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QUACKTASTIC
Mar 31, 2010

__(.)<
\___)

Sergeant Stubby (1916 or 1917 – March 16, 1926), was the most decorated war dog of World War I and the only dog to be promoted to sergeant through combat.

Stubby was found on the Yale campus in 1917 by John Robert Conroy... Stubby marched with Conroy and even learned an approximate salute. When Conroy's unit shipped out to France, Stubby was smuggled aboard the transport SS Minnesota.



After being gassed himself, Stubby learned to warn his unit of poison gas attacks, located wounded soldiers in no man's land, and — since he could hear the whine of incoming artillery shells before humans could — became very adept at letting his unit know when to duck for cover...



After returning home, Stubby became a celebrity and marched in, and normally led, many parades across the country. He met Presidents Woodrow Wilson, Calvin Coolidge, and Warren G. Harding. Starting in 1921, he attended Georgetown University Law Center with Conroy, and became the Georgetown Hoyas' team mascot...

In 1926, Stubby died in Conroy's arms... Stubby was honored with a brick in the Walk of Honor at the United States World War I monument, Liberty Memorial, in Kansas City at a ceremony held on Armistice Day, November 11, 2006.

Also:





I think war dogs are pretty awesome.

e. there's also a dog smoking a cigar in a biplane that I can't seem to find.

QUACKTASTIC fucked around with this message at Jan 5, 2011 around 03:05

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Atticus_1354
Dec 9, 2006

Don't you go near that dog, you understand? Don't go near him, he's just as dangerous dead as alive.


War dogs rock.









QUACKTASTIC
Mar 31, 2010

__(.)<
\___)



Atticus_1354
Dec 9, 2006

Don't you go near that dog, you understand? Don't go near him, he's just as dangerous dead as alive.


You're right. Time to get adorable.







Stone cold pimp.

QUACKTASTIC
Mar 31, 2010

__(.)<
\___)

I think we're derailing the thread









Senior Woodchuck
Aug 29, 2006

When you're lost out there and you're all alone, a light is waiting to carry you home


Gunt McBadpost posted:

Sergeant Stubby (1916 or 1917 – March 16, 1926), was the most decorated war dog of World War I and the only dog to be promoted to sergeant through combat.

Stubby was found on the Yale campus in 1917 by John Robert Conroy... Stubby marched with Conroy and even learned an approximate salute. When Conroy's unit shipped out to France, Stubby was smuggled aboard the transport SS Minnesota.



After being gassed himself, Stubby learned to warn his unit of poison gas attacks, located wounded soldiers in no man's land, and — since he could hear the whine of incoming artillery shells before humans could — became very adept at letting his unit know when to duck for cover...



After returning home, Stubby became a celebrity and marched in, and normally led, many parades across the country. He met Presidents Woodrow Wilson, Calvin Coolidge, and Warren G. Harding. Starting in 1921, he attended Georgetown University Law Center with Conroy, and became the Georgetown Hoyas' team mascot...

In 1926, Stubby died in Conroy's arms... Stubby was honored with a brick in the Walk of Honor at the United States World War I monument, Liberty Memorial, in Kansas City at a ceremony held on Armistice Day, November 11, 2006.

Also:





I think war dogs are pretty awesome.

e. there's also a dog smoking a cigar in a biplane that I can't seem to find.

The best part about Stubby is that there were soldiers who had to salute him and call him "Sir."

SlimWhiskey
Jun 1, 2010


I feel bad for dogs jumping out of planes. They have no idea at all what is going on. They're probably terrified.

Chef Bromden
Jun 4, 2009


SlimWhiskey posted:

I feel bad for dogs jumping out of planes. They have no idea at all what is going on. They're probably terrified.

I bet they feel like they're sticking their heads out the world's largest window.

QUACKTASTIC
Mar 31, 2010

__(.)<
\___)

I have no way of backing this up, but I saw a video of a dog leaping into a plane, knowing he was about to sky-dive. So I'd like to think that they not only knew what was coming, they enjoyed it.

http://animal.discovery.com/videos/...ting-breed.html this dog seems pretty chill about it all (and badass in it's own way)

QUACKTASTIC fucked around with this message at Jan 5, 2011 around 06:52

BlueBayou
Jan 16, 2008
Before she mends must sicken worse


Senior Woodchuck posted:

The best part about Stubby is that there were soldiers who had to salute him and call him "Sir."

