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2074491022871990000
Oct 24, 2009

by Fistgrrl


Space-Bird, do you have AIM or e-mail or anything?

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hell astro course
Dec 10, 2009

pizza sucks



Yeah, why?


Anyone have any advice for adjusting an Intuos 3 for Illustrator..I find it has a high curve gradient..

burzum karaoke
May 30, 2003



I have a medium-sized Intuos 4 at home that I use regularly and use a Cintiq 21UX at work everyday. I love them both, but if money's not an object for you and it's something that's going to get daily use, go with the Cintiq.

In the past I've had a small Graphire 2 (or maybe it was a 3) and it was pretty good for irregular use but had some bad tracking issues near the end of its life. I've used the tiny portable Cintiqs before and can tell you that they are definitely not worth it. The screens are too small to be really worthwhile over an Intuous, especially for the price difference.

burzum karaoke fucked around with this message at Jan 18, 2010 around 13:35

ceebee
Feb 12, 2004


I'm one of those people that have tried a Cintiq extensively and found it to be too distracting/cumbersome for a tablet. Your hand gets in the way especially if you're using larger sized brushes. And there is still a slight delay in the input that it bothers me a tiny bit.

Intuos# Series in size Medium for me! I've had almost every Wacom tablet from 4x5 to 9x12 and I love the Medium/6x8 sizes the most. Right now I'm using a Intuos3 6x11 (Widescreen) while I save up for an Intuos4 Medium.

hell astro course
Dec 10, 2009

pizza sucks



Update: I'm loving the intuos 3 so far...so much control!
Maybe I'll get a Cintiq one day... one day *sighs whistfully*

razz
Dec 26, 2005

Queen of Maceration


Stupid question: I just got a Wacom "Bamboo Fun" tablet. I got the small one.

Anyway, how do you enable the pen pressure sensitivity? I have Photoshop CS2 and I'm able to draw, but the line is uniform thickness. I changed the settings in the brush pallet to "pen pressure" and downloaded the newest driver from Wacom's website.

I'm running Windows Vista on a ~1.5 year old Dell laptop.

BrokenCycle
Nov 15, 2004

A Rough Job, But...

razz posted:

Stupid question: I just got a Wacom "Bamboo Fun" tablet. I got the small one.

Anyway, how do you enable the pen pressure sensitivity? I have Photoshop CS2 and I'm able to draw, but the line is uniform thickness. I changed the settings in the brush pallet to "pen pressure" and downloaded the newest driver from Wacom's website.

I'm running Windows Vista on a ~1.5 year old Dell laptop.

Dumb question, but have you restarted your computer?

razz
Dec 26, 2005

Queen of Maceration


BrokenCycle posted:

Dumb question, but have you restarted your computer?
Yes, I have. I restarted it twice already, and restarted Photoshop a couple times as well.

When I open Photoshop, there is an error saying that I need to restart my computer because the driver is not installed. But after I restarted it, the same error came up.

Datasmurf
Jan 19, 2009

Carpe Noctem

So ... My sister got a small Bamboo Pen & Touch she almost never use. Now I need one, and she said I could borrow hers. How is it to use that for 3D-sculpting?
Can't really afford to buy my own atm, and I need it for some stuff at school. So yeah. Does it work at all with sculpting, or am I screwed?

ceebee
Feb 12, 2004


Check the European Wacom site and see if the drivers for the Bamboo work from that site.

About sculpting on the Bamboo, you shouldn't have a problem. I've seen amazing sculpts from people who use just a mouse.

burzum karaoke
May 30, 2003



Datasmurf posted:

So ... My sister got a small Bamboo Pen & Touch she almost never use. Now I need one, and she said I could borrow hers. How is it to use that for 3D-sculpting?
Can't really afford to buy my own atm, and I need it for some stuff at school. So yeah. Does it work at all with sculpting, or am I screwed?

