Search Amazon.com:
Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
«85 »
  • Post
  • Reply
a medical mystery
Dec 15, 2007

You're cute!


MrBling posted:

Maybe it's just that I've only heard the really terribly progmetal. I will freely admit that I've never really looked very hard at the progmetal scene because it never interested. Pretty much all the metal I do listen to is either the psychadelic fuzzy 70s stuff or sloppy/crusty black and death metal which is sort of the antithesis of progmetal. I don't really listen to metal for razorsharp precision and tons of shredding and solos.
It's not even that technicality is bad, it's just that some bands go too far and forget to write actual songs to go with their playing and it just becomes 10 minutes of showcasing how great they are at their instruments.

I basically looked into progmetal when Dream Theater and SymphonyX hit it big and when that wasn't interesting I just sort of skipped it.

Then again, progmetal can be a bit hard to pin down. Does Savatage count as prog metal? I've heard them mentioned as such and them I do like, probably because the Oliva brothers could write good songs. It may have helped them that they set out as a I suppose a regular heavy metal and then gradually went into the whole symphonic/progressive area.

I'd recommend Riverside to you, they're a lot more about the songs themselves than the talent of the band members.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Thundercleese5
Apr 23, 2010

War! It's good for me!
What's my name?


I have loved Prog Rock for decades but I can see some of the problems with it. One thing that confounds me is why so many modern Progressive Rock bands try to sound like they were recording in the early 70s. That's REGRESSIVE, not Progressive.

I have to also sound a note of discord with all this Neal Morse love. I loved the stuff he did with Spock's Beard up to the album "Snow" where I think he just phoned it in. After he became a Born-Again Christian and left Spock's Beard so he could form his own Christian prog label, he just got really really creepy to me. That and some of his lyrics are like really clichéd and ridiculous to me... and I like Yes.

Gotta fourth or fifth or whatever on the love for King Crimson. "Larks Tongues in Aspic" and "Red" are my two favorite 70s period albums, and "THRAK" is an excellent starting point.

With none of this in mind, feast your eyes on THIS. It's from Dutch 70s prog rockers Focus:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RFDW9b_ejfI

I can't look, but I can't turn away!

Thundercleese5 fucked around with this message at Dec 20, 2010 around 01:29

FullEnglshBrkfst
Aug 20, 2010


Anyone who is a fan of King Crimson, especially the first album, has to check out McDonald and Giles' record from 1970, which involved a good portion of the first KC lineup... I just listened to it yesterday, expecting good things, and I was pretty blown away. It's got a lot of the great drumming, flutes, woodwinds that you find on some of the ITCOCK songs like "I Talk to the Wind", and is overall more light-hearted, but still gets really crazy (e.g. "Birdman" about 10 minutes in all the way to the end).

Here's Birdman (just the beginning, follow some youtube links for the other parts):
http://www.youtube.com/user/sbritt#...F/5/gZ2GMtgsWTo

TheForgotton
Jun 10, 2001

I'm making a career of evil.

How about some Dark Suns? Kristoffer Gildenöw (formerly Pain of Salvation) plays bass on their latest album. They have a freaky official video for one of their instrumentals, but it's slightly NWS in a couple of places.

Rollersnake
May 9, 2005

Please, please don't let me end up in a threesome with the lunch lady and a gay pirate. That would hit a little too close to home.

FullEnglshBrkfst posted:

Anyone who is a fan of King Crimson, especially the first album, has to check out McDonald and Giles' record from 1970, which involved a good portion of the first KC lineup... I just listened to it yesterday, expecting good things, and I was pretty blown away. It's got a lot of the great drumming, flutes, woodwinds that you find on some of the ITCOCK songs like "I Talk to the Wind", and is overall more light-hearted, but still gets really crazy (e.g. "Birdman" about 10 minutes in all the way to the end).

Here's Birdman (just the beginning, follow some youtube links for the other parts):
http://www.youtube.com/user/sbritt#...F/5/gZ2GMtgsWTo

The most interesting part of the McDonald & Giles album to me is Flight of the Ibis, which is musically what was originally supposed to be the King Crimson song Cadence and Cascade. The song was sort of split in half with the departure of Ian McDonald; King Crimson wrote new (not terribly different) music to accompany Sinfield's original lyrics, and McDonald had someone else compose lyrics for his original music.

