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Illegal Clown
Feb 18, 2004



Eating the Pudding posted:

Edit. Wait you probably mean the forward assist. It's to mash your bolt into battery if necessary during malfunction.

That what it sounds like and is theoretically correct. In practice, the forward assist is just a useless button, but it is nice and springy so gives you something to play with if you get bored.

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Illegal Clown
Feb 18, 2004



Chantilly Say posted:

Short answer: The guys who do sound work for TV and movies love to insert the noise of guns cocking, basically whenever a gun comes onto screen. They even do this when the guns in question don't actually have hammers to cock (for example, when a cop draws their Glock handgun, a striker-fired semiautomatic, and the sound of a hammer being cocked is inserted into the scene).

Long explanation: It depends on the gun's action. Some handguns are single-action. This means that the trigger only performs one action--in this case, releasing the hammer and letting it spring forward into the firing pin, impacting the primer and firing the round. Single-action semiautomatic handguns can (and should) be carried "cocked and locked" with a round in the chamber, the hammer back and the safety on. When you draw the weapon, it's a simple movement of your thumb to release the safety and make the gun ready to fire. Other guns are double-action. This means that the trigger both pulls back and releases the hammer. The hammer can be manually cocked, in many cases, but there's less of a reason to do so. Double-action guns are commonly carried with a round in the chamber and the safety (if there is one) off, relying on the heavy trigger pull (since the trigger does two things on a double-action gun, the force required to pull it is greater) to prevent negligent discharges. Police officers, for instance, carry their sidearms with a round in the chamber, so all they need to do in order to fire the weapon is draw and pull the trigger. Revolvers can be either single-action or double-action as well, though since they lack safeties they shouldn't be carried around in a holster with the hammer cocked.

Yep, this is pretty much it. A lot of it is just the sound guys thinking it's right, but in some cases, it is right. For example, if my HD gun is my 92FS, the safety is off and the hammer is down. If a bad guy suddenly appears in my house and I have to shoot, I just pick it up and shoot. It's ready to go. Now if I hear him breaking in and I have a couple seconds before he gets there I will cock it. That way I get a lighter trigger pull and maybe a more accurate shot. I do roll my eyes though when I see a movie and the guy cocks the gun to shoe he's really serious. I guess it makes sense when the gun is a 1911 or other SAO. I always laugh when I see a situation like that because I'm always thinking, "This isn't really that tense, it's not cocked yet so he can't shoot him." And yes, when it's on hammerless stuff, like Glocks, it's just bad editing. When I was younger and heard that sound I just told myself it was the safety. Yeah, that doesnt' help when the gun doesn't have a safety either!

Illegal Clown
Feb 18, 2004



The junk collector posted:

In fact it doesn't make ANY sense with a 1911 or similar SAO semi-auto. You have to rack the slide to chamber a round which cocks the hammer. Cocking the hammer on your 1911 to show you mean business really just shows that your gun is unloaded.

I was getting at that I've seen movies where the guy is carrying a 1911 or whatever hammer down and points it at someone. He's acting all serious, but I can't help but think, there's no way that gun is going off. When he cocks it then he is able to shoot, but it seems like he just trying to say he's being REALLY serious. Yeah, it doesn't make sense because he should have been carrying it ready to go. Remember, the hammer or shotgun slide is not a Serious Meter.

Illegal Clown
Feb 18, 2004



infrared35 posted:

Why do OH-58s keep buzzing my house?

Last summer we had some Ranger types doing urban training in unfamiliar settings in my town. I knew about it a few weeks in advance so when one flew over my house I only thought it was cool. I guess it scared a bunch of people across town though, when they dropped armed troopers into the neighborhoods and the old industrial centers.

Illegal Clown
Feb 18, 2004



walrusman posted:

I use the cheapest Romanian steel mags I could get from AIM. Even when the Barackalypse was gearing up, they were like $8 apiece if you bought three.