I messed around with Zbrush for a month or so last year when I had a Graphire and it was perfectly fine, so I imagine the Bamboo won't give you any trouble.

Elentor
Dec 14, 2004



Space-Bird posted:

Mind if I ask a few follow up questions? What do you use it for, and what programs do you use it with?

Sorry for the late reply, I use an Intuos 3 with Photoshop, 3D Studio Max and ZBrush, mostly 2D/3D Game artwork.

Since the Intuos 3 has been discontinued, I guess going with an Intuos 4 would be the best option now.

Megera
Sep 9, 2008


I've been using Cintiqs for a bit now at my internship. Drawing in Flash is super fun, but inking in Photoshop is really hard. I've noticed the same problem with my Intuos2 in that Photoshop gets wobbly lines, which apparently other people are getting too, with or without Cintiqs: http://creativeboytv.deviantart.com...lities-72022346

Yet Painter makes the lines really nice and smooth. I've looked everywhere for a solution to this, but can't find anything. Anyone know of a way to fix this on a Mac?

burzum karaoke
May 30, 2003



Megera posted:

I've been using Cintiqs for a bit now at my internship. Drawing in Flash is super fun, but inking in Photoshop is really hard. I've noticed the same problem with my Intuos2 in that Photoshop gets wobbly lines, which apparently other people are getting too, with or without Cintiqs: http://creativeboytv.deviantart.com...lities-72022346

Yet Painter makes the lines really nice and smooth. I've looked everywhere for a solution to this, but can't find anything. Anyone know of a way to fix this on a Mac?
Photoshop, Painter and Sketchbook Pro all seem to do certain things better than one another and I use all three for pretty much that reason.

Sketchbook Pro is great for thumbnails and roughs, Photoshop is great for colouring and effects and Painter has without a doubt the nicest cleanup lines.

Loud Mouse
Dec 18, 2008

MY WILL IS THE CHEESE CLUB
NOTHING IS BETTER THAN CHEESE






I was wondering how those of you who travel with your tablets carry them? I have an intuos4 small that I keep in my laptop backpack, but I haven't figured out a good way to store the pen. I hate just throwing it in a pocket.

Megera
Sep 9, 2008


My tablet is too big for a laptop case, so when I take it to school (their tablets for students are really small), I carry it in a cymbal case. The pen goes in one of the flaps.

Jet Ready Go
Nov 3, 2005

I thought I didn't qualify. I was considered, what was it... volatile, self-centered, and I don't play well with others.

I just bought myself 3 (triple click!) Bamboo Fun tablets and literally am having tons of fun.

I want to create my own font now (seems simple enough right?) but it seems like the only programs that allow you to do this cost hundreds of dollars. It's something so simple and I can't wrap my mind around how it could cost so much. Is there a free solution somewhere that I'm missing?

If anyone wants to buy my extra two Medium Sized tablets you can visit my thread at SA Mart here: http://forums.somethingawful.com/sh...hreadid=3258309

I'd rather sell it to a goon for price rather than going through the trouble of sending it back to the manufacturer and waiting for the refund to occur on the bill.

I'm really having a lot more fun than I expected with this, and best of all using the pen in lieu of the mouse really takes the strain off your wrist.

gmc9987
Jul 25, 2007


Jet Ready Go posted:

I want to create my own font now (seems simple enough right?) but it seems like the only programs that allow you to do this cost hundreds of dollars. It's something so simple and I can't wrap my mind around how it could cost so much. Is there a free solution somewhere that I'm missing?

I think we tried this site at work a while back:

http://www.yourfonts.com/

and it worked out OK. There were some tracking issues and inconsistent baselines and such, but that may have been the dude who filled out the template. Also, I found this link that lists a free program you can use along with some of the paid ones. I've never used it before, so I can't vouch for it, but free stuff is out there.

http://howto.wired.com/wiki/Create_Your_Own_Font

razz
Dec 26, 2005

Queen of Maceration


ceebee posted:

Check the European Wacom site and see if the drivers for the Bamboo work from that site.