Have a listen:

King Crimson - Cadence and Cascade
McDonald & Giles - Flight of the Ibis

Bonus: A previously unreleased version of Cadence and Cascade featuring Greg Lake on vocals. It's not quite as polished as the final version on In the Wake of Poseidon, but I've always hated Gordon Haskell's crappy simultaneously croaky and nasal voice.

Rollersnake fucked around with this message at Dec 21, 2010 around 22:08

Zuhzuhzombie!!
Apr 17, 2008
FACTS ARE A CONSPIRACY BY THE CAPITALIST OPRESSOR

Absolutely loving the Robert Wyatt reissues. Cuckooland especially.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uokGqyf6prA

Tsaedje
May 11, 2007


a very unhappy baby whale



My sister got me the newish (2008) remaster of Selling England by the Pound for Christmas and it's absolutely loving fantastic. It's like listening to a brand new album, except I already know and love all the songs. Everything just seems so much crisper, clearer and defined than the early-generation CD copy I already had.

Retarded Pimp
Jun 2, 2002



a medical mystery posted:

I'd recommend Riverside to you, they're a lot more about the songs themselves than the talent of the band members.

I love those guys. Poland has been putting out some good prog and prog metal bands lately with them, Votum and Division By Zero.

Dishwasher
Dec 5, 2006

Congratulations on not getting fit in 2011!

Retarded Pimp posted:

I love those guys. Poland has been putting out some good prog and prog metal bands lately with them, Votum and Division By Zero.

Disperse: Journey Through the Hidden Gardens is my current favorite prog album. Also from Poland.

Check it out!

Retarded Pimp
Jun 2, 2002



Dishwasher posted:

Disperse: Journey Through the Hidden Gardens is my current favorite prog album. Also from Poland.

Check it out!

Thanks, will do.

Frazzbo
Feb 2, 2006
Thistle dubh

For your entertainment, I would like to submit Frost*. (NB the asterisk/frosterisk is important, as there's another band around called Frost).

Anyway, try these out: Black Light Machine or Pocket Sun.

Jem Godfrey put this band together and it features a number of people who play in several current prog bands in the UK, notably John Mitchell (also with It Bites, who deserve their own mention in this thread IMO). Frustratingly, it's something of a part-time project and albums/concerts are quite hard to come by. In fact, Godfrey has said he's taking 2011 out from Frost* to concentrate on other things. Still, waiting years between albums is quite a proggy thing, I suppose.

Great thread, by the way!

Dishwasher
Dec 5, 2006

Congratulations on not getting fit in 2011!

Division by Zero kicks rear end by the way.

Anyone looking for good prog needs to check out all things by the label Inside Out Music. They're the studio behind Ayreon and alot of other bands. I haven't heard an act from the label that wasn't awesome.

Tsaedje
May 11, 2007


a very unhappy baby whale



Frazzbo posted:

For your entertainment, I would like to submit Frost*. (NB the asterisk/frosterisk is important, as there's another band around called Frost).

Anyway, try these out: Black Light Machine or Pocket Sun.

Jem Godfrey put this band together and it features a number of people who play in several current prog bands in the UK, notably John Mitchell (also with It Bites, who deserve their own mention in this thread IMO). Frustratingly, it's something of a part-time project and albums/concerts are quite hard to come by. In fact, Godfrey has said he's taking 2011 out from Frost* to concentrate on other things. Still, waiting years between albums is quite a proggy thing, I suppose.

Great thread, by the way!

Jem's youtube channel is also hilarious.

Frazzbo
Feb 2, 2006
Thistle dubh

Tsaedje posted:

Jem's youtube channel is also hilarious.

True - I would have mentioned it as well, but didn't want to come across as a total fanboi. I like the lack of seriousness but obvious enthusiasm (and musical ability) that he and the band have.

Gimmedaroot
Aug 10, 2006

America and Islam are not exclusive and need not be in competition. Instead, they overlap, and share common principles of justice and progress, tolerance and the dignity of all human beings.
-Barack Obama

New on new music for King Crimson fans:

There is an album tentatively coming out in April for a new "almost" King Crimson album.