In all of my detachable magazine guns, the WASR is the one I can use whatever cheap and busted magazine I can find. I mean that literally since a couple are dented and rusty, from the days when 30 rounders were rare and new ones were illegal. I use them because they still work. My M1 Carbine and AR are finicky with magazines. The cheap ones are useless and one of my GI M16 likes to smash the cartridges and try to fold them in half. AKs though, as long as it has a spring and room for ammo they work.

Illegal Clown
Feb 18, 2004



The junk collector posted:

Any M1 carbine I ever owned only worked with USGI mags. 15 round USGI mags however are pretty cheap and fairly durable.

USGI M1 mags are next up on my list of things to buy. I had some repro 15 and 30 rounders that used to work fine, but the last ones I shot tended to not feed as reliably as they once did. Who knows, maybe I forgot to put the magazines all the way in like I'm new here. It's weird that the 30 rounders (holding 25 or less) fed better than the 15s.

Illegal Clown
Feb 18, 2004



SadWhaleFamily posted:

My understanding was that it was /mosin/ /nɑgɑn/. Mssr. Nagant had a French name among Belgians, like Dieudonné Saive.

That's how I've always said it, with the French pronunciation of Nagant. No "Nuh-gant" from me, like the rednecks on Youtube.

Illegal Clown
Feb 18, 2004



dork posted:

What is a good single point sling and quick release thingy that I should buy to put on my AR that I will primarily use to wear around the house to freak out my roommates girlfriend?

I have a belt of linked surplus 7.62 NATO ammo for similar purposes. I don't know if it can get more than that.

Illegal Clown
Feb 18, 2004



iyaayas01 posted:

From the Windex MSDS: "EMERGENCY OVERVIEW - The product contains no substances which at their given concentration, are considered to be hazardous to health"

So yes, Windex is more or less harmless.

See, I wouldn't have known that if it wasn't for the MSDS.

My two cents on the debate is that I'm required to keep them as well, and I totally forgot they existed until this debate started. I should probably look for them next time I'm there.

Talk about useless safety stuff, I remember my mother telling me about how every year her company made everyone watch safety training videos that had nothing to do with her job. She worked in an office and the videos were all about factory and other industrial work. From what I remember she mentioned stuff like safety harnesses for climbing on the roof, how to safely de-energize industrial machinery and the lockout-tag out thing, and what to do about toxic waste spills. There were some office workers that would sometimes need to go to the warehouse part. They would usually wander onto the floor, talking on cell phones, and would almost get run over by for lifts because they would walk through the big loading doors instead of the smaller people door.

Illegal Clown
Feb 18, 2004



Yeah, Lugers are neat and are iconic of the World War eras, but they are overly complicated. Just trying to make the tooling and then the time to make them would be prohibitively expensive. At the very least, a new production one would be way more expensive than a shooter grade original. I mean, the reason they stopped making them was that the machine tools wore out and it made more sense to build an easier and cheaper pistol. That's also why other old pistol designs are still around, because they are easy enough to make and can be profitable for the manufacturer.

Illegal Clown
Feb 18, 2004



MazeOfTzeentch posted:

The barrel length is >16" so it might be sold as a rifle instead of a pistol. That's the only way I can think of.

Except the overall length is a little short for rifles, I think. If it had a stock on it though, it would probably count as a regular rifle.


Pitch posted:

A forend isn't necessarily intended to be held by the off-hand. All T/C pistols have them, so do AR and AK pistols.

Yep, so long as that isn't a forward pistol grip it's a legal pistol.

Illegal Clown
Feb 18, 2004



ShaiHulud posted:

Not sure about all 'old-timey' reproductions (I've never shot one of the Uberti or Pietta ones), but all real old-timey aka vintage BP rifles and all of the Traditions and Thompson Center guns I've worked on have crush-fit breech plug threads that are extremely difficult to remove even with the proper wrench. I know one of the big selling points of those glorified slug guns modern muzzleloaders is that the breech plug is actually removable, which does not apply to most of the classic percussion and flintlock guns I've dealt with.

