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my1999gsr
Mar 21, 2009


There seems to be a lot of questions about maintenance and troubleshooting for Volkswagens and Audis in the Stupid Questions thread so I figured a manufacturer-specific thread might be helpful. I'm a VW and Audi certified technician so if any goons have questions about their VAG vehicles I'll do my best to help. I also have access to all VW and Audi shop manuals from 1990 on and TSB/RVU literature if anyone needs it.

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my1999gsr
Mar 21, 2009


Commodore 64 posted:

I'll bite; I've got a question about my 05 BEW Golf that'll soon hit 80K.

Overall I'd say I know how to do routine maintenance, but I know when I'm getting in over my head (engine replacement, body work that doesn't look like rear end).

For clarification, I've done my own fluid and filter changes, gasket replacement, brake + tire work, and electrical system diagnosis on many different vehicles.

With the proper tools; is the timing belt job (water pump and all the goodies) possible for someone like me?

I've been in touch with a local guy from TDIclub and he seem to know what he's talking about (wants to look at the cams for wiping) and he charges $250 less than the local VW dealership, but I'd really like to learn it myself.

Also, how different is removing the BEW intake manifold from removing the ALH manifold?

If you have the proper tools you can easily change your t-belt, water pump and tensioner on your BEW as long as you remember that a diesel engine's timing has to be dead on before you start it. Typically when I do a diesel t-belt I paint mark the belt on the cam in 2 spots and on the crank in 3 spots to help confirm the timing is correct. There a VAG tool that makes the t-belt job on the BEW much easier - Diesel Injection Pump Locking Pin 3359. It's a perfectly-sized pin the fits a hole in the pump to keep it from moving while you change the belt. The passenger-side engine mount is kind of in the way but you can work around it. Overall, be cautious and you'll be fine.

Since the ALH and BEW have a shutdown flap and EGR assembly instead of a typical intake manifold, they're fairly similar to remove and re-install. The main difficulty is getting at the many hex bolts (especially in the BEW because of the EGR cooler that's attached to the intake) that VW uses to mount them. On the BEW, the EGR cooler has a pipe that's secured to the bottom with two 7mm hex bolts that are usually in bad shape because of the heat generated by the turbo. The ALH is a much simpler design so you can just pull bolts and nuts until it comes off.

my1999gsr
Mar 21, 2009


tehllama posted:

Oh goody. This never got an answer in the stupid questions thread:


2001 Passat GLX, 162k miles, 5 spd, VR6
What are the likely causes of an ABS fault light coming on on the dash when the car goes over 65 for more than 5 minutes (it's a pretty exact duration, maybe not 5 minutes but it always happens at the same spot on the interstate during my commute)? Once I turn off the car and turn it back on the lights go away and won't come on again unless I go fast. The ABS and TCS both still work at low speeds (even after the fault has been tripped), but I don't have anywhere to test whether or not they work at high speeds once the fault light has come on. Forcing the car to engage the ABS or TCS will clear the fault lights.

Also the passenger side front window will fall all the way into the door if it gets rolled down more than half way. Do the 4th gen Passats use the same plastic clips the Jettas did? How hard is to work on the inside of the door panel. I want to know what I'm getting into before I spend a few hours taking it apart.

Aaaand the check engine light has been on for about a year, the computer reports the car needs a new catalytic converter. We just get the light disabled right before we get emissions checked and it still passes. What are the chances it would pass if the catalytic converter were actually shot?

Ok, your Passat's ABS/ASR/ESP system does a number of self-checks depending on a couple of factors. One of the self-checks is a wheel speed sensor integrity check that isn't initialized until the vehicle is driven at speeds over 60 km/h for 30 seconds. If a fault in the sensor electronics is detected after this test has begun than it trips your warning light. I'd like to see what stored trouble codes you have in the ABS control module to make a more specific diagnosis, but it looks like you've got some kind of wheel speed sensor or reluctor ring problem on one or more wheels. If you have a local place to pull the fault codes, post them here and I'll try to be more specific about what you can do about it.

Your Passat uses window clips that are very similar to the failure-prone ones on the Jetta/Golf but we've seen very few failures in the Passat for some reason. There's 2 ways the clips fail: one, the plastic guides that secure them to the slides shatter which allows the window to fall into the door or two, the rubber pads in the clips dry out and the window simply pulls out. It's very easy to remove the inner door panel to inspect the clips to see what happened:

Remove the inner door pull handle. There's a plastic insert that pops out right on the inner side of the handle - use a small screwdriver to remove it. Then, pull up the panel on the door handle that houses the window switches - it's secured by some spring clips that will resist and then pop right up. The switch panel you just pried up has one or 2 plugs in it - disconnect them and set the handle aside. Behind the handle are three #2 Philips screws or three T30 Torx screws - remove them. There'll be 2 or 3 screws on the bottom of the door - T25 Torx or more Philips depending on build date. After that, the inner door panel is held on by 6 pop clips (three on each side of the panel) which are removed by grasping the bottom of the door panel and pulling it toward you. Once the clips pop out the panel is held by a tongue in groove on the top edge where the window glass seals are - just lift the panel straight up and it'll release. There will be a couple of other electrical plugs for the door tweeter and courtesy light - disconnect them. After that, the bowden cable going from the door handle (a small hook attached to the release handle) needs to be removed. When the cable is disconnected, sit the panel aside. There'll be two 2" black rubber plugs in the inner door panel - pop them out. Reconnect the master door switch (with the window switches etc) and key the ignition on. With your window glass all the way up, activate the window motor and slowly raise or lower it until you can see the window clips in the holes where the rubber plugs were. The clips have 10mm bolts so make sure you have a 10mm socket and a 3" or longer extension to loosen/tighten them. Odds are you've just got loose clips so use your 10mm socket, loosen the 2 bolts in the clips and settle the window back into them then re-tighten the clips. Be very careful not to over-tighten the clips - I had a window explode in my face doing one once and it wasn't fun. Before you re-assemble everything, use the window switch and test the window for full open and close movement to be sure it operates freely. After that, reassemble the door panel and you're done.