Jakko M. Jakszyk, who was in the 21st Century Schizoid Band (which was made of members of Crimson plus Jakko during the first four ie. Peter Sinfield albums).
Mel Collins (from In The Wake of Poseidon, Lizard, Islands, and 21st Century Schizoid Band)
Robert Fripp
Tony Levin
Gavin Harrizon (Porcupine Tree and the brief 2008 live version of KC)

I also didn't know that Harrison and Jakszyk worked together before Porcupine Tree.

This sounds like a great lineup, but Fripp in his diaries says its not quite King Crimson. It will likely be a Frakctal project. To me, it'll be King Crimson. I have been waiting for a new version for ages. I think the Belew version has worn itself out, and was grateful to have see them in 1995 and 2008, but like the others, I'm ready for something different. Tony Levin on bass will be the only American in this band.

The album will be called "A Scarcity of Miracles", but so far JFC is the only name for the band. Fripp is worried about the baggage of calling it King Crimson. I hope he changes his mind, releases it, then tours. He's very happy with the material, according to his online diary. Stereo and surround mixes coming as well.

Wow, a new Crimson related project, and Game of Thrones on HBO. Nerdgasm!

teen bear
Feb 19, 2006



Gimmedaroot posted:



Wow I'm very excited for this.

Do you have a link to Fripp's blog for any of these posts?

Gimmedaroot
Aug 10, 2006

America and Islam are not exclusive and need not be in competition. Instead, they overlap, and share common principles of justice and progress, tolerance and the dignity of all human beings.
-Barack Obama

teen bear posted:

Wow I'm very excited for this.

Do you have a link to Fripp's blog for any of these posts?

This link is to Fripp's most recent comments on the new album from Dec. 15th:

http://dgmlive.com/diaries.htm?arti...r=3&entry=18783

I would love a band bringing all the styles together from In the Court all the way thru the most recent reunion. Gavin Harrison is up there with Bruford for me, Tony Levin is probably my favorite bassist, Mel playing flute and sax is always great, and you have Fripp and Jakko both on guitar. So many possibilities.

Lark's Tongues in Aspic should be re-released in 5.1 surround sometime this year, along with Starless and Bible Black, before the Adrian Belew period comes out. I'm really enjoying the new reissues, the sound quality is amazing and the surround is great and trippy. I have more than just Pink Floyd to listen to spinning all around me thru the speakers!

teen bear
Feb 19, 2006



If this results in any kind of tour I will be ecstatic.

Are the reissues that noticeable of a difference? I might have to pick them up.

DrLaserfalcon
Nov 6, 2010


A friend's band, The Road is heavily influenced by King Crimson, Asia, and other progressive sources.

Would be interested to hear your critiques...

http://www.facebook.com/RoadtheBand...=app_2405167945

Gimmedaroot
Aug 10, 2006

America and Islam are not exclusive and need not be in competition. Instead, they overlap, and share common principles of justice and progress, tolerance and the dignity of all human beings.
-Barack Obama

teen bear posted:

If this results in any kind of tour I will be ecstatic.

Are the reissues that noticeable of a difference? I might have to pick them up.

Night and day. The original mixes are included for the purists, along with the stereo and surround remixes done by Steve Wilson of Porcupine Tree. Its worth it for the surround mixes, songs like "Cat Food" from In The Wake of Poseidon are as entertaining as Money on Dark Side of the Moon's 5.1 reissue.

It makes a huge difference sound quality wise as well as the trippy surround sound.

As for a tour, Fripp said that the JFC project almost manifested in a tour after the west coast dates were called off for the last Belew-Levin-Fripp-Mastelotto-Harrison lineup, which I flew to NYC just to see.

The Jakko-Fripp-Collins-Levin-Harrison King Crimson "Projekct" was close to setting up a tour of the UK and Spain. However as he said in his diary, he felt there were other things to do such as legal rangling with record companies over royalties, the tour with Theo Travis, performing with the Orchestra of Crafty Guitars, and the recent solo Soundscapes performance at the World Financial Center. The last of those made him feel like it wouldn't be his last performance like he thought it might be, so he may still do something, but not in the near future.

I hope the JFC album does well enough to at least do a show or two (Royal Albert Hall?) and they film it. I really like my 21st Century Schizoid Band dvd since you won't catch those guys playing anymore, especially the stuff from the Sinfield period.

junan_paalla
Dec 29, 2009

Seriously, do drugs

Can anyone recommend a good prog rock/metal internet radio station? That way I won't just frantically skip songs that start out dull and actually listen to some new music.

