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Magic Hate Ball
May 6, 2007

ha ha ha!
you've already paid for this


Has any Woody Allen film aged worse than Manhattan?

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Debbie Does Dagon
Jul 8, 2005





Other than his home movies?

smitster
Apr 9, 2004




Oven Wrangler

Magic Hate Ball posted:

Has any Woody Allen film aged worse than Manhattan?

I can pick 'em! Is there a better Woody Allen movie to put in its place? Should I just replace that with something else entirely?

Magic Hate Ball
May 6, 2007

ha ha ha!
you've already paid for this


Manhattan is kind of a weird one because it was pretty rightly acclaimed (the cinematography!!) and is actually a very good movie...except that itís literally about Woody Allen dating a teenager. For movies that include him, Iíd suggest Sleeper, Annie Hall, or Hannah and Her Sisters, and for those without, Purple Rose of Cairo or Match Point. I also really like Another Woman and Interiors, but I feel like those are kind of deeper dives.

Spatulater bro!
Aug 19, 2003

Punch! Punch! Punch!



My favorite Woody Allen movie starring Woody Allen is Crimes and Misdemeanors.

Magic Hate Ball
May 6, 2007

ha ha ha!
you've already paid for this


Thatís a good one too. Nasty and funny and dark. Also, Iím pretty sure Iím the only person on the planet who actually likes Alice.

Chili
Jan 23, 2004

College kids ain't shit


Fun Shoe

Spatulater bro! posted:

My favorite Woody Allen movie starring Woody Allen is Crimes and Misdemeanors.

Agreed, still haven't been floored by anything quite like this one.

Spatulater bro!
Aug 19, 2003

Punch! Punch! Punch!



smitster I'm going to start you out easy with one of the most enjoyable movies ever made, Stagecoach.

The River
Jean Renoir, 1951



Feels like a template for every modern coming of age drama I've seen, though few of those are as sublime, thoughtful and gorgeous looking as The River. The first color film shot in India, it's the sort of movie that you just want to sit and look at. Martin Scorsese calls this one of two of the most beautiful color films ever made (the other being The Red Shoes). I get what he means.

The details of life in this fascinating setting was all I really needed. It totally soaked over me in a very pleasant way. We do get plenty of plot and some drama, which only adds to my interest, but it's the FEEL this movie gives off - of the ebbing and flowing of life - that makes it sit differently with me than most plot-driven stuff I watch.

My only complaint is the acting. It's kinda rough across the board. But it's a relatively minor qualm in an otherwise excellent movie.

4.5/5


----- They Shoot Pictures, Don't They? Progress: 503/1000 -----

118. Yi Yi (2000) - Always on many best of the 21st century lists - 10/27/20
131. Rome, Open City (1945) - Rossellini's Journey to Italy was good - 10/27/20
144. The Gospel According to Matthew (1964) - The only over Pasolini I've seen is Salo - 11/6/20
153. Histoire(s) du cinťma (1988) - A 4.5 hour documentary from Godard? I'm not super excited... 12/26/20
157. The Umbrellas of Cherbourg (1964) - I've seen The Young Girls of Rochefort and enjoyed it - 1/1/21
162. The Red Shoes (1948) - Another Powell/Pressburger film that gets loads of praise - 12/26/20
168. Rocco and His Brothers (1960) - Ah, the director who made The Leopard. Cool. - 1/8/21
178. Mouchette (1967) - A Robert Bresson film I haven't seen. Hell yeah. - 1/15/21
182. Imitation of Life (1959) - My first Douglas Sirk movie - 1/21/21
185. Dekalog (1989) - The length is intimidating, but Kieślowski has yet to disappoint - 1/29/21

Zogo
Jul 29, 2003



Spatulater bro! posted:

185. Dekalog (1989) - The length is intimidating, but Kieślowski has yet to disappoint - 1/29/21

"You said it was in 1943?"




The Eight Diagram Pole Fighter - Rival factions are vying for control and the Yang Generals end up being ambushed. It's overly dramatic as only two sons survive and both have issues to overcome. The fifth son spends time debating with and raging at Buddhists who won't let him join up. In short, he's a monk with a bad attitude.

One of the mainstays of this genre is how one weapon and/or fighting style dominates only to be usurped by another weapon/style out of necessity. So oodles of elaborate counterattacks with spears and sticks take place this time around. The ending was somewhat of a twist as the monks come to the rescue to defang the evil Tartars.

Legendary Weapons of China (1982) and Five Element Ninjas (1982) are probably my two favorites in this genre as of late.


Also watched:

In the Heat of the Sun - Another film set in Beijing during the Cultural Revolution. It briefly covers some of the issues found in To Live (1994) but the difference here is that this is from the perspective of a youngster. So it's romantic, idealized at times and full of youthful exuberance. Maoism is more a vague feeling than anything else. At some points it gets harrowing as gang fighting and delinquency ensues. It intersects slightly with A Brighter Summer Day (1991) in these moments.

I was cursorily reminded of Following (1998) when the narrator nicknamed Monkey (Xia Yu) is apt to stalk girls, pick locks and brawl with others. Another atypical aspect is that he's an unreliable narrator and comes across like Walter Mitty at times. Illusion and reality are never fully established but it doesn't matter as we're given a heavy dose of poetic narration. All of it was believable.




James Bond versus Godzilla (42/64 completed):

Hesitation (43 completed):

#38 To Have and Have Not - From what I've heard this one sounds similar to Casablanca. 8/27/20

#41 Frankenstein Conquers the World - Another big monster film. 10/9/20

#44 Europe '51 - There are still many Roberto Rossellini films I haven't seen. 11/28/20

#45 Roger & Me - Somehow I missed seeing Michael Moore's original film. 12/5/20

#48 Heroes of the East - Japanese martial arts vs. Chinese martial arts. 1/12/21

#49 Police Story 2 - The first film was great with a capital G. This one should be good if it's anywhere close to the original. 1/12/21

new #50 Holy Motors - Sounds like an atypical one. 1/30/21

BBC Culture: The 100 Greatest Foreign Language Films (95/100 completed):

#88 The Story of the Last Chrysanthemum - I haven't seen a Mizoguchi film in years. 12/7/19

DVD Beaver's Top 100 Desert Island Films (95/100 completed):

Too Late for Tears - An interesting title. 5/27/20

Woman on the Run - Apparently an underwatched film noir. 6/16/20

Spatulater bro!
Aug 19, 2003

Punch! Punch! Punch!



I sat down to watch the copy of Dekalog I'd obtained and the aspect ratio was jacked (it was cropped from 1.33 to 1.78. gently caress that). I think I'm just going to pick up the Blu-ray from the upcoming Criterion flash sale.

Zogo
Jul 29, 2003



Spatulater bro! posted:

I sat down to watch the copy of Dekalog I'd obtained and the aspect ratio was jacked (it was cropped from 1.33 to 1.78. gently caress that). I think I'm just going to pick up the Blu-ray from the upcoming Criterion flash sale.

