13, 2004
I may be bad, but I feel good.

TwistedNails posted:

It has been almost 9 months now since I quit smoking. I quit cold turkey and began to run daily and joined a new gym, after running a mile with smokers lungs quitting became really easy. It hurt to breathe while I was running but it got easier everyday and it helped keep me away from cigs. Now I've lost a ton of weight joined a Karate and Judo class on top of my normal gym and I really turned my life around.

gently caress cigarettes. Goodluck guys!
Running is great now. I used to be a really good runner while being a smoker (12:34 best 2-mile!), but now that I've quit it's just nice to know that I'm getting back on track. I feel better every run, I can do it faster, and I'm not in a rush to finish the workout. Got a new job (am still poor, but it'll get better!), made it over four weeks without a single cig, and made it through a heavy drinking weekend too.

Abiggoat posted:

I'm not doing too bad, though! I did three days smoke-free but eventually succumbed to my cravings. I only had one and gave the ten pack I bought to my friend who is allowed to give me one a day, if I ask. If I do ask, he will give me it at some point in that day. This way is working quite well because he's being clever about it and giving me one when he knows I wouldn't want one (just before eating, just woke up, about to go to bed etc) so its completely taking away anything I enjoyed about smoking and just replacing it with that feeling you'd get when you'd had one too many.

Yes, I'm still smoking a little, but I'm finding I want to less and less! I think going from 5 or 6 a day to sometimes wanting 1 is pretty good (for me, at least)!
This actually sounds like a fantastic way to quit, man. Good luck!

fluffzilla
Mar 20, 2007


Been done for one week exactly. Completely cold turkey. I woke up last Monday morning with no smokes left and simply said "I'm not going to do this anymore." Toughest days were Tuesday, Thursday, Friday and today as I ended up drinking with friends who smoke but never gave in. It's definitely worth it, I feel way better already. I have a lot more energy and don't have to go outside in the cold every hour or so anymore. I've been kicking myself in the rear end to start running or other exercise as a replacement/additional beneficial point to my health, but previously mentioned cold is preventing that so far...until I dig out my cold weather gear.

The solution is finding the best way that works and just do it. For me, it was just telling myself not to be a dumbshit and STOP. If you can convince yourself mentally to block out the cravings, that is definitely the best way, in my opinion. Just eliminate them without adding dependency to something else (pill, gum, e-smoke.)

Will keep updated on progress. First week down, many more to go!

Emu on Acid
Oct 27, 2005

Let's build a snowman!

One week down! But a ton to go... This thread has been a big help. Personally, I've found replacement habits pretty helpful. I've gone through like five boxes of Cheez-its.

flyboi
Oct 13, 2005

agg stop posting


College Slice

Wanted to come back and provide an update.. 3 months no smoking! I think I'm good for the long haul now

It was hard at first because smoking was still allowed in bars and restaurants here. I had to quit taking Chantix because it gave me bad dreams and I didn't want it to get worse. I substituted with an electronic cigarette that had 0mg nicotine which worked great until the ban went through. Haven't used the ecig in over 3 weeks now and only relapsed 1.1 times. Was wasted at a conference and had a cigarette 2 months ago and had a single puff of a cigarette twice when the ban wasn't in affect.

Edit: what's even greater is my partner now is thinking about quitting smoking after seeing me do it and is working with the quit line. A friend of mine as well has mustered the will to try himself. Hooray!

flyboi fucked around with this message at Nov 22, 2010 around 15:25

CannedMacabre
Jul 6, 2007

In space, no one
can hear you fart.


I also wanted to offer support to those who are still struggling. I quit with the patch over 8 months ago. Quitting was like giving myself a raise of $160+ a month. Best decision I have made in a long time.

electricsugar
Jan 21, 2008

Tum again?

Considering trying to quit again. It's loving tough (obviously). I have tried 3 or 4 times in the past and always relapsed.

I just enjoy it so loving much. I love the feeling of sucking in the smoke and the calming flow of the nicotine through my veins. I can't imagine myself EVER not craving that feeling. Which is what makes smoking so hard. How can I quit something that gives me a feeling I love?

Adjectivist Philosophy
Oct 6, 2003

When you gaze long into an abyss, the abyss also gazes into you.


electricsugar posted:

Considering trying to quit again. It's loving tough (obviously). I have tried 3 or 4 times in the past and always relapsed.

I just enjoy it so loving much. I love the feeling of sucking in the smoke and the calming flow of the nicotine through my veins. I can't imagine myself EVER not craving that feeling. Which is what makes smoking so hard. How can I quit something that gives me a feeling I love?