Still no pen pressure . Think I will call Wacom today and see if I can get somebody to help me. Because it's so cool and I really want it to work right!

Jet Ready Go
Nov 3, 2005

I thought I didn't qualify. I was considered, what was it... volatile, self-centered, and I don't play well with others.

gmc9987 posted:

http://www.yourfonts.com/

and it worked out OK.

Thanks, your fonts was the only thing I could find but I'm not 100% keen on spending the $10 just yet. By far though they seem the most simple, I checked a lot of other programs which made you use tracing tools to trace around the font you already wrote.. and it's kind of like OH MY GOD what the gently caress are you guys doing? Haha.

gmc9987
Jul 25, 2007


Jet Ready Go posted:

Thanks, your fonts was the only thing I could find but I'm not 100% keen on spending the $10 just yet. By far though they seem the most simple, I checked a lot of other programs which made you use tracing tools to trace around the font you already wrote.. and it's kind of like OH MY GOD what the gently caress are you guys doing? Haha.

If it's 10 bucks to do it then that's not the site we used at work, the one we used was free. Sorry, I only really saw the end result. I can ask at work tomorrow what free one we used and post it.

Jet Ready Go
Nov 3, 2005

I thought I didn't qualify. I was considered, what was it... volatile, self-centered, and I don't play well with others.

gmc9987 posted:

If it's 10 bucks to do it then that's not the site we used at work, the one we used was free. Sorry, I only really saw the end result. I can ask at work tomorrow what free one we used and post it.

The website used to be free if that makes any difference.

Tesla Was Robbed
Oct 4, 2002
I AM A LIAR

I found a stash of Intuos3 A5 widescreen tablets at Adorama. They're refurbs from middle of last year and as close as you'll get to a brand new Intuos3. $225 with cheap shipping.drat, all gone. Hope whoever got them enjoys them. Been playing with mine for a few days now and am absolutely loving it.

Just wish I could find an Intuos4 pen stand. Having that neat little nib holder would be sweet.

Tesla Was Robbed fucked around with this message at May 28, 2010 around 04:44

Miskatonic
May 16, 2010

A lie told often enough becomes the truth.


Hate to hijack a thread. But I recently bought a Wacom Tablet and I'm terrible at it. Anyone know of any helpful tutorials and how to fix the annoying "hold the pen in one spot for less than a second and a window pops up" in photoshop thing?

Good Sir
Oct 19, 2008


I was able to get an Intuos4 Medium for 300$ with free shipping using some retail price comparison site and ordering from a local canadian PC retailer! Be sure to try and save money on your tablet...

ALTHOUGH I HAVE HAD SOME ISSUES WITH MINE.

The OLED lights make a VERY high pitch, headache-inducing screech sound. I can't use it unless they're off, or I have headphones on. Wacom has admitted this is a design flaw, and they recommend not using the displays (horrible work-around).

The nibs last just a couple weeks, at most, thanks to the "paper-like" surface of the Intuos4. Previously, my nibs would last months. Wacom has admitted this is a design flaw, and they recommend taping paper ontop of your intuos (brutal work-around)!

beef express
Sep 7, 2005

The highest technique is to have no technique.

Fun Shoe

I'm just getting back into using my 6x8 Intuos3 again after a year or so without it. I'm still sliding about like crazy, but I'm having a lot of fun loving about with the free edition of Artrage. You can make some crazy messes and there's no brushes to clean

Das MicroKorg
Sep 18, 2005

Vintage Analog Synthesizer


I have an A4 Intuos3 and it's awesome and already lasts me for almost 4 years (I think) without any problems whatsoever.

I tried out several A5 widescreen tablets and Bamboos in the past years, but always felt they were too jittery for my klutzy hands I mean you have less space, so small movements of your hand move the mouse cursor a lot further than on a larger tablet, making precise movements a lot harder.