I hate when that happens.


I can pick another from your list if you want.

Spatulater bro!
Aug 19, 2003

Punch! Punch! Punch!



Zogo posted:

I hate when that happens.


I can pick another from your list if you want.

Nah it gives me a good excuse to buy it.

bitterandtwisted
Sep 4, 2006






Hello thread, been a while.

Zogo posted:

#49 Police Story 2 - The first film was great with a capital G. This one should be good if it's anywhere close to the original. 1/12/21
While not quite on the level of the first one, it's still an upper tier JC movie imo

Dances with Wolves
"I've just pissed in my pants, and nobody can do anything about it."

It turned up on Prime UK, so I finally got around to seeing it.

The bulk of the film is Costner getting to know the Sioux who live near his post. He learns their language and customs and eventually "goes native".
I had heard of it being used as a prime example of a white saviour narrative. It's rather unfair I think. He doesn't save the Sioux from white settlers/US army, they have to rescue his dumb rear end, which makes things worse for them and the ending is very clear that, yes, the white folk take everything in the end.
It's a very nice looking film and the John Barry score is great.

I enjoyed it overall, but I don't think I'll check out the four hour version.

In the time since my last post, I also saw
1917
I saw it months ago and I enjoyed it. I thought the continuous long take might feel gimicky, but I soon got used to it. The camera became a sort of character in its own right. I liked the two leads and the fact they were relatively unknown. On a technical level it's a great film, but after a few months, I can't say it's one that sticks powerfully in my mind.


My List:

1) (highest ranked imdb) Hamilton

2) (comedy) Any Luarel and Hardy feature film Not seen one before

3) (animation) Anomalisa interesting concept

4) (Academy Award winner) Patton

5) (foreign language) Wild Strawberries I should watch more Bergman

6) (Western or Musical) Moulin Rouge One of the biggest hits of that weird early noughts musical revival period

7) (Horror) I Spit on your Grave (1978) Infamous

8) (sci fi/fantasy) Alphaville sounds intriguing

9) (epic) The Last Emperor

10) (wildcard) Quardophenia mods vs rockers

Watched (96): Taxi Driver; Close Encounters of the Third Kind; The Iron Giant; Platoon; American History X; City Lights; My Neighbour Totoro; Rashomon; Duck Soup; Friday 13th (1980); Birdman; Frankenstein (1931); Time Bandits; Carrie (1976); King Kong (1933); Das Boot; The Blair Witch Project (1999); The Sting; Annie Hall; The Bridge on the River Kwai; The Cabinet of Dr Caligari; Godzilla (1954); Bicycle Thieves; The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974); The English Patient; Scanners; Forbidden Planet; Deliverance; The Creature from the Black Lagoon; Life is Beautiful; Minority Report; Rosemary's Baby; On the Waterfront; Solaris (1972); Driving Miss Daisy; Eraserhead; M (1931); This is Spinal Tap; Death Race 2000; The Producers (1967); Martin; Easy Rider; Office Space; Ghost in the Shell (1995); The Kid; Freaks (1932); The Abyss; Ben Hur (1959); Poltergeist (1982); Escape from New York; Once Upon a Time in America; Phantasm; Dracula (1958); Videodrome; Slumdog Millionaire; The Blob (1958); The Blob (1988); My Fair Lady; Avengers: Infinity War; Cinema Paradiso; 8 1/2; The Lord of the Rings (1978); Logan's Run; Willow; Misery; Bringing up Baby; Aguirre, The Wrath of God; The Man Who Fell to Earth; Candyman; The Dark Crystal; Tron; Andhadhun; Avengers: Endgame; The Lives of Others; Critters; Harakiri (1962); Blood and Black Lace; Grave of the Fireflies; The Seven Year Itch; Wings; Modern Times; The Searchers; Coraline; Cabaret; Tokyo Story; Joker; Dr Zhivago; Once Upon a Time in the West; The Hidden Fortress; An American in Paris; Der Golem; Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid; Sholay; Waltz with Bashir; Dances with Wolves; 1917

Zogo
Jul 29, 2003



bitterandtwisted posted:

5) (foreign language) Wild Strawberries I should watch more Bergman

"I dozed off, but was haunted by vivid and humiliating dreams. There was something overpowering in these dream images that bored relentlessly into my mind."



Police Story 2 - Police Story (1985) is one of the better films I've seen in a few years so I was curious to see this one. It picks up where the first film ends. We get a recap and then Jackie Chan's character must face the repercussions of his recent recklessness. He's an out of control cop. If you know Max Rockatansky, Harold Callahan or John McClane you know the basic archetype.

This one is more investigatory and mysterious compared to the original. Anyway, the main villain is released and this demonstrates once again that wealthy criminals are above the law. There are more criminals to deal with and this time they're building explosives and threatening to bomb buildings.

I look forward to seeing parts three and four of the series at some point.


Also watched:

Roger & Me - This was made circa 1986-1989 before Michael Moore was well-known so the interviews are mostly candid. Back then politicians weren't terrified and literally running away from him. Flint, Michigan is hit hard as GM shuts down auto plants in the area. It's a nightmare of layoffs and evictions. However, compared to the COVID-19 era the scale seems quaint in some respects. It is seemingly impossible for millionaires and billionaires to relate to and understand the homeless and vice-versa.

It's autobiographical but Moore also sifts through various ideologies of the time i.e. the typical union viewpoints vs the typical corporate viewpoints. In short, it's all about the money and that argument never ends. He also throws in some odd Amway references showing some absurdities of the era. Nothing lasts forever.

Anyway, Moore stalks and repeatedly tries to talk with Roger Smith (Chairman and CEO of GM) to no avail. Not that a meeting would've solved anything:

Michael Moore: Do you know how many people are homeless now?

Roger Smith: Do you know how many billions of dollars we've made?





James Bond versus Godzilla (42/64 completed):

Hesitation (45 completed):

#38 To Have and Have Not - From what I've heard this one sounds similar to Casablanca. 8/27/20

#41 Frankenstein Conquers the World - Another big monster film. 10/9/20

#44 Europe '51 - There are still many Roberto Rossellini films I haven't seen. 11/28/20

#48 Heroes of the East - Japanese martial arts vs. Chinese martial arts. 1/12/21

#50 Holy Motors - Sounds like an atypical one. 1/30/21

new #51 Dogville - A classic case of hesitation. 2/15/21

new #52 The Turin Horse - A highly ranked recent film. 2/15/21

BBC Culture: The 100 Greatest Foreign Language Films (95/100 completed):

#88 The Story of the Last Chrysanthemum - I haven't seen a Mizoguchi film in years. 12/7/19

DVD Beaver's Top 100 Desert Island Films (95/100 completed):

Too Late for Tears - An interesting title. 5/27/20

Woman on the Run - Apparently an underwatched film noir. 6/16/20

bitterandtwisted
Sep 4, 2006






RND gives Zogo

quote:

#88 The Story of the Last Chrysanthemum

Wild Srawberries
A sour old man goes on a roadtrip

Professor Borg travels with his daughter in law to Lund University to receive an honorary degree, picks up hitchhikers, and contemplates life. We see his earlier life in a series of dreams and daydreams. It's often melancholic, but balanced with humour and there's a redemptive aspect to his arc as he makes friends with the three youngsters and comes to terms with his past.
It's a great looking movie with interesting imagery in the dream sequences and Victor SjŲstrŲm is great as the Professor.