Optimum Gulps
Oct 6, 2003

You wanna save this place, right? And I want to destroy it. Brick by hypocritical brick.

Just download episodes of Planet Prog from here http://www.wmse.org/archive/new.php?dow=Sun&hour=210
Mark Krueger has been doing the show in some form or another out of Milwaukee for 34 years with no sign of stopping anytime soon, and his tastes occasionally lean towards the metallic end of the prog spectrum.

FrankenVader
Sep 12, 2004
Polymer Records

Here's love for Kansas - Fine American Prog

I'd put Magnum Opus up with there the best of any other prog bands offerings

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AW21tcSdvhU

plus, these guys actually did the "rock" part of progressive rock back in the 70's

If all you know is "Dust in the wind" or "Carry on my wayward son" then you're missing out big time

Rollersnake
May 9, 2005

Please, please don't let me end up in a threesome with the lunch lady and a gay pirate. That would hit a little too close to home.

I like Kansas alright, but I don't think they're at all in the same league as the big British prog bands. They're excellent from a technical standpoint, but just about everything I've heard from them is derivative and/or lacking in personality. Magnum Opus is undoubtedly one of their best pieces, but my personal favorite is probably Journey from Mariabronn. I love Robbie Steinhardt's violin work on this.

Sprint
Feb 4, 2006


I didn't think this news could support its own thread, so I've resurrected this one to let all the Van der Graaf Generator fans on SA know that the band has just released a new album today, A Grounding in Numbers.

Last night, I was thinking about the band for the first time in months and I decided to see what they were up to, remembering rumblings of a new album awhile back. Lo and behold, when I looked, the album had only been available for the past two hours, so I snapped it up on iTunes.

This album is a much better use of the trio format than they had on Trisector, where it felt like they were doing older-style songs without replacing the missing sax/flute and it felt like there was a bit of a hole in their sound. Not so with this album - they've got the balance down and there are one or two tracks that are straight ahead guitar/bass/drums and still sound fantastic.

There is a track listing and near hour-long interview with Peter Hammill about the album and the history of VdGG here.

Anyone check this one out yet?

SpeedoJoe
Feb 23, 2006


I used to be a big Oldfield fan but slipped out ten years ago. Been getting back into it recently but am I the only one who thinks his work since The Millennium Bell has been kind of crappy except for a few tracks off the following albums?

Also, next year is the 20th anniversary of Tubular Bells 2. How great would it be if he did another concert. I doubt he will though.

DaWolfey
Oct 24, 2003



College Slice

Songs of Distant Earth onwards: poo poo.

FrankenVader
Sep 12, 2004
Polymer Records

Thundercleese5 posted:


I have to also sound a note of discord with all this Neal Morse love. I loved the stuff he did with Spock's Beard up to the album "Snow" where I think he just phoned it in. After he became a Born-Again Christian and left Spock's Beard so he could form his own Christian prog label, he just got really really creepy to me. That and some of his lyrics are like really clichéd and ridiculous to me... and I like Yes.


I have a lot of admiration for anyone who has faith enough in some message, though it will alienate a portion of his audience and says it anyway. That takes balls. Prog artists barely make money selling that kind of music as it is (small audiences, downloading recordings illegally, etc), so you could say he's "putting his money where his mouth is"..or heart is, as it were...good on him, regardless of the message.

Anyway...Give Sola Scriptura a try. Musically, it's pretty fantastic regardless of any religious prejudices the listener may have. I think it's a bit heavier than the things I've heard from him in the past, by a large margin.

T-Paine
Dec 12, 2007

by Lowtax


Is anybody else excited that Yes is finally putting out a new album? It's going to be called "Fly from Here" after one of the coolest songs Yes never recorded. Also, the Buggles are back on board, which makes the lack of Jon Anderson suck a little bit less (though it still sucks a whole lot).

Here's the Buggles version of "We Can Fly from Here":
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iLkuKXt-nec

And Jon Anderson is still putting out great music on his own. I love this song from his forthcoming album, "Survival and Other Stories"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K8nyL5ksJqs
Hopefully the new vocalist can at least come close...

Rollersnake
May 9, 2005

Please, please don't let me end up in a threesome with the lunch lady and a gay pirate. That would hit a little too close to home.