EDIT: Concerning software, my Intuos came with Corel Painter LE, which is nice and pretty similar to ArtRage as I've heard.

EDIT 2:

Miskatonic posted:

Hate to hijack a thread. But I recently bought a Wacom Tablet and I'm terrible at it. Anyone know of any helpful tutorials and how to fix the annoying "hold the pen in one spot for less than a second and a window pops up" in photoshop thing?

I don't know what you're talking about concerning Photoshop, but you definitely have to get used to working with a tablet. The problem I had at first was that when I wanted to "left click", I moved the pen too much horizontally, thus moving the mouse pointer off the thing I wanted to click on It gets better though really fast, at which point you won't want to miss your tablet.

Das MicroKorg fucked around with this message at May 27, 2010 around 19:37

The Consultant
Apr 5, 2006

I'm tops and you're horseplops


Are tablets with LCD screens still really expensive? Should I bother with them? I still have an older tablet but my new motherboard doesn't have the serial connector and I read that the driver would specifically now work with USB-serial adapters.

anyways, how do the ones with screens work? would Windows just treat it as an additional monitor?

Nexa
Apr 1, 2010


Heya, I've got an Intuos 3 (I've had it for years and years) and I finally decided to upgrade after saving all my pennies. So, now I have an Intuos 4 (medium - flashy light things for me!) so I thought I'd let you know what I think.

The Intuos 3 is a solid bit of kit. Considering that it's been beaten around a bit now it still preforms admirably even though it's got a large and nasty scratch on the drawing surface. The touch strip on it is great for quick zooming and you can bind the keys on the side to give you quick access to often used short cuts.

The Intuos 4 is a different beast. I'd describe it as something of a glass cannon, because the difference in sensitivity, accuracy, feel and design is amazing, but it also feels fragile. It feels as though it won't last as long (perhaps this is why they've got so many replacement parts for it on the Wacom site?). My only real issue with the 4 is the rate at which the nibs wear down. If you are using your tablet for light use, then it won't really affect you that much, but if like me you are a hardcore painting fiend, then be prepared to buy nibs and eventually you will need replacement screens and the like, I'm sure of it.

The way I look at it is that for years now, since I got all my kit, I've never had any art costs. Normal artists have to pay for paper / paints / specialised stuff - you name it, but artistically speaking I've had a free ride. The simple fact that the Intuos 4 is so beautiful, effortless and tasty to use means that I can get over it, because I've been spoilt by Wacom anyway. I won't be happy about paying for nibs and perhaps replacement parts, but the way it's made my art quality jump in the space of a single painting is just... wow!

Unfortunately the Intuos 4 nibs last for about a painting. One painting at say, 5000x5000 @ 300 dpi is enough to eat my pen nibs - down to the base, and I don't press down hard. Compare this to my Intuos 3 and we're talking *years* for a nib to wear down. Years O.O

At the end of the day the question is, do you want stability, tried-and-tested high quality, could probably survive a nuke tablet goodness, or do you want to take a small leap of faith and instead of having something that lasts a lifetime, have something that really does feel like it can plug in to your imagination and take you away with it, for however long it is around?

That's what it comes down to, in my opinion. It's like choosing a class in an RPG - do you want a Fighter or a Wizard? That is how different they are to me. Both are good, but for sheer value for money, I'd be tempted to get a 3. It'll probably last you the rest of your life.

Good luck on your tablet hunting!

Oh it's also worth mentioning that the Intuos 4 comes with a choice of Photoshop Elements, Sketch Pad and something else to use. I got elements and even though it's a bit random, it's actually very smart. Photoshop without the bloat - lovely!

Nexa fucked around with this message at May 28, 2010 around 09:54

Tesla Was Robbed
Oct 4, 2002
I AM A LIAR

LittleFish posted:

Intuos 3 v. 4

Good poo poo
Wow, the way you describe the 4 makes me think that it will hold me at night when the scary people come. Too bad it eats nibs like skittles. The nice part is that my 3 will last me until the 5 comes out with 2^14 levels of sensitivity and a 3-like drawing surface.

