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Asymmetric POSTer
Aug 17, 2005

no good or respectable restaurant offers gift cards

Fists Up posted:

Well you don't get anymore central than the hilton so good choice. Still just a little too far to get a good view of the fireworks though Too many buildings in the way I would think.

The places I talked about are all public parks and stuff. Anyone thats next to the water pretty much on both sides of the harbour (but you are not likely to go over to the north side or down to somewhere like drummoyne).

Basically the whole thing centres around the harbour bridge with a bunch of stuff coming off barges in the middle of the harbour and some other stuff on buildings. The very best spot would to be on a boat most likely (i've only done this once when I was younger).
Next best would be places like Mrs Macquaries chair or Blues point reserve (tiny, north side).

The opera house forecourt is usually closed off for a ticketed event.

Theres a map here. Blue stars are where fireworks come from.

http://www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/...ts/default.aspx

I obviously can't vouch for all the places but really you could go check a few out anyway seeing as its likely you'll go near a few during your stay in Sydney.

Fantastic advice, thank you.

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2ndclasscitizen
Jan 2, 2009

by Y Kant Ozma Post


brendanwor posted:

That's exactly what I said in my last post?? 2ndclasscitizen was referring to a scenario in which you didn't have prebooked tickets to anything, in which case yes, you'd want to get inside whatever pub/bar/club you're interested in quite early.

mishaq posted:

I was just interpreting 2ndclasscitizen's post as if it wouldn't be worth it even WITH tickets. That's why I asked! Sorry...

Sorry, I was referring to if you didn't have tickets to a venue.

Gromit
Aug 15, 2000

I am an oppressed White Male, Asian women wont serve me! Save me Campbell Newman!!!!!!!


HookShot posted:

...It's on the expensive side (a little under $20 for a pasta main) but it's sooooooo good.

Get used to food being more expensive than you are used to. Restaurant prices for main meals would hover around $20 everywhere in Australia, depending on the quality of the establishment. Having said that, I've had great $10 steaks. Mind you, at that price I would probably order two.
And no free soft-drink top-ups!

igby
Sep 7, 2010

by T. Fine


mishaq posted:

Fantastic advice, thank you.
Follow up post to Fists Up:

If you want to watch from Mrs Macquarie's Chair, you need to get there early. Like, 4-5pm early so you get in after the 9pm kiddie fireworks. If memory serves me correctly, you can't drink there.

The Hilton is probably the worst place to stay for NYE in the CBD, because you're so far away from everywhere else. I hope you're not paying more than $400 a night, because you would not be able to see poo poo from any room in that hotel. DO NOT BOTHER trying to catch a bus from the city between 9pm and 3am. You likely won't be able to get a taxi either. Your best bet to get back to the hotel will be to go to Circular Quay and catch a train to Town Hall, or walk.

I'd advise against Mrs Macquarie's Chair or anywhere which is recommended for tourists. You won't get a nice spot, and it'll be full of police, children and douchebags. For me, the best place to go to see the fireworks is Blackwattle Bay Park near the bottom of Glebe Pt Rd. http://www.timeoutsydney.com.au/ven...e-bay-park.aspx

You see the Anzac Bridge and the Harbour Bridge (not the Opera House, though. But who gives?), you see the fireworks coming from the North Shore and from Darling Harbour. And, best of all, you will find a place to sit if you show up at 11pm, and the vibe is studenty, because of all the student houses in Glebe. So, if you want to get drunk or smoke up, you won't get sprung by the po-po unless you make a scene. Security and waiting times in CBD vantage points make it a far too stressful and annoying affair.

The only downside with going to Blackwattle Bay Park from the Hilton is that it's a longer walk. But, if you walk the back route down Glebe St, down Harris St and through Chinatown, it's less lovely than walking up Glebe Pt Rd and down Broadway/George. You WILL NOT be able to get a taxi anywhere unless you book one a week in advance, and it's almost pointless trying to get a bus. Sydney is a badly organised place most of the time, but on NYE it's just plain stupid to not wear walking shoes.