My List:

1) (highest ranked imdb) Hamilton

2) (comedy) Any Luarel and Hardy feature film Not seen one before

3) (animation) Anomalisa interesting concept

4) (Academy Award winner) Patton

5) (foreign language) Run Lola Run looks cool

6) (Western or Musical) Moulin Rouge One of the biggest hits of that weird early noughts musical revival period

7) (Horror) I Spit on your Grave (1978) Infamous

8) (sci fi/fantasy) Alphaville sounds intriguing

9) (epic) The Last Emperor

10) (wildcard) Quardophenia mods vs rockers

Watched (97): Taxi Driver; Close Encounters of the Third Kind; The Iron Giant; Platoon; American History X; City Lights; My Neighbour Totoro; Rashomon; Duck Soup; Friday 13th (1980); Birdman; Frankenstein (1931); Time Bandits; Carrie (1976); King Kong (1933); Das Boot; The Blair Witch Project (1999); The Sting; Annie Hall; The Bridge on the River Kwai; The Cabinet of Dr Caligari; Godzilla (1954); Bicycle Thieves; The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974); The English Patient; Scanners; Forbidden Planet; Deliverance; The Creature from the Black Lagoon; Life is Beautiful; Minority Report; Rosemary's Baby; On the Waterfront; Solaris (1972); Driving Miss Daisy; Eraserhead; M (1931); This is Spinal Tap; Death Race 2000; The Producers (1967); Martin; Easy Rider; Office Space; Ghost in the Shell (1995); The Kid; Freaks (1932); The Abyss; Ben Hur (1959); Poltergeist (1982); Escape from New York; Once Upon a Time in America; Phantasm; Dracula (1958); Videodrome; Slumdog Millionaire; The Blob (1958); The Blob (1988); My Fair Lady; Avengers: Infinity War; Cinema Paradiso; 8 1/2; The Lord of the Rings (1978); Logan's Run; Willow; Misery; Bringing up Baby; Aguirre, The Wrath of God; The Man Who Fell to Earth; Candyman; The Dark Crystal; Tron; Andhadhun; Avengers: Endgame; The Lives of Others; Critters; Harakiri (1962); Blood and Black Lace; Grave of the Fireflies; The Seven Year Itch; Wings; Modern Times; The Searchers; Coraline; Cabaret; Tokyo Story; Joker; Dr Zhivago; Once Upon a Time in the West; The Hidden Fortress; An American in Paris; Der Golem; Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid; Sholay; Waltz with Bashir; Dances with Wolves; 1917; Wild Strawberries

smitster
Apr 9, 2004




Oven Wrangler

bitterandtwisted, you get to watch Moulin Rouge - such a joyous movie full of life!

Stagecoach was a blast - just a really fun and enjoyable ride with a variety of clearly drawn characters through the dangerous wild West. There are fights, attacks, a duel, and love. The overall message seems to be, donít judge, walk a mile in someone elseís shoes, all in that very optimistic early Western vibe. I liked it.

My List:
12 Years A Slave - a well-regarded recent best picture I never did get around to seeing
Solaris (1972) - I have a feeling Iíll like it, but Tarkovsky always seemed like it would be a slog and I never want to commit to it
My Neighbor Totoro - Iím him, Iím the goon that has seen very little Miyazaki
Crimes And Misdemeanors - Iím just not a fan of Woody Allen, though I know his movies are important so Iíd like to become at least a little more familiar with them - and I changed this from Manhattan based on this threadís discussion
Rio Bravo (1959) - Iíve got at least one more classic Western that I somehow have never seen in me, adding this to the list!
Breathless - It always seemed like I would find it boring so I avoided it forever. That should change!
Paths Of Glory - Donít tend to watch war movies but this shows up all the time
Paris, Texas - This seems right up my alley and yet Iíve never brought myself to see this neonoir. That should be fixed.
Scarface - Iíve seen clips, just never got around to watching the whole thing
Wild Strawberries - Need to see more bergman

Deshamed: Stagecoach

bitterandtwisted
Sep 4, 2006






smitster posted:

My Neighbor Totoro - I’m him, I’m the goon that has seen very little Miyazaki
You should remedy that and this is a great place to start

Moulin Rouge

This has to be the most high-energy movie I've ever seen.
I'm not sure what I expected, but it wasn't the rapid-fire pop music medleys. I don't know much about music licensing, but clearing all that must have cost a pretty penny. Kidman and McGregor are great and throw themselves into the roles. I also really liked Jim Broadbent. It's not the sort of role I've seen him in before.
I wouldn't say it's my kind of movie, but I was entertained throughout and I can understand the love it gets. It's stylish and spectacular and rarely slows down.

My List:

1) (highest ranked imdb) Hamilton

2) (comedy) Any Luarel and Hardy feature film Not seen one before

3) (animation) Anomalisa interesting concept

4) (Academy Award winner) Patton

5) (foreign language) Run Lola Run looks cool

6) (Western or Musical) Shane one of the most famous of the era

7) (Horror) I Spit on your Grave (1978) Infamous

8) (sci fi/fantasy) Alphaville sounds intriguing

9) (epic) The Last Emperor

10) (wildcard) Quardophenia mods vs rockers

Watched (98): Taxi Driver; Close Encounters of the Third Kind; The Iron Giant; Platoon; American History X; City Lights; My Neighbour Totoro; Rashomon; Duck Soup; Friday 13th (1980); Birdman; Frankenstein (1931); Time Bandits; Carrie (1976); King Kong (1933); Das Boot; The Blair Witch Project (1999); The Sting; Annie Hall; The Bridge on the River Kwai; The Cabinet of Dr Caligari; Godzilla (1954); Bicycle Thieves; The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974); The English Patient; Scanners; Forbidden Planet; Deliverance; The Creature from the Black Lagoon; Life is Beautiful; Minority Report; Rosemary's Baby; On the Waterfront; Solaris (1972); Driving Miss Daisy; Eraserhead; M (1931); This is Spinal Tap; Death Race 2000; The Producers (1967); Martin; Easy Rider; Office Space; Ghost in the Shell (1995); The Kid; Freaks (1932); The Abyss; Ben Hur (1959); Poltergeist (1982); Escape from New York; Once Upon a Time in America; Phantasm; Dracula (1958); Videodrome; Slumdog Millionaire; The Blob (1958); The Blob (1988); My Fair Lady; Avengers: Infinity War; Cinema Paradiso; 8 1/2; The Lord of the Rings (1978); Logan's Run; Willow; Misery; Bringing up Baby; Aguirre, The Wrath of God; The Man Who Fell to Earth; Candyman; The Dark Crystal; Tron; Andhadhun; Avengers: Endgame; The Lives of Others; Critters; Harakiri (1962); Blood and Black Lace; Grave of the Fireflies; The Seven Year Itch; Wings; Modern Times; The Searchers; Coraline; Cabaret; Tokyo Story; Joker; Dr Zhivago; Once Upon a Time in the West; The Hidden Fortress; An American in Paris; Der Golem; Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid; Sholay; Waltz with Bashir; Dances with Wolves; 1917; Wild Strawberries; Moulin Rouge

twernt
Mar 11, 2003

Whoa whoa wait, time out.


bitterandtwisted posted:

5) (foreign language) Run Lola Run looks cool

bitterandtwisted, you get to watch Run Lola Run. It's probably my favorite movie of 1998.

