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Sir Sidney Poitier
Aug 14, 2006

My favourite actor


I know little about firearms. In film and TV, guards carry pistols. They hear a noise and decide to go and check it out, and on the way they cock the pistols. This seems to happen with shotguns, too.

Is this silly? To my uneducated mind it wouldn't make sense for them to carry a weapon that's not (barring the safety) ready to fire as they wouldn't know when they'd need it, they might get surprised by someone and having to take time to cock it before firing would get them killed.

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Sir Sidney Poitier
Aug 14, 2006

My favourite actor


Illegal Clown posted:

I guess it makes sense when the gun is a 1911 or other SAO.

Can you elaborate on this please? Why would it make sense with those and what's an SAO? I assumed semi automatic <something>.

Sir Sidney Poitier
Aug 14, 2006

My favourite actor


What is the mechanism by which dry-firing an airgun can damage it?

Sir Sidney Poitier
Aug 14, 2006

My favourite actor


I don't quite understand mil dots. I read a couple of guides, but there's one thing I don't get - zoom. My scope is 3-9 zoom, so if I have it at 3x and I see something that's 1' tall as 1 dot, I can then zoom in and the 1' object will be 3 dots tall. So does one have to factor zoom into the calculations for range? Or have I missed something really simple?

Sir Sidney Poitier
Aug 14, 2006

My favourite actor


The size of the reticle stays the same, so something of the same size, when zoomed in more, covers more dots. Unfortunately the scope is second hand so I have no documentation. But I can, presumably, work out at what magnification it's accurate when I know the size and range of something.

Sir Sidney Poitier
Aug 14, 2006

My favourite actor


Didn't know whether I should post in here, in the small questions thread in A/T, or make a new thread in A/T. Here won.

On my new (third hand) air rifle, the cocking lever (I think it's aluminium?) has what looks like a bit of dirt or patina on it. Here are some linked images of it.

http://imgur.com/RaXYp.jpg
http://imgur.com/b8YMP.jpg
http://imgur.com/Kzi1b.jpg
http://imgur.com/kpQxH.jpg

It's probably most visible in the second and last images, the last one is deliberately underexposed to make it more visible. Does anyone know how I can get rid of the marking?

Sir Sidney Poitier fucked around with this message at 15:43 on Jul 2, 2010

Sir Sidney Poitier
Aug 14, 2006

My favourite actor


I mentioned this in the pictures thread, then figured out I could come here and maybe get an answer:

When I fired my grandfather's Anschutz .22LR rifle the kick was WAY less (barely noticeable) than my airgun at the time (a cheap Chinese piece of poo poo) when the .22LR round is at least 10x the energy. I THINK the .22LR was one of these, with a moderator on it. The airgun was a .22 break-barrel SMK B2. Why would the kick be so much smaller on something which likely was in excess of 120ft/lbs energy than on something which was probably under 10ft/lbs? I know the real gun was heavier, but not by a great deal.

Sir Sidney Poitier
Aug 14, 2006

My favourite actor


Not being a firearm owner, I don't know this:

How sensitive are primers? Are they only sensitive to sharp shocks like hammers striking them? Or would a gradual application of the same amount of force cause them to fire? What does one need to be worried about when handling ammunition (specifically concerning the primers)?

Sir Sidney Poitier
Aug 14, 2006

My favourite actor


The main reason I was wondering was regarding cartridge belts, and if one would need to be careful when wearing them. Thanks for the information.

Sir Sidney Poitier
Aug 14, 2006

My favourite actor


thermobollocks posted:

Are you talking about actual, linked machine gun ammo, or clothing belts with cartridges in them? Anything clothing is going to be deactivated -- probably not even real primers.

