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Alain Perdrix
Dec 19, 2007

Howdy!

If you buy a Sigma, it is you who will be the douchebag. They're ugly, and they're poo poo. If you don't believe Gtab, see what its trigger feels like (It feels like poo poo).

PS My cousin bought one, and he's as solid an endorsement for eugenics as you're ever going to find.

PPS Don't buy a Sigma.

e: as and for are two different words and, as such, have two different meanings

Alain Perdrix fucked around with this message at 02:33 on Jun 12, 2010

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Alain Perdrix
Dec 19, 2007

Howdy!

Uncle Caveman posted:

Yeah, but what are you gonna do about it? You can't even own a real gun. :crossarms:



Guy with the 870 was a Brit visiting with someone at the range during a VA/DC meet last year, he got a kick out of trying all our :911: stuff. We usually do some informal clay shooting, turns out he'd been a trap shooter for years and absolutely destroyed all of us.

This guy is awesome. Look at him unironically doing the Alan Partridge sports-casual look.

I bet he's from Norwich.

e: my girlfriend has pretty nasty depression and has bounced around on a few different meds, but she has been flying pretty straight for the last year or so, thanks to finding meds that work for her. She doesn't do the whole "lying in bed crying for hours / unable to function" thing.

As for me, I've had issues with depression in the past, but have found my way past it, and was never to the point where I needed treatment. A lot of people do though, and I suspect that it wouldn't take too much misfortune for me to wind up in the same state again down the road, as I am obviously prone to it.

Alain Perdrix fucked around with this message at 19:40 on Jun 17, 2010

Alain Perdrix
Dec 19, 2007

Howdy!

Will a .30 boresnake work well in a 6.5mm bore, or am I gonna get it stuck? :ohdear:

e: it looks like "no, no it won't work well" is the answer

Alain Perdrix fucked around with this message at 19:43 on Jun 18, 2010

Alain Perdrix
Dec 19, 2007

Howdy!

Cyrano4747 posted:

Better yet, Buy an actual .250/6.5mm bore snake.

That does seem like the common-sense choice. Probably should have figured that one out all by myself. :downs:

Alain Perdrix
Dec 19, 2007

Howdy!

Aperture Priority posted:

Where is it on the Remington?

Beside the trigger guard.

Alain Perdrix
Dec 19, 2007

Howdy!

^^^ gently caress yes, someone else watches rocket horses

rossmum posted:

I'm sorry, but ice hockey is the only true (non-shooting) sport

I am increasingly confused by you, with your tales of Tim Horton's and hockey. Are you an Australian who made his way to Canada briefly, but was then subsequently banished to the land of vegemite, or are you a Canadian who moved to Australia?

Alain Perdrix
Dec 19, 2007

Howdy!

AbdominalSnowman posted:

Not sure if this is the best place to ask, but can someone recommend me a few good lever-actions with an "Old West" aesthetic? I have been looking at stuff like the Henry Golden Boy, but everything I can find has been in the $600-1200+ range, which is more than I wanted to spend. Are there any decent lever actions that don't look all modern (I hate the look of Marlin lever actions, for example) that don't cost so much, or are they all that expensive?

Sounds like you like the straight stock, without the pistol grip. Honestly, the advice posted above, to find a nice used rifle, is solid. I'd suggest that you pick yourself up a nice, pre-1964 Winchester 1894 in .30-30.

Even if you don't hunt with it, everyone in North America probably needs to own at least one .30-30, and a nice old-school Winchester 94 is as fine as any.

Alain Perdrix
Dec 19, 2007

Howdy!

Roundboy posted:

That is a K11 rebarreled to 30-30? 7.5 Swiss is supposed to be VERY close to .308, so are you sure its a different barrel? i can't tell from pics

EDIT - the barrel does look really different. does it have 30 WCF stamped on the barrel?

This isn't that uncommon. The president of my Swiss Rifle Club has a bunch of K11s in .30-30. Maybe it's more popular up here in Canada.

Alain Perdrix
Dec 19, 2007

Howdy!