Edit: if you're in the mood for a massive schlepp and know a member, however, the Cruising Yacht Club of Australia (CYC) in Rushcutter's Bay is almost perfect to see the fireworks from. It's where the Sydney to Hobart launched from every year, and all you need to do to get in there for NYE is to have a member sign in with you. Similarly elitist and even more schleppy, Watson's Bay is a beautiful place with amazing views of the harbour. I've never been there for NYE, but I will routinely trek out there to sit on this random rock fishing spot. It's my favourite place in the world, and I often go there to write. It's near a pub and Doyle's restaurant, which you should go to if you can afford to stay at the Hilton on NYE.

igby fucked around with this message at Oct 15, 2010 around 18:24

Asymmetric POSTer
Aug 17, 2005

no good or respectable restaurant offers gift cards

igby posted:

...I hope you're not paying more than $400 a night, because you would not be able to see poo poo from any room in that hotel... It's near a pub and Doyle's restaurant, which you should go to if you can afford to stay at the Hilton on NYE.

Staying 100% on points, don't worry, I'm not made of money

Thanks for the expanded advice.

goattrails
Nov 27, 2009

Ride the frog, baby!

igby posted:

I'd advise against Mrs Macquarie's Chair or anywhere which is recommended for tourists. You won't get a nice spot, and it'll be full of police, children and douchebags. For me, the best place to go to see the fireworks is Blackwattle Bay Park near the bottom of Glebe Pt Rd.

Seconded, I've lived for about a month in a hostel on Glebe Point Rd. And you will have a great view to downtown Sydney from which to enjoy the fireworks

Macintyre
May 6, 2006
Slow Rider

I plan to visit Australia for a month in April/early May. We will be starting in Sydney and working our way north to the Great Barrier Reef.

Couple questions: From what I have read the Easter holiday over there is a huge deal and most things shut down. Is this true? Should I just expect to be chilling out for that weekend?

Also looking for any advice on the best places (off beat?) to view the Great Barrier Reef.

Lastly, how good is the rail service from say Sydney to Brisbane? I enjoy a good train ride but the prices seem to be in line with flying, and flying is a heck of a lot faster.

I greatly appreciate any help fellow toursists/locals can offer, thanks!

2ndclasscitizen
Jan 2, 2009

by Y Kant Ozma Post


Macintyre posted:

Couple questions: From what I have read the Easter holiday over there is a huge deal and most things shut down. Is this true? Should I just expect to be chilling out for that weekend?

We like our long weekends, and in NSW next year everyday is going to be a public holiday. Lots of stuff will be closed on the Sunday, the other days it will vary. Big chain stores will be open, smaller stuff will be hit and miss. But, this depends on where you'll be over the weekend. In a city? Don't be too concerned, maybe stock up on stuff before to 100% safe, smaller towns be prepared for stuff to be shut.

Macintyre posted:

Lastly, how good is the rail service from say Sydney to Brisbane? I enjoy a good train ride but the prices seem to be in line with flying, and flying is a heck of a lot faster.

Shithouse, don't bother. Takes forever, pretty expensive and you're not going to have time to get off and check out towns unless you want to wait for the next day for the next train (which will make it even more expensive).

brendanwor
Sep 7, 2005



Macintyre posted:

Couple questions: From what I have read the Easter holiday over there is a huge deal and most things shut down. Is this true? Should I just expect to be chilling out for that weekend?

Most shops will be closed, yeah. Supermarkets will be open intermittently. Make sure you stock up on alcohol from a liquor store before the long weekend - seriously, unless you want to be sorely disappointed!

2ndclasscitizen posted:

Shithouse, don't bother. Takes forever, pretty expensive and you're not going to have time to get off and check out towns unless you want to wait for the next day for the next train (which will make it even more expensive).

This. With Australian low cost carrier airfares, it can quite literally be cheaper to fly than to get a train - at the very least, the cost differential will 1000000000% be worth it.

Fists Up
Apr 9, 2007



Isn't easter saturday usually normal hours as far as everything being open?
Good Friday is the one where everything is closed. Monday is usually Sunday trading hours.

concreteelephant
Jul 13, 2009


Fists Up, you're right about that. Even the largest shopping centres are closed on good friday but on easter they will probably be open 1-5 or thereabouts. So take advantage of the extended hours on Thursday if you're running out of stuff.

Most larger attractions would have their Easter hours posted on their website I would imagine.

If you are in Sydney for that weekend you can always go to the Royal Easter Show, which is held at the Olympic park out at Homebush. It's basically a state fair, with the addition of showbags which are promotional bags of lollies, usually about $20. So you can buy an M&M's showbag and it will have a variety of M&M's candy and so on. Some will have costumes or joke items or whatever. They are mainly for kids and it's a big event every year for kids to look in the paper or on the website and pick out what showbags they want (I only ever got one though because my parents are frugal ). It would still be fun if you hadn't done this before though, I think.