My list of shame:

1. The Rules of the Game (1939) Iíve never seen anything by Jean Renoir and this seems like a sensible place to start

2. Halloween (1978) I really like Carpenter but Iíve never seen this for some reason.

3. The Hills Have†Eyes (1977) Another classic 70s horror movie I've always wanted to see, but never have.

4. The Godfather (1972) Probably the most shameful movie on my list of shame.

5. The Godfather: Part II (1974) The sequel to what is probably the most shameful movie on my list of shame.

6. The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966) I've only recently gotten into older westerns.

7. Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964) I've seen this in bits and pieces, but never from start to finish.

8. Schindlerís List (1993) Ralph Fiennes is so charming and I don't want him to radicalize me.

9. Tokyo Story (1953) I don't think I had even heard of this movie before this year.

10. Battleship Potemkin (1925) The silentness and Russianness of this one has always seemed intimidating.

Spatulater bro!
Aug 19, 2003

Punch! Punch! Punch!



Now THAT'S a juicy list!

Magic Hate Ball
May 6, 2007

ha ha ha!
you've already paid for this


Tetsuo: The Iron Man

Hot diggety! I'd say the first two thirds of this or so are one of the best films I've ever seen, and the last third is mostly a step down, but that's still like 45 minutes of unmatchable cinema bliss. The only thing I knew about this going into it was that it was like Eraserhead on amphetamines, which is fairly accurate in that you get the same level of audio-visual overload but in a more acute, hectic fashion. The use of stop motion reminded me a lot of Svankmajer's Alice, constantly warping and inventing, with a similar kind of claustrophobic audio landscape. You could just release the audio from this film as an album and it would be a satisfying industrial nightmare on its own. As a side note, something I love about older films is how selective foley often was, as opposed to modern techniques where it feels like the foley is like eight hundred layers of room tones and ambient noises. Obviously this is heightened here, because it was a very, very cheap movie, but the total artificiality of the soundtrack, the fact that it's completely expressionistic, peppered with both silence and chaotic discord, is a perfect match for the explosive creativity of the visuals.

So much happens at once all the time in this that it's hard for me to select moments to discuss, but some bits stand out to me, such as the sexy car crash saxophone interludes, the eating scene (talk about foley), and the vision of the "metal world" towards the end. This is true expressionism and one of the great examples of what film is capable of as a medium.

10/10

shamezone

1) Cries and Whispers - red movie
2) The Blue Angel - Dietrich movie
3) One Sings, The Other Doesn't - varda!
4) The Deer Hunter - wedding movie
5) The Tree of Wooden Clogs - mike leigh's favorite
6) Last House on the Left - violent movie
7) Salesman - real movie
8) Don't Look Now - venetian movie
9) Alexander Nevsky - ice movie
10) A League Of Their Own - baseball movie

[full list] Floating Weeds 9/10, Daisies 8/10, Stray Dog 8/10, Victim 6/10, Man Bites Dog 9/10, Night and Fog 10/10, Weekend 8/10, Jubilee 10/10, Sans Soleil 10/10, Candidate 8/10, Valerie and Her Week of Wonders 10/10, The Freshman 5/10, Garlic Is As Good As Ten Mothers 10/10, Branded to Kill 8/10, In Heaven There Is No Beer? 10/10, Blood Simple 10/10, The Marriage of Maria Braun 7/10, A Day In The Country 7/10, A Brief History of Time 10/10, Gates of Heaven 10/10, The Thin Blue Line 10/10, The Fog of War 10/10, My Beautiful Laundrette 10/10, Blind Chance 8/10, My Winnipeg 10/10, The River 7/10, Odd Man Out 8/10, The Passion of Anna 9/10, Brute Force 10/10, The Rite 5/10, The Piano Teacher 10/10, Ashes and Diamonds 7/10, Meantime 9/10, Carnival of Souls 8/10, La Notte 10/10, Frances Ha 10/10, L'avventura, Again 10/10, A Room With a View 9/10, Laura 8/10, Marjorie Prime 10/10, Ex Machina 8/10, Tampopo 10/10, Pickpocket 4/10, Harlan County USA 10/10, The Spirit of the Beehive 10/10, Heaven's Gate 4/10, A Short Film About Killing 9/10, The Pillow Book 6/10, Desert Hearts 9/10, Alice in the Cities 10/10, Yi Yi 10/10, Rififi 9/10, Children of Paradise 10/10, A Poem is a Naked Person 8/10, Late Autumn 8/10, Chimes at Midnight 10/10 Watership Down 9/10, Ugetsu 9/10, Veronika Voss 9/10, The Hidden Fortress 7/10, Close-Up 10/10, Journey to Italy 10/10, L'Eclisse 7/10, Andrei Rublev 11/10, Vagabond 9/10, The Cabinet of Dr Caligari 9/10, Shoplifters 10/10, Escape From New York 10/10, Die Hard 10/10, The Last Picture Show 9/10, Mr Smith Goes To Washington 8/10, Saturday Night Fever 9/10, First Blood 7/10, Mad Max 7/10, Come and See 10/10, Friday the 13th 7/10, Predator 5/10, Sicario 10/10, Grizzly Man 9/10, Cache 10/10, The Evil Dead 9/10, Tetsuo: The Iron Man (total: 182)

CriminyCraffft gets The Godfather

twernt
Mar 11, 2003

Whoa whoa wait, time out.


The Godfather

I was worried that watching this for the first time would be like, after so many other movies had referenced it. Like seeing Die Hard in the late 90s. It definitely holds up and its reputation is well deserved! Right away, I had to look up who had won the Art Direction and Cinematography awards that year because so many scenes are just beautiful to look at. Otherwise, Iím sure itís all been said before but I wanted to share some of my favorite things:

* Contrast between light and dark during the whole wedding sequence.
* Eerie tension in the empty hospital that could have come right out of a horror movie.
* Screeching streetcar and the closeup of Michael's eyes during his meeting with Solozzo and McCluskey.
* Baiting Sonny and the scene at the toll both.
* The meeting of the families and Don Corleoneís speech about his superstitious nature.
* The baptism where Michael is settling business and the way itís a callback to the wedding.