That's interesting. I wondered how people cleaned guns back in the day. I don't have experience with the muzzle loaders, but the breach loading Springfields are stupidly easy to take apart. Just remove the lock, another screw, and the barrel bands and out comes the barrel. I assume the equivalent muskets were the same, but if the plug was hard to remove I guess that would make it more useless.

Illegal Clown
Feb 18, 2004



Gtab posted:

TFR you are mind-numbingly easy to troll

We're not used to outsiders. We were just happy that someone came over for a visit.

Illegal Clown
Feb 18, 2004



Black Stormy posted:

Is it that, or that we don't want another puckins episode? I honestly don't know.

Yeah, that was my first thought when he said "urban warfare." I was going to ask if anyone was messing with his puckins, but by then it had already spiraled into full on troll/crazy mode, so I just sat back and watched.

Illegal Clown
Feb 18, 2004



Ron Mexico posted:

Not to mention 7.62 Tok is kind of a wacky shaped cartridge to try and make a cylinder for. You'd probably have to use moonclips. I'd rather have a Nagant revolver with a .32 H&R cylinder or yeah, even .327 federal.

Yeah, I think the shape is the biggest problem. I just compared the two, along with .32ACP, and the Tok. ammo is about a millimeter thicker because of its tapered case. There's just not enough room on one of those cylinders. Those seven shots are crammed in there as much as possible.

bunnielab posted:

Eh, iirc the Nagant uses an ejector rod so moonclips wound not be an issue. However, the only redeeming thing about the Nagant is the cheap price and the relevantly expensive ammo makes that pointless as well.

Sadly, while they are neat little guns they are impractical to shoot and there is no simple or cheap way to change that.

I don't know if you've checked lately, but Nagant ammo is about half the price of what it was a few years ago. The first box I bought was like $.75 or more per round. Today it's less than $.50. I just checked AIM surplus and it was $.44. That's not too bad. Yes, 7.62 Tok is cheaper, especially surplus, and 9mm Luger and Mak are WAY cheaper than 7.62 Nagant, but I'm also not mag dumping half a box of the stuff in five seconds. It's a slow to load, slow to shoot gun, so you don't go through as much ammo. The guns are a lot of fun though and don't be turned off from them if you can get one for a good price.

Illegal Clown
Feb 18, 2004



Cyrano4747 posted:

This is why I find all the conversion cylinders (or shooting improper ammo that just happens to fit and fire relatively safely) so silly. The amount of money you save with the cheaper ammo is negligible compared to a conversion cylinder, and shooting the wrong ammo leads to the accuracy going to poo poo - and at that point why the hell are you firing it anyways? Why not just buy a cap gun at that point?

At one point it made sense when the right ammo was not available, but since it is now there is no reason. Me, I've thought about getting another cylinder (not seriously) because I also shoot .32APC, but the cylinder costs as much as I paid for the gun. I can buy a couple more boxes of ammo with that money.

Yeah, the Nagant just isn't a fire all day every weekend gun. It's a fire seven shots then pass to all your buddies to shoot type of gun.

Sgt. Shaved Balls posted:

I don't want 7.62tok because its cheap, I like it because its 7.62tok. It's bad rear end as hell.

Also why is making a bottle-necked chamber for a revolver unfeasible? (disregarding pressure stuff)


Even if it was made of titanium steel alloy?

On the Nagant, there is only like a two or three millimeter thick wall between chambers. The Tok. ammo is thicker than the Nagant, so it wouldn't fit and there's no room to make more space. Maybe you could make a six shot cylinder but would have to work on the timing. It's just not worth it.

Illegal Clown
Feb 18, 2004



hangedman posted:

Check out the .22 Jet. It was a tapered, bottlenecked cartridge that S&W chambered in their N-frames that had functioning problems out the wazoo, so they discontinued it. I don't think too many people have been wanting to repeat that mistake. Basically what would happen is that firing full-power loads would make the brass back out of the chamber and lock up the cylinder.