Fists Up
Apr 9, 2007



The paper will list everything thats open/times etc. So check that.

igby
Sep 7, 2010

by T. Fine


Also, the rail connection from Sydney to Brisbane isn't complete. You get a train to Casino, then a coach to somewhere else, then something else, then a train again. There's a complete track from Brisbane to Sydney, but not the other way. I wouldn't advise a foreigner to attempt to navigate our lovely rural infrastructure. Plus, the trip is like fourteen or fifteen hours. Pay $80 for a plane ticket and gently caress that noise.

7-11s and stuff are open on Good Friday, but that's about it. Saturday's normal hours and Sunday depends on the shop. Good Friday is the only day of the year it is illegal to sell alcohol, so make sure you buy some scotch and a goon bag on the Thursday.

If you get a chance on your travels up the coast, you should definitely climb Mt Warning near Murwillumbah. It's only an hour and a half outside of Brisvegas, and it's a pretty gorgeous hike. Also, trudging through guano in the rainforests around the Whitsundays is pretty awesome. I went to the GBR when I was about 8 and loved it. I climbed a coconut tree! And scraped all the skin off my shins!

bitmap
Aug 8, 2006
Probation
Can't post for 4148 days!


Fun Shoe

igby posted:

Also, the rail connection from Sydney to Brisbane isn't complete. You get a train to Casino, then a coach to somewhere else, then something else, then a train again. There's a complete track from Brisbane to Sydney, but not the other way. I wouldn't advise a foreigner to attempt to navigate our lovely rural infrastructure. Plus, the trip is like fourteen or fifteen hours. Pay $80 for a plane ticket and gently caress that noise.

7-11s and stuff are open on Good Friday, but that's about it. Saturday's normal hours and Sunday depends on the shop. Good Friday is the only day of the year it is illegal to sell alcohol, so make sure you buy some scotch and a goon bag on the Thursday.

If you get a chance on your travels up the coast, you should definitely climb Mt Warning near Murwillumbah. It's only an hour and a half outside of Brisvegas, and it's a pretty gorgeous hike. Also, trudging through guano in the rainforests around the Whitsundays is pretty awesome. I went to the GBR when I was about 8 and loved it. I climbed a coconut tree! And scraped all the skin off my shins!

Yeah, Brisbane to gold coast via train, gold coast to casino via coach, casino to grafton via train etc...or check out tiger airlines or the virginblue specials for a sub $50 price. turn up to the airport at least 2 hours before though.

concreteelephant
Jul 13, 2009


igby posted:

If you get a chance on your travels up the coast, you should definitely climb Mt Warning near Murwillumbah. It's only an hour and a half outside of Brisvegas, and it's a pretty gorgeous hike.

My family would go visit that area every time we went on holiday to Australia, which was every other year. There's another good hiking area in that vicinity called Binna Burra (directly west from Tweed Heads) which is a nice rainforest with trails. Also, if you do go to Mt. Warning, keep an eye out for the fruit stand in one of the little towns at the base selling Black Sapote ice cream! A black sapote is a weird variety of fruit, unlike anything else you will ever taste.

Rhandhali
Sep 7, 2003

This is Free Trader Beowulf, calling anyone...

Grimey Drawer

Are there any goodwill or salvation army type thrift stores in the Brisbane area? I'm going to be outfitting an apartment from square 0 and will be needing the usual array of household goods.

Fists Up
Apr 9, 2007



Rhandhali posted:

Are there any goodwill or salvation army type thrift stores in the Brisbane area? I'm going to be outfitting an apartment from square 0 and will be needing the usual array of household goods.

St Vincent de Paul or Vinnies and the Salvation Army are the main national ones.

http://www.vinnies.org.au/vinnies-c...tional?link=365
http://salvosstores.salvos.org.au/shop/find-a-store/

There should be one around you. Some are much bigger than others though so it might be worth checking around. Then theres other charities stores in places

Morning Bell
Feb 23, 2006



Yams Fan

I'm moving to Melbourne at the start of next year. I'm going to be studying postgrad at Monash's Caulfield campus (the 2nd biggest campus, not the main one).

I'm not sure about the student accommodation on offer there. On one hand, student living is usually pretty awesome (though I've never done it in Australia). On the other, Caulfield and the surrounding areas seems to have absolutely nothing to do for a single 24 year old guy, and I've always found myself happier living in busier central areas and sadder living in family suburbs. I'm considering saying "screw it" and looking for a place in St Kilda, Collingwood, Brunswick or anywhere nearer the CBD where there is life for a kid like myself.