Some final tips:

Before you finish tightening all the screws for the outer panel make sure you've re-attached the bowden cable for the handle and you have all the plugs re-connected. Also, make sure you leave the plug for the window switches accessable for when you snap them back in the panel.

If the clips are broken then you'll need to buy new ones and install them which is a little more time-consuming.

If you've got a cat efficiency fault stored it's usually a death sentence for the cat. Basically, your ECM is looking at what's going into the cat and what's coming out and comparing those results to a table to see if it's up to stuff. Now, if you're passing your e-tests then obviously it's not an issue from a purely emissions-related standpoint. It's possible that you've got a lazy secondary 02 sensor on one cylinder bank or the other and that's causing the problem but it would take a little more diagnosis to confirm that.

Sorry about the wall o text!

my1999gsr
Mar 21, 2009


Pipkin posted:

It may be the way you worded it but just to be clear please tell me that you don't paint mark timing belts on an ALH. I've never worked on any PD belts so it may be possible to do them properly with marks.

I also have a question about my car (95 GTI VR6). When the engine is cold (just started) it will buck and missfire (its still driveable but its very annoying) until the oil temp reaches 190ish or hotter for more than 20 minutes or so. Ambient temp does not affect the situation. Then when its warmed up it's just not as fast as it used to be. It feels like it is bogging until 5-6k rpms then vtec kicks in. I don't get any codes beside the one for the SAI since it was removed. Does this sound like a MAF failure? My other thought is the IAT or coolant temp sensor and I plan on replacing them anyway since the car has 195k on it. The MAF is expensive because its obd1 and I won't replace that unless it is suspect.

I can also help with some questions in this thread, especially ALH TDI ones.

Sorry, yeah I didn't word that as clearly as I should have in regards to paint marks on the belts. I paint mark the pump and crank pulley and the old t-belt before I remove it with the crank and pump locked in position. With the old belt on the bench I use the marks on it (on a single tooth that corresponds to the marks I made on the pulleys) to make new marks on the new belt in the exact same spots. This is by no means the way I use to confirm timing - I use the marks as outlined in the service manual - but I use it as a failsafe after I roll the engine over a few times to check belt tension. If the paint marks match up then I can be sure the timing matches and the tensioner isn't faulty. If those marks don't match exactly I know there's something wrong and it's time to re-check my work.

Ok, on to your VR6. We've had a lot of VR6 engines with complaints like yours that ended up being bad injectors - poor drivability, bogging, misfires and the like. Without being able to watch your MAF numbers it's hard to pass or fail it but a bad MAF usually has a fault code associated with it. Same thing with the ECT - when they go bad they usually throw a code for an internal short or something similar. Do you ever have a MIL on for misfires? Your symptoms sound like a failing MAF but you're right - they're expensive to replace unless you're sure. I forget what it looks like on the VR6, but does your FPR's vacuum hose look ok? If your car were in my shop, I'd hook it up to the 5 gas analyzer and see what the emissions look like when it's running crappy - once you know if it's a lean or rich condition you can move ahead.

my1999gsr
Mar 21, 2009


VanFullOfMidgets posted:

Mods, please close thread, OP fraternizes with the company that brought us the G60.

Every time a G60 Corrado shows up I'm embarassed for it and the owner. At least VAG only offered it for a short time.

my1999gsr
Mar 21, 2009


VanFullOfMidgets posted:

Really, don't ever buy one. It is impossible to find parts for-

A) the sunroof, which WILL be broken
B) the G60 charger itself, which also WILL be broken and costs a lot to fix
C) 3.5mm vacuum hose is expensive, and it requires a lot of it
D) everything else will be broken (spoiler doesn't work? $800!!! at least mine works there...)

Also, I'm about 5'8" and this car is built for midgets or something, even for me it's kind of a squeeze to get inside it. I'm selling this thing and buying a BMW or RX-7.

Do you happen to have the rebuild guide for the charger handy and available to post? I'd love you forever.

edit: Also, why doesn't VW put the VR6 in every car they make? It is the best sounding engine ever.

I'll have a look in my old SSP's - I might have a rebuild manual for the charger but that's a while back. I'll post more if I find it

The VR6 just wasn't that popular an option - they're by far the most rare engine I see in the Mk3/4 cars. I think it's got something to do with how it sold in the main VW markets in Europe - they tend to prefer a smaller, more fuel efficient engine and that trickles down the the North American market. That didn't stop VAG from using the VR block design as the basis for most of their modern V6 engines though. And yeah, they do sound pretty mean for a V6.

EDIT: I checked my online manuals and what I have printed at home with no luck. In fact, VW's online manual has no info at all about the G60 Corrado. I'll have a look in the archives at the shop next week - there's manuals in there from the early air-cooled days.

my1999gsr fucked around with this message at 15:54 on May 1, 2010

my1999gsr
Mar 21, 2009


Nuclear Tourist posted:

Thanks for this thread, maybe now I can finally figure out what kind of voodoo is going on with my car.

I own a Mk.1 Jetta TX from '84 and about a month and a half ago it developed a crack in its radiator. I've since had the radiator replaced with a shiny new one, however- before it was replaced the old leaky radiator managed to spray coolant all over the engine block and various components which I would assume probably don't react too well with getting soaked.

