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Swoon
Jun 14, 2008


n1000 posted:

To reiterate, people get fat after quitting because eating food gives a similar (albeit weaker) rush to smoking a cigarette, and your biochemistry makes you hungry.

Makes sense. I knew a little about the blood sugar havoc it can wreak, I was just wondering what other people had experienced. I'm in a weird spot with the appetite/energy levels because of my workout schedule. My workouts make me ravenous, but I'm not sure how much of it is nicotine withdrawal or legitimate hunger because my metabolism is working overtime.

I do get the urge to snack a lot, and a lot of it seems like oral fixation. I've been turning to crunchy things, for whatever reason, the crunchier the better. Unsalted almonds have become my new vice.

In other news, I have developed the quitter's sore throat/flu like symptoms. I thought it was an early Spring allergy attack until I saw that the pollen count wasn't anything of note. Then I read up on typical side-effects of quitting. From what I understand it's from the body trying to heal itself and expel toxin buildup. This sucks, my nose is running, my throat feels like I've gargled with broken glass and I'm still trying to soldier through.

Anyone found a way to deal with this? Cough drops? Mucinex?

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CannedMacabre
Jul 6, 2007

In space, no one
can hear you fart.


Its been almost a year now since I quit. The extra pounds and fits of anger were all worth it. My clothes don't stink, I save $160+ a month and my taste buds work again. Oh... and I am not slowly poisoning myself anymore. SOOO worth it. So keep your chin(s) up goons. In a year, you too will be very happy about quitting.

Furious Mittens
Oct 14, 2005



Lipstick Apathy

SO I finally did it a couple days ago..

I dipped Skoal on and off from age 16-24 (I was dipping machine in college) and then picked up Swedish Snus to get away from that messy habit. I ran out of my supply about a week ago and I quickly ordered some more to replace it. During the time that I was waiting, I was really, really irritable and jumpy because I didn't have my nicotine. I thought to myself that it was really lovely that I was this addicted to the stuff and made the determination that I was going to quit. I got the order in and gave it all to a friend to get it out of the house but I found one tin in my patrol car and after a stressful night,I dug into it. I finished the tin and now I'm completely out.

I picked up Nicorette gum and I'm going to follow the plan religiously to get myself off this stuff. So far, so good. I'm only doing about 8 pieces a day, which is much less than they recommend but it's working very well for me so far. I can put the gum where I used to put my Snus in my mouth and I don't know the difference. I've also upped my workout routine to compensate for any increase in appetite (I haven't seen it yet) and just to keep me busy and motivated. I've been lucky not to have any gum or teeth problems associated with my use but I really didn't realize or like how much my body was dependent on the stuff and I really hated that my body and mind was relying on this stuff to function. Made me revisit my perspective a bit on people who are drug addicts.

I know it's not cigarettes, but I'm kicking tobacco entirely. Any other Goons kicking the smokeless habit?

Furious Mittens fucked around with this message at Mar 10, 2011 around 15:01

fatjoint
Sep 28, 2005
Fatjoint

This coming Sunday will be two weeks tobacco free - this is a slightly larger yay! for me. I'm chewing so much nicotine gum that my teeth are sore, and I'm alternating days with an e-cig.

I've noticed my sense of smell appears to be better. I'm noticing the smell of other smokers after they finish and that I can smell it clear across a room. I still have a wheeze at the end of my breath, which while it's still there I've noticed it's far less pronounced, and only at times instead of all the time.

I started smoking when I was 9, and I'll turn 40 next week - hopefully its not too late. I have to say that I already feel a tad bit better.


\/\/\/\/ - Thank you! I wasn't looking for a reply, but it's nice to receive a well wish. I hope your quitting is going well also.

fatjoint fucked around with this message at Mar 10, 2011 around 15:45

Swoon
Jun 14, 2008


fatjoint posted:

This coming Sunday will be two weeks tobacco free - this is a slightly larger yay! for me. I'm chewing so much nicotine gum that my teeth are sore, and I'm alternating days with an e-cig.

I've noticed my sense of smell appears to be better. I'm noticing the smell of other smokers after they finish and that I can smell it clear across a room. I still have a wheeze at the end of my breath, which while it's still there I've noticed it's far less pronounced, and only at times instead of all the time.

I started smoking when I was 9, and I'll turn 40 next week - hopefully its not too late. I have to say that I already feel a tad bit better.

Wow, Congrats! It's never too late to start feeling better goon!