I also watched Part 2 and didnít like it quite as much, though it was still fantastic. Itís hard to describe but it almost felt like it was a mini series stitched together into a very long feature film. Surprisingly sympathetic to Castro, but if the whole series is a critique of capitalism that makes sense.

My list of shame:
1. The Rules of the Game (1939) Iíve never seen anything by Jean Renoir and this seems like a sensible place to start
2. Halloween (1978) I really like Carpenter but Iíve never seen this for some reason.
3. The Hills Have Eyes (1977) Another classic 70s horror movie I've always wanted to see, but never have.
4. The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966) I've only recently gotten into older westerns.
5. Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964) I've seen this in bits and pieces, but never from start to finish.
6. Schindlerís List (1993) Ralph Fiennes is so charming and I don't want him to radicalize me.
8. Tokyo Story (1953) I don't think I had even heard of this movie before this year.
8. Battleship Potemkin (1925) The silentness and Russianness of this one has always seemed intimidating.
9. Safety Last! (1923) Thatís Lobstertainment!
10. Alien (1979) Iíve seen Aliens many times and Iíve even seen the hated Alien Resurrection so this is a very shameful omission.

Watched:
The Godfather 5, The Godfather: Part II 4.5

Magic Hate Ball I think you should watch One Sings, The Other Doesn't.

bitterandtwisted
Sep 4, 2006






There's a lot of gold in your list! I think I'll give you

CriminyCraffft posted:

10. Alien (1979) I’ve seen Aliens many times and I’ve even seen the hated Alien Resurrection so this is a very shameful omission.



Run Lola Run
A woman runs to save her boyfriend

It's stylish, energetic and fun and there's more to it than I expected, with the repeating timeline and butterfly effect flashforwards. The story is told almost entirely through the visuals. I think you'd be able to follow everything even if you turned off the subs and don't speak German. It's short at 80 minutes, but that's the perfect length for it.
Love the banging soundtrack. It's so 90s cool.

My List:

1) (highest ranked imdb) Hamilton
2) (comedy) Any Luarel and Hardy feature film Not seen one before
3) (animation) Anomalisa interesting concept
4) (Academy Award winner) Patton
5) (foreign language) The 400 Blows said to be one of the best French films ever
6) (Western or Musical) Shane one of the most famous of the era
7) (Horror) I Spit on your Grave (1978) Infamous
8) (sci fi/fantasy) Alphaville sounds intriguing
9) (epic) The Last Emperor
10) (wildcard) Quardophenia mods vs rockers

Watched (99): Taxi Driver; Close Encounters of the Third Kind; The Iron Giant; Platoon; American History X; City Lights; My Neighbour Totoro; Rashomon; Duck Soup; Friday 13th (1980); Birdman; Frankenstein (1931); Time Bandits; Carrie (1976); King Kong (1933); Das Boot; The Blair Witch Project (1999); The Sting; Annie Hall; The Bridge on the River Kwai; The Cabinet of Dr Caligari; Godzilla (1954); Bicycle Thieves; The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974); The English Patient; Scanners; Forbidden Planet; Deliverance; The Creature from the Black Lagoon; Life is Beautiful; Minority Report; Rosemary's Baby; On the Waterfront; Solaris (1972); Driving Miss Daisy; Eraserhead; M (1931); This is Spinal Tap; Death Race 2000; The Producers (1967); Martin; Easy Rider; Office Space; Ghost in the Shell (1995); The Kid; Freaks (1932); The Abyss; Ben Hur (1959); Poltergeist (1982); Escape from New York; Once Upon a Time in America; Phantasm; Dracula (1958); Videodrome; Slumdog Millionaire; The Blob (1958); The Blob (1988); My Fair Lady; Avengers: Infinity War; Cinema Paradiso; 8 1/2; The Lord of the Rings (1978); Logan's Run; Willow; Misery; Bringing up Baby; Aguirre, The Wrath of God; The Man Who Fell to Earth; Candyman; The Dark Crystal; Tron; Andhadhun; Avengers: Endgame; The Lives of Others; Critters; Harakiri (1962); Blood and Black Lace; Grave of the Fireflies; The Seven Year Itch; Wings; Modern Times; The Searchers; Coraline; Cabaret; Tokyo Story; Joker; Dr Zhivago; Once Upon a Time in the West; The Hidden Fortress; An American in Paris; Der Golem; Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid; Sholay; Waltz with Bashir; Dances with Wolves; 1917; Wild Strawberries; Moulin Rouge; Run Lola Run

twernt
Mar 11, 2003

Whoa whoa wait, time out.


This is a tough choice bitterandtwisted but I think you should watch

bitterandtwisted posted:

9) (epic) The Last Emperor

Alien

Thank you! This is going to be my year of Harry Dean Stanton, which is not a bad thing.

What a fantastically tense and scary movie! All of the pragmatic blue collar banter during the first half hour or so really makes the rest of the movie all the more terrifying. These aren't soldiers of fortune plundering a forbidden tomb or coeds spending an ill-advised weekend at a creepy old cabin. They're the crew of a tugboat in space, just doing what an all-powerful, amoral corporation has ordered them to do.

Knowing the general plot of this movie didn't make me enjoy it any less. The only thing that ever really took me out of the moment was the music, which kept reminding me of both Raiders of the Lost Ark and Star Wars. I don't think it was the same composer, but this just may be what movie scores sounded like from about 1977 to 1981.

My list of shame:
1. Halloween (1978) I really like Carpenter but Iíve never seen this for some reason.
2. Some Like It Hot (1959) I've never actually seen anything with Marilyn Monroe.
3. Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964) I've seen this in bits and pieces, but never from start to finish.
4. Schindlerís List (1993) Ralph Fiennes is so charming and I don't want him to radicalize me.
5. Tokyo Story (1953) I don't think I had even heard of this movie before this year.
6. Safety Last! (1923) Thatís Lobstertainment!
7. A Woman Under the Influence (1974) I feel like should watch more Cassavetes.
8. City of God (2002) The favela segment in Baraka reminded me that I've never seen this.
9. A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984) This is the highest-ranked movie on the They Shoot Zombies list that I haven't seen.
10. 8 1/2 (1963) I've never seen anything by Fellini and this is his most popular one.

Watched:
The Godfather 5, The Godfather: Part II 4.5, Alien 4.5, The Hills Have Eyes 3, The Rules of the Game 4, Battleship Potemkin 4, The Good, the Bad and the Ugly 4.5

twernt fucked around with this message at 18:30 on Mar 2, 2021

bitterandtwisted
Sep 4, 2006






I guess there's some similarity with the moodier bits of John Williams' scores but my first reaction to your post was to imagine Ripley fighting the Alien to the Indian Jones main theme

twernt
Mar 11, 2003

Whoa whoa wait, time out.