So while the new radiator appears to be working just fine the car seems to have developed some other issues. It began as occasional vibrations when I pushed on the throttle, at first these vibrations were relatively minior and would come and go so I didn't think too much about them because, hey, it's a well-used 26 year old car and every time I drive it I seem to notice something new rattling/making noise. Anyhow, the vibrations grew progressively worse over the course of a week or two until the point where I'm at now, where the car is basically undrivable. It bucks and shakes like a rodeo horse when I try to drive it and the engine also likes to cut out and die when I lift off the throttle at low speeds, which is quite scary.

So basically I'm not sure what could be causing this. Did the old leaky radiator spray coolant into somewhere where it really shouldn't have? Could it simply be bad spark plugs? Is the seal between the air filter and carburetor leaky? Could it be some sort of fuel supply witchcraft? Compression issues? Also, for what its worth this problem only seems to manifest itself when the car has warmed up slightly. On a cold day I can maybe drive around for half a kilometer before it starts acting up, but on a warm day it basically craps itself from the get-go.

Please help me internet

I wish I could help you but there's so few Mk1 cars left in my area (rust belt) that I've only had experience with a handful. Still, check the basic stuff like cap and rotor and plugs because it sounds like you have some kind of ignition problem. Maybe one of the other goons has some input here.

my1999gsr
Mar 21, 2009


copperblue posted:

My 2001 GTI VR6 occasionally has the secondary air pump run on startup. It runs for about 1-2 minutes, during which time the car will backfire if I accelerate moderately/aggressively. Is this cause for concern?

The secondary air pump will run at startup so that's not likely the problem. Do you have a MIL light on at all?

my1999gsr
Mar 21, 2009


Pipkin posted:

Thanks for all the info. I had planned on having the injectors sent out to be cleaned and flow checked before I drive it again so hopefully that will eliminate that possibility. The MIL is on only for the SAI, I've checked it a few times hoping for a code for something that would help me diagnose. All the vacuum lines are in good shape since they are one of the things I always replace when I first get a car. It runs eye-burningly rich.

I thought of one other thing since my post this morning. I need to replace the lifters as they are making a lot of noise. Do you know if that sound might affect the knock sensors and pull the timing? It retards something like 11 degrees if a knock sensor is tripped and I thought that also may be the cause of the bogging and slowness. I have not checked the sensors with a meter yet but its on the list of stuff to do this summer.

You had me concerned with the paint marks but that does sound like a good way to check the tensioner. I always just looked at the needle and v-mark after turning it a couple times to make they were still lined up.

I doubt your lifter rattle would be enough to trip the knock sensor - they look for a particular frequency output before yanking the timing. On the other hand, the ECU retarding the timing would explain your performance issues. Certainly check your timing and see what it looks like.

my1999gsr
Mar 21, 2009


Mathturbator posted:

2001 Audi A6 2.4 Avant (euro-spec). What will cause the brake-warning light to come on, even after replacing the front brake pads (twice)? It's on every god drat time I start the car - the brakes are ok

First off I'll say that I have little experience with any engine/trans combo that wasn't offered in North America so your 2.4 Avant is an oddball to me. Having said that, Here's my advice for troubleshooting:

Pull off both front wheels so you have access to the plugs for the pad wear sensors.

Unplug both sensors (if your Audi has one on each side) and use a paper clip to bridge the 2 pin plug on the vehicle side (to simulate a brand new pad with an intact wear sensor).

If you turn on the car and the light is off then one of your wear indicators in the new pads have a problem. I'm guessing that if you've already replaced the pads twice and the light persists then you've got another problem. I'd be looking for damage or corrosion in the wiring going to the wear sensors. Also, how's your brake fluid level?

my1999gsr
Mar 21, 2009


bennyfactor posted:

I have a '04 Passat GLX Wagon (B5); the passenger HID low-beam has gone out, but the rest of the headlamp assembly still works (high beams, DRLs, turn signal).

The only thing I can find online as a replacement part is the entire assembly, which is a few hundred dollars. I got the Bentley service manual for the car for Christmas, and I can see that the assembly opens up and that individual light can be replaced, but it doesn't list a part number. Could you give me the p/n? Is there something that I'm missing here that is the reason I can only find the whole headlamp assembly and not the bulbs?

I was just about to post in the stupid question thread and happened to see this. This looks like a lot of great information so far. Thanks!

I'll check it out for you on Monday and get a part number. What country are you in?

my1999gsr
Mar 21, 2009


Somewhat Hairy Ape posted:

How big of a deal is the carbon buildup problem in Audi/VW DI engines for long term ownership? Are you pretty much guaranteed to lose a poo poo-load of power in your engine after a few years unless you disassemble the engine and clean out the deposits at a fairly regular interval?

I can honestly say that carbon build up on the TDI is non-issue unless you're using it as a super-short trim vehicle. From time to time carbon can interfere with shut down flap operation but it's so simple to clean and it so seldom happens that I wouldn't even think about it. We've got several 300,000 km+ TDI cars that are regular customers that haven't had an issue. The one thing I will say about the TDI is that it really, really needs to be driven hard once in a while - get on the highway and wind it out a little bit to blow out some of the soot.

my1999gsr
Mar 21, 2009


1337JiveTurkey posted:

OK, I got my car back from the dealership after paying way too much to fix barely half the things wrong with it. Among the things skipped was a gasket around the antenna which inevitably dries out after a few years and can only be replaced by replacing the rest of the antenna as well since they don't keep it as a part on its own. After they accidentally left my car undriveable until they got a replacement shipped in I got a New Beetle Convertible as a loaner. Then when I get my car back there's broken glass in the rear hatch hinge from where they crushed my old taillights by leaving them there after replacing them, the moment I stick my key in the ignition the car alarm goes off and none of this even fazes me. Have I finally achieved the absolute Zenith of VW ownership, the point where nothing else will give me as strong of a feeling that yep, I'm driving a Volkswagen?