Shempt_The_Mighty
Sep 16, 2004
FABRICATI DIEM, PVNC


fatjoint posted:

This coming Sunday will be two weeks tobacco free - this is a slightly larger yay! for me. I'm chewing so much nicotine gum that my teeth are sore, and I'm alternating days with an e-cig.

I've noticed my sense of smell appears to be better. I'm noticing the smell of other smokers after they finish and that I can smell it clear across a room. I still have a wheeze at the end of my breath, which while it's still there I've noticed it's far less pronounced, and only at times instead of all the time.

I started smoking when I was 9, and I'll turn 40 next week - hopefully its not too late. I have to say that I already feel a tad bit better.



Keep it up! I turn 40 myself in a month and I smoked since I was 14 years old. I am a month smoke free, and feeling awesome. You can do it.

Swoon
Jun 14, 2008


fatjoint posted:


\/\/\/\/ - Thank you! I wasn't looking for a reply, but it's nice to receive a well wish. I hope your quitting is going well also.

I'm 5 days quit. I still want to stab everyone I come into contact with. But it's getting a little a bit easier.

Hearing from people months and years out from quitting helps a lot!

Swoon
Jun 14, 2008


7 days out now. I still get the physical cravings pretty hardcore, but the mental/memory cravings have chilled out dramatically. My sense of smell has started to return.

I still have the sinus drainage and intermittent sore throat, not sure how long it's going to last but it blows.

I can already see an improvement during my cardio workouts. It isn't huge but I can push myself noticeably further since I've quit.

And something weird. I've lost 7 lbs since I quit. I don't even loving know.

ElectricMayhemBand
Mar 27, 2010



Swoon posted:

7 days out now. I still get the physical cravings pretty hardcore, but the mental/memory cravings have chilled out dramatically. My sense of smell has started to return.

I still have the sinus drainage and intermittent sore throat, not sure how long it's going to last but it blows.

I can already see an improvement during my cardio workouts. It isn't huge but I can push myself noticeably further since I've quit.

And something weird. I've lost 7 lbs since I quit. I don't even loving know.

Hey, good job on all of this! It sounds like you're doing great. Seeing my cardio performance improve has really helped me stick to my quit (today is my 36th day). It sounds like it's helping for you too. Keep up the good work

Schistosity
May 15, 2009



I am so sick of smoking. The attempts where I used patches seemed to go the best, but what always happened is that I forget to put them on in the morning, lose my resolve by 10 am, and go back to smoking. If I put them on in the early evening or afternoon and leave them on overnight, I have the most hosed up dreams ever, all really vivid and centered around my body decaying and bleeding. So I have to choose between the dreams or basically forgetting and failing to quit. I think part of it too is that with my cravings in the morning without the patch, the part of me that sucks wants to smoke (read: the addict) and dismisses the need for the patch. It's just an excuse I know.

Now that it's getting warmer outside, I want to be able to start running again. To not smell awful. For my apartment to not smell even worse and stale. This time, I am going to drink more coffee. I've read advice that recommends against this, but I never associated coffee or eating with smoking, and every time I stop smoking, I get so sleepy.

Johnbo
Dec 9, 2009


After nine years of continuous smoking it's time to give it up. I've actually gotten to the point that I hate smoking yet still want that nicotine kick nonetheless. I don't actually remember the last full day I went without one, so that'll be the first hurdle to get past.

I have a crappy diet and don't exercise, so smoking is hardly improving matters either.

Johnbo fucked around with this message at Mar 15, 2011 around 09:54

Captain Cancer
Sep 18, 2005

Teach em' young

10 Weeks today! (Not that I'm counting). I'm really not finding any profound improvements in cardio performance, smell and taste, but I think I feel subtley better and my wallet is much heavier which is a massive bonus and one of the chief reasons I gave up. £6.50 for my favourite brand was just getting too much.

I get a micro-urge every now and then, mainly when I see people smoking in their cars, which was one of the most pleasurable times I would spark up.

I'm three weeks off of my personal record, but unlike before, this time I don't feel like I'm constantly fighting the urge.

All in all, a fantastic decision and I think I've finally made a lasting change.

Steve Higginson
Oct 21, 2005
NO NO NO we do not have images of fat guys sucking each others dicks in our custom titles!