I would also mention that on the Nagant, the firing pin is attached to the hammer, and it is just this flimsy little pin that I'm sure I could snap off with my fingers. It there is any back pressure or casings kicking back I'd be worried about breaking it. As it is, the Nagant is such a low powered, low recoil gun.

bunnielab posted:

Yep, and I reload for all of them. Currently the most expensive to shoot is a Guide Gun. Some 45-70 loads will get up around $.50-1.00 a shot but my average plinking load is somewhere around $.25-30 per shot. Now that I have a load that I like I can buy bullets in greater bulk and so long as I keep up my near perfect brass retention record the price will stay at the low end.

The only factory ammo I really buy is Wolf type stuff. Everything else I can make better and cheaper myself. I do admit that I really enjoy reloading so it isn't realy a chore but even so, I don't make nearly enough money to shoot as much as I want to otherwise.

The .45-70 I shoot costs at least $1.50 per round, thankfully black powder cartridges are easy to reload. I understand how you feel about money and reloading. I'm with you on that. For me, those expensive ammo type guns are just for special occasions. But yeah, you'd probably feel you should get your money out of a gun and one that sits in a safe 50 weeks out of the year isn't worth it. I can understand that, even though that's what most of my guns are.

Illegal Clown
Feb 18, 2004



Detective Thompson posted:

So is thing safe to fire with modern ammo, or would that be a bad idea?

http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.aspx?Item=181087186

I assume not, just because I've never seen any type of rifle converted to shotgun capable of using modern loads. I don't know what the chamber dimension are so you might not be able to fit a shell in it. I bet that was made during the era of black powder and paper cartridges so that's what it would take. Plus that action looks flimsy and weak. It looks like a lot of the types of breach block conversion systems that were popular in the 19t century, and none of those are particularly strong and capable of modern ammo.

Illegal Clown
Feb 18, 2004



gimpsuitjones posted:

Requesting Eric Bana thisismysafety.gif

I'm helping!

Illegal Clown
Feb 18, 2004



Makrond posted:

Ah, I was kind of hoping someone would come along and say "Well, the PU optic probably means it was <interesting history lesson here>"

$1100 for a reproduction Mosin made in someone's garage seems incredibly steep, even if a Mosin is a Cat D weapon.

fake edit: Looking around, Mini-14s are apparently $1500 so maybe there's some crazy import poo poo going on as well.

Yeah, when you first posted it I thought it might be an original sniper version, which would be more expensive than a normal one. Then I looked at the link and saw it was a reproduction. I didn't even see the Australia part. Yeah, guns cost different prices in different countries. Just look at the US and Canada. Stuff that is cheap in the US can be expensive in Canada, and other stuff that is cheap their, may be twice as much in the US. A great example would be the SVT-40. Mine in the US cost three times as much than it would in Canada, because they cannot be imported here. I'm still comforted in the fact that thanks to our laws I can fill the magazine to capacity and the government doesn't know I have it.

Illegal Clown
Feb 18, 2004



I had a big problem with Wolf not cycling in my AR. Then I realized it was a problem with crappy magazines. I've shot other steel case ammo out of P-Mags with no problem, and good brass cased ammo that kept jamming with surplus magazines. I don't have any Wolf but I may buy some more in the future, once I'm out of surplus 5.56.

Illegal Clown
Feb 18, 2004



Otto Skorzeny posted:

Why does NASA have an MP5

Because people weren't joking when they said they were a space shuttle door gunner. It's a real job.

Illegal Clown
Feb 18, 2004



Craptacular posted:

Yeah this happened to me a couple years ago. I was unemployed at the time so I was home in the middle of the morning on a weekday. The doorbell rang and the guy who was there looked a little surprised that someone had answered and mumbled something about if I knew where such-and-such a street was. It seemed a bit strange, to say the least. After I said "no" and shut the door I saw a second guy through my kitchen window who was coming back around the side of my house, I guess he was checking the back. Both jumped in a truck and left. I called the police but nothing came of it.