Do the OLEDs have that whine talked about earlier? And is Sketchpad better or would I be better served with Painter 11?

Kingtheninja
Jul 29, 2004

"You're the best looking guy here."


Does anyone run an intuos4 with windows 7? I just picked up a medium 4, and every so often after turning off and on my machine, the tablet won't boot up. I can't even access the properties of the tablet, like the data stopped existing. The first time this happened I uninstalled/reinstalled the tablet stuff but I'd like to avoid doing that every day.

Nexa
Apr 1, 2010


radical edward posted:

Wow, the way you describe the 4 makes me think that it will hold me at night when the scary people come. Too bad it eats nibs like skittles. The nice part is that my 3 will last me until the 5 comes out with 2^14 levels of sensitivity and a 3-like drawing surface.

Do the OLEDs have that whine talked about earlier? And is Sketchpad better or would I be better served with Painter 11?

To be honest with you I think the 4 *will* hold you at night when the scary people come. It'll sing sweet lullabies to you while ripping pure mana out of the world, until all that is left is the dust of pen nibs.

I can't hear any whine at all - I mostly listen to some rocking choons when painting like a freak of nature but even without any music, I can't hear a whine. My suggestion to the chap who had said problem is to send an e-mail to Wacom, as even without the care package your shiny v4 tablet is under warranty for two years, I believe.

Oh hell yes the 3 is awesome. I'm keeping mine in a stasis field. I'm working on the theory that when my 4 dies a bit, the 3 will always be there, ready to love me again.

The 5 is probably going to be the most amazing and ultimate of all monsters. I'll go to the Wacom site one day like some crazy pen nib junkie and there it will be, gleaming with vile and forbidden magics.

As for sketchpad vs 11 - No contest!! Get 11, now! I can't even be bothered with much of Photoshop any more, because even though Photoshop is technically brilliant in a million more ways than I can probably list, Painter has a real soul to it, and getting a cut down version will do you no favours at all. There are trial versions of Painter 11 around the place - why not give it a go until it runs out? It does not have as many techy things compared to Photoshop but the way it handles paints and other natural media is a truly beautiful thing to behold. It is also about 90% compatible with Photoshop (supports the use of .psd files and the like) so it makes the perfect accompaniment to all acolytes of Photoshop. The key to Painter is to understand that it works best when used with Photoshop - it is a stand alone product, but it shines when you save, load it up in the other program, modify, save, then re-open and so on.

My first tip to you is when you get it, to click the box that says "pick up underlying colour" on the layers menu.

Then, it shall begin.

skizzenstifte
May 22, 2010

Liberty. Reason. Justice. Civility. Edification. Perfection.

MAIL.


LittleFish posted:

good stuff

Hey, thanks for all the good info! I've always worked with traditional media, but that can get so pricey. You've inspired me to finally take the plunge and get a tablet - it should get here sometime next week. I'm pretty psyched. (Got the standard 6x8 Intuos 3... figured getting an Intuos 4 at this point was like buying a motorcycle for someone who can't ride a bike.)

I'm kind of intimidated by the "brutal learning curve" I've heard a lot about, like getting used to keeping your eyes on the screen, making a non-jagged line, stuff like that... I get the feeling that it'll take me a while to be able to draw something that's not shaky poopcrap.

Nexa
Apr 1, 2010


skizzenstifte posted:

Hey, thanks for all the good info! I've always worked with traditional media, but that can get so pricey. You've inspired me to finally take the plunge and get a tablet - it should get here sometime next week. I'm pretty psyched. (Got the standard 6x8 Intuos 3... figured getting an Intuos 4 at this point was like buying a motorcycle for someone who can't ride a bike.)