Not so much seeing as you don't call NCOs (which is what a sergeant is) "sir"

Thunder Mug
Jul 11, 2008

They may kick our ass, but they will never kick Our Freedom!

Carl Panzram

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Panzram

Got his first arrest at the age of 8 for drunk and disorderly conduct, and died heckling the executioner at his public hanging.

He robbed, raped, and killed alot of people, but I still think he was pretty bad rear end. For an unredeemable monster that is.

Lasciel
Dec 24, 2010


Iowa class Battleship firing its cannons.


Click here for the full 744x558 image.



Click here for the full 900x1147 image.

Pirate Radar
Apr 18, 2008

yeeeeee strigoi!!


BlueBayou posted:

Not so much seeing as you don't call NCOs (which is what a sergeant is) "sir"

But now I have the image of some CO giving the unit mascot honorary O-1 status and insisting that all fresh E-1s and E-2s come to attention when the dog walks into the room.

Hellbeard
Apr 8, 2002


Please report me if you see me post in GBS so a moderator may bulldoze my account like a palestinian school.


As long as we're into military bad assery I present for your consideration one of the bad assest tank dudes there ever was. Not so much a bad rear end picture as a picture of a bad rear end.

Zvika Greengold:


In the Yom Kippur war with a force comprised of two tanks he single handedly beat back 2 armored brigade sized forces. A brigade is around 100 tanks so he was outnumbered 1-100.

from Wikipedia posted:

Greengold's "Koah Zvika" (Zvika Force) spotted Syrian tanks belonging to the 51st Independent Tank Brigade[2] which had broken through the line and was advancing unopposed northwest along the road to Nafekh. Greengold's two tanks engaged the opposing T-55s at 2100, with Greengold destroying six.[2] Later, he had lost contact with his other tank when he spotted the advancing 452nd Tank Battalion. He engaged the enemy, taking advantage of the darkness and moving constantly to fool the Syrians into thinking the defenders were stronger than they were. Greengold destroyed or damaged ten enemy armoured vehicles before the confused Syrians withdrew, believing they were facing a sizable force.[2] Even Greengold's superiors were deceived; as the fighting wore on, he did not dare report how weak he actually was over the radio for fear it would be intercepted; at best he could only hint "the situation isn't good".[4]
For the next 20 hours, he fought, sometimes alone, sometimes in conjunction with other tanks, displaying an uncanny knack for showing up over and over at the critical moment to tip the scales of a skirmish. He had to change vehicles "half a dozen times"[1] as his tanks were knocked out. He soldiered on, even after he was wounded and burned.[1] When Nafekh itself came under attack from a fresh force of T-62s, he rushed over to bolster the defense.[1] In a lull in the fighting, an exhausted Greengold got out of his latest tank and dropped to the ground, murmuring, "I can't anymore."[2]
Afterward, he claimed 20 enemy tanks destroyed; other estimates place his tally at 40 or more.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zvika_Greengold
http://www.amazingben.com/arf0123.html

Hellbeard fucked around with this message at Jan 5, 2011 around 17:06

QUACKTASTIC
Mar 31, 2010

__(.)<
\___)

In the same vein:



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audie_Murphy (the most decorated American soldier of World War II)

Second Lt. Murphy commanded Company B, which was attacked by six tanks and waves of infantry. 2d Lt. Murphy ordered his men to withdraw to a prepared position in a woods, while he remained forward at his command post and continued to give fire directions to the artillery by telephone. Behind him, to his right, one of our tank destroyers received a direct hit and began to burn. Its crew withdrew to the woods. 2d Lt. Murphy continued to direct artillery fire, which killed large numbers of the advancing enemy infantry. With the enemy tanks abreast of his position, 2d Lt. Murphy climbed on the burning tank destroyer, which was in danger of blowing up at any moment, and employed its .50 caliber machine gun against the enemy. He was alone and exposed to German fire from three sides, but his deadly fire killed dozens of Germans and caused their infantry attack to waver. The enemy tanks, losing infantry support, began to fall back. For an hour the Germans tried every available weapon to eliminate 2d Lt. Murphy, but he continued to hold his position and wiped out a squad that was trying to creep up unnoticed on his right flank. Germans reached as close as 10 yards, only to be mowed down by his fire. He received a leg wound, but ignored it and continued his single-handed fight until his ammunition was exhausted. He then made his way back to his company, refused medical attention, and organized the company in a counterattack, which forced the Germans to withdraw. His directing of artillery fire wiped out many of the enemy; he killed or wounded about 50. 2d Lt. Murphy's indomitable courage and his refusal to give an inch of ground saved his company from possible encirclement and destruction, and enabled it to hold the woods which had been the enemy's objective

Mister Bung
Jun 7, 2004

What about the children foo'?