Wow, that's scary. Thanks to everyone I'm going to be even more paranoid than before. Maybe my dad's "Get off my property!" every time he sees someone show up makes more sense beyond him just being an angry old man. Normally when someone knocks on the door I go around a back or side entrance just to catch the person off guard and put myself in control of the situation. I remember one shady situation where someone knocked on the front door, I went around the side. He had a buddy in a car. The guy in the car started frantically waving to the guy at the door. The guy came around, asked if I wanted to sell any scrap metal, and then left when I told him I had nothing for sale.

The only time I ever thought I would have a HD situation was when I was house sitting for my family while they were on vacation. One day I hear something outside and there is a redneck couple poking around. The guy was even drinking a beer. They seemed to be snooping around the front yard so I put my pistol in a IWB holster and went outside the back way to see what was going on. It turned out they were the neighbors and they claimed that my dad had asked them to check on the place and their pets while they were on vacation. This seemed suspicious, since that was my job, so I told them I would be there at all times for the rest of the week and would take care of things. When my family got back I told them about it and my dad confirmed the neighbor's story.

Illegal Clown
Feb 18, 2004



Cyrano4747 posted:

Part of the reason you're catching so much poo poo is that those are all pretty much terrible beginner guns. They're either expensive, gimmicky, require jumping through a bunch of hoops, use really expensive ammo, or a combination of the above.

That said, you could probably wrangle going shooting with a TFR goon local to where you end up who owns one or more of those.

I have a friend who is into guns, in that he's shot a few but mostly plays video games. He claims to have a SPAS and a gun that won't be named. Whenever he mentions them I usually say, "No you don't, and I'm not impressed. Those guns suck." Plus I'm sure he's in violation of the state's handgun laws if he does. Whenever he describes his dad's guns they always sound like NFA violations.

thermobollocks posted:

A plain-jane semiauto AK wouldn't be too bad.
After the obligatory 10/22 and Buckmark, of course.

First gun I ever owned was a WASR, and I still think it was a good choice. It was far from the first gun I'd shot, but it was a good starter gun in maintaining. It was an expensive for a center fire semiauto rifle, easy to maintain, and cheap to shoot. Plus it was way more fun than a .22.

Illegal Clown
Feb 18, 2004



Cyrano4747 posted:

This is broadly true, but it's also a bit over-blown.

Yes, leave guns in a foam case for long enough and the case will promote rust. SURFACE rust which will not impair the function of the gun. That said, throw a little desiccant in there and store it in a climate controlled area and you'll be fine for a month or two of less than ideal living conditions.

Where people get in trouble is when they leave them in those cases for years at a time and throw the case in some attic or a closet that doesn't get opened much. If it's sitting in your average house with central air the air is so dry that the fact that the foam concentrates what moisture there is doesn't amount to much.

Most of my guns are located in a house that has basically no climate control. I keep them with the little moisture absorbing bags, or whatever, and oil them every couple weeks. So far I haven't had any trouble. So yeah, the cases will be fine for temporary storage. It's not like they will be a block of rust after a couple weeks.

I've told this anecdote before, but my dad stored three guns in leather soft cases from the '70s in a closet for 20 to 30 years. They were his grandfather's higher end hunting guns, plus a cheap 20 ga single shot my dad bought when he was young. When he finally remembered them and we took them out, they looked brand new. Seriously, there was not a spec a rust or dust on them. He also had his grandfathers old .22 tube fed bolt action rifle that was made at a time before putting serial numbers on guns was the law. It was not in a case and came out a little worse than the others. The stock was dry and there was some light rust, but it cleaned up nicely. It still shoots and was one of the first rifles I ever fired. It probably helped create my fetish for bolt actions.