I loved Drama, so I'm at least a little bit interested in their newest album, but I'll probably never accept Fake Jon Benoit David—you can't just replace your frontman with a soundalike! That's just disgraceful.

Though I'm sure it never would have worked out, I wish they'd instead brought back Trevor Horn as a full member, who has a lot more to offer the band than sounding like the old guy (which he doesn't and I never had a problem with). I hear he's singing lead on the title track, and I'm happy for that at least.

Rollersnake fucked around with this message at Apr 26, 2011 around 00:59

Iucounu
May 12, 2007




So wait... Geoff Downes is on keys? I always thought his work on Drama was really tasteful and comparatively restrained relative Yes' other keyboardists. The coda on Does It Really Happen? (after the 5:00 mark or so) gets stuck in my head pretty regularly:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GL68VE-Qi7Y

TheForgotton
Jun 10, 2001

I'm making a career of evil.

I'm interviewing Steve Hackett today for my radio show!

Black Griffon
Mar 12, 2005

Now, in the quantum moment before the closure, when all become one. One moment left. One point of space and time. I know who you are.

You are destiny.


FrankenVader posted:

I have a lot of admiration for anyone who has faith enough in some message, though it will alienate a portion of his audience and says it anyway. That takes balls. Prog artists barely make money selling that kind of music as it is (small audiences, downloading recordings illegally, etc), so you could say he's "putting his money where his mouth is"..or heart is, as it were...good on him, regardless of the message.

Anyway...Give Sola Scriptura a try. Musically, it's pretty fantastic regardless of any religious prejudices the listener may have. I think it's a bit heavier than the things I've heard from him in the past, by a large margin.

Sola Scriptura is really awesome, and the message doesn't appeal to me at all. It's just great music, basically. There's some Spanish style guitar stuff in there that's just fantastic.

teen bear
Feb 19, 2006



Is there any new news on JFC and A Scarcity of Miracles? I think it's supposed to come out in May

sethsez
Jul 13, 2006

He's soooo
dreamy...


T-Paine posted:

Is anybody else excited that Yes is finally putting out a new album? It's going to be called "Fly from Here" after one of the coolest songs Yes never recorded. Also, the Buggles are back on board, which makes the lack of Jon Anderson suck a little bit less (though it still sucks a whole lot).

At this point it just doesn't feel enough like Yes for me to care. No Anderson, no Wakeman... it feels like they're at the point where they should just go by a different name.

a medical mystery
Dec 15, 2007

You're cute!


sethsez posted:

At this point it just doesn't feel enough like Yes for me to care. No Anderson, no Wakeman... it feels like they're at the point where they should just go by a different name.

Maybe?

Iucounu
May 12, 2007




a medical mystery posted:

Maybe?

I think "Sorta" would be a more accurate reflection.

sethsez
Jul 13, 2006

He's soooo
dreamy...


"I Guess..." seems like a good fit to me.

Elec
Feb 25, 2007


sethsez posted:

At this point it just doesn't feel enough like Yes for me to care. No Anderson, no Wakeman... it feels like they're at the point where they should just go by a different name.

I understand where you're coming from, but this is almost exactly the same as the 1980 line-up, plus an Anderson sound-alike. They'll probably sound more archetypical Yes-like than when Rabin and Kaye were in Yes, and Kaye was even an original member.
Maybe I just have a hard-on for Drama, and I really liked Ladder and Magnification, but all this could just be bias.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

T-Paine
Dec 12, 2007

by Lowtax


When the band split, the Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe version considered calling itself "The Affirmative" but they decided on ABWH.

Elec posted:

I understand where you're coming from, but this is almost exactly the same as the 1980 line-up, plus an Anderson sound-alike. They'll probably sound more archetypical Yes-like than when Rabin and Kaye were in Yes, and Kaye was even an original member.
Maybe I just have a hard-on for Drama, and I really liked Ladder and Magnification, but all this could just be bias.
Drama is a really great album, so this has potential, and I agree that The Ladder and Magnification were both sorely underrated, especially with tracks like "Face to Face," "The River," "New Languages," and "Lightning Strikes" from former and the title track, "We Agree" and "Give Love Each Day" from the latter. Then again I think all of Yes's post-90125 output is underrated, and Keystudio is one of their best albums as a whole.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply
«85 »