Did this really happen to you? If it did, would you mind telling me what dealership it was?

my1999gsr
Mar 21, 2009


ManMythLegend posted:

I'm glad this thread popped up because I'm looking at buying a Jetta TDI. Kind of like Hairy Ape I'm trying to get a feel for what I have to look forward to if I do. I've read tons of reviews and such, but I'd really like to hear from folks how deal with them every day. How is the long term reliability? Are there any weird gremlins that have shown up after everyday use? I guess, in general, was it a good purchase?

Here's the thing with TDI/PD Volkswagens: if you're going to use it as a short trip commuter then you're not going to get your money's worth out of the diesel's efficiency - it really shines on the highway. Since you pay a premium for the diesel engine option and it gets synthetic oil and an expensive timing belt change you've got to make your money back in fuel mileage which is hard to do with mainly city driving. I can tell you that the TDI engines are nearly bulletproof if you stick with the manufacturer's recommended service intervals - the engine will literally outlast every other part on the vehicle.

What year of Jetta are you thinking about? The last 2 generations have a few different gremlins to consider. Every customer we have in a diesel Golf, Jetta, Touareg or Q7 LOVE them.

my1999gsr
Mar 21, 2009


Somewhat Hairy Ape posted:

Sorry, I should have been more specific, I was referring to the gasoline DI engines such as FSI/TFSI. Any opinions on those?

Ah ok! Well, the direct injection gasolin engines have some good and bad points so I'll go through a few of each.

The 2.0t FSI engines are smooth and powerful and they get pretty good fuel mileage too. Sadly, the earlier BPY-code engines have had a very poor track record for oil consumption - I've replaced 3 engines under warranty so far for it and and as a group my shop has replaced 6-9 of them since launch and 2 of those brand new motors have started consuming oil too. Audi has a TSB about the issue that says oil consumption of .5 L of oil per 1000 kms is acceptable throughout the life of the vehicle. Keeping in mind that the service interval is 15,000 kms, if your vehicle were consuming oil at that rate then your oil pan would be empty before your first oil change. On the good side, the newer, CCTA-code 2.0t FSI-TFSI engines don't seem to have any oil consumption issues so far and we've had few complaints about them in the Audis or VW products.

If you're interested in the larger displacement DI gas engines, then that's where carbon build-up is somewhat of an issue. Of the 3 RS4s that we have (with the 4.2 FSI V8) 2 of them have had to have their heads pulled and de-coked under warrantee for poor valve seating. Since those engines are a little more rare, I don't have as large a pool of info to take from but it must have been pretty discouraging for the owners of a $100,000+ GT sedan to have their car down for 3 days while we tore down the top of the engine.

my1999gsr
Mar 21, 2009


Autism Sundae posted:

Never mind, looks like all GTIs in CA are CBFA due to CARB. my1999gsr, do newer CBFAs have the same oil consumption issues or has that been fixed by now?

I can't say for sure on the CBFA motor since we don't get it where I am. I'll check VW ServiceNet. OK, it appears that the oil consumption measurement for the CBFA motor is a little different than the other motors but nothing really specific. In general, if the engine code has 4 letters - CBFA for instance, then oil consumption hasn't been a problem.

my1999gsr
Mar 21, 2009


SpeedFreek posted:

Why wont VW address the failing cams in the BRM TDIs? The service manager denies that they ever fail but the parts desk guy tells me they have done about a dozen cars so far.

Also could you please define a leak from VWs standpoint. Apparently the transmissions were supposed to soak everything around them in gear lube, they cleaned it with a rag and charged me $50 (not covered under warranty?) to tell me that its not leaking.

I love the cars but not the ownership experience.

Interesting... I haven't seen a camshaft replacement in any of our diesels at all. The only VAG engines I've seen that eat cams (and high-pressure fuel pumps) were some of the early run 2.0t engines in Passats and A4s. That was due to a manufacturing problem with the cams (very much like the early 80's 305ci GM camshaft issues - cam lobe material was too soft) and I have done several of those.

VW/Audi warranty is often... difficult. They've been seriously cracking down on the dealerships for warranty claims. The dealerships cope with that by hitting the customer for the cost of things that used to be covered. Having said that, the dealership service department has a certain amount of leeway or "goodwill" that they can extend to a customer in cases like yours. Obviously you're not happy with the service (who would be?) so it might be worth your time to call the customer service hotline for VW and see if they can help - they're usually very good at dealing with things like this. Also, if your leak returns then you can ask for your $50 back because the problem wasn't repaired.

VW/Audi dealerships have a couple of stats they use to determine how a dealership is doing: one is CSI - Customer Service Index. The CSI is based on customer feedback that the dealership is obliged to collect and send to VW/Audi America/Canada and corporate watches that number VERY closely. The other stat is FRFT - Fixed Right, First Time. FRFT is exactly what it says: when a warranty claim that is submitted, corporate tracks the vehicle. If another warranty claim for the same part or problem is submitted then we get a call from the auditor informing us that we're on the hook for the parts, diag and labor. I pass this on to you because given the nature of your difficulties, your complaints fall under one of those (CSI) and potentially under the other (FRFT).