Now someone just needs to write an overly long essay comparing Indie's fedora and Jonesy the cat to Inception's totems.

BiggerBoat
Sep 26, 2007

I'm sorry, everyone.

The great thing to me about the Godfather films (besides everything) is how rewarding they are on re-watch. I found it almost impossible to entirely keep track of who was who and which person was referring to another one but it didn't detract from my enjoyment at all. I had to watch the original probably 5 times to get a handle on all last names being bandied about and fully understand who was doing what and why.

CriminyCraffft posted:


I also watched Part 2 and didnít like it quite as much, though it was still fantastic. Itís hard to describe but it almost felt like it was a mini series stitched together into a very long feature film. Surprisingly sympathetic to Castro, but if the whole series is a critique of capitalism that makes sense.

That's interesting that you point that out. There's a cut together version of the films called The Godfather Saga that changes all the editing to be in chronological order. Consensus seems to be that it's not really good but I remember liking it and it makes your "mini series" observation even more succinct.

BiggerBoat fucked around with this message at 16:52 on Feb 24, 2021

twernt
Mar 11, 2003

Whoa whoa wait, time out.


BiggerBoat posted:

The great thing to me about the Godfather films (besides everything) is how rewarding they are on re-watch. I found it almost impossible to entirely keep track of who was who and which person was referring to another one but it didn't detract from my enjoyment at all. I had to watch the original probably 5 times to get a handle on all last names being bandied about and fully understand who was doing what and why.

I would definitely like to rewatch parts 1 and 2 at some point, but there are still so many movies I haven't seen!

Meanwhile, I'm working my way through my list and updating it but I should ask if anyone is waiting on a recommendation from their list.

Zogo
Jul 29, 2003



CriminyCraffft posted:

4. Schindlerís List (1993) Ralph Fiennes is so charming and I don't want him to radicalize me.

"I'm only trying to do my job."




The Story of the Last Chrysanthemum - A kabuki actor gets fed up with all the empty praise of geisha flatterers. He's only getting the praise because of his famous surname. In contrast, the family's wet nurse gives him a refreshing dose of honesty and says his acting sucks. But the family sees this relationship as inappropriate so this sets off a chain of drama and a life of struggle for Kiku.

He's stubborn and decides to go it alone so-to-speak. So he continually has to restart his acting career as he works alongside a bunch of hammy and perpetually laid off wandering actors. It's a downward spiral into the toilet and one wonders if there will ever be some kind of rebound or reprieve.

Ultimately his career rebounds thanks to his wife's will but he's still surrounded by heartless manipulators so he goes through personal tragedies in the midst of good career fortunes. It shares some themes with Romeo and Juliet (1968) and The Red Shoes (1948). It could be titled A Star is Reborn.


Also watched:

Holy Motors - Every so often you'll come across a film where it's simply impossible to predict where it's going. There's a ton of unconventionality here and some artifice and some alienness and some fantasy. Denis Lavant runs through a gamut of characters that very few get to in a single film. Using a limousine as a dressing room he's a shapeshifter who doesn't get much rest.

The framework of the film vaguely resembles something found in e.g. Collateral (2004) but with characters and direction inspired by films like The Holy Mountain (1973) and Inland Empire (2006). Even with these comparisons it still feels like it's comfortably defying genres.



James Bond versus Godzilla (42/64 completed):

Hesitation (46 completed):

#38 To Have and Have Not - From what I've heard this one sounds similar to Casablanca. 8/27/20

#41 Frankenstein Conquers the World - Another big monster film. 10/9/20

#44 Europe '51 - There are still many Roberto Rossellini films I haven't seen. 11/28/20

#48 Heroes of the East - Japanese martial arts vs. Chinese martial arts. 1/12/21

#51 Dogville - A classic case of hesitation. 2/15/21

#52 The Turin Horse - A highly ranked recent film. 2/15/21

new #53 The Limey - Been on my watch list for far too long. 3/2/21

BBC Culture: The 100 Greatest Foreign Language Films (96/100 completed):

DVD Beaver's Top 100 Desert Island Films (95/100 completed):

new Mouchette - I've heard this is similar to Rosetta. 3/2/21

Too Late for Tears - An interesting title. 5/27/20

Woman on the Run - Apparently an underwatched film noir. 6/16/20

Zogo fucked around with this message at 06:12 on Mar 3, 2021

twernt
Mar 11, 2003

Whoa whoa wait, time out.


Zogo posted:

#38 To Have and Have Not - From what I've heard this one sounds similar to Casablanca. 8/27/20

Because, according to the trailer, the only law is the law of the Caribbean!

Schindlerís List

This was a relentless series of punches right in the gut! There were so many great and understated performances and the fact that it was shot and directed so well just amplified how heartbreaking everything was. I felt guilty for noticing and enjoying the movie as a piece of art.

Going into it, I didn't know Schindlerís List was over three hours long so I was surprised by how unsympathetic Oskar Schindler was at the beginning. I'm not sure how much license they took with him, but it's much more satisfying to have the "protagonist" learn to see others as human and then fight for them, giving up everything he had by the end.

My list of shame:
1. Harakiri (1962) I need to expand my period Japanese viewing beyond Kurosawa and Mifune.
2. Some Like It Hot (1959) I've never actually seen anything with Marilyn Monroe.
3. Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964) I've seen this in bits and pieces, but never from start to finish.
4. The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928) I haven't see any Carl Theodor Dreyer.
5. Tokyo Story (1953) I don't think I had even heard of this movie before this year.
6. Safety Last! (1923) Thatís Lobstertainment!
7. A Woman Under the Influence (1974) I feel like should watch more Cassavetes.
8. City of God (2002) The favela segment in Baraka reminded me that I've never seen this.
9. A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984) This is the highest-ranked movie on the They Shoot Zombies list that I haven't seen.
10. 8 1/2 (1963) I've never seen anything by Fellini and this is his most popular one.

Watched:
The Godfather 5, The Godfather: Part II 4.5, Alien 4.5, The Hills Have Eyes 3, The Rules of the Game 4, Battleship Potemkin 4, The Good, the Bad and the Ugly 4.5, Schindlerís List 5, Halloween 4

twernt fucked around with this message at 22:11 on Mar 5, 2021

Zogo
Jul 29, 2003



CriminyCraffft posted:

9. A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984) This is the highest-ranked movie on the They Shoot Zombies list that I haven't seen.

"Come to Freddy."




To Have and Have Not - This one does have a passing resemblance to Casablanca. It's set in Martinique but it has the same feel to it. It shares a conflicted couple stuck between the larger French on French conflict. Of course, it's not as quotable as Casablanca but that goes without saying.

One of the main plot points is Harry Morgan (Humphrey Bogart) and his reluctance to let the French resistance use his fishing boat to transport people. He's more interested in using it to let the rich fish off of it. Captain Renard is the main antagonist and he comes strutting into the hotel with serious Jabba the Hutt energy. And he wears a beret to top it off.