I know literally nothing about Remington Nylon 66s. Are these things good? Is $175 Canadian a good price for one in "good" condition?

e: would also like to inquire about whether or not a Marlin Guide Gun in .45-70 would be a fun gun for me. I am not recoil sensitive (plus), but I do not reload (minus). I like things with levers. Guide Gun Goons, tell me about your Guide Guns.

Alain Perdrix fucked around with this message at 07:13 on Jul 19, 2010

Alain Perdrix
Dec 19, 2007

Howdy!

bunnielab posted:

Guide guns are huge fun but the ammo cost is pretty nuts. However, if you are shooting heavy hunting loads then 5-10 is as much as most people want to shoot in one sitting. When I traded into mine it cam with like 120r of that Hornady Lever Evolution ammo and it took like 10-15 range trips to get it all shot up (I wanted the brass) and that was with me letting people shoot as much as they want.

That doesn't sound too bad. Realistically, I've acquired enough firearms in the past two months of having my license that I can't possibly afford/hope to shoot them all all that much, so having one with super-expensive ammo is probably fine. Also, I'm pretty much certain that I will be a reloader someday, it's just that someday and right now are two different things.

I'm going to see if I have any friends who have a GG and will let me try it out. As I said before, I'm not recoil sensitive in the least, but I've also had people who are similarly insensitive complain about the recoil from a .45-70, and from what you're telling me, it does sound pretty stiff. Only wanting to put 5-10 rounds through it at a time is probably a blessing in disguise anyway.

Alain Perdrix
Dec 19, 2007

Howdy!

king of the bongo posted:

In other news, I had no idea that Anderson Silva brought Steven Seagal in to train with for Sonnen. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FaVDFW_o1cA

well this is the weirdest loving thing I've seen all day

Alain Perdrix
Dec 19, 2007

Howdy!

bunnielab posted:

The best way to describe it is this: Have a friend punch you in the the shoulder really hard. Then have him do it 5 more times. Each shot is not really that bad but after a magazine full you really don't want to shoot any more for a while.

I seem to recall you having mentioned that you shoot all of your firearms without earpro at least once. Did you do that with the GG? I imagine that must have hurt a ton.

Alain Perdrix
Dec 19, 2007

Howdy!

nnnnghhhhgnnngh posted:

These people are allowed to handle guns?

An army is usually armed, if that's what you're asking. The Salvation Army generally eschews anything heavier than carbines and sidearms, though.

Alain Perdrix
Dec 19, 2007

Howdy!

Detective Thompson posted:

What do you BP shooting guys think of the BP substitutes? Aside from being less corrosive, do they hold any advantage over BP?

Not if you're firing a flintlock; they often won't even ignite. Pyrodex is notorious for this. I've succeeded in getting Triple 7 to work once, when I had no BP around and was desperate to shoot my .50, but it's nowhere near good as regular old #FFF. Pyrodex works just fine out of percussion arms.

Also, despite living in what can be a very humid climate, I've never had any rust on my rifle. So long as you clean it soon after use, you'll be fine. Most old-timey BP rifles have the advantage of a breech plug and easy-out barrels, meaning you can just stick the flash end in a barrel of hot, soapy water, and start sending patches down the bore. I can clean my black powder rifle faster than I can clean my Lee Enfield (I still don't have a .30 boresnake).

Alain Perdrix fucked around with this message at 22:49 on Jul 24, 2010

Alain Perdrix
Dec 19, 2007

Howdy!

ShaiHulud posted:

Not sure about all 'old-timey' reproductions (I've never shot one of the Uberti or Pietta ones), but all real old-timey aka vintage BP rifles and all of the Traditions and Thompson Center guns I've worked on have crush-fit breech plug threads that are extremely difficult to remove even with the proper wrench. I know one of the big selling points of those glorified slug guns modern muzzleloaders is that the breech plug is actually removable, which does not apply to most of the classic percussion and flintlock guns I've dealt with.

You can't remove the breech plug from any old-timey muzzleloader I've seen, but I also didn't mention removing the breech plug. The breech plug sealing off the end of the barrel just makes it really easy to get some suction and draw water up the barrel through the flash hole when you run your patch down the muzzle. I think it speeds up the cleaning process a bit.

e: vvv right, but that's not an issue when you're cleaning it

Alain Perdrix fucked around with this message at 01:35 on Jul 25, 2010

Alain Perdrix
Dec 19, 2007

Howdy!