Gunt McBadpost posted:

In the same vein:



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audie_Murphy (the most decorated American soldier of World War II)

Second Lt. Murphy commanded Company B, which was attacked by six tanks and waves of infantry. 2d Lt. Murphy ordered his men to withdraw to a prepared position in a woods, while he remained forward at his command post and continued to give fire directions to the artillery by telephone. Behind him, to his right, one of our tank destroyers received a direct hit and began to burn. Its crew withdrew to the woods. 2d Lt. Murphy continued to direct artillery fire, which killed large numbers of the advancing enemy infantry. With the enemy tanks abreast of his position, 2d Lt. Murphy climbed on the burning tank destroyer, which was in danger of blowing up at any moment, and employed its .50 caliber machine gun against the enemy. He was alone and exposed to German fire from three sides, but his deadly fire killed dozens of Germans and caused their infantry attack to waver. The enemy tanks, losing infantry support, began to fall back. For an hour the Germans tried every available weapon to eliminate 2d Lt. Murphy, but he continued to hold his position and wiped out a squad that was trying to creep up unnoticed on his right flank. Germans reached as close as 10 yards, only to be mowed down by his fire. He received a leg wound, but ignored it and continued his single-handed fight until his ammunition was exhausted. He then made his way back to his company, refused medical attention, and organized the company in a counterattack, which forced the Germans to withdraw. His directing of artillery fire wiped out many of the enemy; he killed or wounded about 50. 2d Lt. Murphy's indomitable courage and his refusal to give an inch of ground saved his company from possible encirclement and destruction, and enabled it to hold the woods which had been the enemy's objective

Jesus christ, reading that gave me goosebumps. Truly the greatest generation.

Keshik
Oct 27, 2000

Ye soldiers of Freedom, then strike, while strike ye may


For the record, Audie Murphy isn't just the most decorated American soldier of the second World War but is also the most decorated soldier in the history of the American armed forces. Moreover, there have been changes to the way medals are awarded, the details of which I cannot recall, that have had the effect of making it effectively impossible for anyone to receive anywhere near as many awards as he did.

So basically, not only is he the most decorated soldier in our nation's history, he always will be.

The people who get the MoH all have awesome stories, and anyone can read them on the DOD website. One really neat one I have long enjoyed is from 1959, when then-newly-elected-Congressman Dan Inouye was being sworn into office by Speaker Sam Rayburn, the Speaker made a minor gaffe and said to Inouye "Raise your right hand and repeat after me."

Namarrgon
Dec 23, 2008

Congratulations on not getting fit in 2011!

As long as we are going in the direction of military fetishes...



Leo Major single-handidly liberated my home town (roughly 120k inhabitants now, so your guess is as good as mine how big it was then) from Nazi occupation in 1945. I could paraphrase it all but why bother when wikipedia has a good summary;

wikipedia posted:

In the beginning of April, the Régiment de la Chaudière were approaching the city of Zwolle, which presented strong German resistance. The Commanding Officer asked for two volunteers to recon the German force before the artillery began firing at the city. Major and his friend Willie Arseneault stepped forward to accept the task. In order to keep the city intact, the pair decided to try to capture Zwolle alone, though they were only supposed to recon the German numbers and attempt contact with the Dutch Resistance.
Certificat2.jpg

Around midnight Arseneault was killed by German fire after accidentally giving away the team's position. Enraged, Major killed two of the Germans, but the rest of the group fled in a vehicle. He decided to continue his mission alone. He entered Zwolle near Sassenport and came upon a staff car. He ambushed and captured the German driver, and then led him to a bar where an officer was taking a drink. Inside he found that they could both speak French (the officer was from Alsace), and Major told him that at 6:00 am Canadian artillery would begin firing at the city, causing numerous casualties among both the German troops and the civilians. As a sign of good faith, he gave the German his gun back.