EDIT: After digging around in my files I did find a cam-related BRM failure: A BRM code engine came in with a destroyed head because the lifter faces had been hammered to pieces. That's literally the only one I've ever seen do that though. A little digging around in the interwebs tells me that there have been other owners with similar problems but from what I can tell it's not a widespread problem. If VW handles it anything like they did with the 1.8T engines, as long as you have your service records up to date, they should (emphasis on "should") be able to replace the damaged components under a goodwill claim.

my1999gsr fucked around with this message at 15:52 on May 2, 2010

my1999gsr
Mar 21, 2009


tehllama posted:

So now I noticed today that the strut dust boot for the drivers side strut has torn and fallen down, exposing the strut itself. I'm duct taping it up for now, but I'd like to replace it when I get the chance. I can't find one for my specific year from an online retailer, what're the chances that one designed for a '97 will fit?

Hmmm. It's a crap-shoot if a 97 would work. I want to say it will, but I'm not sure. If you like, I can talk to my parts desk tomorrow and see.

Sorry tehllama - we were slammed all day and I didn't have a chance to ask my parts guy for a PT number for the HID bulb or the dust boot. I'll try tomorrow!

my1999gsr fucked around with this message at 00:24 on May 4, 2010

my1999gsr
Mar 21, 2009


Jovian posted:

I have a 2.0T FSI BPY engine that probably has its tumbler flap on the way our or already gone. If I start driving soon after starting the car I never get these codes.

012600 - Intake Manifold Runner Control: Regulation Deviation
P3138 - 008 - Implausible Signal - MIL ON
008200 - Intake Manifold Flap; Bank 1: Electrical Malfunction
P2008 - 001 - Upper Limit Exceeded - MIL ON
Freeze Frame:

Currently I am in a crappy situation where I moved away from friends with driveways and live in a community so I cant do much if any work on the car myself. So what would replacing something like this cost to replace?

So from what I understand its only really needed for cold idle, what issues may occur if I don't replace this?

Haha yup this an the PCV system are very annoying but still love this engine.

There's a TSB for this and here's how it works: You go to the dealership, they pull the codes. There's an RVU (Recommended Vehicle Update) ECU reflash that's specifically for the faults you have and I see it ALL THE TIME. So, you get the flash update, the faults are erased and off you go. If the fault(s) return or the basic settings can't be performed (this would be done after checking/updating the ECU), you usually get a new Intake manifold flap motor V157 but that will depend on what kind of warranty you have.

I just checked the TSBs for your engine as I read this and there's still a Tech Bulletin about it - 2016868/4.

Originally, VW/Audi had a recall for these faults called the CH campaign so your car might have already had the update but the dealership has to check the software level of the module and see if it's up to date before replacing the flap motor. You can call your local Audi dealer's service department, give them your VIN and they can check to see if the update/recall has already been performed.

my1999gsr
Mar 21, 2009


Nait Sirhc posted:

Why are the oil pans on 2001.5+ V6 Passats such piles of poo poo? My girlfriend and her sister each have one of these cars, and both of them have dented/scratched oil pans (to the point where they start leaking). (GF is on pan #3, sister on pan #2) They aren't driving like poo poo either, I've been in the car once when she's cracked a pan and it was barely a scrape, going 10mph over a speedbump.

They're only $55 from FCPGroton but it's annoying to have to keep replacing these. There is no OEM skidplate, is there some kind of solution to this?

I've never replaced a pan on any Passat ever. The Passats all have a rather large sound baffle/belly pan but it's only plastic so the protection it gives the oil pan is minimal. Honestly, not to be a dick here but if your GF and sister have damaged multiple oil pans on 2 different Passats I'd be looking a little closer at their driving habits or the environment that they drive in most because, for the most part, the pans in the Passat have proven very durable.

my1999gsr
Mar 21, 2009


Autism Sundae posted:

Hey my1999gsr, I have a strange issue with my MKVI GTI (which I'm not even sure is an issue..) I've asked about it on VW forums and here, and took the car to dealers to see what they could do but nothing so far, maybe you can help me out.

My GTI randomly shudders/vibrates at idle. It's pretty slight, so if I have my stereo turned up I can barely feel it if at all, but I definitely notice it. It's weird and hard to describe, feels like a pulse or series of pulses that can be felt through the driver's seat and the brake pedal, sort of like a small earthquake. It's noticeable because the idle is very smooth so every errant vibration really shows.

I tried to figure out some kind of pattern to it but it happens seemingly randomly, engine temperature doesn't seem to matter, I can drive for two hours and still get it at a light. It usually starts after the car idles for 2-4 minutes (longer lights is when I notice it most), but sometimes it happens right away and sometimes doesn't happen at all. The frequency/strength of these shudders is also random, sometimes they are stronger but never to the point of being violent.

RPM needle at idle is usually right below 780, but every once in a while goes down noticeably closer to 760 (it doesn't jump around, just idles a bit lower than usual every once in a while). This doesn't seem to be related to the shudders, just don't know if it's normal or not. No CEL, no strange noises, nothing strange otherwise. Dealer checked it out but I guess they scanned it for codes and couldn't find anything. At this point I feel like an idiot every time I bring it up, and I'm probably being too paranoid/retarded about the whole thing but it just feels wrong. I know that no codes doesn't necessarily mean "nothing's broken".

Another thing: I've read that there was an RVU for early MKVI GTIs and my VIN falls within the range for that update. Any way to find out whether it was performed for my car?

There's not much I can tell you about your vibration issue. Is your GTI a stick or auto? Is there ever any noise associated with the shuddering when you feel it? There's nothing wrong with making your concern known when you bring your GTI in for service - it goes on your vehicle's record so if it develops into a problem you have it noted in your service history.