Cycloneman posted:

Gonna need a citation on that.

Anderson, Jon Lee (1997). Che Guevara: A Revolutionary Life. New York: Grove Press. ISBN 0-8021-1600-0, pages 237-238, 269–270, 277–278.

Luther, Eric (2001). Che Guevara (Critical Lives). Penguin Group (USA). ISBN 002864199X, pp. 276.

:v:

Alain Perdrix
Dec 19, 2007

Howdy!

Detective Thompson posted:

movie

If you want someone to help with a soundtrack, let me know. A lot of my professional output has involved sparse guitar playing with extended technique methods, minimalist electro-acoustic noise, or voice-modulated no-input mixer feedback, which would maybe fit with a post-apocalyptic setting? I've done some soundtrack work before and had fun with it, and the University of Dundee's College of Art and Design in Scotland has exhibited some soundscape-y installations of mine.

Alain Perdrix fucked around with this message at 23:36 on Aug 10, 2010

Alain Perdrix
Dec 19, 2007

Howdy!

Detective Thompson posted:

I will say upfront that as this is a super low budget film, I can't really offer you any real compensation in terms of money, but you'll of course get credit and a copy of the film and some other little things. If that's okay, then yeah, I could definitely use some help with music. I've got one friend that I know for sure will want to do some stuff for it, but it would be good to have some other help so he doesn't get too weighed down trying to create music for the whole thing and can instead focus on making a few good pieces. I am definitely thinking minimalist so far as the soundtrack goes, single/double instrument tracks and atmospheric noise. No big orchestra pieces or anything like that. I think I might even buy a Theremin and do some work with that. Do you have any examples I can listen to?

I'll warn you right now that a theremin is an extremely tricky instrument to play at first, but they are a ton of fun.

I've never been paid anything substantial for soundtrack work, so I just sort of accept that as a given. I don't have any current examples of the sort of thing I'm talking about, but if you wanted to hear some slightly off-topic stuff, I could arrange that. I don't want to post that stuff on SA, but maybe... on Steam?

e: better yet, how much of a rush are you in? If you can give me a week or two, I can knock something out that'll be more reflective of the sort of thing I'd probably be doing anyway. The samples I have right now are all of my touring project, which involves singing and would be really inappropriate in this context. I'm in the midst of recording some of that stuff right now, but I can probably find some time in the next short while to make something that would fit. We can discuss this more on Steam. I might be on later tonight, if you're around.

Alain Perdrix fucked around with this message at 01:09 on Aug 11, 2010

Alain Perdrix
Dec 19, 2007

Howdy!

I figured, and when the time comes, it'd be handy if I could get a DVD so that we can both be on the same page for what I'm doing as it relates to the scenes in question. I just wondered if you needed to approve me faster or something.

Alain Perdrix
Dec 19, 2007

Howdy!

Gtab posted:

Oh my god my avatar owns.


Oh my god it OWNS.

I still :love: you. Also, what did you do?

Alain Perdrix
Dec 19, 2007

Howdy!

Gtab posted:

Nothing.

Why, that post simply reaffirms my :love: for you.

Who here has a .17HM2 kit for their 10/22? Is it fun? Is it good? Would you recommend it?

Alain Perdrix
Dec 19, 2007

Howdy!

The Automator posted:

I then walked around the store and bought a tub of gummy bears, a new electric can opener, some laundry detergent, and an off-brand snuggie :3:

Please post a photo of yourself enjoying all four of these purchases simultaneously.

Alain Perdrix
Dec 19, 2007

Howdy!

The Automator posted:

The gummy bears are Ghandi, but I'll see about getting the rest of them together for a picture tonight

If you fulfill this deal, you will be forever in my top five posters.

Alain Perdrix
Dec 19, 2007

Howdy!

Itchy_Grundle posted:

I just picked up a used flintlock kit rifle. Does anyone know where I can get Goex without having to buy 25lbs at a time? I just want a few cans of FFg and FFFFg to start out with.

Where do you live?