Major then proceeded to run throughout the city firing his machine gun, throwing grenades and making so much noise that he fooled the Germans into thinking that the Canadian Army was storming the city in earnest. As he was doing this, he would attack and capture German troops. About 10 times during the night he captured groups of 8 to 10 German soldiers, escorted them out of the city and gave them to the French-Canadian troops that were waiting in the vicinity. After transferring his prisoners to the troops, he would return to Zwolle to continue his assault. However, four times during the night he had to force his way into civilian's houses to get some rest. He eventually located the Gestapo HQ and set the building on fire. Later stumbling upon the SS HQ, he got into a quick but deadly fight with eight ranking Nazi officers: four were killed, and the other half fled. He noticed that two of the SS he just killed were disguised as resistance members. The Zwolle resistance had been (or were going to be) infiltrated by the Nazis.

By 4:30 am, the exhausted Major found out that the Germans had retreated, Zwolle had been liberated, and the Resistance contacted. Walking in the street he met four members of Dutch Resistance. He informed them that the city was now free of Germans. Major found out later that morning that the Germans had fled to the west of the River IJssel and, perhaps more importantly, that the planned shelling of the city would be called off and his Régiment de la Chaudière could enter the city unopposed.. Major then took his dead friend back to the Van Gerner farm until regimental reinforcements could carry him away. He was back at camp by 9:00 am. For his actions, he received the Distinguished Conduct Medal.

All of this was after he escaped from a hospital (from the Allied side) because they wanted to send him back home. Also not pictured but he his eye got hosed and he wore an eye patch during all this. I have a friend who met him and said he was a nice guy.

After that, in the Korean war, he held of 14k Chinese troops with just 20 men for 3 days.

Ninja_Orca
Nov 12, 2010

by hoodrow trillson


Namarrgon posted:

holy poo poo

Any word on whether he beat the Nazis to death with his giant steel balls?

suddenlyissoon
Feb 17, 2002

Don't be sad that I am gone.



This is Joseph Kittinger, one of the very last American bad-asses. Why people haven't heard more of him is beyond me. He was part of Project Excelsior.

quote:

On August 16, 1960, he made the final jump from the Excelsior III at 102,800 feet (31,300 m). Towing a small drogue parachute for initial stabilization, he fell for four minutes and 36 seconds, reaching a maximum speed of 614 miles per hour (988 km/h) before opening his parachute at 18,000 feet (5,500 m). Pressurization for his right glove malfunctioned during the ascent, and his right hand swelled up to twice its normal size. He set historical numbers for highest balloon ascent, highest parachute jump, longest drogue-fall (four minutes), and fastest speed by a human being through the atmosphere. These are still current USAF records, but were not submitted for aerospace world records to the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI).

That's right, 102,800 FEET (nearly 20 miles) IN THE loving AIR. That record has stood for 50 years.

He'd be a total badass if that was the only thing he did in life, but it wasn't. He also also did 3 tours in Vietnam and flew a total of 483 missions. Close to the end of his last tour he was shot down and spent 11 months in the Hanoi Hilton.

Sexual Lorax
Mar 17, 2004

HERE'S TO FUCKING



Fun Shoe

Continuing the derail:



Witold Pilecki volunteered at 17 to defend Poland in World War I. That's enough to earn anyone an entry in the badass books, but it was later in his life that he set the badass bar impossibly high. In 1940, he came up with a plan to find out what was going on inside Auschwitz by intentionally having an intelligence agent be captured by the Nazis and VOLUNTEERED TO DO IT HIMSELF.

After providing information about what was actually happening in the concentration camp, his superiors decided not to mount a rescue effort. Pilecki's response was to BREAK OUT OF AUSCHWITZ to convince them in person. In a time when most thought Auschwitz was just a large prison camp, his eyewitness accounts of the inside of Auschwitz were the best intelligence the Allies had regarding Nazi concentration camps.

Not badass enough for you? Pilecki continued to fight the Nazis after escaping Auschwitz, was eventually captured, and spent the last year of the war in a Nazi POW camp.

Still not badass enough? After spending most of a decade getting the poo poo beat out of it by Nazis, Poland then spent the next 30 years or so getting the poo poo beat out of it by the Soviets. Almost without a break, Pilecki went from underground resistance of the Nazi occupation of Poland to underground resistance of the Communist occupation of Poland.