Illegal Clown
Feb 18, 2004



Terrible Robot posted:

A buddy of mine has a Mosin Nagant 1891-1910 with an octagonal reciever, no bayo attachment, and is thinking of turning it into a sniper clone for hunting, using reproduction scope mount and scope with a nice turn-down bolt, and a match trigger. Is he potentially about to gently caress up a special/rare Mosin, or are these models a dime a dozen like the 1938s-44s?

I missed this post at first, and thought we were talking about messing up a common 91/30. Yes, those were a dime a dozen...in 1930, not so much today. If it hasn't been altered I would buy it just to get it away from him and let him use the money towards a "proper" 91/30 sniper clone.

Illegal Clown
Feb 18, 2004



Terrible Robot posted:

Um, I said in a post just a little down the page that he isn't the type to gently caress with something that is actually rare and awesome, which is why I was so curious about it in the first place. I actually just got off the phone with him, as it turns out he had the same epiphany today and had already decided to find a 91/30 to do up instead. I wish I could supply some pictures, but currently I'm 1600 miles away. I'll see if I can get him to email me some, but I'm not holding my breath on that, as he lives out in the sticks.

Still wondering if anybody has information on that polish Mosin .22lr training rifle. It's really odd. Like a 9/10 scale M38. 7.62x54r.net doesn't seem to have any info on it.

I'm glad this may have a happy ending. Hopefully he would spend the money on an already sporterized Mosin, or just go out and get a premade sniper version, but as long as the rarer one is saved, I'm happy.

Also to add to the training rifle discussion, yeah, those are usually for marksmanship training organizations and not just for soldiers. The size really gives it away for me, since in the US, at least, they used to make cadet rifles that were smaller than the military ones. These were specifically designed for highschools and academies, or any place where marksmanship was taught. Though in the US, .22LR versions of the regular service rifles were made for soldiers to practice marksmanship. Some even used little cartridge inserts to simulate loading and firing the full size cartridges, but still only shooting the .22. These were specifically made for National Guard and smaller posts that didn't have room for a full rifle range. They would often setup shooting galleries in the basements of their armories so the soldiers could still practice.

Captain von Trapp posted:

A very large fraction (by volume) of that bullet is not brass but rather an N2/O2 gas mixture.

Ha, I was going to make a joke about it being kosher because the core was made of air, but didn't think anyone would get it.

Illegal Clown
Feb 18, 2004



Cyrano4747 posted:

True, but doesn't the giggle switch tax stamp trump everything? No barrel length restrictions on MGs etc - at least that's how I understand it.

Case in point: G43's post-sample AK74su


edit: this wouldn't do poo poo for the SBS issue, but what I'm saying is that if an SOT in MI really wanted to have, for example, a shorty M4 if they got all the proper demonstration paperwork, etc in order couldn't they just get a proper FA M4 and gently caress the SBR garbage?

Correct, machine gun barrels don't matter, but you put that short barrel on a rifle then uh oh.

Even crazier, the last time I checked, AOWs were fine. And then lets not forget that folding stock rifles are considered pistols. We just tell ourselves that it could be worse. I get to carry a pistol when I go out, and I can put 100 round mags in my AR. If I save the money I can even own some machine guns. While I envy other states, every day I'm thankful I don't live in California or the mysterious land of dragons 65 miles to my east.

Illegal Clown
Feb 18, 2004



dhrusis posted:

How many of you kids have bug out bags, and what's in them? I'm starting to build mine out -- one for each of my 2 cars (with equipment suitable for wife and I to share if poo poo goes down on the road) and one big one at home for hurricane prep and other o poo poo disasters.

Goal for the car ones would be small enough to not inconvenience me too much with trunk storage, but large enough to take care of us until we can get home, or if we had to leave, it would need to satisfy our essentials for a few days.

Caveat here is that the bag(s) need to survive Texas sun inside-the-car (150-200?) temperatures on a regular basis without deteriorating and forcing me to spend another X on first aid kids, etc. I'm fine with replacing the food and water every 6 months.