It's been just over a year now since I quit and I just wanting to let everyone know that it is possible. I never think about smoking anymore (except when I read this thread). If you've quit and think there's a hole in your life that will never go away, don't fret for it will. It will gently caress right off.

chippy
Aug 16, 2006

OK I DON'T GET IT

Schistosity posted:

I am so sick of smoking. The attempts where I used patches seemed to go the best, but what always happened is that I forget to put them on in the morning, lose my resolve by 10 am, and go back to smoking. If I put them on in the early evening or afternoon and leave them on overnight, I have the most hosed up dreams ever, all really vivid and centered around my body decaying and bleeding. So I have to choose between the dreams or basically forgetting and failing to quit. I think part of it too is that with my cravings in the morning without the patch, the part of me that sucks wants to smoke (read: the addict) and dismisses the need for the patch. It's just an excuse I know.


Have you tried setting an alarm on your phone or something to put the patch on? What happens if you put on a patch at 10am when you remember and start craving?

Sandweed
Sep 7, 2006

All your friends are me.



Three days inn without a single smoke, not so bad yet. Is there a peak time for the craving?

Shrieking Muppet
Jul 16, 2006


So last week i fell off the horse a few times but now I'm a solid 3 days in, actually more contested (WTF?) and having the occasional spastic episodes where I'm craving smokes, Still I can breathe better already so this should be worth it.

nVex
Jan 3, 2007



zalderach posted:

Three days inn without a single smoke, not so bad yet. Is there a peak time for the craving?

I've quit a number of times that lasted from a week to a month or so, the craving peaks or "humps" that everyone calls them are always different. Other than the chemical addiction, I've found it has a lot to do with why you smoke (ex. friends, boredom, stress, etc...). I've had the bottom be after the second or third day, and on a different occasion it was the second or third week.

I quit cold turkey about four months ago on my birthday as a present, I don't think about it anymore at this point.

Good luck!

Swoon
Jun 14, 2008


I'm 10 days quit now and the mental addiction has dropped dramatically. Sadly, I still get pretty intense physical cravings, they are getting easier, but it's still difficult.

Some things that I found helped -

1) Do not fantasize about smoking. I cannot stress this enough. Fantasizing and hyper-focusing on smoking will lead you right back to it. Every time I started to fantasize about smoking I had to mentally hit the brakes and immediately shift my attention to something else until the craving passed. If you sit there and think about how good it would feel you will talk yourself right back into smoking.

2) I kept a blog of my progress, which I updated every time I had a change as well as every time I had a bad craving. It helped me lock down which times of day were the most difficult for me. Once I got my head around that I learned to plan ahead and be ready for the fuckers. It also was an easy, direct way to track any improvements.

3) Drink lots of water and start working out. If you already workout regularly, step your game up and push yourself.

Good luck, goons!

fyo
Mar 9, 2007
smugly conventional

Swoon posted:

I'm 10 days quit now and the mental addiction has dropped dramatically. Sadly, I still get pretty intense physical cravings, they are getting easier, but it's still difficult.

Some things that I found helped -

1) Do not fantasize about smoking. I cannot stress this enough. Fantasizing and hyper-focusing on smoking will lead you right back to it. Every time I started to fantasize about smoking I had to mentally hit the brakes and immediately shift my attention to something else until the craving passed. If you sit there and think about how good it would feel you will talk yourself right back into smoking.

2) I kept a blog of my progress, which I updated every time I had a change as well as every time I had a bad craving. It helped me lock down which times of day were the most difficult for me. Once I got my head around that I learned to plan ahead and be ready for the fuckers. It also was an easy, direct way to track any improvements.

3) Drink lots of water and start working out. If you already workout regularly, step your game up and push yourself.

Good luck, goons!

This is all good advice. In my experience, #1 is more important than anything. I think we talked about it a few pages back, but the common thread in all my non-smoking streaks hasn't been that how many cravings I get, but whether or not I immediately distract myself as soon as smoking enters my mind.

This is also true for any stress-related triggers you may have. I swear your reptile brain knows exactly the sorts of things that lead you to relapse and it'll try to throw them at you again and again. The last time I successfully quit I was surprised at how easy it can be to get over a craving just by directing your thoughts.

That said, I backslid about a month ago and am back to half a pack a day, at least. I keep saying I'll wait a bit to quit again since I'm busy as poo poo, but I may just go ahead and drop them cold turkey in the next day or two.

Gothmog1065
May 14, 2009


Oh goddamn. I had a client I had to do a service call for, and she smoked like a freight train. I was physically ill after leaving her place. I'm having a mild craving now that the nausea wore off, but goddamn smoke stinks now.