Can anybody give me any advice? I don't suppose anybody could share any knowledge about living around the Caulfield area, or in Monash uni accommodation?

Cirofren
Jun 13, 2005



Pillbug

I'm a 24 year old dude living in CBD Melbourne and moving to Caulfield sounds like a really lovely idea.

All the other places you mentioned would be much better if you can handle the commute.

SonicDefiance
Jan 30, 2005

How did you stray so far to end up here?

I don't know how easy it will be to find something within a uni student's budget, but try looking around South Yarra. Extremely convenient to cinemas, shopping, restaurants and nightlife, a short walk/tram ride to Prahran and Windsor (by far the better end of Chapel Street), close as hell to the CBD and a quick, easy train ride to Caulfield station.

bitmap
Aug 8, 2006
Probation
Can't post for 4148 days!


Fun Shoe

I'm a 24 year old dude living in Fitzroy and living in Caufield sounds awful. I've got a 24 year old friend who lives in Malvern who unironically owns doilies and it's too boring for her.

bitmap
Aug 8, 2006
Probation
Can't post for 4148 days!


Fun Shoe

Um as far as useful advice goes though, Collingwood, Brunswick and Fitzroy are awesome and have huge student populations. You won't be alone making the commute to your campus.

Fitzroy and Collingwood are cool as gently caress but can be very expensive to live in. Brunswick isn't as cool in my opinion but the medium rent reflects this. North Fitzroy(which is a different suburb to Fitzroy) is completely lovely and more affordable, as is the south part of Abbotsford, which borders on Collingwood (just stay away from Victoria street). Look on gumtree and facebook for free rooms rather than applying directly for houses or apartments through real estate agency rental lists because finding a house in Melbourne when you are young and male is hell.

HollowYears
Aug 18, 2009


So my friends and I want to go to Australia.

Problem is my friends live in a fantasy world and think they can go with next to no money and expect a job waiting for them there with no return airfare. I'm the cautious one so if we decide to go I will have tons of money in my bank and have all of my bases covered so I can actually enjoy myself there.

I told them it's fairly expensive to do things there and depending on the season it can be even more expensive. Is this idea feasible or should I find new travel partners?

edit: I also educated them on the working holiday visa and how it works and that you need to prove that you have x amount of dollars and they still don't believe me.

HookShot
Dec 26, 2005



HollowYears posted:

So my friends and I want to go to Australia.

Problem is my friends live in a fantasy world and think they can go with next to no money and expect a job waiting for them there with no return airfare. I'm the cautious one so if we decide to go I will have tons of money in my bank and have all of my bases covered so I can actually enjoy myself there.

I told them it's fairly expensive to do things there and depending on the season it can be even more expensive. Is this idea feasible or should I find new travel partners?

edit: I also educated them on the working holiday visa and how it works and that you need to prove that you have x amount of dollars and they still don't believe me.
When I went to Australia on a working holiday visa they never actually asked me if I had x amount of money, but it does say at least 2-3 times on the application form that they can ask to make sure.

And yeah, it is a lot more expensive to do most things in Australia than in north america. Depending on where you're from, rent is probably going to be more expensive, food is definitely more expensive, especially from restaurants (I didn't think it was POSSIBLE to spend $20 at McDonalds until I moved here).

I can't speak as to the job situation since I've been self employed for 2 years, but the minimum wage in a lot of sectors is going to be a lot higher than you're used to. I was a server at two bakeries when I first moved here and I was making just under $20/hr. Minimum wage here depends on what industry you're working in (called an 'award') but starts at like $13 or thereabouts.

I'd say definitely don't come without money to live off just in case. That's just ridiculously stupid, I wouldn't do it without at least 5k, but once you do get a job and all that sort of thing you should be pretty ok.

bitmap
Aug 8, 2006
Probation
Can't post for 4148 days!


Fun Shoe

of course more money is always better and return airfare paid for is smarter, but that said a lot of British friends of mine came to Melbourne with about 2-3 thousand dollars and made it stretch just fine. Work is very easy to find if you're not picky- our very high backpacker population means waiting and kitchen jobs are used to paying cash in the right areas. Call centre work is super duper easy to find.

If you come to Melbourne- look up a group called "salesforce". They contract out call centres to various companies. Its not five star work but the people are cool, they aim at no experience personable backpackers, you get two weeks training and the hours are constant after that. I was living in a hostel when I first moved here for 6 months, went along to salesforce to pay a month or two's rent after spending my money on piss and swedish backpacker girls and I was the only australian in an induction group of 15 people.

