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kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

eames posted:

The change to overclocking is interesting. I assume that most retail processors will be sold as "K" models since 10% is a relatively small price to pay for the extra performance a knowledgable person can get out of it.

When I first read this paragraph I thought Intel would limit unlocked multipliers and overclocking in general to the completely unreasonably priced Extreme Editions.
Phew.

Actually, I'm guessing it will be an even mix at suppliers like Newegg, and heavily favor the normal versions at Best Buy and the like. 10% isn't much of a surcharge, but it's $20 wasted if you're not planning on overclocking. That's enough to people doing price comparisons to pick the cheaper option.

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kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

LooKMaN posted:

Lucid software lets P67 mobos access QuickSync video

Very promising for all the p67 owners, hope it doesn't cost too much. I usually use x264 for my encodes but for something like a smartphone this would be perfect.

They got it wrong with the original article. It enables QuickSync when the integrated graphics card is not being used. It explicitly does not work with P67 chipsets:

The Article posted:

The news would be better if this software could tap into the Sandy Bridge IGP on a P67 board, but Lucid tells us that's not possible. (An earlier version of this story suggested P67 support was possible. Apologies for the error.)

Basically, Lucid is just copying the framebuffer from the discrete GPU into the integrated SNB GPU, and then having it pipe it out from there. If the chipset doesn't enable the integrated GPU, it's not possible to use it in this fashion.

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

Also, putting the transceiver in the cable allows the user to choose between fiber optic or copper for transmitting the signal. Right now the only choice is copper, but Intel definitely wants fiber to be an option, and this lets the current TB spec to be compatible.

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

freeforumuser posted:

My 2500K is going last a long time. From a strictly desktop POV IB is too lackluster to jump ship to.

It's not even just CPUs; AMD is making 7770s that are barely faster than its own 5770 almost 2.5 years ago it's as if they knew Nvidia won't try to one-up them in the future(even though GTX 560 is already waaaay better). Stagnation is here, folks.

Generational improvements that are so massive as to warrant upgrading from the immediately preceding generation are relatively rare, and usually are as much because of a flaw in the older generation than anything else (Pentium IV to Core 2, I'm looking at you). Much of the PC market upgrades every couple of years or more, so most manufacturers need to make sure that there's improvements worth buying every 2 years, not every 6-12 months. AMD would seem to be having trouble with that, in some cases. Intel, by pretty much every measure, is not. And IB has some big upsides for the increasingly important mobile market.

GPUs I'm not nearly as familiar with, but ultimately the premise is the same. And using the (supposedly) competitive GPU market as being a source of stagnation sort of undermines the whole argument about an Intel monopoly being a problem, specifically. If the GPU market is stagnating, the AMD's presence in the CPU market is irrelevant and it'll stagnate either way.

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

FISHMANPET posted:

How long does it typically take for this cutting edge stuff to end up in business desktops (Optiplex and the like)?

We can get i5-2500 towers for about $650, and we're probably going to do some hardware refreshes in the next few months, and I'm wondering 1) how long before Dell comes out with Ivy bridge desktops and 2) If it's even worth it to bother upgrading, or just keep using the i5-2500. Since Ivy Bridge is going to be more expensive than Sandy Bridge, it's probably not worth the extra cost for normal business use cases.

It's pretty much not worth waiting/upgrading unless you are relying on an increase in the integrated graphics performance or really, really want to get a little power savings.

Without the GPU upgrades, IB is just a 'tick' and gets some small improvements, but nothing worth holding out for in most cases.

kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

Bob Morales posted:

1920x1080 on an 11.6"?? WHY?

Yeah, W7 and earlier suck on high DPI displays (and I'm not sure W8 is better on the desktop). I know Apple is driving towards high DPI displays (and this is a wonderful development), but the OS has to properly support it. Releasing a 189dpi display on Windows, today, is crazy.

The 13.3" version is extremely tempting though. Now to convince my boss I need a new laptop...

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kapinga
Oct 12, 2005

I am not a number

Factory Factory posted:

That's literally the question that was asked and answered in the two posts above yours.

Is the answer answer is sometime "after 1H '13"? Because that's the only way I can read that image to say anything at all about Ivy Bridge-E, if it will ever exist.

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