I'm kind of intimidated by the "brutal learning curve" I've heard a lot about, like getting used to keeping your eyes on the screen, making a non-jagged line, stuff like that... I get the feeling that it'll take me a while to be able to draw something that's not shaky poopcrap.

Forgive my wall of text - I have a lot to write about this subject, and much advise to give

You made the right call on getting a 3 for your first tablet. What I used to do when my friends saw me using all this "crazy high tech stuff" was tell them to get a little one from Trust, just to make sure they like it (saves them spending a few hundred quid they didn't really have, while I got mine when things were better .etc) but you know you are an artist (they were not so sure) so you know it's going to be worth it, and it is, and you are going to rock.

I'm glad you are excited! The best thing is that you can still continue to be a traditional artist but now you can take your art to places I never could -traditional and digital cross has been explored but not that much, people found speed-painting and other things and that became the big thing - you still have some genuinely *new* things to do, things they have not done! I've been using a tablet since I was about 14 (pretty much when they started releasing them to begin with) and I never learnt how to draw on paper. Sounds random because it's all the same thing, but you know it isn't like that at heart too

Excitement is the best thing right now - you want to keep that going because there is a sortof "artistic depression" that can come from using tablets. It's almost like, when you join the digital guys you suddenly realise how mega some people are, and some people have told me they have felt very sad in comparison (yeah, I'm like this too from time to time), lost motivation and couldn't carry on (hence the "get a trust tablet!" to those guys). In traditional art things are judged differently I think, a painting is a painting, but in digital art I think people trade thoughts and skill / style more than anything else. In digital art, people can make many things by playing with a few filters and calling it a day, so it's not about how you make things (traditional can be about how you make things), but what you make - what thoughts are you trading? I'm just writing this because this is stuff I'd have loved to know way back when.

Don't get disheartened - join some art sites / forums / places where there are people of great and varied skill levels. One day, you will look at them and say "I have moved beyond that in my skills, fantastic", then you'll see one of those mega people and think "now *this* level is the goal" while trading your concepts and thoughts all the way, connecting with people instantly and working from pure light in a space that doesn't really exist to make something fantastic.

The learning curve - I remember well the days of looking at my tablet in frustration, re-learning what paper means to me. I wouldn't class the learning curve as steep, but you are essentially re-programming yourself. One thing that helps some people to start with is to draw some sketchy stuff on paper, then try to trace over it. It's just learning how to use a brush for the first time, except you paint on a canvas and the paint appears on the wall next to it. I started off by illustrating poems with stick men. Learning what all these filters did, and then I realised I didn't need to really use them any more (I still don't use them really). You should experiment with brushes in Photoshop, but don't become reliant on them (happened to me, probably set me back a year or two). I don't have mega art skills, I never have done, so I am a photo-manipulator (just not a normal one), because what I actually do is more like "Photo-paintings". By the time I am done with the photo it's been changed so much it's hardly a photo any more. So, this is what you should do to learn:

1) Draw random shapes
2) Play with your shapes using photoshop filters and put your shapes on different layers
3) Play with brushes in Photoshop (grunge is a good place to start with brush types)
4) Play with brushes in Painter (the oil pastels are surprisingly good and I swear by them)
5) Start drawing landscapes based on: Earth, Air, Fire and Water. Mastery over the basic elements will catapult you to freedom. Once you can draw rock and mountains, sky and clouds, fire and water, you are truly free, and everything else comes from those elements in some way. (Water becomes mountains, clouds becomes the extra detail that makes something truly awesome, fire becomes magic / effects and so on). Port them to photoshop to apply brushes, then take it back into Painter, paint over said brushes and carry on. Build it up. Landscapes will teach you your limits, and how to overcome them. They will also give you mastery over your tablet.
6) While attempting really hard stuff, play to your strengths also. You will need to reward yourself in order to motivate you through the hard poo poo.