Even after being warned that his cover was broken and having an opportunity--actually being ordered--to flee Poland before the Communists got him, Pilecki continued to do anything he could to defend his country. The story doesn't have a happy ending, unfortunately. Pilecki was captured by the Communists and executed in 1947.


Edit: Writing is hard.

Sexual Lorax fucked around with this message at Jan 5, 2011 around 21:54

Centripetal Horse
Nov 22, 2009

Fuck money, get GBS

This could have bought you a half a tank of gas, lmfao -
Love, gromdul


Sexual Lorax posted:

Witold Pilecki volunteered at 17 to defend Poland in World War I. That's enough to earn anyone an entry in the badass books, but it was later in his life that he set the badass bar impossibly high. In 1940, he came up with a plan to find out what was going on inside Auschwitz in 1940 by intentionally having an intelligence agent be captured by the Nazis and VOLUNTEERED TO DO IT HIMSELF.

I was skeptical of your claim of an unreachably high badass bar, but goddamn. That has got to be the point where "badass" bumps up against "mentally ill."* Reading the rest of your synopsis, it's clear that this guy was truly born to be a fighter (not necessarily a soldier, because it doesn't say much about his ability to follow orders.)

Also, I hate to admit this (and it may belong in the "mind blown" thread), but I thought Audie Murphy was just a guy who acted like a badass. I sort of had it in the back of my mind that he had been a soldier, but I didn't know he was THE soldier.

Edit: * Although, I suppose before people like him went in to gather intelligence, they may not have known just how bad it was in those camps.

Man with Hat
Dec 26, 2007

Open up your Dethday present
It's a box of fucking nothing


Biscuit Hider

Phantom LOLbooth posted:

Also, I hate to admit this (and it may belong in the "mind blown" thread), but I thought Audie Murphy was just a guy who acted like a badass. I sort of had it in the back of my mind that he had been a soldier, but I didn't know he was THE soldier.

He also had malaria and was tiny. And I think he got literally all the medals they had back then, even one that was generally only given to dead people. And a whole bunch of non-american ones as well, if I recall correctly.

Edit: My source probably isn't the most reliable one, though. But it is full of awesome badass stories.

Man with Hat fucked around with this message at Jan 5, 2011 around 19:35

OddOne
Mar 18, 2008

by T. Finn


Man with Hat posted:

He also had malaria and was tiny. And I think he got literally all the medals they had back then, even one that was generally only given to dead people. And a whole bunch of non-american ones as well, if I recall correctly.

Edit: My source probably isn't the most reliable one, though. But it is full of awesome badass stories.

Wikipedia blathers thusly:

"Murphy became the most decorated United States soldier of the war during twenty-seven months in action in the European Theatre. He received the Medal of Honor, the U.S. military's highest award for valor, along with 32 additional U.S. and foreign medals and citations, including five from France and one from Belgium."

Audie was a bad rear end out of the dotmil as well - he got hooked on sleeping drugs he was using to combat his case of shell shock, and when he recognized he was addicted he made a "gently caress this noise" move: he locked himself in a hotel room and did a cold-turkey to get off the drugs.

Cleretic
Feb 3, 2010

Fans always know better than the creators.


Gunt McBadpost posted:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audie_Murphy (the most decorated American soldier of World War II)

Cracked taught me something really interesting about his story:

He played himself in a movie. Movie Murphy had to be toned down, because if you told that in a film it would be considered too unbelievable.

Robokomodo
Nov 11, 2009


I would read the gently caress out of an "armed-forces badasses" page.

Really.

Keshik
Oct 27, 2000

Ye soldiers of Freedom, then strike, while strike ye may


Robokomodo posted:

I would read the gently caress out of an "armed-forces badasses" page.

Really.

http://www.history.army.mil/moh.html

Pirate Radar
Apr 18, 2008

yeeeeee strigoi!!


Robokomodo posted:

I would read the gently caress out of an "armed-forces badasses" page.

Really.

http://www.history.army.mil/moh.html

Here's one. For example:

quote:

MAXWELL, ROBERT D.