You can call your local VW dealer's service department and ask about your RVU. Once they have your VIN it takes seconds to find out if you're eligible.

my1999gsr
Mar 21, 2009


ModernDayDiogenes posted:

http://www.evolutionimport.com/Thor...a-00003-005.htm

I put one of these on my 2000 V6 a couple of years ago. It's solid and bolts directly into the frame and is a hell of a lot beefier than the crappy plastic splash guard that comes with the car.

That being said, thank you all for this thread. I asked this question a couple of weeks ago and I didn't get any response, so I'll try a different tack - where can I pick up a camshaft adjuster solenoid for my car? Apparently one in mine is going bad, causing my CEL to trip on every couple weeks or so. Unfortunately, the only way I could get one through the dealer is to order the entire camshaft adjuster assembly, and I don't want to pay 700 dollars for a 30 dollar solenoid. Is it time to hit my local junkyards?

edit: To tack on something else: what kind of fitting is used to open up the drain plug on the Passat's transaxle? I'm trying to change my transaxle fluid while I'm changing my CV axles, and the drain plug is a new one for me. It looks like a big triple square fitting with some kind of tamperproof peg in the middle of the hole. my1999gsr, is this a specialty fitting that I would have to pick up at a dealer? Would they even sell it to me?

As far as I know, the cam adjuster solenoid can't be replaced on it's own - you need the whole assembly. There may be another option, but at the dealership level we'd just quote the assembly part price. Try over on VWVortex - if there's a way to just do the solenoid, someone over there will know. According to my parts list the solenoid can't be ordered on it's own but the aftermarket sometimes has work-arounds for that type of thing.

If you've got the drain plug I'm thinking of, then yes, it's a... I want to say 18mm tamperproof triplesquare. I'm pretty sure you can buy it over the counter at a VW parts department. If not, try Hazet - they manufacture a lot of Euro-import specialty tools and your local Snap-On dealer might be able to get it for you.

my1999gsr
Mar 21, 2009


Autism Sundae posted:

Is there a way to see which VW dealerships are good and which are not in a given area? I've been trying to get some hatch rattle issues fixed for a while now and apparently a local dealership that I've been to broke some plastic trim piece in the trunk (which was pointed out to me by another dealership).

It's so hard to say. Once again I'd say ask around on VWVortex - there'll be members that are local to you that can point you to a dealership.

my1999gsr
Mar 21, 2009


DONT DO IT posted:

I've got a question for you... For whatever reason, my 2000 Audi S4 has been running rich for the past 2 years. It never warms up despite having the thermostat changed (twice!). That would explain why it runs rich.. However, none of the local shops (or even the Audi dealership) have been able to diagnose the root problem. The biggest issue is it starts like rear end whether it is warm or not. As the battery inevitably dies, it just gets harder and harder. But just for fun, if I use ethanol fuel it starts right up. Too bad the ethanol fuel worsens my already terrible fuel mileage and idles like poo poo. It's not water in the tank, as after two bottles of Heet you'd expect some sort of change. It doesn't seem to be carbon buildup either, as I used the three bottles of a $25 dollar per bottle treatment (forgot the brand) as recommended by the last mechanic that worked on it. Any ideas?

All of this crap is why I bought a 400 dollar Volvo.

I sound bitter.

OK, this is a little tougher to diagnose. First, we need to figure out why it never warms up. Do you have any faults or a MIL light on? Also, has your S4 been in for the ignition coil recall yet? That it idles poorly is pretty strange - does it idle better when you've got a tank full of ethanol?

my1999gsr
Mar 21, 2009


Neon Machete posted:

Does putting universal green coolant in your 2.7t really damage the engine that badly? Cause I bought one pre-owned and the "G12 ONLY" was rubbed off the expansion tank...now my coolant system is leaking every which place and starts steaming up after five minutes of driving. Did the green stuff eat through all my hoses or what?

Glycol-based coolants like good ol neon green antifreeze tend to damage coolant systems that are made for G12/pink - they really beat up the seals in particular so it's not a terrible surprise that you've got leaks. At this point you're going to have to get the system flushed and re-filled with proper G12 and see what happens (I'm guessing your leaks will continue). After that, you'll have to find and repair the leaks one at a time until the system seals properly. Every now and again we get a car in that's been to a shop that didn't know any better and it's full of green antifreeze and I feel bad for the customer every time. Odds are, they got upsold to a coolant flush at some lube shop and than they show up on the hook at my shop.

my1999gsr
Mar 21, 2009


SpeedFreek posted:

Repaired? they charged me $50 for a can of brakleen and a blast of compressed air. The leak was still there buy since they cleaned it it wasn't an issue to them, its leaked since I got it with 20k on it.

Also the cams are considered an operator induced problem, the dealership will blame it on the oil and not the lovely design of their bearings.

Can you tell me anything about the codes I can pull up through the climatronic? I know speed, coolant temp, engine RPM, and a few more but cant figure out the rest.

edit: I'm replacing the door harness, speakers, and exploding radiator fans on a MkV, how long is this probably going to take?

By "repaired" I mean that's what the paperwork says when a work order is closed.

Believe me, Audi/VW has been VERY good about replacing whole engines under goodwill when they're ruined due to oil sludge as long as the customer has records of all oil changes being done on time and using sythetic oil (and even a few that used non-syth oil too). At last count I've done 10 1.8T's under goodwill for sludge - Audi/VW picked up the whole tab.

There's not much I can tell you about Climatronic/Climatic value blocks without a car and a scantool. If there's one in particular you're looking for, let me know and I'll see what I can do.