ElectricMayhemBand
Mar 27, 2010



Something that helps me a lot is having a quit timer for my phone- I use QuitNow. It shows how long without a cigarette and has nifty little timers for improved health.

Schistosity
May 15, 2009



chippy posted:

Have you tried setting an alarm on your phone or something to put the patch on? What happens if you put on a patch at 10am when you remember and start craving?

Let's just say I usually wake up at 5:30 am and have my first cigarette at 5:45 am. If I don't have any, I'd pick up a pack by 6:30 am on my morning commute. With previous attempts with the patch, if I woke up with the patch on, it felt like this promise I had to keep with the day, that I wouldn't smoke. If I woke up without one, it was like I'd have to consciously chose to quit every morning. And if I didn't put one on by the 9 am coffee break, I'd be bumming a smoke or driving to the store to buy one. It's solely in my head (but isn't the addiction too, really?), but it's exponentially harder for me to stay committed if I don't wake up with a patch. Instead I get to wake up after a dream where almost all my teeth and gums fall out, blood everywhere . But I hope the patch induced dreams are temporary.

quick edit: I've completed my first day, and am putting on the next patch. doing this.

Swoon
Jun 14, 2008


^^^ "It's solely in my head (but isn't the addiction too, really?)"

Actually no, a large part of it is mental but there's also a very real physical addiction that you're fighting.

Gothmog1065 posted:

Oh goddamn. I had a client I had to do a service call for, and she smoked like a freight train. I was physically ill after leaving her place. I'm having a mild craving now that the nausea wore off, but goddamn smoke stinks now.

I actually wish that smoke stunk to me now! It's very difficult trying to reintegrate myself with all my friends (who all smoke) and smelling sweet sweet cigarettes.

Hopefully with a little more time they will stink to me too.

Swoon fucked around with this message at Mar 15, 2011 around 21:08

Rolo
Nov 16, 2005

Hmm, what have we here?

Swoon posted:

I actually wish that smoke stunk to me now!

I said the same thing to myself when I first started quitting, and trust me, it totally will.

Also agreeing that fantasizing about smoking is obviously a terrible idea. As soon as you start debating to yourself about the pros/cons of smoking during a craving, you will lose (at least I did, every time.) Don't even try to list off why you're quitting, just get your mind out of there when the cravings hit.

...also today is 37 days.

Sweet CupnCakes
Feb 13, 2007

Did you ever walk in a room and forget why you walked in? I think that's how dogs spend their lives.

was off cigs for about 6 weeks when last weekend i was going to go to party at the marine base. my friend is married a marine and they all smoke like chimneys. i was sure that i would be smoking all weekend. i had a bit to drink and decided to have a cig and it was awful. i couldnt even get through a few puffs. i am so happy that it tastes bad to me now. i dont even understand how i started since they taste terrible. keep in there...good luck everyone. it can be done

Binary
May 21, 2004


I'll throw in my support for the e cigs. I quit a couple times and used Snus for a while, but I always came back to smoking. For those of you complaining about social situations and smoking the e cig is fantastic, after an adjustment period of a few weeks I don't even want a real cigarette any more and when my friends go out to smoke I don't feel like I'm missing out on anything. Another cool thing is that I think I went through cigarette detox two weeks ago, the same symptoms I'd get whenever I stopped smoking, and all while continuing to use e cigs.

The e cig provides nicotine but none of the other crap they put in cigarettes to further the addiction. The transition is easy and now a real cigarette makes me feel nauseous. Hangover recovery is also much faster without smoking the night before or the day after I've found. There's no lingering smell and I can even use it in the homes of people who don't smoke, you can't even tell it's there.

Binary fucked around with this message at Mar 16, 2011 around 00:14

ChubbyEmoBabe
Sep 6, 2003

-=|NMN|=-


For those who have tried quitting with assistance (nicotine gum, patches, etc) without success: Try giving it 4 days. Cold turkey for 4 days (and no, not thinking "can't wait for the 4th day for a smoke") *or* quitting with assistance for 4 days and then dropping the "assisted" method.

If you can make it 4 days, you can do it.

Azzmun
Nov 17, 2006

Lemonrape, all the way down.

Smoked for about 6 months. At my peak I was smoking around 4 a day, which wasn't that bad. I realized I could be forming a habit that would haunt me the rest of my life, so I started reading this thread and went cold turkey. Reading about you guys with similar problems, most of them a lot bigger than mine, helped make it a no-brainer to quit.