Rank and organization: Technician Fifth Grade, U.S. Army, 7th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division. Place and date: Near Besancon, France, 7 September 1944. Entered service at: Larimer County, Colo. Birth: Boise, Idaho. G.O. No.: 24, 6 April 1945. Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at risk of life above and beyond the call of duty on 7 September 1944, near Besancon, France. Technician 5th Grade Maxwell and 3 other soldiers, armed only with .45 caliber automatic pistols, defended the battalion observation post against an overwhelming onslaught by enemy infantrymen in approximately platoon strength, supported by 20mm. flak and machinegun fire, who had infiltrated through the battalion's forward companies and were attacking the observation post with machinegun, machine pistol, and grenade fire at ranges as close as 10 yards. Despite a hail of fire from automatic weapons and grenade launchers, Technician 5th Grade Maxwell aggressively fought off advancing enemy elements and, by his calmness, tenacity, and fortitude, inspired his fellows to continue the unequal struggle. When an enemy hand grenade was thrown in the midst of his squad, Technician 5th Grade Maxwell unhesitatingly hurled himself squarely upon it, using his blanket and his unprotected body to absorb the full force of the explosion. This act of instantaneous heroism permanently maimed Technician 5th Grade Maxwell, but saved the lives of his comrades in arms and facilitated maintenance of vital military communications during the temporary withdrawal of the battalion's forward headquarters.


Edit: Beaten

Kammat
Feb 9, 2008
Odd Person

drat some of those entries are insane.

Korean War Listings posted:

BENFOLD, EDWARD C.

Rank and organization: Hospital Corpsman Third Class, U.S. Navy, attached to a company in the 1st Marine Division. Place and date: Korea, 5 September 1952. Entered service at: Philadelphia, Pa. Born: 15 January 1931, Staten Island, N.Y. Citation: For gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving in operations against enemy aggressor forces. When his company was subjected to heavy artillery and mortar barrages, followed by a determined assault during the hours of darkness by an enemy force estimated at battalion strength, HC3c. Benfold resolutely moved from position to position in the face of intense hostile fire, treating the wounded and lending words of encouragement. Leaving the protection of his sheltered position to treat the wounded when the platoon area in which he was working was attacked from both the front and rear, he moved forward to an exposed ridge line where he observed 2 marines in a large crater. As he approached the 2 men to determine their condition, an enemy soldier threw 2 grenades into the crater while 2 other enemy charged the position. Picking up a grenade in each hand, HC3c Benfold leaped out of the crater and hurled himself against the on-rushing hostile soldiers, pushing the grenades against their chests and killing both the attackers. Mortally wounded while carrying out this heroic act, HC3c. Benfold, by his great personal valor and resolute spirit of self-sacrifice in the face of almost certain death, was directly responsible for saving the lives of his 2 comrades. His exceptional courage reflects the highest credit upon himself and enhances the finest traditions of the U.S. Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for others.

Throw yourself on them? Throw them back? Hell no, loving charge with them right back at the enemy. This is almost action movie territory.

oh dope
Nov 2, 2006

No guilt, it feeds in plain sight


See if we can derail this derail.

Ip Man



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BzC96R27eYU
If you haven't seen the movie, you should.

But hey, he was a real person.



He had many disciples, but one in particular stands out.

Some chump named Bruce Lee.

Chopstix
Nov 20, 2002

That's a rib gone. Not broken. Gone.

Keshik posted:


The people who get the MoH all have awesome stories, and anyone can read them on the DOD website. One really neat one I have long enjoyed is from 1959, when then-newly-elected-Congressman Dan Inouye was being sworn into office by Speaker Sam Rayburn, the Speaker made a minor gaffe and said to Inouye "Raise your right hand and repeat after me."



The way he lost his arm?

"As he raised himself up and cocked his arm to throw his last grenade into the fighting position, a German inside fired a rifle grenade that struck him on the right elbow, severing most of his arm and leaving his own primed grenade reflexively "clenched in a fist that suddenly didn't belong to me anymore".[9] Inouye's horrified soldiers moved to his aid, but he shouted for them to keep back out of fear his severed fist would involuntarily relax and drop the grenade. As the German inside the bunker reloaded his rifle, Inouye managed to pry the live grenade from his useless right hand and transfer it to his left. As the German aimed his rifle to finish him off, Inouye managed at last to toss the grenade off-hand into the bunker and destroy it. He stumbled to his feet and continued forward, silencing the last German resistance with a one-handed burst from his Thompson before being wounded in the leg and tumbling unconscious to the bottom of the ridge"

He was also shot in the stomach and continued on in a different battle.