The cooling fans are super easy - a co-worker just did a pair on a A5-style (2.0t-equipped) GTI today actually. I'd say an hour or so but we take them out through the bottom of the car so if you can't raise it high enough then I'm not sure how long it'll take. I think the speakers in your car are still riveted to the inner door panel so you'll be drilling them out to pull the speakers. On the A5-style GTI/Rabbit/Golf you'll need to remove the door skin to replace the harness. You may be able to do it without removing the door skin by using the hole the speaker was in to get to the harness but I've always found it easier to just pull the skin off. Either way, if you've never done it before, both the inner door panel and the outer skin have a few quirks about their removal that it'll help to know before you start. If you'd like some details about them, let me know and I'll give you some tips on whatever method you choose. As to how long it'll take, again, it depends on how familiar you are with the inner workings of the doors. If you've had them apart in any way it'll dramatically shorten the time, if not, figure 3-5 hours depending on method.

my1999gsr
Mar 21, 2009


Triikan - as Pipkin said, the water on your driver's side floor is from that clogged drain under the battery - the design is just crap. If you want to see for yourself, get a flashlight, turn the wheels all the way to the right and shine your light into the passenger's side wheel-well where the steering rack/tie rod is. You should be able to see a small, black rubber funnel-shaped thing pointing down right above the steering rack. What happens is, some debris clogs up the drains (there's 2 under the battery that are identical), the lower windshield cowl (where the battery sits) fills up with water so when you accelerate, the water that has accumulated slops around and follows the wiring conduit that's underneath your car's E-box (that's the plastic box that's under your hood on the driver's side right where the windshield and fender join) and enters the cabin. There was a HUGE recall in Canada about it called the.. R5 I think, where that stupid funnel/drain is totally removed and the sunroof drain tubes (the little black rubber tubes that you can see when you open the front doors all the way in the hinge-area) are clipped so they allow larger bits of debris to drain out and not block the flow. I'm not sure what you're looking for in a diagram but you'll want to look closely at the wiring to the left of your clutch pedal - that's the area where the water has been getting in so look for corrosion. The seal under the E-box is usually adequate for splashes of water but it can't handle submersion - maybe introduce a little water near the E-box and see if it's getting into the cabin in the area around the clutch pedal.

my1999gsr
Mar 21, 2009


SwashedBuckles posted:

I have a couple of questions on my 2010 S4. Is carbon buildup also known to be a problem on the 3.0TFSI? Also, the shifts on the S-Tronic transmission seem to be more rough than when I first got the car (~2k miles right now); what could be causing this?

I haven't heard anything about the supercharged 3L yet - we've got 2 on the road from my dealership but I've got no TSBs for it yet so that's a good sign. What are your driving habits like? The TCM adapts to your driving style so if it sees you driving in a "sporty" manner it tries to match it's shifts to that. If you find the shifting too harsh then make an appointment at your dealership for a test-drive with a technician and go from there. With the low mileage you've got on your S4 there's no reason for it to behave in a way you're not happy with so that's the next step I'd take.

my1999gsr
Mar 21, 2009


minivanmegafun posted:

I have a 2008 Rabbit 5-speed. I've noticed when I open the door after the car's been off, I hear a very faint motor whirring for about a second. It's done it since the car was new, so I presume it's normal - I'm just curious what it is. Any idea?

And yes, your ECM uses the door latch opening as a signal to prime the fuel pump - that's the noise you're hearing.

my1999gsr
Mar 21, 2009


elzergone posted:

Hey cool, thanks for doing this thread

I have a question. I have a 1990 Audi Coupe Quattro, with an engine that isn't so healthy.

What 5 cylinder Audi's are potential donor cars? Googling has brought me nothing but confusion.


Thanks!

Ahhh! A Quattro Coupe owner - I knew I'd see a question from one of you guys sooner or later! I wish I could help you but we just don't do engines on cars as old as yours so it's difficult to say what other cars have engines that would work in your Coupe. Try finding a forum for Coupe owners - they might have some insight on it. I wonder if there's a kit to sneak a 2.7 biturbo into that chassis...

my1999gsr
Mar 21, 2009


tronik posted:

I have a 2007 Audi A3 2.0T with just about 17000 miles on it. I bought it used but so far it seems to be running rather nicely. Question I have is what should I be doing in terms of preventative maintenance and keeping the engine in optimal condition? I changed the oil at around 15000 miles and had the dealership do some warranty work on the car, but that's about it.

Also, if anyone knows of a good VW/Audi mechanic in the Central Florida/Orlando area I'm all ears.

I'm not a big fan of the 15,000 mile oil change interval - our dealership recommends every 8000 even with synthetic oil. Other than that, just stick to the service plan in your manual and enjoy your A3 - I like it more than the GTI.

my1999gsr
Mar 21, 2009


Alighieri posted:

Got a 2006 GLI and love it. Few questions about it. How much would it be to take it in for routine maintenance at VW, next scheduled one is at 70k and just looking at cost. Since it is not under warranty I would assume it will be more. Also there is just one small part that was missing from it. At the top of the center console below the hazard button are the two AC ducts, one is missing the tab that allows you to move it up/down, left and right. Is there a place to get a new one of those, or will replacing the entire upper part of the console be my only option? Other then that everything is great.

Sorry - I can't tell you a price for your maintenances - they're dealer-dependant and I rarely see the bill for them.

Looking in my repair manual it tells me that the whole assembly for your center vents must be replaced if a vent is broken BUT my manuals don't always show me if parts are available on their own - the vent may be plastic-welded to the cover and replaceable on it's own. Call up your local dealership's parts counter and ask them - they should be more than happy to quote you a price for the vent alone if it's available.

my1999gsr
Mar 21, 2009


wav3form posted:

What does your place charge for a timing chain job on a '01 VR6? I'm almost at 90k miles on mine and would like to change at around 100k.