Haven't smoked a single cig for 8 months, despite many temptations. Complete and utter denial is key. Watching my brain rationalize helped me a lot too, because I realized that my "reasons" were pretty much all bullshit and nicotine motivated. Also, a while back in the thread someone mentioned that if your friends smoke, it's better to go outside with them and talk rather than stay inside. The reason being, you're not tempted to rationalize that stopping smoking is stopping you from socializing with your buds. This is a good piece of advice, especially if your friends aren't assholes and don't push poo poo on you.

Thanks goons!

f#a#
Sep 6, 2004

taming the wilderness


I'm on day 5, and going to throw in my support for Allen Carr's Easyway program. Pick up a copy from your local bookstore—it may have been literally the best use of my money in my entire life, especially seeing as I had more psychological problems with quitting (like Azzmun above said, you realize your brain is rationalizing something that is in fact addiction-driven). I don't know what it was, but after finishing reading that book, I now have no desire to pick up a cigarette ever again.

And honestly I don't feel bad at all. Carr's approach is one of optimism and positivity—and if you can buy into that, it's a fantastic find. I actually feel like I'm accomplishing something rather than "losing" a part of myself, which is how my quitting attempts used to go. Even withdrawal symptoms are somehow psychologically diminished for me—I can tell that I'm slightly more irritable than usual but I'm under control. Otherwise...nothing.

provocateur
Sep 22, 2008


I've smoked 50 cigarettes per day for the past few years. I only took notice of how often I smoked in the past 6 months, I've always been too ashamed to keep track. My partner and I spend anywhere between $230- $345 per week on cigarettes. Sometimes more, never less. I'm 25 and have been smoking since I was 15.

It's been 2 days since I've quit. So far it seems hard but not impossible, my mind plays tricks on me (I imagine my hand reaching for a lighter) and I have to constantly counteract whatever thoughts are running through my head, eg: I think I love the taste of cigarettes/ In reality cigarettes taste like nothing but warm toxic air that is choking me.

I've almost given up twice so far, then I realise I don't want to fail. I want to smell again, be able to taste, to not be self conscious of my breath and the list goes on and on. That empty nagging feeling can be strong sometimes, but i'm determined to beat it.

hedonista
Feb 23, 2007

why is grief. grief is strange black. sugar is melting. we will not swim.

Checking in at the 1-year post-quitting mark -- after 5+ years, cold turkey -- the smoker me would have been irritated as hell at anybody who said this, but it's a brighter world out here! I LOVED smoking, cigarettes were a part of me, etc. etc., but it becomes like an ex you remember fondly: it wasn't working out because they were killing me slowly, we keep our distance now but there will always be love for them in my heart.

Be strong. One day you won't think about a cigarette. One day even further on you'll bum a camel while drinking and not be able to choke down half of it, and you will be so proud. I treat myself to a Nat Sherman mint or a nice rolled one every once in awhile if I'm tipsy with friends, and it feels great to be able to have one and then leave them alone. I've gained about 5 lbs, but most of it's probably from lifestyle/job changes and laziness in conjunction with the oral fixation.

I admittedly had a serendipitous set of circumstances which made it easier. Nobody's the same, but my personal tips for success were:
-Switch to additive-free tobacco first (American Spirits). When I first made the change from capris (lol) to rolling my own Am. Spirits, I definitely went through some kind of crazy chemical-withdrawal that was not just nicotine.
-Get a significant other who doesn't smoke, or at least don't exclusively hang out with your "smoking friends."
-This sounds counter-intuitive, but when I was with smoking friends I encouraged them to smoke around me, not to treat me like I was fragile/being tempted, as being around the secondhand-smoke was a comfort and made me feel included.
-If you partake and you're not giving it up too: Roll yaself a pack of little j's for the toughest times. It really helped to have the "fire-stick" urge replaced, and it calmed the cravings for sure. This obviously isn't exactly the "smoke free" option but it really helped get the cigarette monkey off my back.

Space Monster
Mar 13, 2009



This thread makes me feel like an rear end in a top hat. I've been smoking for two years, and every now and then I will quit for a week or two....no physical withdrawal at all, but I don't have the willpower to straight up quit just because I love doing it so much.

I think I could quit easily if I weren't such a pothead. I just have to have a cigarette after weed...best feeling.