BOOTY-ADE
Aug 30, 2006

BIG KOOL TELLIN' YA'LL TO KEEP IT TIGHT


Fun Shoe

Gunt McBadpost posted:

I have no way of backing this up, but I saw a video of a dog leaping into a plane, knowing he was about to sky-dive. So I'd like to think that they not only knew what was coming, they enjoyed it.

http://animal.discovery.com/videos/...ting-breed.html this dog seems pretty chill about it all (and badass in it's own way)

Dog and owner here are bad asses - dog is a badass for being able to do all those sports/activities, and the owner is a badass for rescuing her from a shelter and giving her a good home.

a bunch of ants
Jan 21, 2009

Wanna be professional criminals with me?


Even though they were the greatest generation it doesn't make some people in our generation any less great, case in point:

Salvatore Giunta

Salvatore Augustine Giunta is the first living person to receive the Medal of Honor, for actions that occurred since the Vietnam War. Giunta was cited for saving the lives of members of his squad on October 25, 2007 during the War in Afghanistan. He rescued three of his squad mates who were pinned down (and pretty much his whole platoon) and then noticed another soldier was missing so he chased after Taliban soldiers who were dragging his friend away shot them and then dragged his friend back.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salvatore_Giunta

Michael P. Murphy

Click here for the full 767x600 image.

He is on the far right.
Murphy and 3 other SEALS were on top of a mountain waiting to assassinate a Taliban leader. Some goat herders stumbled upon their position but were let go (so as to avoid any repercussions of killing civilians), later a force of Taliban soldiers estimated to be around 150 closed in on Murphy and his team. Heavily out numbered the SEALS began retreating down the mountainside while returning fire. Murphy broke from cover to reach higher ground to alert command that they were screwed, did I mention every single one of the SEALS was wounded multiple times at this point? Eventually the SEALS were cut down save for Marcus Luttrell who only escaped after he was blown off the mountain by a RPG. Luttrell then spent the next few days crawling to escape the Taliban before being hidden by local villagers and then eventually being rescued. Marcus Luttrell is also a badass and eventually wrote a book about the events.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Red_Wings

Edited for more Badassery:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o..._in_Afghanistan

a bunch of ants fucked around with this message at Jan 6, 2011 around 23:19

Lapse in Judgement
Sep 29, 2009

The rig, the rig, the rig is on fire...

Hopefully not posted before:



John Simpson Kirkpatrick

From Wiki:

After deserting from the merchant navy and travelling around Australia, prior to the war, Simpson apparently enlisted as a means to return to England. One account alleges that he dropped "Kirkpatrick" from his name and enlisted as "John Simpson" to avoid being identified as a deserter. He was accepted into the army as a field ambulance stretcher bearer on 23 August 1914 in Perth. This role was only given to physically strong men.

Simpson landed on the shores of the Gallipoli Peninsula on 25 April 1915 as part of the ANZAC forces. In the early hours of the following day, as he was bearing a wounded comrade on his shoulders, he spotted a donkey and quickly began making use of it to bear his fellow soldiers. He would sing and whistle, seeming to ignore the deadly bullets flying through the air, while he tended to his comrades. The donkey came to be named Duffy.

Colonel (later General) John Monash wrote: "Private Simpson and his little beast earned the admiration of everyone at the upper end of the valley. They worked all day and night throughout the whole period since the landing, and the help rendered to the wounded was invaluable. Simpson knew no fear and moved unconcernedly amid shrapnel and rifle fire, steadily carrying out his self imposed task day by day, and he frequently earned the applause of the personnel for his many fearless rescues of wounded men from areas subject to rifle and shrapnel fire."

On 19 May 1915, Simpson was struck by machine gun fire and died. At the time of his death, Simpson's father was already dead, but his mother was still living in South Shields, England.