I'm talking about clothing, but I'm talking about the real thing that might be worn by hunters or clay shooters:

http://www.uttings.co.uk/Product/568/104641/beretta-b1one-cartridge-belt-ber-ca1601190706/

Sir Sidney Poitier
Aug 14, 2006

My favourite actor


Does anyone know of a good guide for the basics of using a rifle sling for steadying, or the different sorts available? Wikipedia mentioned a number of varieties and google showed me how to use one sort, but I don't know what the options are for my gun that's got 2 of this sort of mount:

Sir Sidney Poitier
Aug 14, 2006

My favourite actor


Uncle Caveman posted:

The best sling to use as an actual shooting aid is still the US 1907:

http://www.fulton-armory.com/slinguse.htm

Turner makes the best service slings I've seen.

Also, a decent low-cost alternative is the canvas Service sling:

http://www.ray-vin.com/tech/websling/webslinghelp.htm

Looking at the fixings on them I don't think they'd attach to the mounts I posted a picture of. It may just be that I am poo poo out of luck with those mounts. They're just over half an inch wide.

Sir Sidney Poitier
Aug 14, 2006

My favourite actor


In the UK are there any standards for the mechanical safety of guns? I ask because on another forum I'm a member of there was a chap selling a few shotguns for 10 each because he needed the space in his safe and they weren't really worth anything. Do guns get certified as mechanically sound in any way?

Sir Sidney Poitier
Aug 14, 2006

My favourite actor


QuarkMartial posted:

I don't know anything about gun laws in the UK, but that sounds sketchy as hell.

In which way? If you mean safety-wise, that's why I'm asking if there's a standard or certification.

If you mean legality-wise, cheap/crappy second-hand firearms are worth less than you'd expect here because of the strict licensing. From what I've seen, anyway - on this forum old shotguns regularly go for 50. Edit: And even if they're safe, these 10 ones I mentioned would most assuredly be crappy.

Sir Sidney Poitier fucked around with this message at 08:23 on Aug 4, 2010

Sir Sidney Poitier
Aug 14, 2006

My favourite actor


Does anyone know of a place where I can get something I can print out and set at a fixed distance so that I can learn at what magnification level the mil dots on my scope are accurate?

Or instructions on how to make such a thing?

I did some calculations based on the size of A4 paper and it suggested that on my 6-24x50 scope the dots were accurate at 18x. I'd like to double check this with the method I outlined above since it would make more sense to me if it was accurate at 12x.

Sir Sidney Poitier
Aug 14, 2006

My favourite actor


My problem is I don't know where to start. I can't get my head around the calculations to figure it out for myself, despite trying. Also, unfortunately I only have a maximum of 35y to work with when pinning things up to look at, since that's the largest range we have at the airgun club and I don't have any land of my own.

Sir Sidney Poitier
Aug 14, 2006

My favourite actor


Thanks very much, I knew the ranging formula but my brain switches off when it comes to rearranging them. That's exactly what I was after.

Sir Sidney Poitier
Aug 14, 2006

My favourite actor


Here is what might be a stupid question, but I don't know much about this sort of thing:

If you've got two projectiles which are identical in all ways except that one is, for example, twice the weight of the other and you fire them both at the same muzzle velocity, will they both follow the same trajectory?

Sir Sidney Poitier
Aug 14, 2006

My favourite actor


Uncle Caveman posted:

My basic understanding is that if the powder charge is the same for both, the heavier bullet will lose velocity and drop faster than the lighter bullet.

I don't think I'm talking about when the powder charge is the same - because surely that would result in a lesser muzzle velocity for the heavier projectile. I'm talking about a charge that would result in them leaving the barrel at exactly the same velocity.

Sir Sidney Poitier
Aug 14, 2006

My favourite actor


I had a couple of questions about deer stalking & butchering, one got asked in GWS but I think this one belongs here a bit more:

I've gutted rabbits & chickens and I noticed the inside of them had the same smell that's hard to describe but you know it if you've smelt it. Does deer gutting share this same odour?