Here in Ontario, I just wander into the gun shop and pick up a pound as the need arises. I would expect this to be the same where you are, assuming you're in North America.

e: Also, what calibre are you shooting? I generally find that FFFg is what I like for a main charge, but I'm only shooting .50. FFFg does pretty well in the pan, too.

Alain Perdrix
Dec 19, 2007

Howdy!

Itchy_Grundle posted:

I'll be shooting a .45 flintlock (used Jukar kit gun that I picked up cheap from an estate). I was planning to use FFg for the charge and FFFFg for the pan. Anyone have recommendations for a safe starting load? I will be shooting .440 patched ball.

Use FFFg for the charge, FFFg or FFFFg for the pan. FFg is really coarse and, from all I've ever heard, functions better in large bore flintlocks, not so great in small ones like you're shooting. Bonus with FFFg is that you can also use it in the pan if you don't find / run out of FFFFg.

Start at 40 grains of FFFg and work up from there. That sounds about right to me. Or you can ask the guys over at The Traditional Muzzleloading Forum. That's the best resource online for muzzleloading. It has very knowledgeable people on its boards.

e: hurrrrrl

Alain Perdrix fucked around with this message at 21:17 on Aug 24, 2010

Alain Perdrix
Dec 19, 2007

Howdy!

Detective Thompson posted:

I still haven't been called for duty, but I guess living in a fairly small state will do that. But related to the whole police/trial thing, my dad was called up for duty a few years back. They asked him if he could think of any reason why he wouldn't be able to serve, or however it is they phrase that, and he said yes. Why? Because he was the officer that arrested the defendant in question. I guess that's a pretty good reason.

This is amazing.

Alain Perdrix
Dec 19, 2007

Howdy!

infrared35 posted:

Depends on what level of retention you want, but Raven Concealment makes one. It's a reasonably secure holster, and it's endorsed by the guys at Magpul!

Which, by the way, means it's almost a hundred dollars.

But it is a very nice holster.

And it can be converted to IWB if you want.

If you check out the Canadian Guns / Shooters thread, beaver_cheese just got one of these for his Glock 17 with flashlight. He likes it a lot.

Alain Perdrix
Dec 19, 2007

Howdy!

Plasma1010 posted:

Okay great go buy your pepper spray, I have my gun.

I'd suggest you talk to some people who actually work with bears frequently, so that you can hear what you're hearing here from them.

You've seen two or three bears stand up before lumbering off. In your story, you mentioned that you happened across the bears while they were in your campsite (or so I'm led to believe; you mention one or two coming into your camp, and you also mention that you thought the one stood up "because it was near [your] food."

That's great and all, but when one of them decides that it wants to close distance with you in a purposeful manner, it is going to do it faster than you can even imagine. However much time you think you're going to have to react – well, you're not. Having the bears come poking around for your food is a very different situation from bumping into one when it's with a cub or its own food.

I've seen several black bears up close while camping in Northern/Central Ontario, and yes, they'll mostly just lumber away, especially if you yell at them or make a bunch of loud noise. In about 1999, though, I witnessed a bear charge in Algonquin Park (not against me; no one was seriously hurt, though someone was treed for about 5 minutes and cut themselves up pretty badly scrambling up the trunk while the rest of us stood around yelling at the bear and tossing rocks in its general direction). It was all pretty nerve-wracking, even as a spectator. The things cover ground effortlessly and at ridiculous speed. In dense brush, you'd be lucky to have time to work your pump twice. Unless you're carrying the gun in a ready position with it loaded (which you certainly could, though it keeps your hands full and makes for inefficient hiking), you're probably not even going to get a shot off. Even those lumbering, fat-looking bears can move pretty drat quickly when they want to.

I've never used bear spray, but my understanding has always been that it's very easy to deploy under duress. It definitely does work well, and that's why people who have experience in the field recommend its use. The article you were linked to mentions that no one reported being incapacitated by the bear spray, so you don't really need to be too worried about that.

Alain Perdrix
Dec 19, 2007

Howdy!

rope kid posted:

I looked for the lever gun thread, but the little angel has flown away.