I'm still kind of battling with that one.. Anyone have suggestions for food that can withstand temp fluctuations and how I should store water (in stainless steel vs plastic maybe?)

I can't help you with the heat, as I mostly have to worry about the cold, but I do keep some supplies in my truck. It's mostly for daily emergencies rather than SHTF situations. I have a medical bag full of medical stuff and other supplies. Plus I keep a couple MREs there too. I also have a small duffel bag with a change of clothes. Again, it's more of a daily emergency thing, like keeping a tool kit and and a spare tire. I've had to use them a few times for medical or wardrobe emergencies, but I've also gone on mini camping trips of sorts and the supplies were handy.

At home, I have a big army backpack full of MREs and ammo pouches. I guess this is my bug out bag. I can fill it with ammo and water bottles quick enough, but weapons aren't a top priority. I already have my carry pistol and ammo so that's already factored in.

Illegal Clown
Feb 18, 2004



I like turtles posted:

I have a pallet of water behind the front seats (extended cab) in my truck, that's pretty much all I can expect to survive inside a car in southern arizona for long. I also keep a spare pair of shoes, because you never know when your shoes will get hosed up, and... the ground is spiky and hot here.

I suppose if you keep everything in a cooler and try to park in shady areas, it would probably extend the life of more fragile stuff.

Yeah, I've also never had a problem with unopened plastic water bottles. I have had opened ones deform in the heat, but unopened ones have held up in 100+ heat. I too also keep an older pair of shoes and boots in my truck. Sure, it started out as me needing them and being too lazy/forgetting to bring them in, but now I consider them part of my emergency supplies.

Illegal Clown
Feb 18, 2004



Kthulhu5000 posted:

The classifieds on Subguns.com and Sturmgewehr.com are also good for this. But yeah, what Pitch said - demand is high, supply is very low, and barring the passing of some drat ballsy legislation by the government (ha, good luck!), that's unlikely to change.

Yeah, and it will be a while before I can get into government and introduce my Puppies for Orphans Bill, with an attached rider reopening the machine gun registry for regular people to buy new machine guns.

Illegal Clown
Feb 18, 2004



AbdominalSnowman posted:

I know this is a stupid question, and I'm not quite sure how to describe it, but what is up with the dark colored metal on WW1 / WW2 era rifles? For instance on Enfields and Mausers it looks like all the metal bits are painted black. Then again on Mosins the bolt is definitely a chrome color and the barrel looks like it is just blued. For the others is it just very dark bluing, some weird automotive-style paint, or what? Is that originial, or just for recaptures / guns that were put into storage? I have seen some pictures of Mausers that look like parts (particularly the bolt) are actually metallic looking, but it could have just been strange lighting or some kind of custom work on it. Can someone shed some light on this so I can stop thinking about it?

A lot of the rifles you're seeing were painted or refinished for long term storage. It's just another layer of protection. This is especially true for Mosins and the Russian captured Mausers. They looked much different during the war. In the event of the big one, and those rifles had to go into service, that crap would likely have been stripped off.

Illegal Clown
Feb 18, 2004



Daikon posted:

Good point. I kind of had some vague speculation in the back of my mind that it was due to no holster for rifles, but wasn't sure.

It's strange to get used to no safety on a pistol, but a safety on a rifle. From the military's standpoint, I can see why they like safeties on pistols - since it carries over from rifles.

And as a counter example, I own a couple old French rifles that have no safety. Once cartridge guns showed up, and definitely by the time repeaters became standard, armies demanded safeties on their rifles. Not the French. They didn't put safeties on until they got into semi auto rifles. I guess their doctrine was to not chamber a round until in contact.

Illegal Clown
Feb 18, 2004



Ygolonac posted:

Obligatory snarky-fix. Even though I know it's bullshit.