Fists Up
Apr 9, 2007



If you come with no plans, little money and no return airfare then theres a good chance they might just turn you around and not let you in the country.

Now if he's got a couple thousand dollars. KNOWS some ideas of where he could find some work and looks at visa stuff before coming then he should be fine.

You've got to remember that if hes mving to a major city then he will need a decent chunk of money just to pay rent whilst hes finding a job.

Whitey Ford
Jan 29, 2007

The power of dreams



A lack of return ticket is going to be a pretty massive concern to immigration.

It's usually more expensive to buy a one way international ticket than a return ticket (unless you're flying a budget carrier) so you're probably better off financially and legally to buy a return ticket that you never plan on catching.

Teezy F B
Dec 5, 2007
ya'll is stupid

This might be an odd question, but what are the best souveniers found (Sydney)?

I love buying little gifts for people, like key rings, or cheap things that are only found in that country, but am struggling here.

Been to circular quay, looked at the shops in there, which were ok, but a bit pricey and the quality left a little to be desired.

Tried the Sydney Souvenier Warehouse off Liverpool St, and much the same experience.

I should mention, I'm not looking specifically for "tourist" souveniers, just something that is Australian made, and is a cool little thing to give as a gift.

I've bought Vegemite.

Kristian
Dec 24, 2006


Teezy F B posted:

This might be an odd question, but what are the best souveniers found (Sydney)?

I love buying little gifts for people, like key rings, or cheap things that are only found in that country, but am struggling here.

Been to circular quay, looked at the shops in there, which were ok, but a bit pricey and the quality left a little to be desired.

Tried the Sydney Souvenier Warehouse off Liverpool St, and much the same experience.

I should mention, I'm not looking specifically for "tourist" souveniers, just something that is Australian made, and is a cool little thing to give as a gift.

I've bought Vegemite.

What about those tree oil's that are made from australian trees? Pretty unique I would imagine. And they do wonders for when your nose is blocked

Fists Up
Apr 9, 2007



Do you want stuff specific to Sydney or just "Australian"?

The latter you could do Opals and Pearls which might be too expensive although some opal stuff is quite cheap.

Off the top of my head theres a few souveneir shops along George street. Theres one or two near the QVB and another between there and cirular quay. Although these are all pretty standard, will most likely be exactly the same as all the others you've been too, and are just places where they force the buses of Asian tourists into.

The rocks has the best selection of shops for Australian stuff. You could get a photo print. Theres massive amounts of good photos of the opera house/bridge/skyline. The botanic gardens would have a good shop to buy something botany related. The museum of sydney probably has some nice stuff in it (I think its on Phillip street, couple of streets down from circular quay), or if you want something related to Sydney design/culture check out the museum of contemporary art (MCA) which is free to enter. Or how about something related to sydney music? Redeye records on king street has a good selection and if you ask the guy working there he could probably help you out.

Other stuff

Merino Wool gear/Ugg Boots
Driza Bone stuff
Akubra Hat
Bush Tucker food like jams or tinned stuff which is easier to take home
Small Wooden items
Aboriginal Artwork


Now that stuff isn't all inherently "sydney" but is all pretty good and for some of it you could easily just get something that is cheap and small.

Fists Up
Apr 9, 2007



Also do they still have Australian Geographic stores around? Try and find one of those. Full of little quirky/fun/educational things.

2ndclasscitizen
Jan 2, 2009

by Y Kant Ozma Post


Fists Up posted:

Also do they still have Australian Geographic stores around? Try and find one of those. Full of little quirky/fun/educational things.

Looks like the closest one to the city is at Bondi Junction, but seconding going to The Rocks.

Gromit
Aug 15, 2000

I am an oppressed White Male, Asian women wont serve me! Save me Campbell Newman!!!!!!!


HookShot posted:

I can't speak as to the job situation since I've been self employed for 2 years, but the minimum wage in a lot of sectors is going to be a lot higher than you're used to. I was a server at two bakeries when I first moved here and I was making just under $20/hr. Minimum wage here depends on what industry you're working in (called an 'award') but starts at like $13 or thereabouts.

Keep in mind that you don't get any tips. Great if you're surly, perhaps not so much if you're blonde and busty.

Shnicker
Feb 15, 2006


HollowYears posted:

So my friends and I want to go to Australia.

Problem is my friends live in a fantasy world and think they can go with next to no money and expect a job waiting for them there with no return airfare. I'm the cautious one so if we decide to go I will have tons of money in my bank and have all of my bases covered so I can actually enjoy myself there.