Adjectivist Philosophy
Oct 6, 2003

When you gaze long into an abyss, the abyss also gazes into you.


Space Monster posted:

I think I could quit easily if I weren't such a pothead. I just have to have a cigarette after weed...best feeling.

Throw your pack out and when you get your next post-bowl craving, just pack another bowl/roll another doober. You might be surprised how quickly the craving goes away while just doing something with your hands. If you're still jonesing after you pack the bowl, just smoke it until you're too blazed to leave the house. If you can do that for a few weeks you wont even associate the two by the end of it

Swoon
Jun 14, 2008


provocateur posted:

I've smoked 50 cigarettes per day for the past few years. I only took notice of how often I smoked in the past 6 months, I've always been too ashamed to keep track. My partner and I spend anywhere between $230- $345 per week on cigarettes. Sometimes more, never less. I'm 25 and have been smoking since I was 15.

It's been 2 days since I've quit. So far it seems hard but not impossible, my mind plays tricks on me (I imagine my hand reaching for a lighter) and I have to constantly counteract whatever thoughts are running through my head, eg: I think I love the taste of cigarettes/ In reality cigarettes taste like nothing but warm toxic air that is choking me.

I've almost given up twice so far, then I realise I don't want to fail. I want to smell again, be able to taste, to not be self conscious of my breath and the list goes on and on. That empty nagging feeling can be strong sometimes, but i'm determined to beat it.

Jesus look at all the money you would save! You can do it, goon!

Abiggoat
Feb 21, 2008

Kill yourself!



Every time I see this thread on the front page I feel more ashamed of myself. I posted earlier, and was actually making a good job of quitting but, AGAIN, I succumbed to my cravings. I'm determined to make this my last pack. I've got 6 left. I don't have any need to smoke, I don't like the way it makes my breath and my clothes smell, I'm bothered about what it's doing to me health-wise, and I can't afford it at all.

This is all part of my larger life turn around (stop eating as badly, exercise more often, work harder etc etc) so hopefully this will make it easier as I won't be doing a lot of the same things I used to. I can see how it could make it harder to change so many things at once but gently caress it; I'll give it a go.

John Blaster
Aug 2, 2006

I can't fall asleep without thinking about killing people.

I quit last august after 6 years of roughly a one pack-a-day habit. I had all but given in to the idea that I would smoke until I died. As a friend put it, that thought is pretty intoxicating to some. but it freaked me out too much and decided that i wasn't going to be old and look back on my youth and say ah gently caress, I should have quit smoking. you never satisfy the loving craving anyway.

While I supplemented a lot of my cravings with smoking pot, the one thing I decided to try that really helped me was to actually keep one lone cigarette in my desk at home. that way, quitting was a choice and there was always that friend waiting for me in the desk if i really truly needed it. turns out I didn't, and while I do still have it, it serves no purpose anymore other than a relic and/or conversation piece.

Warthog
Mar 8, 2004
Ferkelwämser extraordinaire

Reporting in:

2 months clean now (after 13 years of ~10 a day).
I still don't sleep well - even though I'm constantly a bit tiredish.
I'm an angry person.
I drink too much (not a lot more than before, though).

Still, it feels right.

Rolo
Nov 16, 2005

Hmm, what have we here?

Warthog posted:

I still don't sleep well - even though I'm constantly a bit tiredish.

I've been sleeping like absolute hell for about a month, I never thought it might be because I'm quitting.

I will get up at least twice a night to stuff my face with whatever my half-awake mind can find in the fridge, then I proceed to have horrible dreams and a stomach ache.

I didn't do this before.

Swoon
Jun 14, 2008


John Blaster posted:

While I supplemented a lot of my cravings with smoking pot, the one thing I decided to try that really helped me was to actually keep one lone cigarette in my desk at home. that way, quitting was a choice and there was always that friend waiting for me in the desk if i really truly needed it. turns out I didn't, and while I do still have it, it serves no purpose anymore other than a relic and/or conversation piece.

Sup lone ceremonial cigarette buddy!

I did the exact same thing. The prospect of quitting would make me so god damned nervous that I would talk myself out of it. So I kind of pulled one over on myself be smoking all but my last cigarette. It's still there, in the pack. It kept me from just outright panic. After all, if it got too bad there was one cigarette right there to save me from oblivion. It's worked like a charm.

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Toucan Sam
Sep 2, 2000


Haven't smoked* in a year and a half but i still love those sweet,sweet smoking dreams.

*Cigarettes

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