If you can get past the lovely 90s web design read This. Is it the feeling of having nicotine you love, or the feeling of being without that you hate?

electricsugar
Jan 21, 2008

Tum again?

Traffic Reporter posted:

If you can get past the lovely 90s web design read This. Is it the feeling of having nicotine you love, or the feeling of being without that you hate?

I would say it's love of the feeling. Like I mentioned above, Its hard to imagine ever not wanting to have that feeling. Is this just the addiction talking?

Will it actually go away with time? I don't know because I've never been able to stay quit for more than a week

Adjectivist Philosophy
Oct 6, 2003

When you gaze long into an abyss, the abyss also gazes into you.


electricsugar posted:

I would say it's love of the feeling. Like I mentioned above, Its hard to imagine ever not wanting to have that feeling. Is this just the addiction talking?

Will it actually go away with time? I don't know because I've never been able to stay quit for more than a week

Yes and yes.

flyboi
Oct 13, 2005

agg stop posting


College Slice

electricsugar posted:

I would say it's love of the feeling. Like I mentioned above, Its hard to imagine ever not wanting to have that feeling. Is this just the addiction talking?

Will it actually go away with time? I don't know because I've never been able to stay quit for more than a week

Being someone that was a daily pot smoker who substituted w/ cigarettes to quit smoking yes it does get better over time. I too loving love the feeling of my lungs burning, holding it in and then watching the cloud build above my head. I smoked weed from 14-23ish daily starting age 17 and got up to around a half ounce a day in my roughest period. Started smoking cigarettes to quit weed and was at around 14-20 a day.

The only time I really really really crave a cigarette anymore is when I'm drunk and they're around me or when I'm bored and not doing anything. I fight these urges and they go away after a few minutes. It was extremely bad when smoking was allowed in bars because it's right in your face and you can smell it and taste it. Now that it's out of sight I rarely even crave at bars.

It's a matter of getting over the initial hump of the nicotine addiction and then the oral fixation. I highly suggest giving an e-cig a whirl in your situation. It completely helped me in curbing my need to feel my lungs cry after I was over the initial nicotine withdrawal.

electricsugar
Jan 21, 2008

Tum again?

It seems to me like e-cigs just prolong the nicotine addiction even longer. Isn't that what we're trying to quit?

ElCondemn
Aug 7, 2005
I claim I was poor, but it turns I had a single mother who could actually work a job so I don't know what it really means to be poor.


electricsugar posted:

It seems to me like e-cigs just prolong the nicotine addiction even longer. Isn't that what we're trying to quit?

You can get nicotine free cartridges, but personally I quit smoking because I hated the smell and effect it had on my breathing.

flyboi
Oct 13, 2005

agg stop posting


College Slice

electricsugar posted:

It seems to me like e-cigs just prolong the nicotine addiction even longer. Isn't that what we're trying to quit?

The liquid I was using had no nicotine in it so I was just smoking flavored fog machine smoke.

Rat
Dec 12, 2006

My gut is telling me no. But my gut is also very hungry.

You can do it! I was smoking 3-5 cigs a day or so for 9 months. I up and decided to stop buying smokes and quit that way.

Been 2 months smoke-free. The first two weeks are rough. Tough it out and then you're on the home stretch.

Woodhouse
Aug 1, 2010

Tell me, Aldo, if I were sitting where you're sitting, would you show me mercy?

The hardest part about quitting for me is after I finish smoking a blunt/bowl/etc I need a cigarette.

Quitting cigarettes is one thing, but stopping both of these habits is another monster entirely.

lapse
Jun 27, 2004



electricsugar posted:

It seems to me like e-cigs just prolong the nicotine addiction even longer. Isn't that what we're trying to quit?

I personally was trying to quit for health reasons.

Nicotine replacement does that part of the job pretty well. You get just nicotine without all the other chemicals and tar and poo poo.

Eventually I'm sure I'll want to get rid of the expense altogether, but for me e-Cigs were a good first step.

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MykeOck
Mar 4, 2010



After about 14 years of smoking 1 pack/day, I'm trying to quit smoking for the second time this year. First time I've had a 5 month cold turkey break, and caught the habit again, thanks to alcohol and good, supporting friends.

This is the second smoke-free day, and I'm experiencing nicotine withdrawal as I write. Aside from chest pains, nausea and dizziness I also feel like tearing down the walls and kicking my boss in the teeth every time he opens his mouth.

I've stocked up on fruits to help me get over this phase. They've worked wonders last time. Taking a break to peel an orange (and eat it of course) is an incredibly good replacement for that cigarette break I used to have every hour.

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