I told them it's fairly expensive to do things there and depending on the season it can be even more expensive. Is this idea feasible or should I find new travel partners?

edit: I also educated them on the working holiday visa and how it works and that you need to prove that you have x amount of dollars and they still don't believe me.

I went over 3 years ago with not too much money - definitely much less than the visa required (although I had a letter from my parents' bank saying they had enough and would back me up) - and I never got asked for any proof. Granted, I was able to stay with some friends and not have to pay rent for a month. But there are some temp agencies that are useful to go with. I worked with Julia Ross and Hallis - they have branches in all the major cities I believe. I also went through Geoffrey Nathan but they're a little different. They use some loophole or something to allow you to pay slightly less tax, but in the end it's not really worth it because you get all your tax back anyway.

I'd suggest to send all your information to the big temp agencies, and to some of the ones more unique to the city you'll be in (if you plan on working in a city). Send it to them even before you leave your home country, that way you can hit the ground running and have the interview as soon as you get there. Those temp agencies were always really good at finding me work, and even now I still get the occasional email asking if I'm available for work. I never had to wait more than 2 weeks after the interview to get even a little bit of work. It'll obviously be easier for them to place you if you're willing to stay somewhere for at least 3 months or something like that. But when I was in Brisbane, for example, Julia Ross offered me some easy paying job for a few days to help usher the big Brisbane tennis tournament. And Hallis would call me every once in a while to do a mail drop where we'd walk around a suburb, putting notices from the Brisbane City Council into every mailbox we came across for $25 an hour. They'd only last a day or two, but it's great if you don't want to work too much or want to supplement a hospitality gig. As for Geoffrey Nathan, they're OK if you have nothing else - they placed me into two call center jobs. The first one was $27 an hour and the second was $23. But if you can get a job through another agency, you'll get back a lot more tax at the end of your stay.

Of course, you have to be really flexible when it comes to those temp jobs. The three or four main ones I had lasted for at least 2 months, but they were always week to week, so we were never 100% sure if we'd be there 2 weeks later.

edit: Sorry, I don't really mean to suggest that your friends' idea is a very good idea, because if I had to do it over again I would go with more money.

Shnicker fucked around with this message at Dec 31, 2010 around 20:26

Vanilla
Feb 24, 2002

Hay guys what's going on in th

What places are good for short weekend breaks around Sydney?

We've already checked out the blue mountains, Jervis Bay and soon Nelson Bay. Wondering what other places to consider?

Fists Up
Apr 9, 2007



Vanilla posted:

What places are good for short weekend breaks around Sydney?

We've already checked out the blue mountains, Jervis Bay and soon Nelson Bay. Wondering what other places to consider?

The list is endless with coastal towns and areas but if you feel you've done enough of that then you can easily get to Canberra and the snowy mountains (which will not be very snowy right now) for a weekend. Canberra will take about 3 hours give or take half an hour depending on traffic/where you are going from. Mountains another hour or two after that.

Thredbo I believe has the most things to do in Summer. I've never been in Summer but I've always wanted to.

Or for other areas theres some botanical gardens and national parks I like but i think they could sustain you more for a day rather than a weekend.

2ndclasscitizen
Jan 2, 2009

by Y Kant Ozma Post


Fists Up posted:

Thredbo I believe has the most things to do in Summer. I've never been in Summer but I've always wanted to.

I've been there in November and done the Kosciusko walk, it is an utterly spectacular part of the world in the Spring/Summer.

Fists Up
Apr 9, 2007



Actually I've been there when I was really young and walked Kozciusko. And I've been to lake Eucembene to go fishing.

unixbeard
Dec 28, 2004



Wollongong can be OK to. It has some really nice beaches and is pretty laid back. There are some nice places around wisemans ferry and brooklyn too, even just for a day trip picnic

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ReindeerF
Apr 20, 2002

Rubber Dinghy Rapids Bro


Am I allowed to chime in to say that I loved Sydney, I really like Australians and that if I weren't Texan and living in Bangkok I'd probably like to live in Australia? I'm sure there are issues, but man I really enjoy Australians. Australia's my main market so I deal with Australians all the time and by and large you're (they're) all just a fantastic bunch of people to work with and deal with, even with the slackin' Aussie stereotype. Don't have a bad word to say. Anyway, I know it's not contributory, but I wanted to post.

I guess in order to have posted something worth contributing: quay is not pronounced "kay" unless you want a bunch of ticket takers named Shazza to start laughing and screeching "THE YANK SAID KAY HAHA" so there's that

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