Harry is able to turn the tables on Renard so this one ends on a happier note.



James Bond versus Godzilla (42/64 completed):

Hesitation (47 completed):

#41 Frankenstein Conquers the World - Another big monster film. 10/9/20

#44 Europe '51 - There are still many Roberto Rossellini films I haven't seen. 11/28/20

#48 Heroes of the East - Japanese martial arts vs. Chinese martial arts. 1/12/21

#51 Dogville - A classic case of hesitation. 2/15/21

#52 The Turin Horse - A highly ranked recent film. 2/15/21

#53 The Limey - Been on my watch list for far too long. 3/2/21

new #54 I Confess - This is a Hitchcock film with critical praise but I never hear it mentioned much these days. 3/9/21

BBC Culture: The 100 Greatest Foreign Language Films (96/100 completed):

DVD Beaver's Top 100 Desert Island Films (95/100 completed):

Mouchette - I've heard this is similar to Rosetta. 3/2/21

Too Late for Tears - An interesting title. 5/27/20

Woman on the Run - Apparently an underwatched film noir. 6/16/20

twernt
Mar 11, 2003

Whoa whoa wait, time out.


Zogo posted:

#41 Frankenstein Conquers the World - Another big monster film. 10/9/20

This looks like a lot of fun.

A Nightmare on Elm Street

"You won't need a stretcher up there. You'll need a mop."

In this first film of the franchise, Freddy Kreuger is more of a standard supernatural boogieman than the charismatic killer he evolves into.

The two real innovations here are that Freddy is not a relentless, hulking monster like Michael Meyers or Jason Voorhees and that he attacks children in their dreams, where they're both emotionally and physically vulnerable. In fact, Freddy seems to be the manifestation of the parents' guilt, existing along the edge of what is real.

The practical effects hold up surprisingly well. Glen and Nancy are sympathetic. Nancy's mom drinks a lot.

My list of shame:
1. Harakiri (1962) I need to expand my period Japanese viewing beyond Kurosawa and Mifune.
2. Some Like It Hot (1959) I've never actually seen anything with Marilyn Monroe.
3. Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964) I've seen this in bits and pieces, but never from start to finish.
4. The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928) I haven't see any Carl Theodor Dreyer.
5. Tokyo Story (1953) I don't think I had even heard of this movie before this year.
6. Safety Last! (1923) Thatís Lobstertainment!
7. A Woman Under the Influence (1974) I feel like should watch more Cassavetes.
8. City of God (2002) The favela segment in Baraka reminded me that I've never seen this.
9. Friday the 13th (1980) Another 80s slasher that I should have seen by now, but haven't.
10. 8 1/2 (1963) I've never seen anything by Fellini and this is his most popular one.

Watched:
The Godfather 5, The Godfather: Part II 4.5, Alien 4.5, The Hills Have Eyes 3, The Rules of the Game 4, Battleship Potemkin 4, The Good, the Bad and the Ugly 4.5, Schindlerís List 5, Halloween 4, A Nightmare on Elm Street 4

BiggerBoat
Sep 26, 2007

I'm sorry, everyone.

I loving suck because I want to post in the thread and hand out assignments since it's a cool idea but I still haven't made time to watch Casablanca like 2 or 3 years later.

twernt
Mar 11, 2003

Whoa whoa wait, time out.


BiggerBoat posted:

I loving suck because I want to post in the thread and hand out assignments since it's a cool idea but I still haven't made time to watch Casablanca like 2 or 3 years later.

Don't feel bad! I think you can take a mulligan and ask someone to pick something else if you don't think you'll ever watch it.

Spatulater bro!
Aug 19, 2003

Punch! Punch! Punch!



Or, you know, just watch Casablanca.

Magic Hate Ball
May 6, 2007

ha ha ha!
you've already paid for this


One Sings, The Other Doesn't

This is a difficult one! Varda takes a sort of epistolary approach, framing the narrative as a series of post cards. While this is befitting of the sumptuous travelogue vibe, it also means that the actual dramatic arc of the two women, Pauline (nicknamed "Pomme") and Suzanne, comes in tiny scattered pieces, and it feels less sprawling and more sporadic. The first chunk is particularly problematic, with a lengthy, dour prologue that's narratively important but also kind of a red herring for a first-time watcher, and the structure of brief glimpses of their lives makes it tough to get close to the characters. Unlike Vagabond or Cleo, this film is less essayistic, so instead of a sequence of focused vignettes, it's more like an assemblage of...well, post cards. We glean what we can.

However, it also pays off. As things move along, and time passes (it takes place over a period of about a decade), we start to get a sense of who these two women actually are when certain elements of their personalities stick around, or change more slowly, while other facets come and go. That's really where the magic comes in, with the slow portraiture. Suzanne moves at a steady pace, while Pomme finds herself going here and there. One keeps trying out new personas and attitudes, the other gradually builds a fully realized version of herself. We can tell when one is tricking herself, and can sense disaster, and we hope earnestly for the success of the other's carefully picked love. Two different people, becoming two different, but complete, people, in two different ways.

Varda also points repeatedly to the importance of women supporting one another, and about the value of alternative family structures. The unit that Pomme and Suzanne form is founded on a heavy moment of trust and sacrifice - Pomme lies to her parents about needing money for a school trip to pay for Suzanne's secret abortion - and they remain unshakable through the following years. They also form their own families, finding and creating trust where they can, with Suzanne escaping her horrible parents via help from another local woman, and Pomme on the road with her all-female band.

One of the most difficult moments comes when Pomme marries an Iranian man who presents himself as a feminist when in France, but, when she moves with him to Iran, quietly suffocates her by demanding she be a wife and nothing more. And yet, when she returns to France to have their child, she struggles to leave him. Varda's portrayal of this tortured ambiguity is so subtle and complex, and is aided by the time we've spent dropping in on her throughout the preceding years. We are intimately familiar with what she hoped for, what she expected, and what she sees in him, and of the time she's already spent, but also with the agonizing collapse of her self-imposed illusions about her life in Iran.

While I suggested earlier that this isn't as much an "essayistic" film like Cleo or Vagabond, where a thesis is analyzed and dissected via clear vignettes, One Sings is convincing in its own earthy way. Varda compares and contrasts the two characters, but all of their experiences point towards the same struggle for liberation, and she ultimately paints a finely detailed picture of what liberation can mean. Pomme and Suzanne work their way from the damp hell of pre-lib France into a sunny feminist paradise, and it never feels false or fake.

A quick word on the music and cinematography. The music is pretty good, though most of the songs, like the story itself, are presented in fragments, and kind of blur together. The cinematography, though, is unbelievable, and has the same aura of her other two color films I've seen (Vagabond and Le Bonheur). The winking visual jokes are subdued here, but the photographic observational style is breathtaking, and I can't remember another film that was so sumptously textured. It's also all rendered in the creamy tones that the other Varda restorations have (and that I've seen in many other restorations), which is mostly a boon. The colors are rich - warm indigos and browns, cozy greens, and saturated, appealing teals - but the tint leans hard in some places and sometimes it looks like someone urinated in the film canister (this is particularly noticeable in afternoon scenes - the sky turns an unmistakable pee color).