I can do it myself but I may not have the time to do so as I know it'll take me at least 2 days due to never doing it before. (just trying to get some cost estimates vs a DIY job)

It looks like we charge 6.5 hours plus parts for the VR6 but that's purely a book time estimate - we don't have enough VR6's on the road for any of us to be fast at replacing the chain on them. Figure 7 hours at $89/hr plus parts plus a little more time if there's seized bolts or any other unforseen problems. Do you have a particular reason for changing the chain? Unless it's acting up they're not a part we replace often or ever.

my1999gsr
Mar 21, 2009


Opensourcepirate posted:

The front passenger power window has stopped working on my 98 Jetta TDI. When you press the up/down button you can hear a faint click from the door; one click when you press the button and one click when you release it, and the lights dim slightly if the engine is off.

Any chance you can diagnose it just based on that?

I can somewhat diagnose this. It sounds like your window regulator assembly (which is a system of pulleys and cables) is in the middle of destroying itself. The only way to be sure is to take the inner door trim panel and inner door panel off and have a look at the mechanism to see what's going on. I've done this countless times for broken window clips and replacing door latches so that's the first step I take when the door motor isn't working as it should. If you'd like some instructions on how to do that I can help you - it's not hard just time-consuming the first time you do it.

my1999gsr
Mar 21, 2009


NWO posted:

The cat has gone on my 2004 Golf 1.6 FSI, and as im rather short on the money at the moment, so it may have to wait a while before its replaced. Am I doing any more long term damage if im still driving it daily? It doesn't seem to affect performance or fuel usage too much, its just rather noisy.

If the cat has failed then driving around until you get it replaced isn't hurting anything but the environment. I can't access any of the Euro-spec engine (which yours is) warranty stuff to see, but have you checked with your local dealership to see if there's any extended coverage for your car's emissions equipment? There were several cars here in North America that VW extended the cat warranty on so it might be worth looking into if you haven't already.

my1999gsr
Mar 21, 2009


Triikan posted:

There was a leaf in it. Jesus christ. Should I just throw this piece away, then? What is it supposed to do? Was it connected to any sort of tubing?

I made a coathanger into a long, pointed hook to pull the funnel out from the wheel well so removing the battery isn't necessary. Pull that sucker out - it's not supposed to be connected to anything and it only causes trouble.

my1999gsr
Mar 21, 2009


wav3form posted:

Maybe it's the coolant temp sensor? Just a wild guess.

Very possible but I'd like to see the car after a road test to check the values out of the coolant sensor versus the actual coolant temp to confirm the ECT is going bad. We've done a pile of ECTs on every other VW/Audi product so it wouldn't be a surprise although they usually throw a code for short to B+ or something and turn on the MIL.

my1999gsr
Mar 21, 2009


wav3form posted:

It'd purely be a preventative measure. Engine runs like a top and is quiet (other than the normal VR6 noises). I'm typically paranoid about any car I own and I do a lot of preventative maintenance when possible.

It's not the chains I'm worried about, it's the chain guides. I probably won't bother with them until I hear some rattling due to broken guides.

Your price isn't bad, I've seen unofficial quotes of over 2 grand with parts.

Remember, I'm only quoting from my VW "suggested repair times" catalogue and I've never personally done one (unless you count the VR6 engine in the Touaregs) so my time quote isn't gosphel although $2000 seems a little steep even with parts.

my1999gsr fucked around with this message at 00:18 on May 4, 2010

my1999gsr
Mar 21, 2009


Autism Sundae posted:

If I take my GTI for an oil change but not to a dealership (I want to do one at 5K before the scheduled 10K), is that going to cause any issues with warranty? I'm assuming it won't and I'm taking it to a certified VW/Audi shop and not to Jiffy Lube, but I figured it doesn't hurt to ask.

You are absolutely allowed to get your oil changed anywhere you like as long as you keep your records of when you had it done. Seriously, keep your records - VW warranty is generally very good but if you leave the door open they will squash your warranty claim in a heartbeat if you can't back up your service history.

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my1999gsr
Mar 21, 2009


Autism Sundae posted:

Stick; no noise at all. I was told by dealership techs that it could be some pumps turning on and off but none of them seem to be sure about this, they just say something along the lines of "well there's so much stuff under the hood, it's probably normal". That's the whole thing though, I don't have any experience with these cars to know if it's normal or not. I have no idea how something like this can even be detected if it doesn't throw a CEL, and I know it goes on record but I'd rather not wait until it gets worse. I'm getting an oil change soon so I'll ask the shop tech about it.

When I was at the dealer for vibration issue they told me they found and performed some kind of throttle-body update/reset. The way their service guy explained it to me is that GTI adapts to my driving style over time and it ties into throttle management somehow. Does the ECU really adapt to my driving or was he full of it, and do you have any general info on available MKVI GTI TSBs or updates?

The update programming you got was for the intake flap motor but it shouldn't have anything to do with your vibration issue. What you were told about the ECU adapting is 100% true - it really does adapt to your driving style. It's surprising to drive a Jetta that's owned by an older driver because it's so soft on the shifts.

I have access to all the RVU/TSBs for the GTI. Is there one in particular you're interested in?

There's an outside chance that your vibration is due to a failing dual-mass flywheel. Don't take that as anything other than a shot in the dark - I've seen piles of failed dual-mass flywheels and a few have had a slight vibration prior to total failure but some of them don't or have other symptoms so it's just a guess. Usually you can see clutch debris and broken springs through the ports in the bottom of the bellhousing when the flywheel is totally ruined. Once again, I'm guessing so don't be alarmed - it's only a possibility without me having seen the car in person.

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