I'm starting to get irritated with my Rossi 92 carbine. It's .357 Mag/.38 Spc and I can't get it to feed reliably for the life of me. FMJ round-nose .38s, flat-nose. .38s, lead flat-nose .357. Brisk cycling, slow cycling, different speeds all over. I haven't tried my Hornady Levereverevereverevolution yet but I would think that the cartridges I'm using would have fed properly by now.

Is this just kind of "the way model 92s are"? The accuracy is good and it's a nice looking gun, but I get cartridges failing to fully pop-up or jamming into the top of the barrel off the feed ramp regularly.

My friend has a Rossi 92 in .357/.38, and we've shot it a ton together. I've never seen it fail to feed anything, and he hasn't mentioned it being a problem when he's shooting alone, either. I'd definitely say there's something up with your carbine.

Alain Perdrix
Dec 19, 2007

Howdy!

I like turtles posted:

Since a big part of glass blowing is only reheating part of the piece, I first depended on partners to tell me if I needed to go forward or back, and I eventually mounted a laser pointer that would shine onto the piece at the door.

This is just the most adorable thing ever.

Alain Perdrix
Dec 19, 2007

Howdy!

WimpBastard posted:

I'm sure there were also "human wave" assaults, but I can't imagine them being that effective. Even with plenty of manpower it is just wasteful and I doubt even the Chinese were keen to throw away troops like that.

Aren't you Australian?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Kapyong

This substantial battle in which your countrymen and Gtab's (and mine) both took part (:canada::hf::australia:) involved a ton of human wave attacks, and the detailed account of the Canadian defense of Hill 677 is one of the most intense things I've ever read (prolonged hand-to-hand fighting, with the Canadian commander repeatedly calling artillery in on his own head throughout the night). The Australians had withdrawn earlier in the day after being similarly beaten on and nearly encircled. Both the 3RAR and the PPCLI got Presidential Unit Citations from Truman for this battle.

These weren't "technically" human wave tactics, but they were extremely similar in effect and composition.

Alain Perdrix fucked around with this message at 05:26 on Sep 21, 2010

Alain Perdrix
Dec 19, 2007

Howdy!

WimpBastard posted:

Well it says on that very same page:


Again, it isn't surprising at all that these attacks might be described as human wave attacks, since if you were the one being assaulted it would certainly seem that way. They also used night time for their assault, probably (and I'm speculating here) to conceal their movements so they wouldn't be torn up by artillery before they got anywhere near the Australians.

To me, it seems a development of WW1 stormtrooper tactics, except using lower quality troops (and correspondingly higher casualties).

You hit upon it here, but yeah, this is what I was referring to when I said they were "technically" not simple human wave attacks. For what most people think of when they think "human wave attack," they actually did fit the bill. There is an account in a book by John Melady ("Korea: Canada's Forgotten War") in which the soldiers he interviews do use the term "human wave" in describing the attack, presumably because that's what it looked like to them. They did describe being infiltrated repeatedly, but also mentioned several of these waves happening almost separately, as far as they could tell at the time.

It was a really costly strategy, and it left ridiculous numbers of Chinese dead (several hundred in front of the Canadian positions, and several hundred in the Australian sector). They did use the darkness to get as close as possible before teeing off their attack, though the effect may have been spoiled somewhat because, if I remember correctly, the Canadians described hearing a bugle, followed by a couple of thousand dudes screaming and then rushing their positions, which is a pretty big giveaway.

e: the more I think about it, it sort of seems to me like the article splits hairs a bit – the infiltrations as described in Melady's interviews were done as quietly as possible, but from what I recall, these were interspersed with unsupported, loud frontal assaults by huge numbers of Chinese troops

Alain Perdrix fucked around with this message at 06:21 on Sep 21, 2010

Alain Perdrix
Dec 19, 2007

Howdy!

WimpBastard posted:

The point of the infiltrations was to get close enough as to render the most powerful Allied support weapons too dangerous to use. Keep in mind that "danger close" for heavy artillery is something around 100-200m (Depending on what kind of arty). The whole point of infiltrating was to allow Chinese troops who didn't have spiffy gear to get close enough that having big artillery pieces and planes didn't matter.

