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a llama
Mar 10, 2010

by T. Finn


Gelob posted:

I work at http://www.limestonenetworks.com we are an un-managed dedicated server provider in Dallas. On the subject we do allow IRC as long as your not linking to efnet, linknet, etc. We run a GameSurge.net server as well (Limestone.TX.US.GameSurge.net).

Rumor has it you should start looking for another job. Just a heads up.

Also, cPanel is an amazing control panel with support that is nearly unmatched in the industry. The last time I sent a support ticket to cPanel (and not my web host, the actual people who develop the software) it was responded to in 3 minutes.

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a llama
Mar 10, 2010

by T. Finn


Gelob posted:

Rumors are always true...

You are right; but your investors shopping around a client list due to a repeated quarterly loss isn't a rumor

Just trying to let you know to watch out

a llama
Mar 10, 2010

by T. Finn


Bob Morales posted:

Well, there's got to be somewhere they pull the plug. If you made your own Linux distro, for example, and just used Dreamhost or Hostgator to host the ISO's, they'd pull the plug on you. You couldn't just store a bunch of 5 meg files and link to them elsewhere, I was talking to a guy who got shut down for that.

As the guy who used to search boxes on a certain shared host that was listed specifically by the user above and rhymes with ghosthater, they'll go out of their way to shut down people using the hosting for 'file sharing', 'backups' or 'file hosting'. It comes down to the fact that it's much easier to pull large amounts of bandwidth and use tons of disk space when you're explicitly hosting files for the purposes of having them downloaded. This is pretty much industry-wide for any company beyond mom and pop hosting.

a llama
Mar 10, 2010

by T. Finn


Xythar posted:

Maybe on places that offer you "unlimited" hosting, but I should think that on a web-host where you pay for a set amount of bandwidth per month then it shouldn't be their business at all what you use that bandwidth for, provided it's not illegal.

Am I just talking crazy talk here or what?

There are few to no large shared hosting companies that don't offer unlimited or effectively unlimited hosting. This is because it is ineffective and will lose you lots of potential customers if you attempt to advertise against 'unlimited' hosts.

Also; remember that a host can literally cancel you for any reason. This includes but is not limited to if they don't like how you smell, what you are hosting (ask hate groups), or how you treat their staff. It's fairly common industry practice to search servers that are using excessive bandwidth or are out of disk space and just force cancel customers who, while within their service limits technically, they just aren't profitable to keep around.

Usually, the big companies (lunarpages, hostgator, midphase, site5..) have 400-700 customers per box on a quad core server with a raid 10 array that is between 2 - 4TB. They are pretty much limited at that disk array size right now simply due to the time it takes to perform a file system check so it's much cheaper and much more effective to just cancel customers who are using 600GB and paying 6$ a month because even attempting to transfer these accounts to a new server is a pain in the rear end and something that takes close to a week of maxing out both server's connections.

So in short, don't host important or popular files on shared hosting because it's going to get your account pulled because it makes you an easy target.

a llama fucked around with this message at May 21, 2010 around 07:09

a llama
Mar 10, 2010

by T. Finn


Xythar posted:

Oh yeah, I know that. Shared hosting is cheap for a reason, after all.

I do my important hosting on a VPS which is more what I was thinking about when I mentioned set limits for resources each month. I have a shared account as well but that's pretty much just for hosting some LP videos that I have on my computer anyway so I wouldn't really care if they pulled the plug, I'd just take my $5 a month or whatever it is elsewhere.

Low-end VPS providers do the EXACT same thing.

a llama
Mar 10, 2010

by T. Finn


auruspex posted:

Sorry for the delay on responding to this but I can explain slightly why our prices are a bit higher. HostDime is a more unique host because we own and operate our own Datacenter and do all support (from level 1 to network operations) in house, meaning absolutely no outsourcing at all. We also have 24/7/365 phone/live chat/ticket support with responses within 20 minutes normally. We aren't the cheapest host on the market but we are one of the most unique in the fact that we are completely self-sufficient and do not rely on other companies nor venture capital to move forward. If you have any other questions or need a coupon code to start up your account, let me know and I can defiantly work something out for you

Full disclosure: I am the Support Manager at HostDime and run all Support Operations for the Company, from level 1 to 3.

its manny!

a llama
Mar 10, 2010

by T. Finn


cPanel itself doesn't really offer the ability to install scripts automatically, it's actually a third party product called Fantastico that ties into cPanel and offers this.