Sir Sidney Poitier
Aug 14, 2006

My favourite actor


I frequently see "silhouette" versions of guns. Like this:

http://www.sportsmanguncentre.co.uk/product/634b56e92589b8d674978679/CZ+ZKM+452+Silhouette+-%7C22LR/

What does silhouette mean in this context?

Sir Sidney Poitier
Aug 14, 2006

My favourite actor


This is coming from a Brit with little experience of powder burners. Since these things are so tightly controlled here I wasn't able to find this information just by checking out gun shop websites.

I'm thinking of getting into shooting powder burners. I've been shooting airguns for a little while and I've shot a little bit of .22LR. Ideally I'd like to be shooting .22LR at the higher end of its possible ranges but it seems virtually no clubs here cater for that, they're pretty much all 25y near me. Therefore I've been thinking about .308 or .223 because of the distances covered. What I wanted to know was how much do rounds of these calibres cost? A ballpark figure would do, I just need to know if it will be prohibitively expensive.

Comments on whether I should steer clear of a particular type of shooting would be welcomed too.

Sir Sidney Poitier
Aug 14, 2006

My favourite actor


Mtmd posted:

If you're basically limited to 25 yards why buy a larger centerfire caliber? That's way too short a range to really take advantage of a rifle cartridge. I'd stick with the .22 unless you just want the recoil of something bigger.

To clarify, I would not be shooting the larger calibre at 25 yards. It's just I'd only be able to shoot calibres at the clubs that cater to that sort of shooting - so it would either be 25y in .22LR at one indoor club or 200-1000y in .308/.223 at a different, outdoor club which, as far as I know, doesn't cater to 50y+ .22LR.

Sir Sidney Poitier
Aug 14, 2006

My favourite actor


Schigolch posted:

All else being equal, .223 will be far cheaper to shoot than .308.

I figured it might be. I think it might also be easier to get vermin shooting for that calibre added to my future license should I decide to go that direction.

I could really use some information on how much these things cost though, because I don't have a clue how expensive fullbore ammunition is.

Detective Thompson posted:

Would the outdoor club really not let you bring a .22?

I don't know, I just doubt it. The problem is that shooting clubs here have to be very formalised. That means that whilst they may have the facilities to cater to exactly what I want to do, if they haven't applied to the Home Office to be allowed to take part in that sort of shooting then I'm pretty sure they can't let it happen. Especially since I'm not particularly experienced with any firearms.

Sir Sidney Poitier fucked around with this message at 22:04 on Nov 8, 2010

Sir Sidney Poitier
Aug 14, 2006

My favourite actor


I like turtles posted:

Are you still in the UK? I don't know if this is high, low or average for there, but http://www.peterlawman.co.uk/ammunition.php

Yeah, I am. That looks most helpful - even if it's not average price it still gives me an idea. Thanks.

Strangely though, that site shows .308 being cheaper than .223. I reckon I could cope with 0.45 or so per round as they show there.

Sir Sidney Poitier
Aug 14, 2006

My favourite actor


I realise this is an incredibly broad question, but as I always say in this thread I don't know much about firearms.

What proportion of every-day guns have two-stage triggers? By which I mean that from the resting position there's some travel before the sear is reached and the gun is discharged. By every-day guns I mean things that aren't fancy specialised target rifles, I mean things like AR15s, Glocks, 1911s and so on. Is it a common thing on guns that aren't for competitions? Do more rifles have two stage triggers than pistols? What about shotguns? I'm just trying to gauge the prevalence of them without having the opportunity to handle lots of guns.

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Sir Sidney Poitier
Aug 14, 2006

My favourite actor


Otto Skorzeny posted:

You're describing a single stage trigger with take-up ('slack'); in a two-stage trigger, once the slack is taken up there's a period of resisted movement against the sear which comes to a stop at a definite point, where additional pressure is needed to finally trip the sear and send the firing pin moving forward. Two-stage triggers are near unheard of in pistols, but common among service rifles (M1s and M14s have them, most custom AR15 triggers are two stage, etc).

I did a bad job of describing it. You described what I meant.

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