This is a movie that I kind of wish I'd seen before I'd seen it, but having seen it, I'm pretty happy.

8/10

shamezone

1) Cries and Whispers - red movie
2) The Blue Angel - Dietrich movie
3) Daughters of the Dust - movie i want to see movie
4) The Deer Hunter - wedding movie
5) The Tree of Wooden Clogs - mike leigh's favorite movie
6) Last House on the Left - violent movie
7) Salesman - real movie
8) Don't Look Now - venetian movie
9) Alexander Nevsky - ice movie
10) A League Of Their Own - baseball movie

[full list] Floating Weeds 9/10, Daisies 8/10, Stray Dog 8/10, Victim 6/10, Man Bites Dog 9/10, Night and Fog 10/10, Weekend 8/10, Jubilee 10/10, Sans Soleil 10/10, Candidate 8/10, Valerie and Her Week of Wonders 10/10, The Freshman 5/10, Garlic Is As Good As Ten Mothers 10/10, Branded to Kill 8/10, In Heaven There Is No Beer? 10/10, Blood Simple 10/10, The Marriage of Maria Braun 7/10, A Day In The Country 7/10, A Brief History of Time 10/10, Gates of Heaven 10/10, The Thin Blue Line 10/10, The Fog of War 10/10, My Beautiful Laundrette 10/10, Blind Chance 8/10, My Winnipeg 10/10, The River 7/10, Odd Man Out 8/10, The Passion of Anna 9/10, Brute Force 10/10, The Rite 5/10, The Piano Teacher 10/10, Ashes and Diamonds 7/10, Meantime 9/10, Carnival of Souls 8/10, La Notte 10/10, Frances Ha 10/10, L'avventura, Again 10/10, A Room With a View 9/10, Laura 8/10, Marjorie Prime 10/10, Ex Machina 8/10, Tampopo 10/10, Pickpocket 4/10, Harlan County USA 10/10, The Spirit of the Beehive 10/10, Heaven's Gate 4/10, A Short Film About Killing 9/10, The Pillow Book 6/10, Desert Hearts 9/10, Alice in the Cities 10/10, Yi Yi 10/10, Rififi 9/10, Children of Paradise 10/10, A Poem is a Naked Person 8/10, Late Autumn 8/10, Chimes at Midnight 10/10 Watership Down 9/10, Ugetsu 9/10, Veronika Voss 9/10, The Hidden Fortress 7/10, Close-Up 10/10, Journey to Italy 10/10, L'Eclisse 7/10, Andrei Rublev 11/10, Vagabond 9/10, The Cabinet of Dr Caligari 9/10, Shoplifters 10/10, Escape From New York 10/10, Die Hard 10/10, The Last Picture Show 9/10, Mr Smith Goes To Washington 8/10, Saturday Night Fever 9/10, First Blood 7/10, Mad Max 7/10, Come and See 10/10, Friday the 13th 7/10, Predator 5/10, Sicario 10/10, Grizzly Man 9/10, Cache 10/10, The Evil Dead 9/10, Tetsuo: The Iron Man 10/10, One Sings, The Other Doesn't 8/10 (total: 183)

CriminyCraffft gets A Woman Under the Influence

Chili
Jan 23, 2004

College kids ain't shit


Fun Shoe

Spatulater bro! posted:

Or, you know, just watch Casablanca.

Yeah, I've had to take a mulligan here or there, but Casablanca is not a mulligan movie. Give it ten minutes, most people will stick with it at that point. If not? Bin it and get back here...

I need to do the same with Rififi

Spatulater bro!
Aug 19, 2003

Punch! Punch! Punch!



To be honest, I fear for the future of someone in this thread who DNFs Casablanca.

Jurgan
May 8, 2007

Just pour it directly into your gaping mouth-hole you decadent slut


CriminyCraffft posted:

The two real innovations here are that Freddy is not a relentless, hulking monster like Michael Meyers or Jason Voorhees and that he attacks children in their dreams, where they're both emotionally and physically vulnerable. In fact, Freddy seems to be the manifestation of the parents' guilt, existing along the edge of what is real.

I think the most interesting read of the original movie is that Freddy was innocent of the original murders, and the parents made him a monster. This doesn't hold up if you consider the sequels, but originally there was only supposed to be the one movie.

twernt
Mar 11, 2003

Whoa whoa wait, time out.


Jurgan posted:

I think the most interesting read of the original movie is that Freddy was innocent of the original murders, and the parents made him a monster. This doesn't hold up if you consider the sequels, but originally there was only supposed to be the one movie.

I had never heard this before and it's super interesting! I'm definitely going to try to watch the rest of the series because I know he eventually becomes more of a comedic Crypt Keeper kind of character, in addition to the murders and whatnot.

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twernt
Mar 11, 2003

Whoa whoa wait, time out.


Magic Hate Ball posted:

6) Last House on the Left - violent movie

This is on my list and I'd really like to read what you think of it!

A Woman Under the Influence

This is the second John Cassavetes Iíve seen and Iím having trouble describing his style and what I love about it. The way the camera lingers on little, personal moments makes it all feel so natural. Then thereís the sound. Quiet noises are allowed to be quiet, conversations overlap in a very improvisational way, and he embraces background noise. It all feels like a home movie and I mean that in the most complimentary way possible.

Gena Rowlands is amazing. Her range of emotion and expression is fantastic. Iím struggling to think of a better performance. Peter Falkís Nick is also great. Heís helpless and can only react with anger to a situation he canít hope to control.

My list of shame:
1. Harakiri (1962) I need to expand my period Japanese viewing beyond Kurosawa and Mifune.
2. Some Like It Hot (1959) I've never actually seen anything with Marilyn Monroe.
3. Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964) I've seen this in bits and pieces, but never from start to finish.
4. The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928) I haven't see any Carl Theodor Dreyer.
5. Tokyo Story (1953) I don't think I had even heard of this movie before this year.
6. Safety Last! (1923) Thatís Lobstertainment!
7. M (1931) This is supposed be noir, but before noir was noir.
8. City of God (2002) The favela segment in Baraka reminded me that I've never seen this.
9. Friday the 13th (1980) Another 80s slasher that I should have seen by now, but haven't.
10. 8 1/2 (1963) I've never seen anything by Fellini and this is his most popular one.

Watched:
The Godfather 5, The Godfather: Part II 4.5, Alien 4.5, The Hills Have Eyes 3, The Rules of the Game 4, Battleship Potemkin 4, The Good, the Bad and the Ugly 4.5, Schindlerís List 5, Halloween 4, A Nightmare on Elm Street 4, A Woman Under the Influence 4.5

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