I would recommend staying far away from a server with Fantastico on it as it has in the past had a large number of security flaws and typically doesn't secure the script as much as someone who knows what they are doing or even reads a guide.

a llama
Mar 10, 2010

by T. Finn


DarkLotus posted:

That's not even a fair statement. Fantastico is just as good as a novice user that just follows a simple guide. If a server is setup properly, one users scripts won't affect anyone else security wise. As long as a person keeps their 3rd party apps up to date, they will run less of a chance of being exploited.


http://www.exploit-db.com/moaub-1-c...-vulnerability/

a llama
Mar 10, 2010

by T. Finn


I'm not sure what strange argument you're making but in your own words:

quote:

Exploits will exists as long as there are people developing software, all we can hope for is that the developers fix the issues promptly.

I don't see how you can back Fantastico as a good product considering the point you made yourself is that every single piece of software will have bugs. Why would you add another layer of software to an equation that doesn't need it. It is just going to make it more vulnerable.

When you install cPanel on your server, you're installing a product backed by a company with over 125 employees dedicated to fixing, releasing and testing it's product.

When you install Fantastico on your cPanel server, you are installing a product that may have a development staff of 10 people, limited resources and unknown amounts of potential issues.

a llama
Mar 10, 2010

by T. Finn


I am sure you would immediately deploy a new enterprise product by a small company you have never heard of over a software company with a major track record and a budget that can successfully support the product.

The fact of the argument is that Fantastico is a poor product with poor support and quality assurance that shouldn't be deployed in a serious environment. If you really need your users to install an automated version of Wordpress, use the pre-built feature already in cPanel or give them a proper guide on how to do it themselves.

You'd honestly be surprised by the amount of cPanel servers that are compromised entirely because of this product.

a llama fucked around with this message at Sep 6, 2010 around 10:01

a llama
Mar 10, 2010

by T. Finn


cPanel has account migrations that are almost entirely automated so all you need to do is find a VPS provider you trust.

a llama
Mar 10, 2010

by T. Finn


samglover posted:

We already tried a VPS with HostGator, and before I get my cPanel interface, I've got to learn how to set up DNS servers, user accounts, and all kinds of stuff I have no idea how to do. We gave up.

I need fully-managed hosting.

I'll check out WiredTree, dvgrhl. Thanks!

http://docs.cpanel.net is pretty useful whenever you get around to it.

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a llama
Mar 10, 2010

by T. Finn


StabbinHobo posted:

I haven't had to deal with shared hosting in almost 10 years, so I'm curious how the whole "mod_php run by the same user for everyone" thing got solved? For instance how do dreamhost/hostdime/1&1/godaddy keep me from writing a phpscript that includes the database username/pass from another customers account such that I can destroy/steal their data? In 2000 people tried to deal with it via mostly "safe mode" (which was a disaster), "open_basedir" (which maybe works? I don't remember) and mostly just obfuscation. I remember some hosts were dabbling with php-as-cgi and I see suPHP exists now, but I'm less interested in what I could homegrow than what the big hosts actually do right now today.

To be honest, if you have the proper database name, username and password that can authenticate to the database with full permission, there isn't anything on the majority of those platforms that can stop you from destroying the database. MySQL runs as a single process for the entire server and the way that databases are mapped are that they simply have a username prefix on them, the security feature being the username and password that you add to the database in order to have read/write access to it; if someone on the same server as you can crack that, then they can do whatever they want to your database.

suPHP makes sure that all PHP processes are run as the user that spawns them. It also enforces secure permissions and ownership on all files across the server.

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