Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
  • Locked thread
f#a#
Sep 6, 2004

taming the wilderness


What a weird time for a thread, I am on day 4 of round 6 of my attempts to quit smoking. 4 of those rounds really were just short-lived (week or less) whims, though. I've smoked for five years and my family has a history of lung cancer. It hadn't phased me much, and still doesn't, but it's a bit creepy to think about.


First of all, what caused it: I'm tired of waking up feeling like poo poo. Sure, I drink, I smoke pot, but at least with hangovers you feel like you actually did something the previous day. So I woke up a week ago feeling like poo poo and looked at the leftover Nicoderm envelopes in my closet from my last attempt. Date of expiration: March 2009. That made me pretty drat sad, so I decided to try again.

This time around I'm making sure to keep routines but omit the smoking--if I get a craving at work, I'll go outside and walk around the block. Somehow, this makes my temptation to run to 7-11 and pick up a pack a lot less pressing.

P.S., on the flip-side of the dreams issue, nicotine patch-induced dreams are amazing, typically speaking.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

f#a#
Sep 6, 2004

taming the wilderness


I'm visiting my long-distance girlfriend in two weeks for the first time since Christmas, and one of my resolutions was to quit smoking.

Now then. I've been a smoker for seven years or so (since late high school) and have tried quitting before but never with success greater than a month. Tried the patch probably about 3 times—at one point I got depressed that my spares had literally expired.

Any way, I also lie a lot about quitting. I've been "kind of maybe quitting" in my mind for the past four months or so, but haven't had a period greater than one week without one in that entire span of time. For example, I've told the person in question to her face (Skype) that I'm quitting and haven't had one in four days. Except I had two two days ago, five halves yesterday, and like six today. And I lied about that to her. I don't even know why though!

I'm pathetic at quitting. Time to read through this thread I suppose

edit: oh hello page 2 (november 2009) post:

f#a# posted:

What a weird time for a thread, I am on day 4 of round 6 of my attempts to quit smoking. 4 of those rounds really were just short-lived (week or less) whims, though. I've smoked for five years and my family has a history of lung cancer. It hadn't phased me much, and still doesn't, but it's a bit creepy to think about.


First of all, what caused it: I'm tired of waking up feeling like poo poo. Sure, I drink, I smoke pot, but at least with hangovers you feel like you actually did something the previous day. So I woke up a week ago feeling like poo poo and looked at the leftover Nicoderm envelopes in my closet from my last attempt. Date of expiration: March 2009. That made me pretty drat sad, so I decided to try again.

This time around I'm making sure to keep routines but omit the smoking--if I get a craving at work, I'll go outside and walk around the block. Somehow, this makes my temptation to run to 7-11 and pick up a pack a lot less pressing.

P.S., on the flip-side of the dreams issue, nicotine patch-induced dreams are amazing, typically speaking.

f#a# fucked around with this message at Mar 9, 2011 around 00:07

f#a#
Sep 6, 2004

taming the wilderness


I'm on day 5, and going to throw in my support for Allen Carr's Easyway program. Pick up a copy from your local bookstore—it may have been literally the best use of my money in my entire life, especially seeing as I had more psychological problems with quitting (like Azzmun above said, you realize your brain is rationalizing something that is in fact addiction-driven). I don't know what it was, but after finishing reading that book, I now have no desire to pick up a cigarette ever again.

And honestly I don't feel bad at all. Carr's approach is one of optimism and positivity—and if you can buy into that, it's a fantastic find. I actually feel like I'm accomplishing something rather than "losing" a part of myself, which is how my quitting attempts used to go. Even withdrawal symptoms are somehow psychologically diminished for me—I can tell that I'm slightly more irritable than usual but I'm under control. Otherwise...nothing.

  • Locked thread