Nice. It's okay, I described my MAS-36's condition as having never been fired and only dropped once. Sure, it's not funny, but it describes how nice it looks. My Lebel M1886 appears to have been dropped twice.

Illegal Clown
Feb 18, 2004



Captain Novolin posted:

If you rack it in front of the enemy they'll get scared and run away

And suddenly the decision to keep a tube magazine rifle in service until 1940 makes sense. Too bad no one told them it only applies to pump actions.

Illegal Clown
Feb 18, 2004



PirateDentist posted:

This one always bothers me. Not the neighbors part, as you don't want to be known as "the crazy guy with the guns" but that you can't discuss your hobby without wondering what risk telling this person entails. Even people you'd trust might casually mention it to someone else and then word gets out. I suppose it's better to be a bit paranoid than lax though. Especially when it comes to firearms.

This is in part why I got a PO Box, I can get (most) stuff from internet strangers without making it super easy to correlate that my apartment has guns by just searching my forum posts.

While most of my friends know I'm the crazy gun guy, few know exactly where I live. I also keep most of my guns in long term storage somewhere else. Since I have a C&R there's not much I can do about the whole stopping people from knowing I'm getting gun stuff in the mail, but at that point I'd probably be too paranoid to use the Internet. I see UPS FedEx trucks all the time, and unless tehy're stopping at a gun store, I never think, "I wonder if they're delivering gun stuff there." Once I buy a house though, I plan on making a secure room like others here have done. In my mind I've imagined some sort of secret room where no one but me would be even able to find the door, though in realty it would probably be just a regular room with a locked reinforced door and no other way in.

Illegal Clown
Feb 18, 2004



Mr. Funny Pants posted:

Gun related because, well, a fuckton of dudes got shot.

How well regarded is Nathaniel Philbrick's recent book, "The Last Stand: Custer, Sitting Bull, and the Battle of Little Bighorn,"?

I haven't read it myself, but based on a speech I saw on Youtube, it sounds like he may be a Custer apologist and anti-Custer conspiracy theory believer.

Illegal Clown
Feb 18, 2004



Fifty Three posted:

Legally speaking, a gatling gun counts as an MG, correct? My girlfriend expressed her desire for one (one day) and I had a huge awful brainfart on the legality of such an item.

As long as it is manually operated, nope. Machine guns = more than one shot per trigger pull. Manually operated Gatling guns are basically one shot per crank, it's just going really fast, like bump firing. Now technically speaking, Gatlings ARE machine guns, but not legally. Correct me if I'm wrong.

Illegal Clown
Feb 18, 2004



Secret Ooze posted:

I just got my annual dividend from one of my stock portfolios and I am having a dilemma. I want to build/buy myself a good AR for 3 gunning, but I also want to buy a PSL. If I buy them both my wife will straight up murder me.

As of right now, I would probably put way more mileage on an AR and Im not sure how well I could preform with a PSL at competition(if at all). I think I may have just answered my own question, but if anyone wants to weigh in on the positives of the PSL, please do.

I've already mentioned my ideas of buying guns and hiding them from the wife. You need to buy both and just keep the other one hidden. ARs are smaller and easy to break down so you should be able to find all types of places to hide it. The only trouble will be remembering where it is.

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Illegal Clown
Feb 18, 2004



Fifty Three posted:

That's, like, four and a half bad ideas. Guns are not a good reason to gently caress with your wife's trust.

I was mostly joking, continuing the story from a few days ago about the guy who has a bunch of guns but the wife can't tell them apart so thinks he has just the one.

This is a little closer to my true feelings:

I like turtles posted:

I'm in the position of making quite a bit more money than my fiance, and have substantial savings. I show her the new stuff I get, and she laughs at me for spending more money on guns, but she doesn't care, since it is my disposable income. *shrug*

As it stands, most of my income at the moment is disposable so I can spend it on whatever I please. There is no one in my life other than my even more fiscally responsible conscience to tell me not to.

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