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Tsutomu Yamaguchi

Only officially recognised survivor of the both the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombs and possibly the unluckiest man born. From Wiki:

A resident of Nagasaki, Yamaguchi was in Hiroshima on business for his employer Mitsubishi Heavy Industries when the city was bombed at 8:15am on 6 (Monday) August 1945. The following day he returned to Nagasaki and, despite his wounds, returned to work on 9 August, the day of the second atomic bombing. In 1957 he was recognized as a hibakusha (explosion-affected person) of the Nagasaki bombing, but it was not until 24 March 2009 that the government of Japan officially recognised his presence in Hiroshima three days earlier. He died of stomach cancer in January 2010.

Yamaguchi lived and worked in Nagasaki, but in the summer of 1945 he went to Hiroshima for a three month business trip. On 6 August he was preparing to leave the city with two colleagues, Akira Iwanaga and Kuniyoshi Sato, and was on his way to the station when he realised he had forgotton his hanko, and returned to his workplace to get it. At 8:15 he was walking back towards the docks when the American bomber Enola Gay dropped the Little Boy atomic bomb near the centre of the city, only 3 km away. Yamaguchi recalls seeing the bomber and two small parachutes, before there was "a great flash in the sky, and I was blown over." The explosion ruptured his eardrums, blinded him temporarily, and left him with serious burns over the left side of the top half of his body. After recovering he crawled to a shelter, and having rested he set out to find his colleagues. They had also survived and together they spent the night in an air-raid shelter before returning to Nagasaki the following day. In Nagasaki he received treatment for his wounds and, despite being heavily bandaged, he reported for work on 9 August.

At 11 am on August 9, Yamaguchi was describing the blast in Hiroshima to his supervisor, when the American bomber Bockscar dropped the Fat Man atomic bomb onto Nagasaki. His workplace again put him 3 km from ground zero, but this time he was unhurt by the explosion. However, he was unable to seek treatment for his now ruined bandages, and suffered from a high fever for over a week.

Vidaeus
Jan 27, 2007

Cats are gonna cat.


a bunch of ants posted:


Michael P. Murphy

Click here for the full 767x600 image.



Quick derail question: What are those things on the end of their rifles, silencers or something? Why does the guy 3rd from the left have a bigger one?

I know nothing about guns.

lilspooky
Mar 21, 2006


To go slightly TFR nerdy on you. Yes they do appear to be suppressors (silencer isn't the correct term). The guy with the longer one seems to be carrying a rifle setup for more long range marksman type duties so he probably needs a more efficient one. While the other guys appear to all have M4 style rifles chambered in 5.56mm, he very well might be carrying something chambered in a larger caliber, probably .308.

Pirate Radar
Apr 18, 2008

yeeeeee strigoi!!


Third from left appears to be an SR-25, a rifle chambered for 7.62x51mm ammunition rather than the 5.56x45mm of the other rifles. His role in the squad, referred to as a Designated Marksman*, will be to provide long-range striking power (most commonly between one and four hundred meters, potentially more if you give him time to evaluate the conditions and make full use of his equipment). The other rifles are more suited to engagements under one hundred meters, the range at which firefights most commonly take place. They are equipped with sound suppressors, which will help conceal their exact location when firing but necessitates the use of specially prepared ammunition that uses less charge when firing, traveling below the speed of sound and avoiding the distinctive sonic boom (more of a whip-like crack in this case) associated with high-powered rifle fire. This, however, will limit their effective range.

*rather than a 'sniper', which refers to a specific role in the American military--snipers operate away from the general advance, in paired teams rather than as part of a squad, and undertake reconnaissance missions in support of the operations of other fighting units.



Knowing is half the battle.



From left: US, North Korea, South Korea. The dark sunglasses are a part of the uniform for South Korean soldiers stationed on the border with North Korea, intended to make them more intimidating. For this purpose, taller and physically larger soldiers are selected for this duty, to make more of an impression on the Northerners they face off against. Due to famine and malnutrition, the average height in North Korea remains low--between five foot five and five foot six for males--compared to the south--where men are typically around five foot eight. The selection of especially tall or imposing soldiers holds true for Americans stationed on the border as well.

Fair Hallion
Jul 25, 2007



Some of the posts ITT are not badass pictures at all; they are quite boring portraits of badass people (which need to come with background stories?!) which I don't think the OP really meant... if you want to post such people, what about some action shots?


Here, have some David Haye.



shock.wav
May 25, 2009


Chantilly Say posted:



There's nothing badass about Captain Anastasia.

But I wouldn't say that to his face.

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noggut
Jan 15, 2008


You mean chest.

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