And so on. Painter is where you find your soul, Photoshop allows you to "get it right". In the words of Android Jones (I love him) "Work from a place of light and love".

Do this for as long as it takes, consider photo-manipulating / artistic collaborations and unless you are an anime artist and want to go that way, avoid anime like the plague as if you are a "painter" the anime style will creep in to everything you do from the moment you get good at it, it's hard to loose the style of it if you decide you don't want to do that any more

This is me doing that exact element based thing (Fire and Rock here): http://fshi.deviantart.com/art/Echo...emory-164409376 - this is fairly simple, especially if unlike me you can actually draw to begin with. Everything I have done is because I decided I wouldn't let my inability to get perspectives and other things right stop me, and I am forcing myself to do this stuff - the part of my brain that should be leet with perspectives and other stuff like that does not work properly, due to a fundamental learning disability I have with maths and 3d space related problems. I'm an artistic dyslexic

If I can do things that people want to buy and think are cool, then *anyone* can do this. Especially those who say "I can't draw" - you can, I am proof of this now, and I started with stick men (and still draw them about the place, haha). You will possibly be feeling a bit overwhelmed for a while, but you will gain speed, and then before you know it you'll be amazed at your progression. Here is a nice tutorial / resource site to get you started in all things digital: http://bluefaqs.com/

The last thing to remember is that in the eyes of many ordinary people (the ones you want to sell your work to), being digital is a novelty. You can be a complete nobody (al la me) in the digital world, but in the real world you're a drat genius. People know about tablets and things now, but it's still a case of "Digital? Oh like one of those tablet thingys?". Capitalise on this - it will make you money.

Good luck to all those starting on the digital path (and those trying to master it)! <3

Robzilla
Jul 28, 2003

READ IT AND WEEP JEWBOY!


Fun Shoe

Anyone know where I can get a replacement pen for my Wacom Graphire4 CTE-640. I just pulled it out after a few years and I can't seem to find it, which makes me sad.

Edit: I mean't not on the Wacom site, since $40 is a bit too much for one. Anywhere else?>

Robzilla fucked around with this message at May 30, 2010 around 09:31

baptism of fiber
Oct 17, 2004
compound

BrokenCycle posted:

If anyone wants an alternative to Photoshop, check out Sketchbook Pro from Autodesk. The interface is really bad, but actual drawing feels and looks way better.

Seconding this. It's a free download if you're a college student. Our school got a demo 21ux and the combo of these two was so much fun. I spin the page like a mofo when I draw, so having the scrollbars on the back of the screen was super handy.

Robzilla
Jul 28, 2003

READ IT AND WEEP JEWBOY!


Fun Shoe

Augh I was retarded and realized I can use the older Bamboo pens that are compatible with the CTE models.

Dr. David PHD
Mar 12, 2010


hmmxkrazee posted:

I use a Graphire4 8x6. Got it for about $100 on Ebay a few years ago. I used a friend's Intuos3 briefly before getting the Graphire4 and I don't really feel a difference (they both have 1024 levels of sensitivity). I use it mostly for drawing and doing t-shirt designs in Photoshop.

I bought a Tablet Laptop (Hp tx2500) but I keep coming back to my Wacom since it's much more sensitive and just better overall. I'd like to eventually get a Cintiq but I've heard mixed reviews.

I have the same model but smaller (Graphire4 4x5) and it has served it's purpose very well. It feels extremely natural and I can get some pretty clean, curving lines.

Holla Forth
May 20, 2010



Anyone have any wisdom to impart about replacement pens for a Graphire4? Mine's finally kicked it. Apparently The Bamboo and BambooFun pens are compatible, as are ones from the older Graphire models. They're all the same price, but do they differ at all in sensitivity/feel?

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Kingtheninja
Jul 29, 2004

"You're the best looking guy here."


I went to install the corel painter you get with purchase of an intuos4, and it asks me for a serial number. Am I supposed to have this somewhere?

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