From that same wiki page, there was a point where after the sun came up, a whole lot of Chinese were left exposed out in the open. Of course, being in the open, and in full sight of Australian and US troops was a death sentence. Other than the infiltrations, the second thing they were doing was to distract defenders by assaulting them frontally, while troops moved around their flanks. I speculate again, but I'm willing to bet they were expending lower quality troops on the frontal assaults while they had their veterans flanking with grenades and smgs.

The distinction I'm making is that the whole point of these tactics was not merely a human wave running suicidally at Allied positions, since that would easily be defeated by artillery and machineguns. It had some thought into it, but I'll admit that at the very end of it, it looks like a human wave.

Okay, I was misinterpreting what you were saying. The infiltrations were pretty effective in their intended purpose, until the artillery started getting called in directly on top of the Canadian positions. The unsupported frontal wave attack thing was pretty much just a slaughter, though – at least through the night on Hill 677.

Alain Perdrix
Dec 19, 2007

Howdy!

Are Rossi 92s good, or bad? Should I, or should I not, buy a Rossi 92?

I have a friend with one and it seems good to me and all, but I also keep hearing people telling me they suck and have a host of problems that my friend's rifle does not have. If my friend's Rossi is simply a fluke, then I guess I'd rather not take my chances trying to replicate his success...

Alain Perdrix
Dec 19, 2007

Howdy!

His Divine Shadow posted:

Rossi 92s are good base guns that can have some issues from time to time. Usually it can be fixed with an action job, sometimes the frontsight needs replacing because it shoots to high.

But even so, you should save yourself a lot of problems and buy from this guy, he's the Rossi 92 expert in america and he works over the guns before selling them so they should be trouble free:

http://www.stevesgunz.com/



I bought a standard Rossi 92 and it shot too high and really needed an action job so I did that myself. I still need to stain & re-oil the stocks on mine and get a peep sight installed.

I'm a Canadian, so I can't buy from that dude, but thanks for the info!

What did you have to do for the action job? How complicated/difficult would you say it is?

Alain Perdrix
Dec 19, 2007

Howdy!

I have never heard anyone describe the SA80 as reliable. I've heard it described as the following things:

a bullpup (this is objectively true)
ugly (this is subjectively objectively true)

Alain Perdrix
Dec 19, 2007

Howdy!

Crazy Banter posted:

What's a good resource for a Remington 870? Mine has decide recently to no longer load a second shell after firing. It works fine if you cycle it manually, but is hit or miss after being fired. A little fiddling has led me to believe that it is related to the arm that hits the transfer bar that releases shells from the tube, but I am a gunsmith.

I am profoundly confused by this post.

Alain Perdrix
Dec 19, 2007

Howdy!

Crazy Banter posted:

I can bring the forearm back and it will eject the hull just fine, and cycle it back closed again, just with nothing in the chamber. It doesn't release a new round from the magazine. No jams, and pulling the trigger to cycle again will load fine.

alain perdrix, sorry to be confusing

I'm going to bet you need to replace either your carrier dog spring, your mag follower/spring, or both. Not expensive at all, and you should be good to go after that.

e: just re-read the details in the shotgun thread, it is a mystery

Alain Perdrix fucked around with this message at 00:05 on Feb 2, 2011

Alain Perdrix
Dec 19, 2007

Howdy!

Backyard Blacksmith posted:

Hmmm. Well that makes me sad. There is hope, though. 7.62x25 is round nosed. I just really want something that's cheap, and decently powerful (read: more powerful than .22), so I figured x25 would be the way to go.

Oh well. I couldn't find one on google, and apparently it's hard to find custom makers for lever actions. :smith:

Just get something in .357/.38 and shoot .38 Spl out of it. Not as cheap as 7.62x25, but more reasonable than getting a custom lever action built.

vvv yeah, or this

Alain Perdrix fucked around with this message at 14:36 on Feb 4, 2011

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Alain Perdrix
Dec 19, 2007

Howdy!

darnzen posted:

I haven't heard of a pistol in 45-70, but I'm sure Taurus is working on it.

BFR and TC Contender

e: and the Bison Bull, maybe others

Alain Perdrix fucked around with this message at 16:01 on Feb 4, 2011

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